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About Today's News Clips
"Today's News Clips" is published into your e-mail box on normal Citadel business days, and contains links to recent news about The Citadel, the state of South Carolina, and other topics of interest to professionals working at institutes of higher education.
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The Citadel in the News

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PUBLISH DATE STORIES
Tuesday
May 3, 2016
1. Learn online from The Citadel from almost anywhere in the U.S. or beyond
People living in most U.S. states and overseas can now learn from the proven producer of principled leaders. Starting in the fall of 2016, The Citadel's nationally-recognized programs will be available to prospective students who live in 38 states and almost anywhere in the world because of changes in policies governing online learning that were recently approved by the Governor of South Carolina. The Citadel's fully online programs include six master's degrees, two graduate certificates, and two undergraduate degree completion programs. Applications are currently being accepted for the fall semester of the 2016-17 academic year. "The admissions requirements and the deeply-rooted quality of the instruction provided by The Citadel haven't changed, only the locations from which students can study have changed," said Connie Book, Ph.D., provost and dean of the college for The Citadel. "The Citadel's newly expanded online learning is especially beneficial to career service people who want to complete an undergraduate degree in order to meet the criteria for military promotions. Now, they can receive a Citadel education from almost any American military base." While some of the programs have been available for years on campus, and some online, view the article to see all classes that are now all available fully online.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Tuesday
May 3, 2016
2. Class of 2017 rising leadership announced by Commandant of Cadets
The Citadel's Commandant of Cadets has designated commanders, regimental staff, sergeants major and first sergeants for the Class of 2017. Cadets who will assume the nine top-ranking positions were recognized during a private ceremony with The Citadel's president, Lt. Gen. John W. Rosa, The Citadel's Provost, Gen. Connie Ledoux Book, Ph.D., and the Commandant of Cadets, Capt. Geno Paluso. The new officers were presented with chevrons that will be added to their uniforms to reflect their ranks. They will assume their stations when the fall semester begins.
Published in: Moultrie News
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Tuesday
May 3, 2016
3. Editorial: Citadel should deny uniform exemption request
The Citadel is considering a change that would mark the school's second major progressive shift in more than 20 years. Most of the time, we're all-in when it comes to progressiveness in every sector, from education, to business, religion and sports. This time is different. In response to a request from a would-be cadet who has been accepted to the school, The Citadel is considering granting her permission to wear a hijab - a scarf that covers the hair and neck - in accordance with her Muslim faith. The school's uniform code does not allow for head coverings other than what's standard issue and if it allows the student to wear the hijab, it would be a historic deviation from tradition. We hope The Citadel sticks with tradition and that has nothing to do with Muslims or Islam. If the request came from a devout Jewish student who wants to wear a yarmulke, a Sikh whose faith requires wearing a turban or a Rastafarian regarding his or her dreadlocks, we would feel the same way. Although commonly referred to by the shortened version of its name, the school is called The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina. An excerpt from its website says, "The Citadel is best known nationally for its Corps of Cadets, which draws students from about 45 states and a dozen countries. The men and women in the Corps live and study under a classical military system that makes leadership and character development an essential part of the educational experience."
Published in: The Herald
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Tuesday
May 3, 2016
4. Recognition Day at The Citadel
Conrad Geis of Streetsboro is among the 588 freshman cadets that have been officially sworn into the South Carolina Corps of Cadets.
Published in: Statesboro Gateway News
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Tuesday
May 3, 2016
5. Cadets sworn in
Lawrence County natives Derek Earl Waddington and Adam Wawrzynski were among 588 freshman cadets who were officially sworn into the South Carolina Corps of Cadets at the Citadel on April 9. Recognition Day is the culmination of a freshman cadet's eight-month experience as Citadel knobs, during which they endured rigid formations, walked in single-file lines and maintained a highly regimented way of life at the Charleston military school. Waddington, a 2015 Mohawk graduate, is enrolled in The Citadel's School of Business and is a Highland bagpipe player in its Regimental Band and Pipes. Waddington resides with his grandparents, Dr. Robert D. and Judith Gurgacz Waddington, in Mahoning Township. Wawrzynski, a 2015 Neshannock graduate, was a defensive lineman on the Citadel Bulldog football team and is a mechanical engineering major, making the fall Dean's List. He is a son of Dr. Paul and LeeAnn Wawrzynski.
Published in: New Castle News
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Tuesday
May 3, 2016
6. CCSD Teacher of the Year Finalist: Karen Pickering
Charleston County School District has announced its top five finalists for district Teacher of the Year. Karen Pickering is an English teacher at Stall High School. She's a graduate of Winthrop University with a Masters Degree from The Citadel. She says she was inspired by her parents,' both former educators. Karen says teaching is her passion. "It is awesome! I did not expect it, so just is an awesome feeling, and I'm so happy to have this honor. To be a teacher is to be a person who is going to embark upon making change for our children for our future. so a teacher has a powerful role because he or she can make that difference in someone's life." The district's teacher of the year will receive a free year's lease on a mini cooper from Mini of Charleston. CCSD will announce Teacher of the Year on Thursday, May 5th, during the Riverdogs game. Coming up Tuesday on News 2 Today, we will introduce you to the second finalist for CCSD Teacher of the Year.
Broadcast on: WCBD-TV Charleston, SC
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Tuesday
May 3, 2016
7. Eight White Knoll High Athletes Sign Athletic Scholarships
White Knoll High School is celebrating after eight more of its student-athletes signed athletic scholarships to attend college. Here is the list, provided by the school, of who is going where: Caterra Barkins signed an athletic scholarship with Coker College, where Barkins will compete on the women's track team. Rian Burris signed an athletic scholarship with The Citadel.
Broadcast on: WLTX-TV Columbia, SC
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Monday
May 2, 2016
1. NSA lauds The Citadel for cybersecurity training
As a computer science intern at the Department of Homeland Security this spring, Citadel junior cadet Anthony Zovich said he helped make a little tweak that solved a big problem. "When I got there, they had an external firewall, but if someone on the inside wanted to do some damage, then they could find thousands of policemen and women's security numbers and addresses," said Zovich, who is president of the school's Cybersecurity Club. Zovich's solution - a new internal login system that he said is now in use at the department - is the sort of work The Citadel was hoping to produce when the school introduced its undergraduate minor in cybersecurity in 2013, and again when it started offering a graduate certificate in cybersecurity in 2014. Now the public military college's fledgling cybersecurity program is getting a big boost of credibility. The Citadel recently earned designation from the National Security Agency as a National Center of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense, becoming the second college in the state to earn the mark after the University of South Carolina. Provost Connie Book said the new laurel will be important as Citadel graduates seek jobs, not just in military and government, but also in areas like health care and business. "For us, having this new designation is critically important for our future," Book said. "It speaks to the unique proposition of a military college in modern day, when so many of the services of our defense system are contracted out to key companies."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
May 2, 2016
2. Class of 2017 rising leadership announced by Commandant of Cadets
The Citadel's Commandant of Cadets has designated commanders, regimental staff, sergeants major and first sergeants for the Class of 2017. Cadets who will assume the nine top-ranking positions were recognized during a private ceremony with The Citadel's president, Lt. Gen. John W. Rosa, The Citadel's Provost, Gen. Connie Ledoux Book, Ph.D., and the Commandant of Cadets, Capt. Geno Paluso. The new officers were presented with chevrons that will be added to their uniforms to reflect their ranks. They will assume their stations when the fall semester begins. View the article for the list of rising leadership.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Monday
May 2, 2016
3a. The Citadel's Confederate flag came down quietly, years before current debate
A black-domed surveillance camera keeps watch over The Citadel's Summerall Chapel. From its perch behind the pulpit, it has a clear shot of a Confederate naval jack that has flown inside the building since 1939 with only one notable exception. Col. Brett Ashworth, a spokesman for The Citadel, said the public military college installed the camera on March 17. About two weeks prior, police had arrested a 1993 Citadel graduate and self-described flag opponent in front of the chapel after he led them on a chase and demanded that somebody tell Citadel President Lt. Gen. John Rosa "to come see me and take it down now." The man may not have known it, but the flag had already come down once before, quietly, in the fall of 2013. The flag's removal and eventual reinstatement predate the current furor over the flag's white supremacist connotations and seem to show an administration that bent to pressure from defenders of the flag. As for the installation of the camera in the chapel, Ashworth said the late-night police chase expedited the process but that "there had been plans" to install it previously.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
May 2, 2016
3b. Confederate flag will fly at The Citadel, for now
The Confederate flag will continue to fly at The Citadel for the time being, after a U.S. House committee rejected an amendment to a defense budget Thursday. The House Armed Services Committee rejected a measure, championed by U.S. Rep. Jim Clyburn, D-Columbia, that would have forced The Citadel to choose between displaying the flag and federal money for its Reserve Officers' Training Corps program. "I am greatly disappointed that a majority of Republican members of the House Armed Services Committee have voted to keep the Confederate battle flag flying in a place of worship at The Citadel," Clyburn said in a statement. "Americans' tax dollars should not be directed to institutions where it is flown." The amendment, proposed by U.S. Rep. Adam Smith, D-Wash., would have barred the Defense Department from giving federal money to ROTC programs at any school that flies the Confederate flag. The Citadel, a public military college in Charleston, is the only school that fits that description. It has displayed a Confederate flag in its Summerall Chapel since 1939. "It is not appropriate to fly (the flag) over institutions that train our next generation of military officers, and it is bizarre to allow the flag to fly above an academy when the military services do not allow the same flag to be displayed in servicemembers' rooms," Smith said.
Published in: The State
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Monday
May 2, 2016
3c. Confederate flag controversy simmers on in Congress
The battle over the Confederate flag isn't over in Congress. Rep. James Clyburn of South Carolina, the assistant Democratic leader, said Friday he's not giving up his effort to force the flag's removal from a chapel at The Citadel military college in South Carolina. On Thursday, Republicans on the House Armed Services Committee voted down that proposal by Clyburn and Democratic Rep. Adam Smith of Washington state. "What I did last night was to remind people that... to continue to romance this flag rather than retiring it to a museum where it ought to be is just not a good thing for the state of South Carolina or for the country for that matter," Clyburn said Friday. The Armed Services Committee action was just the latest congressional skirmish over the Confederate flag. Democratic Rep. Bennie Thompson fought to remove all items from the House of Representatives that feature the flag emblem, including the flag of his home state of Mississippi. "The flag ought to be in a museum," he said. "We're not saying bury it."
Published in: Stars and Stripes
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Monday
May 2, 2016
3d. Editorial: Improper use of federal power
The Citadel should take the Confederate flag down, but Congress shouldn't force the school to do so. The flag, technically the Confederate naval jack, is hung at the Summerall Chapel on The Citadel campus. The military college's board of visitors voted to take it down last summer, about the same time the General Assembly decided to remove the Confederate battle flag from the Statehouse grounds. But the flag still hangs at the college. State law, the Heritage Act, requires the approval of the General Assembly before a Confederate monument, marker or flag on state property can be taken down. State lawmakers should allow The Citadel board to enact its policy and take down the flag. There is a diverse group of students at The Citadel, and to many of them, that flag represents oppression and racism. But the matter isn't a priority for lawmakers. They addressed the much higher-profile flag controversy on the Statehouse grounds last year, and few lawmakers want to revisit the issue.
Published in: Spartanburg Herald Journal
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Monday
May 2, 2016
4. Fulbright Fellowship, High Honor For Citadel Standout, Mendham Grad
James McManus, of Mendham, has shone brightly at the Citadel and will now take his talents abroad. The Citadel Class of 2016 member is headed to Oslo, Norway to teach English after being selected for a Fulbright U.S. Student Award, the school said. McManus is the regimental academic officer for the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, and a leading education major in the college's Zucker Family School of Education. Not only has McManus earned the Fulbright Scholarship, the Honors Program student was recently presented with The Citadel Palmetto Medal, one of the college's highest honors. "Cadet McManus' performance epitomizes our leadership development model here at The Citadel. He is a young person of integrity, is dedicated to the success of others, and is a leader of his peers," said Connie Book, Ph.D., provost and dean of the college, in a statement. "We are very proud of his Fulbright achievement and look forward to his future success as an educator." McManus created his own site, The Oxford Observer, where he records his ongoing research and a resource for educators and is also the chief executive officer of Global Outreach Initiative for the improvement of education in emerging countries.
Published in: Mendham Patch
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Monday
May 2, 2016
5. Nothing holding back differently abled CSU student
At the age of 74, New Jersey transplant Bill Walsh has spent the last year pushing his daughter, Caroline, all across the Charleston Southern University campus. The two of them attend every class together, and sometimes, Walsh is called on by a professor to add perspective to a particular topic from which the class might benefit. Caroline, 19, will readily tell you anything you want to know about any subject. Not bad, considering Caroline didn't talk at all until she was almost 5. She certainly has a story worth hearing. Walsh and his wife, Kim, had four biological children and lived a charmed life in New Jersey. After those children became adults and left home, Bill and Kim adopted four more in the years to come. Caroline was a drug baby, born with cerebral palsy. "She was the biggest challenge of our foster children, but she is also the smartest," Bill says, with his lip quivering and his voice shaking. The emotion builds in Bill, not from embarrassment, but from pride. A father proud to stick out his chest... The Walshes have a grandson about to graduate from The Citadel. The Walsh family hardly knew a thing about Charleston until there was a "Cid" connection. But he sure knows about the Lowcountry now. Caroline, meanwhile, was continuing to excel in her school work. Her middle school teacher told the Walshes, "I learn more through her than I can teach her." In high school, Caroline graduated with all A's and B's and started looking at colleges. In her wheelchair during a visit to Charleston Southern, Caroline found that she liked two things right away: The campus was flat, and people she didn't even know held the door open.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
May 2, 2016
6. Ball State University Senate adopts transparency resolution
Ball State University leaders have adopted a resolution that came about following the abrupt resignation of school President Paul Ferguson. The (Muncie) Star Press reports the University Senate approved the resolution on Thursday. It calls for Ball State to function with transparency and to maintain "open discussion and communication about policy decisions." Senate members had said after Ferguson's resignation in January that there was "unease" among faculty because the move was shrouded in secrecy. The Senate later tabled a draft resolution calling for the Indiana Legislature to change how Ball State's trustees are appointed. The University Senate also elected a new chairman Thursday. Kourtland Koch, an associate professor of special education, was tapped for the role. Koch has bachelor's, master's and education specialist degrees from The Citadel.
Published in: Herald Times
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Monday
May 2, 2016
7. Charleston RiverDogs offer a look at future club level
It's been about a month and a half since the Charleston RiverDogs announced a new, 6,000-square foot club level for weddings and other entertainment purposes would be coming to Riley Park in time for the 2017 season. Now, with new electronic renderings, the RiverDogs have a solid idea of what that space might look like. "The interior designers are designing the space based on the principle of Lowcountry elegance," said Marv Goldklang, principle owner of the RiverDogs. "That's the defining concept. The objective being the space will work for our 70 home games, but also for 100 other - at least 100 events - during the year, weddings to corporate events." The $3-million facility, which the Goldklang Group is financing, will be glass enclosed from the ground up with a view of the ballpark on one side and the Ashley River on the other. Goldklang said it will have a banquet-style seating capacity of 235, up from an original mark of 200 for functions. The overall capacity is around 300, but the RiverDogs plan to limit the game day capacity to about 175 so that people can move around freely without being too crowded. The venue, which is being designed by the LS3P architectural firm in Charleston, will have a bar, a kitchen and high definition flat screen televisions, as well. "When you mention clubs in other ballparks, it will be comparing apples and oranges," Goldklang said. "This will be a special place." Construction is set to begin the day after the RiverDogs' season comes to an end this year, and Goldklang said the group is targeting an opening day of March 1. He anticipates reservations for non-baseball events, such as weddings and banquets, to begin as early as this summer. The RiverDogs share Riley Park with The Citadel, but it's not known yet how the college will utilize the new club level. "Certainly we'll sit down with The Citadel and get a sense of just how and when they would like to be able to use the facility," Goldklang said. "And we'll work off that and develop and expand our relationship. But right now this is a RiverDogs project."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
May 2, 2016
8a. Dogs Come Up Short in SoCon Doubleheader
The Citadel baseball team dropped two games to Furman on Saturday afternoon inside Joe Riley Park. The Citadel (15-29, 5-9 SoCon) was narrowly defeated in the first game of the doubleheader, 9-6. The Bulldogs scored two runs on two hits in the bottom of the ninth but a fly out to center field stranded two runners on base. Jason Smith was three-for-five in the game with one run scored and Barrett Charpia collected two hits of his own. The Bulldogs had 10 hits in the loss. JP Sears got the start on the mound, striking out three over 5.0 innings of work. Jordan Buster, Kyle Smith and Beau Strickland pitched the remaining four innings in relief. In game two, Thomas Byelick made his 11th start this season and tossed 5.1 innings while fanning three. Freshman Dylan Spence worked 1.2 innings of relief, allowing just one hit and striking out two. Zach Lavery also pitched an inning and Kyle Smith closed the game out for his second appearance of the day on the mound. The Citadel held a 5-2 lead after four innings but allowed Furman (19-24, 7-7 SoCon) to tack on two runs in the top of the fifth to make it 5-4. Byelick was able to get out of the bases-loaded jam in the same frame by inducing a double play and a fly out to left field. The Paladins then added four runs in the sixth inning and, despite two runs in the seventh inning, the Bulldogs were unable to mount a comeback and eventually fell 12-7.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
May 2, 2016
8b. Furman edges The Citadel 4-1 in series finale
The Citadel baseball team was defeated 4-1 by Furman on Sunday afternoon inside Joe Riley Park. Jacob Watcher matched his career best with 6.0 innings of work on the mound, scattering six hits and fanning two. The sophomore allowed two base runners in the first five innings before giving up a home run with two outs that gave Furman (20-24, 8-7 SoCon) a 2-0 lead. Watcher threw just 83 pitches over the course of the six innings and did not issue a walk. The Citadel (15-30, 5-10 SoCon) answered with a run of its own in the bottom of the fifth frame on a double to the left field wall by Stephen Windham to score Mike Deese from first, but a hard-hit lineout to left field by Ben Peden just three pitches later stranded Windham on second. Mike Deese, Barrett Charpia and Windham all collected two hits in the contest. Jason Smith and Clay Martin accounted for the other two base knocks for The Citadel, finishing with eight hits total. The Bulldogs continue SoCon play at Mercer beginning on Thursday at 6 p.m. Live stats, audio and video will be available at CitadelSports.com for the game.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
May 2, 2016
8c. Gunn signs scholarship with The Citadel
Dickson County High School senior Al Gunn signed a $180,000 Marine Option NROTC Scholarship to The Citadel in Charleston, S.C. - Gunn's scholarship is for four years to the prestigious military college in South Carolina and he will start in the fall. Gunn will be joining his brother Andy Gunn, who also in the Marines. "It's a prestigious school. Pretty close to home. It's in a nice spot, Charleston," Al Gunn said. "It's going to be a fun experience." Marine Staff Sgt. Caleb Dean, who works in the Dickson Marine Corps. Recruiting office, has worked with Gunn since fall last year. "He's been coming to the recruiting office at least twice a week, physically improving and becoming more well-rounded," said Dean about Gunn's visits since Sept. 23. "He already had an impressive resume, we just took him to the next level." "The biggest thing they were looking for was an improvement... He really put it on it on overdrive," Dean added.
Published in: The Tennessean
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Monday
May 2, 2016
8d. New QBs get their chances
The majority of teams in the Midlands will be breaking in new quarterbacks. Of the top 21 passers in the Midlands last season, only seven return. That will mean the spring will be a good time for teams to get used to their new signal callers. One of the biggest shoes to fill will be at Chapin, where rising junior Trad Beatty replaces Logan Bailey, who had a record-breaking senior season and signed to play at The Citadel. Bailey accounted for 4,288 yards and 66 touchdowns and was a Mr. Football finalist. At 6-foot-5, Beatty is a contrast to Bailey, but Chapin coach Justin Gentry said he's more mobile than people think. Chapin also will have to break new receivers with the graduation of Evan Estridge and Joe Flowers, but return South Carolina commit Will Register at tight end.
Published in: The State
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Monday
May 2, 2016
9. Civic-minded Pitt official from Greensburg oversaw college expansion
Carl Rossman was a consummate professional in the office and a civic-minded, dedicated volunteer in his personal life. "He was just a super guy and a good family man," said Frank Cassell, former president of University of Pittsburgh-Greensburg, where Rossman worked for 17 years as vice president for administrative affairs. Carl A. Rossman Jr. of Greensburg died Sunday, April 24, 2016, of complications from pancreatic cancer. He was 68. Mr. Rossman was born in Hampton, Va., the son of the late Carl and Georgianna Burnett Rossman. He graduated from Augusta Military Academy High School in Virginia and from The Citadel in Charleston, S.C., with a bachelor's degree in education. His time at the University of Pittsburgh-Greensburg occurred after a 24-year career in the Air Force, during which he was a B-52 pilot and retired as a colonel. Friends and co-workers said it was easy to mark him as a military man. "He had a very erect posture and a very formal way of addressing you," said campus President Sharon Smith. "But he also had a wicked sense of humor. He'd get this little twinkle in his eye and come out with a dry comment that was always very appropriate - he'd make the kind of comment that would have you doing a double-take."
Published in: TribLive.com
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Thursday
April 28, 2016
1. Latest development in Congress Confederate flag debate: Congressional committee votes to keep Confederate flag at Citadel
In the early hours of Thursday morning, the U.S. House Armed Services Committee voted to keep the Confederate flag flying at The Citadel. The rejection of a Democratic effort to force the military institution to take down the flag at Summerall Chapel potentially paves the way for a bitter, extended fight on the issue, which is being championed by U.S. Rep. Jim Clyburn, D-S.C. U.S. Rep. Adam Smith, a Washington State Democrat and ranking member of the committee, offered an amendment to the fiscal 2017 National Defense Authorization Act to bar Reserve Officers’ Training Corps funds to any military university that displays the Confederate flag. The only university that falls into that category is The Citadel. The Board of Visitors voted to remove the flag last summer, after revelations that the deadly shooting of nine black parishioners at Mother Emanuel AME Church was motivated by race - an incident which, in turn, prompted the removal of the Confederate flag from the Statehouse grounds.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
April 28, 2016
2a. Clyburn brings Confederate flag debate to Capitol Hill
Democratic Rep. Jim Clyburn is bringing the ongoing debate over the display of the Confederate flag in South Carolina back to the attention of his colleagues in Congress. The only Democrat in the Palmetto State delegation stated his support of a proposed amendment to the annual defense policy bill on Wednesday that would bar federal funds from going to any senior Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) programs at institutions where the Confederate flag is being displayed. "The flag, which never was the official flag of the Confederacy, is a symbol of hate, racial oppression, and resistance to the rule of law," Clyburn said in a statement on Wednesday. The amendment is being proposed by Rep. Adam Smith, D-Wash., at the marathon markup of the 2017 National Defense Authorization Act by the House Armed Services Committee, which often lasts until the early morning hours. The Citadel, a public military college in Charleston, S.C., has displayed the Confederate Naval Jack in its Summerall Chapel since 1939. "It has been used for over a century as a symbol of southern defiance and white supremacy; it was viewed as such by the perpetrator of the horrific shootings at Emanuel AME Church in Charleston on June 17 of last year," Clyburn said in the statement. Last summer he was joined by Republican colleagues in the state's delegation and Gov. Nikki Haley in backing the removal of the Confederate flag from the South Carolina statehouse following the shooting of nine black congregants at Emanuel AME Church. The shooter, Dylan Roof, was a white supremacist who posted photos of himself with the Confederate symbol online. Clyburn also took a shot at S.C. Attorney General Alan Wilson for barring the flag's removal by citing the Heritage Act, which was passed by the S.C. General Assembly in 2000. In 2014, Wilson released an opinion stating that the Heritage Act bars the Citadel from removing the flag from a prominent place on campus.
Published in: McClatchy DC
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Thursday
April 28, 2016
2b. confederate flag debate
flag debate
Published in: Huffington Post
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Thursday
April 28, 2016
2c. confederate flag debate
confederate flag debate
Published in: The State
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Thursday
April 28, 2016
2d. confederate flag debate
confederate flag debate
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
April 28, 2016
3. Former mayor Joe Riley to be inducted into South Carolina Hall of Fame
Former Charleston mayor Joe Riley is set to be inducted into the South Carolina Hall of Fame Wednesday at The Citadel's Holliday Alumni Center. Riley served ten terms beginning in December 1975. "During Riley's forty-year tenure as mayor, the City of Charleston saw a substantial decrease in crime, a revitalization of the historic downtown business district, the creation and growth of Spoleto Festival U.S. A., an expansion of the city's park system, and the development of nationally-acclaimed affordable housing," a news release from event organizers state. The late David Drake, an enslaved African American potter from the Edgefield District, is also being recognized for his accomplishments. Drake was also known as "Dave the Potter." A reception for the induction begins at 5:30 p.m., according to the release. The ceremony begins at 6:30 p.m.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Thursday
April 28, 2016
4. Charleston World Affairs Council Brings In Depth Understanding Of World Events
The world today is a different place than what it was when we were growing up. In fact, our world has changed dramatically in just the last few years given the escalating instability in the Middle East, significant disease and pestilence outbreaks, massive immigration flows as a result of cultural/religious divides and wide ranging acts of terror. This has resulted in large-scale loss of life, compromised personal liberty and ongoing fear in our daily lives. These threats to world stability present serious challenges to leadership both in the US and elsewhere and fully understanding the larger picture remains challenging. Last week, The World Affairs Council of Charleston, a regional thought leader in presenting and discussing events that impact our world, hosted Mr. Andrew Peek, a Fellow in Middle Eastern Affairs at the American Foreign Policy Council in Washington D.C., at The Citadel Alumni Center in downtown Charleston. Peek came highly qualified to present an overview of the continuing volatility in the Middle East and ISIS: The Islamic State of Iraq and Syria. In addition to his affiliation with the Middle Eastern Affairs group, he teaches at American University and at the school of Advanced International Affairs at Johns Hopkins University where he is a candidate for his PhD. Peek also previously served as a strategic adviser to the top US and NATO commanders in Afghanistan.
Published in: The Island Eye News
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Thursday
April 28, 2016
5. Education Briefs - Week of 4/29
Men and women who entered The Citadel as freshmen last fall were officially sworn in as members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets earlier this month during a recognition day. Local students sworn in were Alexander Pang-Riddle, of Charlotte; Jonathan Taylor, of Davidson; and Noah Watts, of Huntersville.
Published in: The Herald Weekly
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