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About Today's News Clips
"Today's News Clips" is published into your e-mail box on normal Citadel business days, and contains links to recent news about The Citadel, the state of South Carolina, and other topics of interest to professionals working at institutes of higher education.
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The Citadel in the News: Archive

July 2019

PUBLISH DATE STORIES
Thursday
July 18, 2019
1. Autonomous vehicles and AI: Citadel’s future engineers prepared to thrive in evolving technical landscape
Artificial intelligence is present in the daily lives of most people, even if few stop to consider the source. A.I. guides ride sharing apps, commercial airliners, and even mobile check deposits. The availability of highly skilled engineers prepared to help lead the development of A.I. and its associated industries in the Charleston, South Carolina area is vital to the state’s competitiveness and its economy. The Citadel School of Engineering, one of America’s oldest engineering programs, is meeting that growing demand. It takes computer, electrical and mechanical engineering ingenuity to develop the A.I. supporting an autonomous vehicle, for example. Engineering students at The Citadel are already learning how to integrate those disciplines and have been for years.
Published in: The Citadel Today - Online
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Thursday
July 18, 2019
2. COLLEGE NEWS: Citadel commencement

More than 500 members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets accepted diplomas during The Citadel's May 4 commencement ceremony in McAlister Field House. Local graduates include Octavia Wolfe and Colby Bruner, both of Orangeburg; Cole Cleland of Harleyville; Dylan Lilly of Dorchester; and Daniel Ilderton of St. George. Nearly 450 members of The Citadel Graduate College accepted diplomas during The Citadel's commencement ceremony on May 4 in McAlister Field House. Local graduates include George McIntosh of Bamberg; Ashley Russell of Swansea; William Rickenbaker of Cameron; Rebecca Hanna of Dorchester; Katherine Jenkins of Orangeburg; Teandra White of Harleyville; James Cason of Eutawville; Thomas Weeks and Trenton Silvers, both of St. George; and Demario Kitt of Bowman.

Other examples of syndicated coverage include:

Cherokee Tribune & Ledger-News

News-Press Now

KPVI - Pocatello, ID

Published in: The Times and Democrat - Online
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Thursday
July 18, 2019
3. Col. Chad Smith reaches retirement from U.S. Army
Col. Chad H. Smith retired from the U.S. Army July 12, at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, during a ceremony hosted by Maj. Gen. Thomas H. Todd, program executive officer for Army aviation. Smith’s retirement celebrated 27 years of service to the nation. In his last assignment, he served as the Contingency Operations Officer at PEO Aviation. Smith is a 1988 graduate of Cedartown High School and received his commission from The Citadel in 1992, where he was a distinguished military graduate. Smith holds a bachelor’s degree in business administration from The Citadel.
Published in: Rome News-Tribune - Online
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Thursday
July 18, 2019
4. The Citadel - Incoming Women's Reception 2019 | Holliday Alumni Center | Friday, 16. August 2019
This is an informal reception for incoming women and their families to meet each other and to meet current women cadets and alumnae.
Published in: Eventbu - Online
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Thursday
July 18, 2019
5. Letters to the Editor

USC debacle

Déjà vu has manifested itself again in the current debacle to fill the presidency of one of the state’s universities, in this case that of applicant Gen. Robert Caslen for the presidency of the University of South Carolina. This is all too reminiscent of the 2014 controversy surrounding the hiring of then-state Sen. Glenn McConnell for the presidency of the College of Charleston. Interviewing and hiring processes tend to move seamlessly as long as politicians respect the expertise of the search committee and board of trustees. For example, just look at The Citadel and Charleston Southern University that recently named new presidents within the past year. Both schools enjoyed a smooth, uneventful and positive search and hiring process. Only when the process becomes politicized by politicians (ref: Gov. Henry McMaster) do things get messy and contentious. Now the state’s flagship university has a mess on its hands. Why anyone would want to step into this hornet’s nest is a mystery to me. Applicants for any position should be hired on merits alone without outside influence or interference. Anything short of this will certainly ignite maelstrom.

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Thursday
July 18, 2019
6. School Spotlight: How Academic Magnet became the best high school in the country
You’ve likely seen a “best” series of some sort from the U.S. News and World Report. Best jobs, best colleges, best hospitals, best nursing homes, best schools. There’s even a specific series on best high schools in the country and this year one Lowcountry school topped that list. Academic Magnet High School located in North Charleston is already well-known in the local area, but now, being named Best High School in the country by the news magazine solidifies its top-notch reputation nationwide as well. Some highlights from the AMHS annual report posted on their website are: 26 seniors from the class of 2018 being named National Merit Scholarship semifinalists, an average composite score of 30.0 on the ACT and an SAT combined average score of 1395 from their students this year. Spencer explains that all the students are required to complete a research and thesis project to graduate that they start in their junior year. “They are required to prepare, research, present and write a paper about their project,” Spencer adds. “Some of their research has been published in professional journals at MUSC, The Citadel and the College of Charleston.”
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Thursday
July 18, 2019
7. VOLLEYBALL ANNOUNCES 2019 SCHEDULE
Tournaments at Youngstown State, Campbell and Troy, along with a home match against the College of Charleston highlight The Citadel's 2019 volleyball schedule that was released Wednesday. "Our ultimate goal is winning the Southern Conference Tournament and we schedule to prepare us for that," said second-year head coach Dave Zelenock. "Our non-conference schedule has us going against teams that are bigger than us that play with power, smaller than us that play with speed and everything in between. "The plan is that we learn along the way and are playing our best volleyball in late November. You don't take a test over the whole book on day one in school, you take it at the end." The Bulldogs will open the season Aug. 30-31 at the Youngstown Invitational. The Citadel opens against Bucknell Friday at 4:30 p.m. Saturday will feature a pair of matches against Saint Francis (PA) at 10 a.m. and host YSU at 3 p.m. The Citadel opens play at McAlister Field House with a pair of matches on Sept. 2 and Sept. 4. The Bulldogs host the College of Charleston on Monday, while North Carolina Central comes to town on Wednesday. Both matches are set to begin at 6 p.m.
Published in: Citadel Sports - Online
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Thursday
July 18, 2019
8. Extra innings, kilts, it’s been a crazy week for the Savannah Bananas
Looking like a team from the movie “A League of their Own,” the kilt-wearing Savannah Bananas defeated Lexington County and moved into a tie for first place in the second half in the South Division of the Coastal Plain League. Savannah (24-13, 7-5 second half) has now won four of its last five games. A crowd of 4,289 saw right-hander Jordan Merritt from The Citadel hurl seven innings, allowing one run on five hits while striking out nine.
Published in: Savannah Morning News - Online
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Wednesday
July 17, 2019
1. Citadel professor wins $1.6 million grant to anticipate social unrest
More than a year of hard work turned into a $1.6 million grant for a professor of computer science at The Citadel. Deepti Joshi, Ph.D., will serve as the principle investigator, or lead, for the project which is funded by the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA). The goal is to find a way to combine diverse types of data and use that information to anticipate social unrest events — such as strikes, riots, civil wars, coups, revolts or revolutions — in 19 strategically selected countries in Asia and Africa. Joshi and her team will spend the next five years working to integrate model-driven and data-driven frameworks to improve the understanding of the dynamics of social unrest and also to potentially help anticipate its onset. This is the second grant the NGA has awarded to Joshi. The first, for nearly $300,000, helped create the building blocks that will be used for her current project, like developing a social science-based model to identify long-term factors for social unrest, as well as developing a map-based visualizer called SURGE, short for Social Unrest Reconnaissance GazEtteer. The map is a work in progress, and new features will be added as more research is completed. Joshi also plans to add a feature that allows users to work with what-if scenarios.
Published in: The Citadel Today - Online
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Wednesday
July 17, 2019
2. Editorial: 75 years ago, the major of Saint-Lô
The Allied landings on the coast of Normandy on D-Day had been more than a month before. They had succeeded, to the extent that a great army had been put ashore and not pushed back into the English Channel. But it did not yet feel like a victory. The Allies were still pinned down, both by the Germans and the topography. The Americans had hoped to have the crossroads village of Saint-Lô — about 20 miles inland — under control within a day of the landings. Now it was mid-July and the Americans were still short of their first-day goal. The same was true all across the landing zone. D-Day had turned into “the battle of the hedgerows.” On June 21, one of those American soldiers finally had time to rest. Thomas Howie took his boots off for the first time since he’d come ashore 15 days earlier; sea salt was still encrusted in his socks. Howie was a balding, 36-year-old teacher from Staunton with a colorful past and a future he could never have known. Howie had grown up in Abbeville, South Carolina, and went on to both a storied academic and athletic career at The Citadel — class president, star football halfback, captain of the baseball team, voted “Most Versatile, Popular and Best All Around” by his classmates. He once led a student strike to protest poor food in the cafeteria — not the easiest thing to do at a military school. But Howie was not one to do the easy things.
Published in: The Roanoke Times - Online
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Wednesday
July 17, 2019
3. Commentary: Military training deaths deserve full investigation
My wife and I lost our only child May 9, H. Conor McDowell – just turned 24, a newly promoted Marine first lieutenant, days away from being engaged to marry his girlfriend, Kathleen Bourque. He was killed instantly when his light armored vehicle turned belly up, crushing him, as he led a patrol in challenging terrain at Camp Pendleton in San Diego County. Conor pushed his gunner to safety but did not have time to save himself. Conor is just one of too many young people who are dying, needlessly, in so-called training accidents in our military. Over the past year, nearly four times the number of troops have been in killed in training rather than in combat. Michael H.C. McDowell is a recent member of the advisory board of The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina.
Published in: Daily Republic - Online
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Wednesday
July 17, 2019
4. THE CITADEL IMPLEMENTS CLEAR BAG POLICY
Fans attending athletic events at The Citadel this year are reminded of the new clear bag policy that has been implemented. Under the policy, fans will be allowed to bring with them a clear plastic, vinyl or PVC bag that does not exceed 12 inches by 6 inches by 12 inches, or a one-gallon plastic bag (such as Ziploc or Hefty bags). The bags may have a logo on one side that is no larger than 4.5 inches by 3.4 inches. Bags carrying a properly sized logo of other teams or venues are permitted. Small clutches - 4.5 inches by 6.5 inches, or approximately the size of a hand, with or without a handle or strap - also can be taken into the stadium along with clear bags. Exceptions will be made for medically necessary items after proper inspection. Diaper bags, after inspection, will also be permitted for families with infants and toddlers. Child must be present.
Published in: Citadel Sports - Online
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Wednesday
July 17, 2019
4. TONY SKOLE TEAM USA BLOG #3
"Coach K and Cuba" On Saturday morning our ball club had an amazing experience. We loaded the bus and headed over to Duke University. Jose Fonseca, the Head Basketball Trainer for the Duke Basketball Program had arranged for Coach Mike Krzyzewski to speak to our players. Jose and I had worked together at ETSU and he has remained a very close friend. I cannot thank Jose enough for making this happen. The night before, I felt like a young child on Christmas Eve as I could barely sleep because I was so excited. Coach K did not disappoint. During our first meeting as a staff in Louisville this past December, Coach McDonnell gave us all a copy of Coach K's book, "The Gold Standard". Reading this book and meeting Coach K this morning brought everything to life. I'm not sure if there is another Coach in the world that has been studied and revered by other coaches, more than Coach K. His success speaks for itself and it was an amazing experience to be able to meet and listen to him deliver an amazing message to our players and staff. Coach K spoke for over an hour on many subjects but hearing him talk about his experience with USA Basketball was very special. It was evident from the start how important wearing USA across your uniform was to him. Coach K is a West Point graduate and his pride in our country really came through during his talk. He showed us some amazing videos (that I'm sure the public has never seen before) about how he was able to assemble the greatest basketball players in the world and get them to buy-in and come together to for something much larger than themselves.
Published in: Citadel Sports - Online
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Wednesday
July 17, 2019
5. Girls Soccer: Olentangy’s Kayla Primm not sitting still this summer
Thanks to her elite soccer abilities, road trips are comprising a large part of Kayla Primm’s schedule this month. The Olentangy High School senior traveled to Washington, D.C., last weekend to participate in the invitation-only Battles Won Academy, sponsored by the U.S. Marines, and will head to Orlando, Florida, to participate in the Allstate All-America Cup on July 31 before the MLS All-Star Game. Primm, who has committed to The Citadel and plans to join the Marines after college, attended the Battles Won Academy from July 11-15. Among the activities were a community service project, tours of Marine Corps Base Quantico and the National Archives and wrestling lessons from Team USA.
Published in: This Week Community News - Online
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Wednesday
July 17, 2019
6. Pirates react to preseason poll
Mike Houston has been in this position before, bracing to prove doubters wrong. It began with his first head coaching job in 2001 at T.C. Roberson High School in Asheville, when his team was picked in the preseason eighth out of nine teams but thrived during the season to take second place. Houston's teams at The Citadel in 2014 and '15 also overachieved at times compared to outside expectations. “The preseason polls are based on last year or transitions or whatever, but we are just concerned about what we are doing this year,” said Houston, who has an 80-25 career record from his stints at James Madison, The Citadel and Lenoir-Rhyne. "What we worry about is the postseason poll and the final standings. ... I’ll talk to our kids about this preseason poll Aug. 1 (when players report for preseason camp), but really that is the only time we’ll talk about it."
Published in: The Daily Reflector - Online
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Wednesday
July 17, 2019
7. BOYS' BASKETBALL: Smith looks to 'lay foundation'
The Charlestown boys’ basketball program has nine sectional titles to its credit, with four of those coming in the last 25 years. New head coach Sean Smith has returned looking for his second at the school — after guiding the Pirates to the 2008 crown — and he has an assistant coach, Ben Ledbetter, who has historic ties to the program. Ledbetter, a retired former assistant principal at Charlestown and principal at New Washington, coached the Pirates over Jeffersonville in the final single-class Jeffersonville Sectional in 1997. He was also a standout Charlestown player in the 1960s, leading the team to a solid season in 1967 by averaging 19 points per game. Ben Ledbetter, who went on to play at The Citadel in college, said he’s excited to join Smith’s charge to bring enthusiasm, toughness and energy to the program.
Published in: News and Tribune - Online
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Tuesday
July 16, 2019
1. YWCA Greater Charleston Announces Incoming Board
As it celebrates its 112th anniversary, YWCA Greater Charleston is welcoming its incoming board of directors, who took office on July 1, 2019. Continuing their service to the board will be previous board treasurer Belita M. Green, a consumer loan underwriter for Heritage Trust Federal Credit Union, Adrmease Cunningham, a parent advocate and outreach professional for Charleston Development Academy, Diana Saillant, CEO of Saillant Language Consulting, LLC and president of the Hispanic Business Association, Shawn Edwards, chief diversity officer for The Citadel, Radia Heyward, community engagement program manager for Charleston Promise Neighborhood, and Adrienne Troy-Frazier, executive director of Berkeley County First Steps.
Published in: Charleston Chronicle - Online
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Tuesday
July 16, 2019
2. Pappas Capital Expands Leadership Team With Appointments Of Kyle Rasbach To Managing Partner And Matthew Boyer To CFO

Pappas Capital, a leading investor in early-stage life sciences companies, today announced the promotion of Kyle Rasbach, PhD, PharmD to a Managing Partner of Pappas Ventures, the firm's venture capital business. In his new role, Dr. Rasbach will help to oversee Pappas Ventures and lead fundraising and investment efforts for its future venture funds. Pappas Capital also announced that Matthew Boyer has been named Chief Financial Officer, succeeding Ford Worthy who will continue with the firm as a Partner and Senior Advisor. Dr. Rasbach joined Pappas Capital as a Partner in January 2018. Previously, he was a Vice President at T. Rowe Price, where he managed pharmaceutical, specialty pharmaceutical and biotechnology investments. During that time, he led T. Rowe Price's IPO investment in Pappas Ventures portfolio company CoLucid Pharmaceuticals, which was sold to Eli Lilly for just under $1 billion. Earlier, he was a Vice President at Cowen and Company, where he covered global pharmaceutical equities. Dr. Rasbach received his PhD and PharmD from the Medical University of South Carolina, and an MBA from The Citadel.

This article has been published in multiple outlets nationwide, including on nasdaq.com

Published in: Business Insider - Online
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Tuesday
July 16, 2019
2. Thomas Anderson to lead Wells Fargo Commercial Banking in SC
Wells Fargo (NYSE: WFC) Commercial Banking announced that Thomas Anderson has been tapped to lead commercial banking operations for South Carolina where it has offices in Charleston, Columbia, and Greenville serving business customers throughout the Palmetto State. He is based in Charleston. A 23-year finance industry veteran, Anderson previously served as regional vice president of Middle Market Banking in the Midlands and Low country Region of South Carolina. Soon after graduating from The Citadel, Anderson began his finance career in the accounting department of Bulldog Hiway Express in 1996. In 1998, shortly before finishing his MBA at The Citadel, Anderson moved to Arthur D. Little, Inc. as a financial consultant. He joined Wells Fargo predecessor, Wachovia Bank’s Business Banking team in Charleston in 1999 and has a proven track record as a top performer, relationship builder, and portfolio manager. Anderson has also been an adjunct professor at The Citadel School of Business since 2011, where he has taught courses on bank management, monetary policy, relationship management and negotiations.
Published in: Soda City Biz Wire - Online
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Tuesday
July 16, 2019
3. College and University News - July 16, 2019
Elizabeth Hooks, of Camden, earned a Master of Business Administration degree from The Citadel. Hooks graduated during The Citadel Graduate College commencement ceremony on Saturday, May 4 in McAlister Field House.
Published in: Chronicle-Independent - Online
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Tuesday
July 16, 2019
4. Former Citadel cadet from the 70s featured on true crime show

Partial verbatim: SEEKING HARRY SR. 'S APPROVAL, HARRY JR. ENROLLS IN COLLEGE AT THE CITADEL IN SOUTH CAROLINA. [RICHARD SALKIN] THE CITADEL IS A PRIVATE INSTITUTION, IS AN ALTERNATE MEANS OF BECOMING FFICER, MAKING A CAREER IN THE MILITARY. THEIR GRADUATES WOULD GET COMMISSIONS IN THE MILITARY. [NARRATOR] WITH HARRY JR. View HARRY JR. RETURNS HOME FROM THE CITADEL ON THANKSGIVING BREAK. IT WAS A BIG THANKSGIVING WEEKEND, HOME FOOTBALL GAME, ALL THE ALUMNI COME BACK TO GREET EACH OTHER AFTER THEY WENT AWAY TO SCHOOL. MARY JANE WAS SO PROUD AND WANTED TO SHOW OFF HER SON COMING BACK FROM THE CITADEL AND PROVE TO EVERYBODY THAT HER SON WAS A MILITARY BOY AND A CITADEL MAN. HARRY SH UP AND I REMEMBER SEEING HIM STANDING IN THE CORNER HANGING OUT WITH ONE OF MY OTHER FRIENDS. [NARRATOR] AS THANKSGIVING WEEKEND DRAWS TO A CLOSE HARRY JR.

Watch the full coverage here.
(For best results, view in Google Chrome)

Published in: Justice Network - Broadcast
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Tuesday
July 16, 2019
5. TONY SKOLE TEAM USA BLOG #2
"The Process" Since arriving in Cary, NC (where the headquarters for Team USA Baseball are located) we have been on the go and working at a very fast pace. Since arriving on June 26th, we had about 6 days to narrow our roster from 36 ball players to 26 ball players. After watching our guys workout these first few days, I quickly realized that these decisions are not going to be easy. Every successful organization is successful because of the people that are involved. USA Baseball is no different. I have been amazed at the organization, efficiency, pride and passion of everyone that works and that is associated with USA Baseball. There is amazing leadership from Executive Director, Paul Seiler, President, Mike Gaski and Team USA General Manager, Eric Campbell. The rest of the staff and administration whose responsibilities all vary, have blown my mind with how hard they work. No matter what is needed, they all seem to be willing to help out in any way possible. Whatever our coaching staff or players have needed, these people have made it happen and have done it with great efficiency. No job is too large or too small. If you are looking to hire someone in college athletics, there is no doubt that you should look at some of the young people who are working at USA Baseball. They are the cream of the crop.
Published in: Citadel Sports - Online
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Monday
July 15, 2019
1a. My son died in a military training accident. Why do they continue to happen?

Michael H.C. McDowell is a recent member of the advisory board of The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina.

On May 9, my wife and I lost our only child, H. Conor McDowell — just turned 24, a newly promoted Marine first lieutenant, days away from being engaged to marry his girlfriend, Kathleen Bourque. He was killed instantly when his light armored vehicle (LAV) turned belly up, crushing him, as he led a patrol in challenging terrain at Camp Pendleton in San Diego County. Conor pushed his gunner to safety but did not have time to save himself. Conor is just one of too many young people who are dying, needlessly, in so-called training accidents in our military. Over the past year, nearly four times the number of troops have been killed in training rather than in combat.

Published in: Washington Post - Online
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Monday
July 15, 2019
1b. In pursuit of transformation through travel

The Camino de Santiago is a network of ancient pilgrim routes stretching across Europe. The passages date back more than 1,000 years, coming together in north-west Spain at the Tomb of St. James in the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela. According to the Pilgrim’s Reception Office near the Cathedral, a pilgrimage on the trail is “essentially a spiritual experience” driven by a personal wish or vow, as penance for sins, a desire for cultural immersion or a love of nature. The office expected travel by cars and airplanes to eventually reduce the pilgrims on the trail but instead reports “huge growth” over the past 30 years, tracked through requests for trail credentials. “In 1985, 1,245 pilgrims arrived in Santiago. In the 2010 Holy Year 272,703 pilgrims qualified.” Citadel professor of language and culture, Alison Smith, Ph.D., is researching the growing pursuit of travel for transformation. In fact, she is developing a course about it to be taught at The Citadel. Smith and her 2018 group walked the Montarnaud to Saint Guilhem-le-Désert segment of the Camino. “The abbey in Saint Guilhem dates from the 10th century and was itself a pilgrimage site. Students spent the night inside the Medieval walls of the city,” Smith said. “The idea of doing an entire course was born then as I observed the transformative potential of the experience through my cadets and students.”

Published in: The Citadel Today - Online
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Monday
July 15, 2019
1c. At World Series of Poker, Citadel band director comes up a winner

As the cameras focused on Tim Smith at the main table at the World Series of Poker last week, ESPN2 announcers took note of his unusual story. Smith, who wore a blue Citadel hat pulled down over his eyes as he hunched over his cards, is the director of music and the Regimental Band and Pipes at the military college. “His first major live event ever,” noted play-by-play announcer Lon McEachern on the telecast. “That is a lot of pressure, your first major live event and you are at a table with a bunch of superstars,” chimed in sideline reporter Kara Scott. “Regimental band of pipes,” mused analyst Norman Chad. “Like, bag pipes, do you think?” asked McEachern. “Pipes,” answered Chad. “I’m not familiar with the music industry.” Thankfully, Smith knows more about poker than the ESPN2 trio knew about bag pipes. Smith, who has been director of music at The Citadel since 2016, finished in the top 10 percent of the 8,569 players at the famed World Series of Poker in Las Vegas. He was No. 831 overall and won $18,535 for his efforts.

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Monday
July 15, 2019
1d. Lessons learned at Citadel pay off for opera star Morris Robinson

Morris Robinson is the only former cadet and All-American football player at the Citadel to become a world-renowned opera singer. The opera bass, who stars in Cincinnati Opera’s “Porgy and Bess” opening July 20, received an honorary doctorate and gave the commencement speech at the military college in Charleston, S.C., two years ago. “At the Citadel, you obtain discipline, personal accountability, you understand the concept of teamwork, of overcoming adversity, of being flexible and of duty and responsibility,” he said at Music Hall. “Then I got into my first opera rehearsal and I realized, the first thing I need to have is personal accountability and teamwork.” Robinson, who played offensive guard, hoped to play pro football but was deemed “too small” at 6-foot-2 and 285 pounds. Instead, he excelled in corporate marketing and sales. The son of an Atlanta Baptist minister, he also loved singing since age 6. When the director of opera at Boston University heard his resonant bass at an event, he was encouraged to study opera.

Published in: Cincinnati Business Courier - Online
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Monday
July 15, 2019
1e. SC memos and distinctions
The Citadel’s bachelor’s degree in nursing program has been accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Monday
July 15, 2019
1f. United Community Bank Continues Growth with Columbia Expansion
United Community Bank has expanded its South Carolina presence with the recent addition of three well-known Columbia-based bankers to its growing team. Shannon Stephens, Austin McVay and Michael Glenn will spearhead operations for United in the Midlands while introducing the bank’s commercial lending capabilities to the market. United has more than 40 locations in South Carolina, spread across the Upstate and the Coast. Glenn also joins the team as Vice President/Commercial Relationship Manager. He has 12 years of industry experience and has worked across multiple disciplines, including retail banking, commercial credit, cash management and commercial lending. Glenn is a native of the Columbia area and graduate of The Citadel as well as the South Carolina Bankers School. In the community, he serves as Treasurer for The Free Medical Clinic and has previously served as board chair for Growing Home Southeast, an organization that supports at-risk youth in foster care. He and his wife Caroline have one daughter and a set of twin boys.
Published in: Soda City Biz Wire - Online
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Monday
July 15, 2019
2a. Getting ready to go back to school with The Citadel Graduate College

While the start of school may still be weeks away, it’s never too early to start preparing. That’s why The Citadel Graduate College (CGC) has already announced its upcoming new student orientation, as well as an open house for those interested in graduate, evening undergraduate and online programs. For students who are finishing their bachelor’s degrees or getting started on their master’s degrees, CGC is holding an orientation for new students on Wednesday, August 21, from 5:30 – 8 p.m. It will be on campus in Bond 165. Then, the month after that, CGC will hold an open house for those who are interested in graduate programs, undergraduate degree completion programs, or online classes. The open house will be Tuesday, September 17, from 5:30 – 7 p.m. in the 4th floor of Johnson Hagood Stadium.

Published in: The Citadel Today - Online
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Monday
July 15, 2019
3. Forty-seven students receive scholarships from Building Industry Charitable Foundation

Over the past 19 years, the Building Industry Charitable Foundation has awarded $579,250 in scholarships to children of Association members and other students who meet criteria set for the program. This month, the Building Industry Charitable Foundation will award an additional $57,000 to students. The scholarship program is funded by annual events, including the BIA Golf Classic presented by 84 Lumber and through private contributions to the Foundation.

2019 Scholarship Recipients include:

Jacob Harding, The Citadel

Dylan Meetze, The Citadel

Luke Meetze, The Citadel

Benjamin Nicholson, The Citadel

Matthew Rush, The Citadel

Published in: The Columbia Star - Online
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Monday
July 15, 2019
3. Graduation 2019: Lakeland Students Make Their College Picks
Hundreds of members of the Lakeland High School Class of 2019 will continue their education in the fall at 106 public and private colleges or universities across 21 states. More than half of the Lakeland students attending college will stay close to home, with 157 students choosing a school in New York. The other most popular states are Pennsylvania (11), Connecticut (9) and Massachusetts (6). South Carolina (1) The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina
Published in: Tap Into - New York - Online
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Monday
July 15, 2019
4. CFHS cadets attend CO-XO Academy at The Citadel
On Saturday, June 29, Carolina Forest High School NJROTC established a new milestone for its program when five cadets graduated from Leadership Academy and two more graduated from CO-XO Academy held at The Citadel in Charleston. The cadets who attended the academy are the best of the 61 NJROTC programs across NJROTC Area 6, which comprises North and South Carolina. While there are more than 7,000 Navy JROTC cadets in the area, just 204 were invited to participate in these intense, week-long events. To say that the cadets were kept busy, is an understatement. Cadets also received copious instruction on post-high school opportunities including the United States Naval Academy, The Citadel and guidance on how to obtain Navy ROTC scholarships across the country.
Published in: My Horry News - Online
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Monday
July 15, 2019
4. Photo: MOAA scholarships awarded
Seven area high school seniors were awarded a total of $6,000 by the Military Officers Associated of America, SENCLAND Chapter, for university and college expenses. Recipients include Hunter Staines (Lejeune High School) who will attend The Citadel, majoring in intelligence/security.
Published in: Jacksonville Daily News - Online
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Monday
July 15, 2019
5a. Charleston’s new Army Corps commander back where her military career started

An military officer who began her service career in South Carolina has returned to the Palmetto State to lead the Army Corps of Engineers in Charleston. Lt. Col. Rachel Honderd assumed command of the Charleston District office on Friday, replacing Lt. Col. Jeffrey Palazzini, who will attend the College of International Security Affairs in Washington, D.C. Honderd, the district’s 88th commander and the first woman to hold the position, will lead the federal agency’s local office for the next two years. She completed her basic training at Fort Jackson in Columbia more than 20 years ago and is back in South Carolina to oversee planning, engineering and construction of water resource projects in the state. “I find myself back in the place I started a better soldier, a better leader and a person ready to learn from this team and serve this team and the community,” Honderd said during Friday’s change-of-command ceremony at The Citadel’s alumni center.

Also covered by the Moultire News

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Monday
July 15, 2019
5b. OPINION: Gen. Caslen should be next University of South Carolina president

I am a 2005 University of South Carolina School of Law graduate. I was commissioned an Army Infantry officer in 1990 after graduating The Citadel, and have served as an Infantry officer, both regular Army and reserve, for the past 29 years to my current rank of colonel. My background gives me a unique perspective on the decision about Robert Caslen becoming the next president of the university, so please consider my input. As a fellow combat arms leader, I have followed Caslen's military career for years. His reputation from within the military, particularly in Iraq, was sterling. In particular, in the area of preventing sexual harassment and/or assault, he was a proven success as a general officer. During his five years at West Point, he was known to combat sexual assault/harassment, resulting in his becoming chairman of the NCAA Commission to prevent sexual assault/harassment.

The Citadel is also briefly mentioned in the Live 5 News article about Gen. Caslen.

Published in: News-Press Now - Online
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Monday
July 15, 2019
5c. Weekend Roundup: 25 things to do this potentially rainy weekend in Charleston
Saturday - Head to the Citadel at 8 a.m. for the Dog Days of Summer 5K. Don't forget to hydrate!
Published in: Charleston City Paper - Online
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Monday
July 15, 2019
6a. Nearly 3 years after daughter’s death, Wilmington couple waits for justice

Alyssa Lee Van Bourgondien, 30, was killed by an alleged drunk driver in Wayne County

On Tuesday, Oct. 11, 2016, Alyssa Lee Van Bourgondien was heading back to Wilmington. Just a couple of months before, the 30-year-old woman had left the Port City for Stafford, Virginia, after her fiance, Robert Woodcock, was stationed in nearby Quantico. Now, it was time to revisit Wilmington -- and mom and dad -- for their wedding. The ceremony was planned for Friday on the deck of the Battleship North Carolina; a perfect setting for Woodcock, a Marine, and military-loving Van Bourgondien, who counted many cadets from The Citadel military college among her close friends having grown up in Charleston, S.C.

Also covered by Havelock News

Published in: Hendersonville Times-News - Online
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Monday
July 15, 2019
7. Citadel's Brown, Kern heading overseas for summer experience
Last season, former Citadel basketball standouts Matt Frierson and Zane Najdawi both took advantage of chances to play overseas. The opportunities helped the duo take their games to the next level. This summer, another pair of Bulldogs is looking to replicate that success as Hayden Brown and Connor Kern will join the USA Eagles Basketball Team later this month and travel to East Asia. The trip will be the same that Frierson went on last season. The team, which includes a pair of Southern Conference opponents in Virginia Military Institute’s Myles Lewis and Connor Arnold, is coached by Kelly Combs, who has close to 20 years of college coaching experience and 10 years of international coaching experience. This is the sixth tour where he will have taken a group to East Asia.
Published in: Moultrie News - Online
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Monday
July 15, 2019
7. Wolfinger enjoys experiencing new cultures through basketball
There are only so many chances for a player to catch the eyes of the right program in an attempt to turn pro. Sometimes, it comes down to the very last chance to make a dream into a reality. For former Bulldog Joe Wolfinger, that could not be more true. Wolfinger was on the University of Washington’s basketball squad for four years, playing two, and made the most of his last chance opportunity with a post-graduate year at The Citadel to springboard him into what has been a nine-year professional career. A native of Portland, Ore., Wolfinger came to The Citadel after four seasons at the University of Washington. In his collegiate career, Wolfinger played in 73 games, including making 18 starts, and was a career 44.6-percent shooter from the field. He scored 355 career points, including 211 at The Citadel in his final year of eligibility, and brought down 181 rebounds, 125 for the Bulldogs.
Published in: Moultrie News - Online
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Monday
July 15, 2019
8a. Freedom grads Abee, Bailey in East-West All-Star game Monday night
Recent Freedom graduates Fletcher Abee and Madison Bailey will hit the court at the Greensboro Coliseum on Monday night for the N.C. Coaches Association’s East-West All-Star basketball games. Bailey will take the floor in the girls game at 6:30 p.m., followed immediately by Abee in the boys contest at 8:30 p.m. Abee, who signed with The Citadel, was named AP all-state after a senior season in which he averaged a county-best 19.0 points with 4.4 rebounds, 2.9 assists and 2.2 steals per game. A two-time county player of the year, conference player of the year and All-District 10 first-team selection, he holds FHS all-time records for career points and 3-pointers, and 3-pointers, 30-point games, 3-point percentage and free-throw percentage in a season.
Published in: The News Herald - Online
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Monday
July 15, 2019
8b. Team USA Baseball roster: Collegiate National Team players, conferences
The USA Baseball Collegiate National Team is ready to head to Japan for the 43rd annual Team USA vs. Japan Collegiate All-Star series to end a successful summer. The four-game series begins Wednesday, July, 17 and concludes Sunday, July 21. Louisville head coach Dan McDonnell continues his busy summer as skipper of the team. McDonnell, of course, led the Cardinals to the semifinals of the CWS less than a month ago. Much was made about his relationship with Mississippi State's Chris Lemonis, who both got their start at The Citadel before becoming foes in Omaha. McDonnell brings back that connection here as well, as Tony Skole — a former teammate of McDonnell and Lemonis and now head coach at The Citadel — joins him on the coaching staff. Mark Kingston (South Carolina) and Greg Moore (Saint Mary's) round out the NCAA baseball coaches on staff with Dave Turgeon of the Pittsburgh Pirates and Xan Barksdale as the bullpen coach.
Published in: NCAA - Online
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Monday
July 15, 2019
8c. Bananas doomed from start in loss to Blowfish
Sometimes it’s just not your night. That was the case Thursday for the Savannah Bananas, who fell to Lexington County 9-3 at home. The Blowfish jumped out to a 7-0 lead before the Bananas even came to the plate. The first eight Lexington County batters reached, and it was a 6-0 deficit before the Bananas recorded an out. Jordan Merrit entered in relief for starter Jack Conlon in the first inning, and The Citadel product pitched five strong innings out of the bullpen. He allowed five hits, walked one, and struck out five. The Bananas fall to 20-11 overall, and 3-3 in the second half. They’re back at home Saturday to host the Macon Bacon.
Published in: WTOC - Savannah, GA - Online
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Monday
July 15, 2019
9. All fans should be a little more like Mr. Two Bits | Commentary
I don’t know about you, but I miss Mr. Two Bits already. He passed away last week at the age of 97, but I’m afraid his attitude, his outlook and his encouraging, optimistic way of being a fan — and a man — died way before he did. All you have to is scroll through your Twitter feed or peruse a fan message board and you will see the noxious negativity and the dreadful divisiveness that Mr. Two Bits spent 60 years trying to combat. His real name was George Edmondson and he was a Tampa insurance salesman by profession, but a Florida Gators football fan by passion. Here’s what I wrote on that sad day in 2008 he decided he was getting too old and too tired to run around the stadium from section to section like he once did: “Mr. Two Bits, 86, is retiring after 60 years of leading cheers, lifting spirits and supporting his team through the best of times — but, more importantly, through the worst of them.” Edmondson had just gotten out of the Navy, where he was a fighter pilot during World War II. He moved back to Tampa and was invited to a UF football game by some Gator buddies of his. Florida was playing Edmondson’s old school, The Citadel, and Edmondson couldn’t believe his ears when the Gators took the field amid UF fans booing the team. Then, as head coach Raymond Wolf’s name was announced, the booing grew even louder.
Published in: Orlando Sentinel - Online
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Thursday
July 11, 2019
1. Intelligence gathering on Russia’s edge
The Republic of Georgia, wedged between Russia and Turkey, is a critical strategic partner to the United States. That’s why a group of graduate and undergraduate students with The Citadel Department of Intelligence and Security Studies went there to study. Their leader: Terry Mays, Ph.D., professor of political science, and international relations expert. Mays, who has focused his research on multinational peacekeeping, led the students from site to site, including some just across the boarder from Russia. As they traveled he explained foreign policy lessons from Georgia and neighboring countries. “They work together to counter Russian cyber attacks and to resist movements by Russia to reincorporate territories into its borders,” Mays said. “These relationships provide many lessons.” According to Mays, the Republic of Georgia has also been the largest per capita contributor to coalition military efforts in Afghanistan.
Published in: The Citadel Today - Online
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Thursday
July 11, 2019
2. Howard Pickett King Presented with the Albert Nelson Marquis Lifetime Achievement Award by Marquis Who's Who
Marquis Who's Who, the world's premier publisher of biographical profiles, is proud to present Howard Pickett King with the Albert Nelson Marquis Lifetime Achievement Award. An accomplished listee, Mr. King celebrates many years' experience in his professional network, and has been noted for achievements, leadership qualities, and the credentials and successes he has accrued in his field. As in all Marquis Who's Who biographical volumes, individuals profiled are selected on the basis of current reference value. Factors such as position, noteworthy accomplishments, visibility, and prominence in a field are all taken into account during the selection process. Mr. King served in the South Carolina National Guard from 1963 to 1967 and as First Lieutenant in the United States Army Artillery from 1961 to 1963 in Fort Sill, OK and Giessen, Germany. Prior to becoming a renowned legal professional, he pursued higher education with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration from The Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina, in 1961.
Published in: 24-7 Press Release - Online
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Thursday
July 11, 2019
3. Ten-hut! Military hopefuls find thriving Jewish community at Hillel
Fewer than 225 Jewish students attend military academies in the United States, according to a 2011 edition of Reform Judaism Magazine. They represent a small community, but one with a strong urge to serve their country and connect with their Judaism. Like Carlen, many of them have found Jewish community and a much-needed reprieve from cadet life at their local Hillel. David, formerly a student leader at West Point Hillel, was the first female graduate of a modern Orthodox yeshiva to enroll at West Point, where the student body numbers nearly 4,500 students. “Judaism is a central part of my identity,” David, 22, said. “Finding a community with a similar ideology was very important to me. That’s why I became involved in Hillel.” Joshua Kreitzer, 22, was drawn to Hillel for a similar reason. When he left South Florida to pursue business administration and political science at The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, Kreitzer assumed the luxury of having peers who understood his practices would disappear. The number of Jewish students barely constitute a minyan at The Citadel, which has a population of more than 3,000 students. “I was worried I wouldn’t see another Jewish person for the next four years,” said Kreitzer, class of ’19. “How would I still connect with my Jewish religion?” That nagging question was answered shortly after he became a cadet. Kreitzer stumbled upon a welcoming Jewish community at College of Charleston Hillel, just a 10-minute ride from The Citadel. He became a well-known face at CofC Hillel as he explored Judaism on his own terms.
Published in: Hillel International - Online
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Thursday
July 11, 2019
4. Remembering Col. Chaplain Charles Clanton

Inside The Citadel’s Summerall Chapel, there are photos of many former chaplains to the Corps of Cadets, honoring the time they dedicated to the college’s shrine of religion, patriotism and remembrance. The many people who served as chaplain in the college’s history tended to the spiritual needs of cadets, alumni, faculty and staff. The chaplains have also served as community leaders, bringing religious leaders from different faiths around the city together for worship and fellowship. They have also led celebrations, such as the annual Christmas Candlelight Services, and they’ve led the celebrations of the lives of the many people who request to have funeral services in the chapel. One of the photos, on the northern side of the chapel, is of Col. Chaplain Charles T. Clanton, US Army (Ret). Clanton served as chaplain at The Citadel from 1994 – 1999. Clanton, 83, died on Monday, July 8, in Columbia. Funeral services will be held at 11 a.m. on Thursday, July 11, at the First Baptist Church in Sumter, SC.

Also covered in The Post and Courier

Published in: The Citadel Today - Online
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Thursday
July 11, 2019
5. TONY SKOLE TEAM USA BLOG #1

Good afternoon. During this 27 day tour with Team USA Baseball, I will attempt share some moments and experiences. Please be easy on me, as I am apologizing in advance for many of the grammatical errors which will undoubtedly occur during this blog. I will attempt to not embarrass all of the wonderful English teachers I had during my scholastic career. I am honored and humbled to have this opportunity. I hope you will enjoy.

Go USA!

"Bucket List"

I always enjoyed the movie "Bucket List" with Morgan Freeman and Jack Nicholson. I think everyone that watched this movie for the first time left the theatre thinking of what their own list would look like. For me, my list is not very long. Of course there are places I would still enjoy visiting and many things that I would like to try or accomplish, but the truth is, I am a pretty simple person. I am very grateful and I feel very blessed because most of the items that I have already checked off on my personal "Bucket List" have come about because of amazing relationships. Examples of these relationships I have been able to form begin with my wife, my children, my family, my PALS, my teammates, my players I have coached and all the outstanding people I have been able to work with during my career in athletics. I believe that items on a "Bucket List" mean nothing if you don't have people you care about to share them with.

Published in: Citadel Sports - Online
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Thursday
July 11, 2019
6. Savannah State basketball coaches teach younger generation

Savannah State is hosting its annual Basketball Individual Camp this week in Wilcox-Willey Gym. Nearly 40 campers are on hand to learn from the Tigers’ coaching staff. For assistant coach Clyde Wormley, that number is double what they expected, and this week’s camp was also a surprise. The session was brought back by popular demand at the request of former participants. A former standout at The Citadel, Wormley said it feels good to know folks in the community want to bring their children on campus and have them under their tutelage. “I’ve been here for 12 years and they were running the camp when I got here,” Wormley said. “It’s been growing in popularity each year, and a lot of it kids come here and have fun. They want to come back and they invite their friends. The parents come back and they see it. They love it. The kids have a good time.”

Published in: Savannah Morning News - Online
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Wednesday
July 10, 2019
1. From bands to bets; Citadel’s director of music competing in World Series of Poker

Update on Smith’s outcome, July 10, 2019 Smith finished in the top 10% of players in the World Series of Poker. He was knocked out on the evening of July 9, in 831 place out of 8,569 participants, earning a cash prize of $18,535. Smith said, “I’ll take that!,” and headed out to what he said would be a “magnificent dinner” before returning to South Carolina. As seen on ESPN2 For months, The Citadel’s director of music has been preparing for more than just the upcoming school year. He’s also been getting ready to compete for $10 million at the 2019 World Series of Poker as a recreational player.

Watch the on-air coverage here.

Published in: The Citadel Today - Online
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Wednesday
July 10, 2019
2. New study says Furman University's economic impact on Greenville area nearly $300 million
They say you can't put a price on a good education, but a recent study from Furman University estimates the institution's annual economic impact on Greenville County is $288 million. Additionally, the university poured more than $9 million in the surrounding counties, totaling an economic impact of $297 million a year. The study was conducted by Jason Jones, an associate professor in Furman's economics department, and Dyson Von Robinson, an undergraduate who graduated in May. The liberal arts school, which sits on Poinsett Highway a few miles north of downtown Greenville, was founded in 1826. It's the top-ranked private university in the state with 2,947 undergraduate and graduate students for the past school year. The impact is "on par" with similarly sized universities, like The Citadel, according to Jones, but the numbers don't come close to the billion-dollar impacts larger universities like Clemson and the University of South Carolina make annually.
Published in: The Greenville News - Online
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Wednesday
July 10, 2019
3. New Leaders, New Recruits for BPD
The Branford Police Department had a busy start to July with the promotion of four members of its leadership team and the addition of three new recruits. The promotion of Deputy Chief John Alves, Captain John Finkle, Lieutenant Phillip Ramey, and Sergeant Matthew Clerkin was announced on July 1, followed on July 2 with news that Alicia Glifort, Caroline Massey, and Michael Vitale had joined the force and started academy training last week. Finkle was promoted from detective lieutenant and will now serve as the Patrol Division commander. Finkle is a 20-year veteran of the department. Finkle holds a master’s degree in forensic science and a bachelor’s degree from the Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina. He is a 2016 graduate from the Senior Management Institute for Policing. He also earned the rank of lieutenant colonel to colonel in the U.S. Army Reserve.
Published in: Zip 06 - Online
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Wednesday
July 10, 2019
4. CHARLES T. CLANTON
Retired U.S. Army Col. Chaplain Charles T. Clanton, 83, husband of Betty Ann Green Clanton, died Monday, July 8, 2019, at Prisma Health Richland Hospital in Columbia. Born Sept. 3, 1935, in Little Rock, Arkansas, he was a son of the late Thomas David Clanton and Almedia Woodward Clanton. Through marriage to his wife Betty Ann, he was also the son-in-law of the late LeRoy and Elizabeth Ann Green of Shiloh. The Rev. Clanton was a graduate of Furman University and Southeastern Baptist Seminary. He was a chaplain in the U.S. Army for 26 years. He served two tours in Vietnam for which he was awarded, among others, the Silver Star, Bronze Star (5 awards), Purple Heart and the Air Medal (4 awards). He was commandant of the U.S. Army Chaplain Center and School and retired as the Forces Command (FORSCOM) Chaplain, where he assigned all religious support for Operation Desert Storm. Following his retirement, he served seven years as the chaplain for The Citadel and then returned to Sumter, where he was interim pastor of Crosswell Baptist Church and First Baptist Church (twice) before serving as pastor to senior adults at First Baptist. The Rev. Clanton was a member of American Legion Post 15 and was post chaplain and past post commander. Visitation will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. today at the Elmore-Cannon-Stephens Funeral Home. Funeral service will be held at 11 a.m. Thursday at First Baptist Church. Burial with full military honors will be at Shiloh Methodist Church Cemetery.
Published in: The Sumter Item - Online
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Wednesday
July 10, 2019
5. Mobile says goodbye to beloved businessman Jack Greer
Family and friends are saying goodbye to a pillar of the community on Tuesday. A private service for Jack Vidmer Greer is being held at the family’s chapel in Theodore. A public celebration will follow. Greer – or “Jack V.” as the Greer’s team called him – served as president of the family-owned grocery chain starting in the 1980s until he retired two decades later. Greer, a Mobile native, passed away peacefully at his home on July 2, according to his family. He was 91. He graduated from Murphy High School and attended The Citadel in Charleston, SC where he played basketball. He graduated from the University of Alabama and enjoyed college life with his friends in Delta Kappa Epsilon (DKE) Fraternity while there. Celebration of Life Service and Visitation will be held Tuesday, July 9, 2019. Family will gather for the Service in Greer Family Chapel at11:00 a.m. Celebration Visitation to follow in the Schoolhouse from Noon to 2:00 p.m. with friends and family. In lieu of flowers, please make donations to Mobile BayKeeper, Dauphin Way United Methodist Church, Christ Episcopal Church, Mobile Rotary Club, or a charity of your choice.
Published in: WKRG - Mobile, AL - Online
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Wednesday
July 10, 2019
6. ‘Prestige’ isn’t all South Carolina, Mark Kingston are getting from Team USA gig
Right now, while most college baseball coaches across the country are on the road, busy scouting and recruiting prospects, South Carolina’s Mark Kingston is half a world away — the Gamecocks’ head coach landed in Taiwan on Monday, then heads over to Japan next week. It’s the farthest Kingston, a baseball veteran who’s played all over the U.S., has ever been from home, but it’s not for pleasure; he is an assistant coach on the USA Baseball Collegiate National Team, working alongside some of the best players and coaches from the amateur level. In that role, Kingston will end up being away from South Carolina for a month. What he thinks he’ll get out of the experience will make up for that, he said. Specifically, Kingston has been eager to learn from his fellow coaches — head coach Dan McDonnell (Louisville), assistant coach Tony Skole (The Citadel), pitching coach Greg Moore (St. Mary’s) and bench coach Dave Turgeon (Pittsburgh Pirates). After a difficult 2019 season that saw the Gamecocks tie the program record for losses in a season and miss the NCAA tournament, Kingston has indicated he wants to reevaluate the entirety of the program.
Published in: Charlotte Observer - Online
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Wednesday
July 10, 2019
7. Bulldogs, Edwards to open season Nov. 5 against Western Carolina

Anthony Edwards’ first game in a Georgia uniform will come Nov. 5 against Western Carolina the team announced on Tuesday after finalizing its non-conference schedule. Edwards, a top-2 national recruit, and the other five fresh faces that compiled the Bulldogs’ top-10 class from 2019 will play their first four games in Stegeman Coliseum, with games to follow against The Citadel (Nov. 12), Delaware State (Nov. 15) and against Georgia Tech (Nov. 20). Georgia then heads to the Maui Invitational beginning Nov. 25 to play teams from a field that includes Kansas, UCLA, Michigan State, Virginia Tech, Dayton, BYU and host Chaminade.

Also covered by Savannah Morning News

Published in: Athens Banner-Herald - Online
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Wednesday
July 10, 2019
8. High school football: Top 10 defensive backs in Charleston and the Lowcountry
Of all the positions on the football field for the upcoming high school season, the deepest in terms of talent and experience is easily the secondary. Several Lowcountry defensive backs have received major college attention with offers coming to rising seniors as well as underclassmen. The top two corners for 2019 are seniors Christian Miller of Hilton Head and K’ron Ferrell of Woodland. Miller is a top 10 prospect in South Carolina with nearly 20 offers from schools at all levels of Division I. The 5-11, 175-pounder is a two-way performer, but colleges are looking at him for his defensive skills. Miller’s biggest offers to this point are from South Florida, Colorado State, Indiana, East Carolina and Rutgers. The Citadel also has offered, along with Western Kentucky and Liberty. He says he will narrow down the list to five after a few visits later this month.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Tuesday
July 9, 2019
1. Tim Smith on the World Series of Poker

Tim Smith, The Citadel's Director of Music, competing in the World Series of Poker, broadcast on ESPN2. His role at The Citadel was also mentioned multiple times.

Watch the on-air coverage from 10 pm here.

Watch the on-air coverage from 12 am here.

(For best results, please open links in Google Chrome.)

Published in: ESPN2 - Broadcast

Tuesday
July 9, 2019
2. Braddock’s Battlefield tour part of history center’s grand reopening

Braddock’s Battlefield History Center will welcome the public for its grand reopening Tuesday, the anniversary of a 1755 battle on the site that pitted British and American troops against French and Native American forces. The event begins at 11 a.m. at 609 N. Sixth Street, North Braddock, with remarks and dedication of the museum’s Robert T. Messner Classroom. Costumed reenactors will bring to life figures from local history — including British Gen. Edward Braddock, who was fatally wounded as his troops lost the Battle of the Monongahela, and George Washington, who led the retreat. Historian and author David Preston, a Western Pennsylvania native who teaches at The Citadel in Charleston, S.C., will lead a 1 p.m. walking tour of the battlefield and, at 3 p.m., will sign copies of his 2015 book on the subject, “Braddock’s Defeat: The Battle of the Monongahela and the Road to Revolution.”

Published in: Tribune-Review - Online
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Tuesday
July 9, 2019
3. Obie sworn in as new Berkeley County council member
Berkeley County Council officially gained a new member on Monday. Phillip Obie II was sworn in to Council's District 3 seat, which represents portions of Goose Creek, Spring Grove Plantation and Foxbank Plantation. "I think it's been a while since we've had someone in the Goose Creek area represent Goose Creek properly," Obie told a small crowd gathered inside Council Chambers. With 66 percent of the vote, the Republican councilman beat out Democratic opponent Tory Liferidge in a special election last month, the county said. Obie is not new to the political scene; the Berkeley County native held the title of Berkeley County school board member from 2008 to 2016. Obie said it was his desire to preserve quality of life in the county that prompted him to jump back into politics. Obie graduated from Goose Creek High School and The Citadel and is currently employed as a “group leader” for Santee Cooper's Solid Fuel and Rail Transportation Group.
Published in: The Berkeley Independent - Online
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Tuesday
July 9, 2019
4. United Community Bank continues growth with Columbia expansion

United Community Bank has expanded its South Carolina presence with the recent addition of three well-known Columbia-based bankers to its growing team. Shannon Stephens, Austin McVay and Michael Glenn will spearhead operations for United in the Midlands while introducing the bank’s commercial lending capabilities to the market. United has more than 40 locations in South Carolina, spread across the Upstate and the Coast. Glenn also joins the team as Vice President/Commercial Relationship Manager. He has 12 years of industry experience and has worked across multiple disciplines, including retail banking, commercial credit, cash management and commercial lending. Glenn is a native of the Columbia area and graduate of The Citadel as well as the South Carolina Bankers School. In the community, he serves as Treasurer for The Free Medical Clinic and has previously served as board chair for Growing Home Southeast, an organization that supports at-risk youth in foster care. He and his wife Caroline have one daughter and a set of twin boys.

Also covered by Metro Columbia CEO

Published in: Midlands Biz - Online
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Tuesday
July 9, 2019
5. Progressive Promises and the Cost To Liberty
Promises, promises, promises. It is the season for political promises. The candidates competing to be the Democratic Party candidate for president in 2020 are out in force trying to outbid each other with promised horns-of-plenty to any and all who might be voting in that party’s primaries beginning in a mere matter of months. There are a handful of words, however, that never seems to be uttered by any of them: scarcity, costs, trade-offs, and liberty. Instead, all of these Democratic Party hopefuls are busy attempting to match and exceed what any of their rivals come up with as a new tack to prove that they are ideologically more “progressive,” politically further to “the left,” or less afraid of saying “socialism” with the modifier “democratic” in front of it. And for all of them, the sky's the limit when it comes to more government spending. First, let’s keep in mind what “progressive” means in this political context: an increase in the size, scope, and cost of government in American society. Those running for that Democratic Party nomination all call for and agree on the need for more government in each of our lives. For instance, a “single-payer” national health system is merely another name for socialized medicine. The government would be the single provider and allocator of all things relating to the people’s medical and related health care needs and desires.
Published in: American Institute for Economic Research - Online
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Tuesday
July 9, 2019
6. Deaths Summary for Monday, July 8, 2019
ROPER, Ervin, 58, of Charleston, an employee with The Citadel and Charleston County Schools, died Saturday. Arrangements by Fielding Home for Funerals.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Tuesday
July 9, 2019
7. BROWN, KERN HEADING OVERSEAS FOR SUMMER EXPERIENCE
Last season, former Citadel basketball standouts Matt Frierson and Zane Najdawi both took advantage of chances to play overseas. The opportunities helped the duo take their games to the next level. This summer, another pair of Bulldogs is looking to replicate that success as Hayden Brown and Connor Kern will join the USA Eagles Basketball Team in July and travel to East Asia. The trip will be the same that Frierson went on last season. "I am extremely excited to spend the last bit of my summer in East Asia with the USA Eagles," Brown said. "Having the opportunity to represent The Citadel and the U.S. with Connor while playing basketball will be a great opportunity for us both." "I am excited to be able to play the game I love in a whole different country across the world," Kern said. "Being able to grow as an individual, as well as a player, while being completely immersed in another culture is so intriguing and exciting. I am very thankful for this opportunity." The team, which includes a pair of Southern Conference opponents in VMI's Myles Lewis and Connor Arnold, is coached by Kelly Combs, who has close to 20 years of college coaching experience and 10 years of international coaching experience. This is the sixth tour where he will have taken a group to East Asia.
Published in: Citadel Sports - Online
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Tuesday
July 9, 2019
8. Southern Collegiate Conference Gets Makeover
Like some of the other competitions across the DII college landscape, the Southern Rugby Conference is making some changes to its fall schedule. In years past the competition was split on a geographical basis, highlighted with Eastern and Western divisions. Each division contained seven teams with the top two teams from each making a four-team playoff at the end of the season. In 2018, at their Annual General Meeting, the idea of separating the fall 15s competition into two divisions based solely on how the teams finished the prior year, was put forth and ultimately fell short by one vote. After the completion of the 2019 season, the same idea came around and the conference elected to make a change. The conference will be divided up into two leagues, the Premier and Challenge. Traditional heavyweights like Furman and UNC-Charlotte will be joined by Appalachian State, the Citadel, ECU, UNC, and UNC-Wilmington to round out the seven-team Premier League. Campbell College, College of Charleston, Coastal Carolina, Elon, Lander, UNC-Greensboro, Wake Forest, and Western Carolina will make up the Challenge League this season.
Published in: Flo Rugby - Online
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Monday
July 8, 2019
1a. Citadel students live and learn in Washington, DC, summer program

As seen in The Post and Courier, by Jeff Hartsell Washington, D.C., is famed for gridlock, but there are people getting things done this summer in the nation’s capital. A group of 14 cadets and students from The Citadel are working, going to class, earning academic credit and learning from real-world decision makers in the military college’s “The Citadel in DC” program. The effort is in its fourth year and takes advantage of The Citadel’s large alumni network in the capital, which includes about 1,400 graduates, the school estimates. Students live at Catholic University of America, which is about 4 miles from the National Mall, during the program, which lasts about two months.

Published in: The Citadel Today - originally from The Post and Courier - Online
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Monday
July 8, 2019
1b. The Citadel's 4th of July Carillon Concert

WCIV covered The Citadel's Carillon Concert, which was performed on both July 3 and 4.

Verbatim: THE CITADEL HAS ALREADY STARTING RINGING IN INDEPENDENCE DAY. TAKE A LISTEN. (BELLS CHIMING) FOR ABOUT AN HOUR, THEY PLAYED PATRIOTIC MUSIC IN HONOR OF THE FOURTH OF JULY. YOU MAY HAVE RECOGNIZED SOME OF THE SONGS.

"SO I TRIED TO TAKE A PRETTY BROAD APPROACH AND SELECT FROM LOTS OF DIFFERENT AMERICAN GENRES AND REPERTORYS. I STARTED WITH MUSIC AND TUNES PEOPLE PROBABLY RECOGNIZED LIKE YANKEE DOODLE AND BATTLE OF THE REPUBLIC."

IF YOU MISSED THE PERFORMANCE OR IF YOU COULDN'T IDENTIFY THE SONG IN EIGHT TOLLS OOF THE BELL, YOU CAN CATCH ANOTHER SHOW TOMORROW. IT'S FREE. IT'S OPEN TO EVERYONE.

Published in: WCIV - ABC News 4 - Broadcast
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Monday
July 8, 2019
1d. Tall ship Spirit of South Carolina to collaborate with College of Charleston
The Spirit of South Carolina, a replica tall ship built in Charleston, will stay afloat — and perhaps more active than ever — thanks in large measure to a new affiliation with the College of Charleston, according to its executive director, Fletcher Meyers. Starting this month, the vessel also will open its gangplanks to individual patrons interested in hands-on educational harbor cruises. It isn’t the first time the Spirit embarked on an academic excursion. In January 2018 it set off for the Caribbean with a team of Citadel cadets on board, but the school opted not to continue with such trips due to fading interest among students, according to the former Citadel at Sea program director, Don Sparks. That might be because bad weather prompted a nearly three-week delay at the outset of the trip, then caused the vessel to pitch and roll through heavy seas on its way to Puerto Rico, leaving some of its passengers a bit traumatized, Sparks said. Nevertheless, the rest of the voyage was terrific, Sparks said. Students met with academics and officials in each port, learned a lot and had a unique seafaring adventure. “I think it was amazing experience,” said Sparks, who is now retired from The Citadel. “I regret (the program) couldn’t continue.”
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Monday
July 8, 2019
1e. Oysters Used in SC River Dredging
Oysters are being used to mitigate the impact of dredging activities in a South Carolina river, according to reports. The implementation of the reef system also helped local authorities obtain permits for the next phase of the work. The Citadel Foundation and the city of Charleston are working together to build the oyster reefs along the Ashley River’s western edge, a move that facilitated work that needed permits from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The project calls for the use of 14,000 bushels of oysters. Known as a military college, The Citadel itself is located in Charleston, and the Foundation helps provide financial assistance for the school. The work, which was awarded to Conti Enterprises, includes plans for a pump station that will move underground stormwater from tunnels to outfalls. Additional work also includes a dock that was recently completed, along with the channel dredging. The project is slated for completion by 2022. The Citadel also has plans for a 1,200-square-foot open-air pavilion and separate dock house.
Published in: Paint Square - Online
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Monday
July 8, 2019
2a. Mainland AFJROTC program finishes on a high note
Eighteen Mainland High School AFJROTC cadets spent seven days at a joint Cadet Leadership Course (CLC) at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina, last month. Nearly 350 cadets from 24 AFJROTC schools attended the annual challenge. This is the 14th consecutive year Mainland has participated. Mainland’s cadets trained extensively for 10 weeks to prepare for this camp, which is modeled after active-duty basic-training situations that consist of a myriad of challenges throughout their 17-plus-hour days. Cadets woke each morning at 5:15 to the sounds of the traditional military reveille. Within minutes, they formed up in 10 flights of 26 cadets and began a rigorous 60 minutes of physical activity on the famous checkerboard quad. The rest of the day consisted of daily uniform and room inspections; tackling the Marine Obstacle Course; finding their bearings on an orienteering course; participating in a timed physical fitness event; leading their flights on a 30-drill sequence; and solving team-leadership problems.
Published in: The Daytona Beach News-Journal - Online
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Monday
July 8, 2019
3. Branford police promotions are ‘the future of the department’

The Board of Police Commissioners and Chief Jonathan Mulhern have promoted several police officers, including naming Capt. John Alves as the new deputy chief. In addition to Alves’ promotion, according to the department’s Facebook posting: — Detective Lt. John Finkle was promoted to captain and now will serve as Patrol Division commander. Finkle is a 20-year veteran of the department who holds a master’s degree in forensic science and a bachelor’s degree from the Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina. He is a 2016 graduate from the Senior Management Institute for Policing and earned the rank of lieutenant colonel to colonel in the Army Reserve.

Also covered by the New Haven Register

Published in: Connecticut Post - Online
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Monday
July 8, 2019
3. From Iraqi desert to Danville library, new director aims to continue to expand services to city
The career of a librarian often invokes the images of sternness and owlish glasses on top of a gray bun, plus a lot of telling people to be quiet. But Jon Bradsher, the new director of Danville’s Ruby B. Archie Public Library, comes to his job by way of the Iraqi desert and intriguing work as an intelligence officer. Originally from Person County, North Carolina, where Bradsher, 50, currently lives, he foresaw a quiet career in archival library work. He first graduated from The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina, in 1991, then earned a master’s degree in library science from the University of North Carolina in Greensboro, North Carolina, in 1997.
Published in: Danville Register & Bee - Online
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Monday
July 8, 2019
3. SC hires and promotions
Leonard “Len” L. Hutchison III has joined First National Bank as regional market executive and president of the Charleston and South Carolina markets. He has about 40 years of financial services industry experience. Previously, he was market president for Wells Fargo & Co. He has a bachelor’s degree in industrial management from Clemson University and a master’s degree in business administration from The Citadel.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Monday
July 8, 2019
3. Veteran couple brings Hand & Stone massage spa to Waco
Blind military veterans receiving therapy in Waco know Heather Balmos, a vet herself, has their back — and their shoulders, sore necks and stiff muscles. She has been giving free massages on Fridays for months at the Doris Miller Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center on New Road. The 39-year-old North Carolina native has opened a Hand & Stone Massage and Facial Spa location in Central Texas Marketplace, with her husband, Heath Balmos, 45, managing the business. Heath Balmos said he was eager to return to Texas after securing a degree in business administration from The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, his six years in the Army and 16 years with snack-maker Frito-Lay, for which he managed a production plant in Vancouver, Washington.
Published in: Waco Tribune-Herald - Online
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Monday
July 8, 2019
4a. CONTRIBUTOR CLOSE UP: KELLY MIELKE
A lifelong lover of history, Kelly Mielke lives in Charleston, South Carolina, with her husband, four cats, dog, and horse. Passionate about academic pursuits, Kelly holds a master’s degree in history from the joint program between the College of Charleston and the Citadel and is currently pursuing a second Master’s degree in English. When she’s not busy with work, school, or reviewing books, you’ll probably find her watching Frasier.
Published in: Journal of the American Revolution - Online
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Monday
July 8, 2019
4b. Neighbors in the news
MOAA scholarships awarded Military Officers Association of America, SENCLAND Chapter recently awarded scholarships to Elvine Katanga, graduate of Northside High School, plans on attending Norwich University, majoring in nursing and Hunter Staines, graduate of Lejeune High School, plans on attending The Citadel, majoring in intelligence/security.
Published in: Jacksonville Daily News - Online
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Monday
July 8, 2019
4c. The Citadel Graduate College: New Student Orientation in Charleston
THE CITADEL GRADUATE COLLEGE: NEW STUDENT ORIENTATION We are so excited to welcome you to The Citadel! Whether you are finishing your bachelor's degree or working on your master's degree, we are here to help every step of the way. Please join us on Wednesday, August 21st from 5:30-8pm to learn more about the Graduate College and many of the resources available to you. We look forward to answering your questions and helping you navigate The Citadel. At this orientation, you will be able to see the campus, meet with key resources, get your Campus ID and parking pass, and answer any remaining questions that you may have!
Published in: Eventful - Online
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Monday
July 8, 2019
5a. Former Vice President Joe Biden calls Charleston area schools ‘Minimally adequate’ in final SC campaign stop

Former Vice President Joe Biden addressed education, gun control and healthcare to a packed crowd at the International Longshoremen’s association hall in Charleston Sunday afternoon. The presidential hopeful spent a large portion of his time calling for education reform and even challenged Charleston area schools. “Your standard for schools is minimally, minimally adequate,” Biden said. Among the crowd was also Damon Fordham, an adjunct professor at the Citadel and Charleston Southern University. With more than two dozen democratic presidential candidates, Fordham says he is an independent who just wants to flush out the candidates.

Published in: WCSC - Live 5 News - Online
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Monday
July 8, 2019
5b. The Real Spirit of the Declaration of Independence
What is America, and what does it represent? These seem to be relevant questions at a time of political discord and disagreement that appears to make peaceful and polite discussion almost impossible. Certainly, asking such questions is appropriate at that time of the year when we celebrate the Declaration of Independence on the Fourth of July. Richard M. Ebeling, an AIER Senior Fellow, is the BB&T Distinguished Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel, in Charleston, South Carolina. Ebeling lived on AIER’s campus from 2008 to 2009.
Published in: The Libertarian Republic - Online
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Monday
July 8, 2019
5b. Want to Really Get to Know Charleston? Explore Its African American History.

From the arrival of the first slave ship through the civil rights era and into the present, Charleston’s black residents have shaped the Holy City’s food culture, art, music, agriculture, faith, and its national reputation. A visit to these landmarks can help create a fuller understanding of the city. The Old Citadel The castle-like building on Marion Square known as the Old Citadel was first constructed in 1829 as the South Carolina State Arsenal because the city’s white populace—outnumbered by enslaved people by nearly 30,000 at the time—were increasingly uneasy about the possibility of a rebellion, especially after the thwarted slave revolt of 1822. The arsenal was converted into a state military academy in 1842. Just a month after South Carolina seceded from the Union in 1860, Citadel cadets fired some of the first shots of the Civil War at Fort Moultrie. After the war, the building was under U.S. federal control until the military academy was reestablished there in 1882. The Citadel Military College moved to its present location on the city’s west side in 1922; the Old Citadel building is now part of an Embassy Suites hotel.

Published in: Afar - Online
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Monday
July 8, 2019
5c. This month in South Carolina History

The Palmetto Regiment of Volunteers from South Carolina suffered heavy losses in the Mexican-American War but was the first regiment to lift its colors over Mexico City in 1847. When it formed in 1846, Pierce Mason Butler was elected Colonel of the regiment. Butler was Governor of the state from 1836 to 1838. The regiment trained at the South Carolina Military Academy (now the Citadel) and left for Mobile, Alabama in December 1846. More training followed in the Canary Islands and the men landed near Vera Cruz in early March 1847. The regiment served throughout the Mexican War, fighting in Vera Cruz, Contreras, Churubusco, Chapultepec, and the Garita de Belen. Colonel Butler and Lieutenant Colonel James Polk Dickinson were mortally wounded at Churubusco on August 20, 1847.

Also covered by the Index-Journal.

Published in: The Gazette - Online
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Monday
July 8, 2019
6. Charles Nelson ‘Boots’ Plowden Jr. -- Columbia
A memorial service for Charles Nelson "Boots" Plowden Jr., 85, will be held at 3 p.m. Wednesday, July 10, 2019, at Eastminster Presbyterian Church. A reception will immediately follow in Thompson Hall. A burial service for family will take place at 10:30 a.m. at Evergreen Cemetery in Summerton. Dunbar Funeral Home, Devine Street Chapel, is assisting the family. Mr. Plowden attended the public schools of Summerton, Darlington School (Rome, Ga.), and The Citadel and graduated from the University of South Carolina with BS and LLB (JD) degrees. He lettered in tennis at Darlington, The Citadel, and USC and was a member of The Citadel's Block C Club and Varsity Club, as well as USC's Association of Letterman. At USC, he was a member of Beaux Arts and Kappa Alpha Order, as well as a squadron commander in the AFROTC. Mr. Plowden was a member of the alumni associations of USC and The Citadel. Memorials may be made to the Society of the Cincinnati of South Carolina, P.O. Box 1041, Charleston, SC 29402; or to St. Mark's Episcopal Church, 6205 Camp Mac Boykin Road, Pinewood, SC 29125-9239.
Published in: The Times and Democrat - Online
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Monday
July 8, 2019
7a. Charleston Battery moving downtown for larger audience, but issues abound with new stadium
When Blackbaud Stadium opened on Daniel Island in the spring of 1999 it was the first soccer-specific stadium in the United States. Over the next two decades the Charleston Battery would build a national brand despite being a second-tier club in American soccer. By the end of the year, Blackbaud Stadium – renamed MUSC Health Stadium in 2015 – will be demolished with townhomes, condominiums and commercial buildings put in its place. One of the biggest issues for attracting more young fans to games was the cost of getting to Daniel Island. Hannah Miner, 21, grew up going to Battery games with her parents. She and her mother have been season ticket holders for the past four years. A rising senior at College of Charleston this fall, Miner said getting to Daniel Island was always a hassle. “It’s a $35 Uber ride,” Miner said. “During the school year, I live downtown, so it would like a $5 Uber ride if they played at Stoney Field or at The Citadel. I could literally walk over there. I think if they move downtown, they’ll get younger fans. There are a lot of College of Charleston students I know that would go to games if they were downtown.” So, where will the Charleston Battery play in 2020? The Citadel’s Johnson Hagood Stadium, which is across the street from Stoney Field, is a longshot option. The club has met with Citadel officials, but a deal doesn’t seem likely.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Monday
July 8, 2019
7b. Wojo’s Way: The long, winding road of an ex-Citadel star’s baseball career
When Asher Wojciechowski strode from the Baltimore Orioles’ dugout to the mound at Tropicana Field last Tuesday night, it marked the 31st time the former Citadel star has pitched in a Major League Baseball game. And yet for his wife and other members of the “Wojo” family in the stadium in St. Petersburg, Florida, it felt like the first time all over again. They met when Asher was at The Citadel (he led the Bulldogs to a Southern Conference title in 2010), and Alanna at the College of Charleston. Alanna’s cousin was dating (and later married) Bulldogs catcher Grant Richards. Said Wojo, “When you turn 30, people think you are getting older. But I feel just as good and just as strong as when I left The Citadel. I have zero plans on stopping.”
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Monday
July 8, 2019
7c. U.S. collegiate national team faces Cuba this week
North Carolina State catcher Patrick Bailey and East Carolina pitcher / first baseman Alec Burleson are participating for the U.S. collegiate national team, which began competition this week. The U.S. team is the host for a five-game international friendship series with Cuba. Game 3 comes at 6 p.m. Thursday at Durham Bulls Athletic Park. Lousiville coach Dan McDonnell is the U.S. team manager. He’s assisted by Mark Kingston of South Carolina, Tony Skole of The Citadel, Greg Moore of Saint Mary’s and Dave Turgeon of the Pittsburgh Pirates. Turgeon was the 2000 manager of the Burlington Indians and an assistant coach in 2006 at Duke.
Published in: The Times-News - Online
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Monday
July 8, 2019
8a. 2019 Coastal Plain League All-Star Showdown preview
All eyes around the Coastal Plain League will be squarely focused on Savannah beginning Sunday evening. The 2019 CPL All-Star Showdown is set to begin at 6 p.m. Sunday at Grayson Stadium as the collegiate wood-bat summer league’s best will be on hand to participate in the CPL’s annual mid-summer classic. All-Star Showdown rosters and pitcher pools RHP-Jordan Merritt-Savannah-The Citadel RHP-Zachary Taglieri-Forest City-The Citadel
Published in: Savannah Morning News - Online
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Monday
July 8, 2019
8b. Mark Kingston talks Team USA experience
On the Fourth of July, people have a lot of different activities they like to partake in from grilling to days on the lake and culminating in fireworks to celebrate America’s independence. Gamecock baseball coach Mark Kingston will be celebrating his country today, just in a more unique way. Kingston will spend it representing his country and coaching baseball as he continues his summer as an assistant with Team USA’s Collegiate National Team. Kingston’s working under Louisville’s Dan McDonnell, a coach who got his start in South Carolina—he played and coached at The Citadel before heading to Ole Miss and taking the Louisville job.
Published in: Rivals - Online
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Monday
July 8, 2019
8c. Nearhood returns to where career began
A little known fact about Willie Nearhood is his coaching career began at Cross High School. Nearhood, just out of The Citadel in the mid-1990s, spent 1996-98 at CHS before beginning what has turned into a hall of fame career at Stratford High School. Nearhood just finished his 20th year on Crowfield Boulevard and is one of just a few wrestling coaches in state history to top the 400-victory mark. He also helped out in football on the sub-varsity level. He admits he probably shocked some people by announcing he was leaving but it’s time for a new challenge. He’s headed back to Cross to essentially build the Trojans’ wrestling program from scratch. Last winter, the Trojans didn’t field a full squad and fizzled out before the season was over.
Published in: The Gazette - Online
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Monday
July 8, 2019
8c. Steven M. Sipple: Motivated by lack of D-I offers, Easley impresses in early NU workouts
Leave nothing to chance. Nebraska freshman sharpshooter Charlie Easley, a preferred walk-on from Lincoln Pius X, believes strongly in that credo. He understands that things won’t always go his way. That’s life. But if you keep working your hardest, he says, you can’t feel too bad about whatever comes down the pike. You also can turn negatives into positives. To wit: Easley, who averaged 23.3 points for the Class B state champions this past season despite playing through foot pain, was offered a scholarship by only one Division I program, The Citadel. He has no clear idea why he received limited D-I recruiting interest. Nobody really gave him a good answer, he says. He strongly considered attending The Citadel. “It was a very tough decision,” he says. “I was pretty close to going there. Eventually, I just figured out the military route wasn’t for me.”
Published in: Journal Star - Online
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Monday
July 8, 2019
9. Florida Gators' beloved cheerleader, 'Mr. Two Bits,' dead at 97
The University of Florida football team's biggest cheerleader died Tuesday. George Edmondson Jr., a Tampa insurance salesman known as "Mr. Two Bits" has died, the Tampa Bay Times reported. He was 97. Edmondson, who never attended the university in Gainesville, was a fixture at Florida football games. He could be seen running through the stands, dressed in a yellow oxford shirt with an orange and blue tie and khaki pants, getting the crowd's attention with a whistle and then leading them in a cheer as he waved his "2-Bits" sign, a practice he began in 1949, the Gainesville Sun reported. The cheer was simple — “Two bits, four bits, six bits, a dollar. All for the Gators, stand up and holler!” Edmondson began the "Two Bits" cheer Sept. 24, 1949, at Florida Field, when the Gators hosted The Citadel. Edmondson, who briefly attended the Citadel, was sitting in Row 83 and said he was upset the fans were booing the Gators, according to the Times. He began the cheer, and the Gators won, 13-0. From then on, Edmondson led the cheer at every game
Published in: WSB - Atlanta, GA - Online
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Wednesday
July 3, 2019
1a. New South Carolina laws go into effect Monday
The S.C. General Assembly passed scores of new laws this year, some of which take effect Monday with the July 1 start of the state’s 2019-20 budget. Here is a rundown of those changes and how they will affect South Carolinians. PAY RAISES FOR STATE EMPLOYEES The state’s 32,000 employees will get at least a 2% pay raise, starting in July. On top of that, workers who earn less than $70,000 a year also will get a one-time $600 bonus. Lawmakers are spending an extra $61 million this year on the raise and one-time bonus in an effort to retain state workers who have complained their low pay leads to high turnover and poor morale. Most state employees haven’t had a raise in two years. SMALLER TUITION HIKES For the first time in years, S.C. lawmakers invested significantly more money in higher education to stave off tuition hikes for students from the Palmetto State. The state will spend $36 million more next year to keep tuition low, plus another $100 million to pay for college construction, maintenance and renovation projects that otherwise could contribute to tuition hikes. That spending becomes official when the budget goes into effect Monday, but it already has made a noticeable impact at S.C. colleges, including: The Citadel, which raised tuition by 0.8% this year after a 3.2% hike last year.
Published in: The State - Online
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Wednesday
July 3, 2019
1b. Tuition increase correction

Yesterday evening, both WIS and WCSC ran a story about tuition increases with an incorrect graphic relating to The Citadel's tuition. WCSC aired the story again at 11 pm, with a correction.

Verbatim:

PUBLIC UNIVERSITIES ACROSS THE STATE ARE RELEASING THEIR BUDGETS FOR THE UPCOMING YEAR. SCHOOLS LIKE CLEMSON, AND WINTHROP ARE KEEPING TUITION HIKES TO A MINIMUM. THEY'RE GETTING FUNDING MONEY IN EXCHANGE FOR DOING SO. SCHOOLS THAT DONT INCREASE THEIR IN- STATE TUITION BY LESS THAN ONE PERCENT WIL GET IT. LAWMAKERS SET ASIDE ABOUT 36 MILLION DOLLARS FOR THIS. THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA IS INCREASING TUITION BY POINT-6 PERCENT. AT THE LAW SCHOOL THERE TUITION IS DECREASING. ROBERT WILCOX/DEAN, SCHOOL OF LAW THE BIG NEWS HERE IS FOR LAW STUDENTS COMING HERE THEY HAVE TO THE POTENTIAL OF BORROWING 15,000 LESS THAN THEY NORMALLY WOULD'VE U-SC OFFICIALS SAY THE SMALL TUITION INCREASE FOR THE ENTIRE UNIVERSITY WILL HELP COVER A PART OF RISING EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT. COSTS. IN A PREVIOUS NEWSCAST, THE WRONG PERCENTAGE WAS LISTED ON A GRAPHIC FOR TUITION INCREASES AT THE CITADEL. THE CORRECT INCREASE IS POINT 8 PERCENT.

Watch the on-air coverage here.

Published in: WCSC - Live 5 News - Broadcast
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Wednesday
July 3, 2019
2. A Lifetime of Service: Ken Byrd Remembered for Faith, Dedication
Large bouquets of red and white flowers and a neatly folded American flag provided a fitting backdrop on Sunday, as the Aberdeen community gathered Sunday to pay tribute to Ken Byrd. Byrd, 66, a Town Commissioner and retired colonel in the U.S. Air Force, died unexpectedly at home on Wednesday, June 26. “This is a celebration of the life of a father, a friend, a fallen soldier, and a man of God,” said Pastor Stoney Locklear, of Turning Point Worship Center. A U.S. Air Force Honor Guard offered military honors during the service while, outside the church doors, Patriot Guard Riders kept a silent vigil. Byrd was the son of a career Air Force officer and graduate of The Citadel in Charleston. Upon graduation, he was commissioned a Second Lieutenant in the United States Air Force, initially in the Air Force Reserve and then on active duty. Following his military retirement, Byrd worked in the private sector as a consultant and settled in Aberdeen, his wife’s hometown. In addition to volunteer work with The Citadel’s Alumni Association, serving as a district director, Byrd was also involved in local politics and community interests.
Published in: The Pilot - Online
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Wednesday
July 3, 2019
3. Ultimate Charleston Fourth of July 2019 roundup: From golf cart parades (duh) to glitter beer to rockin' yoga
Hello, patriotic music. Make your way to the Thomas Dry Howie Carillon at the Citadel on July 3 and 4 for a program featuring folk songs, Revolutionary War-era tunes, American hymns, and more. The performances take place at 12:30 p.m. on Wednesday and 5:30 p.m. on Thursday.
Published in: Charleston City Paper - Online
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Wednesday
July 3, 2019
4. Marine Mike Corrado: It’s an ‘honor’ to ‘play for the home team’
This year’s Fourth of July Celebration at Camp Lejeune will feature a special musical performance by singer-songwriter Marine Col. Mike Corrado. The special event will only be open to Department of Defense identification cardholders and their guests, unlike previous years when the celebration has been open to the public. Camp Lejeune looked at ways to cut costs overall this year due to needing $3.4 billion for repairs and reconstruction following damages from Hurricane Florence in September, The Daily News reported. Though the July 4 celebration aboard Camp Lejeune has previously hosted national acts such as LL Cool J and Kelly Pickler, this year’s show was designed to be more personal, according to Event Coordinator Patsy Schneider. Corrado has been playing music his entire life. He grew up playing drums and percussion but switched to guitar while attending college at The Citadel. He served in the Marines for five years and was stationed at Camp Lejeune when he entered inactive ready reserve.
Published in: JD News - Online
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Wednesday
July 3, 2019
5. College news

Alexander Johnson of Waldorf graduated from The Citadel in Charleston, S.C. and accepted a commission in the U.S. Army during a ceremony held May 3.

Published in: Maryland Independent - Online
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Wednesday
July 3, 2019
6. Forty-seven Students Receive Scholarships From Building Industry Charitable Foundation

Over the past nineteen years, the Building Industry Charitable Foundation has awarded $579,250 in scholarships to children of Association members and other students who meet criteria set for the program. This month, the Building Industry Charitable Foundation will award an additional $57,000 to students. The scholarship program is funded by annual events, including the BIA Golf Classic presented by 84 Lumber and through private contributions to the Foundation.

Congratulations to our 2019 Scholarship Recipients:

Jacob Harding, The Citadel

Dylan Meetze, The Citadel

Luke Meetze, The Citadel

Benjamin Nicholson, The Citadel

Matthew Rush, The Citadel

Published in: Soda City Biz Wire - Online
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Wednesday
July 3, 2019
7. The Real Spirit of the Declaration of Independence
What is America, and what does it represent? These seem to be relevant questions at a time of political discord and disagreement that appears to make peaceful and polite discussion almost impossible. Certainly, asking such questions is appropriate at that time of the year when we celebrate the Declaration of Independence on the Fourth of July. Everyone in the political arena assures us that they represent and wish to preserve or purify “American values” and “the American way of life.” President Trump insists that he speaks for American values in wanting to make America great again, or now with the start of his reelection campaign, his desire for a chance to “keep America great,” under the presumption that his first years in the White House have successfully restored that which had been lost. That’s what tariff walls and real walls along the border are all about — or so insists Donald Trump. After the first round of two nights of the Democratic Party wannabees trying to prove why they should be their party’s standard-bearer in the 2020 presidential election, it is clear that all of them, also, want to maintain or refine “American values” for, as they see it, a more socially just society. Each one made it unequivocally clear that they consider freedom essential to the American way of life; how else can you interpret their respective promises to make so many welfare and redistributive programs totally “free” for the unlimited taking by all who want something — at someone else’s expense, of course. “Freedom” for them means something for nothing for the many.
Published in: American Institute for Economic Research - Online
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Wednesday
July 3, 2019
8. NFL star André Roberts heads Citadel Hall of Fame Class

NFL star André Roberts, baseball standout Terrence Smalls and women’s soccer player Mariana Garcia head The Citadel’s Athletics Hall of Fame class for 2019. Football standout James Lee and honorary inductee Wade St. John round out the five-member class. The Hall of Fame banquet is set for Sept. 20 at the Charleston Marriott. Roberts (class of 2010) was a two-time All-American wide receiver at The Citadel before being selected by the Arizona Cardinals in the third round of the 2010 NFL draft. He also played for the Redskins, Lions, Falcons and Jets before signing with Buffalo in the offseason. Last year, he became the second Citadel player to be selected to the Pro Bowl and was first-team All-Pro as a kick returner.

Other examples of coverage include:

WCSC - Live 5 News

Moultrie News

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Tuesday
July 2, 2019
1. From the Ashley River to the Thames, Citadel grad accepted into Oxford master’s program
When it comes to learning more about global governments, a good place to start is overseas. That’s exactly what a recent graduate of The Citadel, Gilbert Fenters, ’19, decided to do. Fenters has been accepted into Oxford’s Master of Science in Global Governance and Diplomacy, a nine-month program that investigates a range of policy issues surrounding international institutions and processes. It’s a highly competitive program, with an acceptance rate at around 20%. “The University has established itself as the best in the world and enjoys a reputation of educating people who go on to do extraordinary things in a broad spectrum of fields,” said Fenters. “Some of my favorite writers, particularly C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien, studied and worked at Oxford. I visited last summer and got to see the ‘dreaming spires’ firsthand. After that, I was hooked.” Fenters graduated this May, with a degree in Business Administration through the Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business. He says he choose business because of the opportunities it provides, as well as the practical, real-life information that is provided through the department.
Published in: The Citadel Today - Online
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Tuesday
July 2, 2019
2. Morris Robinson tackles ‘Porgy’ on his own terms
Growing up into a muscular, African-American man in the American South, Morris Robinson knew about being pigeonholed into a role. “I used that to my advantage,” he recalled. “Where I come from, playing football was the way you got respect.” Although he sang in choirs, attended a performing arts high school and played drums, he made his way onto the field and made a name for himself. At The Citadel, he was an All-American, but he was too small for the pros and began a corporate career. Encouraged by friends and family, he finally committed to serious vocal training and his opera career began when he was cast in “Aida” in 1999. He quickly learned from other African-American singers to avoid one role for a while if he didn’t want to be pigeonholed. “Porgy,” he said, referring to the title role of the landmark “Porgy and Bess” by George and Ira Gershwin. The composer had stipulated the 1935 piece must always have a black cast and Robinson knew if he sang it too soon, it might be the only role he was ever offered. “I may have come to opera late, but I met people right away who became my mentors and let me know to stay away from that role,” he said.
Published in: Movers & Makers Cincinnati - Online
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Tuesday
July 2, 2019
2. New Top Brass Take Over Reins At Branford Police Department
With the recent resignation of Police Chief Kevin Halloran (who resigned to become North Branford Police Chief) and the promotion of Deputy Chief John Mulhern to Branford's top cop several other higher level jobs in the department needed to be filled. The Branford Board of Police Commissioners and Chief Jonathan Mulhern recently announced the recent promotion of several Branford Officers. Captain John Finkle was promoted from Detective Lieutenant and will now serve as the Patrol Division Commander. Finkle is a 20-year veteran of the department. Captain Finkle holds a Master's Degree in Forensic Science and a bachelor's degree from the Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina. He is a 2016 graduate from the Senior Management Institute for Policing (SMIP). He also earned the rank of Lieutenant Colonel to Colonel in the US Army Reserve.
Published in: Patch - Connecticut - Online
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Tuesday
July 2, 2019
3. Paterson’s prestigious International Baccalaureate program graduates 40 students in its first class
A group of forty students became the first graduating class of the International Baccalaureate program at International High School on Wednesday evening. Students received a world-class education — taking high-level courses like physics, theory of knowledge, a course that requires students to turn in a 1,600-word essay, and Mandarin, one of two main Chinese languages — through the Swiss developed academic program. Students from the IB program are heading to big-name schools — University of Pennsylvania, Columbia University, Virginia Military Institute, The Citadel, University of Pittsburgh, Stevens Institute of Technology, Lehigh University, American University, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and the New Jersey Institute of Technology — in the fall. Collectively the 40 students secured $2 million in scholarships.
Published in: Paterson Times - Online
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Tuesday
July 2, 2019
4. F.A. Hayek on Individual Liberty
The rebirth of a belief in and an enthusiasm for socialism and government planning among a noticeable number of academics, intellectuals, young people, and elected officials raises many of the fundamental issues surrounding freedom and command, market competition and political control. Once more, a call is heard for doing away with free enterprise, this time in the name of a Green New Deal. The case is being made, again, that humankind must take the future of society into their own hands and remake it into forms and directions that are more rational and just than what results when “capitalism” runs unrestrained over the societal terrain in the pursuit of personal profit rather than goals advancing the common good and the general welfare. Social justice, it is said, requires doing away with the income inequalities that emerge from the free play of supply and demand, because free-market–based results are all meant to distribute the most wealth into the hands of a few at the expense of the many. The “purpose” of the capitalist system is to exploit workers, minorities, and other victimized groups so the rich can be, well, rich. The most frustrating elements in all this for the friend of freedom is how much of it has all been heard before, over and over again, during the last two hundred years. There is little in the latest versions of these statements that was not said in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The only new aspect is the attempt to couch demands on government control in an hysteria that insists that not implementing them means the end of life on Earth as we know it, because of human-caused pollution in the atmosphere. In the past, Marxists would declare that the workers of the world should unite because they had nothing to lose but their chains. Now the cry is for humanity to unite behind central planning because we face the danger of global warming.
Published in: The Future of Freedom Foundation - Online
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Tuesday
July 2, 2019
5. This week in S.C. history: On July 27, 1848, Palmetto Regiment was celebrated
The Palmetto Regiment of Volunteers from South Carolina suffered heavy losses in the Mexican-American War but was the first regiment to lift its colors over Mexico City in 1847. When it formed in 1846, Pierce Mason Butler was elected colonel of the regiment. Butler was governor of the state from 1836 to 1838. The regiment trained at the South Carolina Military Academy (now The Citadel) and left for Mobile, Alabama, in December 1846. More training followed in the Canary Islands, and the men landed near Vera Cruz in early March 1847. The regiment served throughout the Mexican War, fighting in Vera Cruz, Contreras, Churubusco, Chapultepec and the Garita de Belen. Col. Butler and Lt. Col. James Polk Dickinson were mortally wounded at Churubusco on Aug. 20, 1847. The Palmetto Regiment was the first to enter the Garita de Belen, which was a main entrance into Mexico City. On Sept. 13, 1847, the regiment's flag was the first of the American colors to be raised over Mexico City. The flag was made of blue silk with the South Carolina Coat of Arms on one side and the United States Arms and a palmetto tree on the reverse. It bore the motto "Not for ourselves we conquer, but our country." After several months of garrison duty, the Palmetto Regiment returned to Mobile in June of 1848. Of the 1,048 men who enlisted with the regiment, 441 did not return home.
Published in: The Sumter Item - Online
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Tuesday
July 2, 2019
6. Verda L. Helms
Verda Lewis Helms, died at her home in Seven Lakes, West End, Sunday, June 23, 2019, at 88 years of age. Verda was the daughter of the late Norman and Verda (Stewart) Lewis, formerly of Lillington. She is survived by her husband, Robert F. Helms; and three children, two sons, Michael Lewis and wife, Pam, of Hendersonville, and Timothy Frederick Helms and wife, Karen, of Carthage; daughter Paula Lynette Helms Womack and husband, Fred, of Pinehurst. Private services will be held at a later date and unspecified location. All remembrances of Verda should be donated to a charity or church of your faith, or to The Citadel Foundation, 171 Moultre St., Charleston, SC 29409. Services entrusted to Fry & Prickett Funeral Home.
Published in: The Pilot - Online
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Tuesday
July 2, 2019
7. Citadel announces start times

Verbatim: THE CITADEL ANNOUNCING START TIMES FOR THEIR 6 HOME GAMES EARLIER THIS MORNING, THE SEASON OPENER SET TO BE A BIG ONE BETWEEN 2 POTENTIAL TOP 25 TEAMS IN THE FCS WHEN THE DOGS HOST TOWSON, THAT GAME WILL BE AT 3PM ON AUGUST 31ST, THE ONLY NIGHT GAME OF THE YEAR WILL COME IN THE CHUCKTOWN THROWDOWN WHEN THE CITADEL AND CHARLESTON SOUTHERN MEET UP WITH A 6PM KICKOFF ON SEPTEMBER 21ST, ALL 3 OF THEIR HOME. GAMES IN OCTOBER WILL BE 2PM KICKOFFS, THE BATTLE FOR THE SILVER SHAKO AGAINST VMI ON THE 5TH, WESTERN CAROLINA ON THE 12TH AND MERCER ON THE 26TH FOR HOMECOMING, THE REGULAR SEASON ENDS AGAINST THEIR RIVALS FROM WOFFORD ON NOVEMBER 23RD FOR SENIOR DAY WITH A NOON START.

Watch the on-air coverage here.

Also covered by The Citadel Sports.

Published in: WCSC - Live 5 News - Broadcast
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Tuesday
July 2, 2019
8. Funky delivery: Barbee refines sidearm motion with the Wilmington Sharks
The sophomore reliever from The Citadel offers a unique throwing style Hunter Barbee swept the dirt off the mound, toed the rubber and tossed a warmup pitch over home plate. The right-hander was about to make his first appearance with the Wilmington Sharks in a preseason exhibition against the Wilmington Post 10 Legion team, a group made up mostly of high school kids, and the crowd at Buck Hardee Field couldn’t help but watch. “Why does he throw like that?” a young fan sitting behind home plate asked her father. Barbee, a sophomore right-hander from The Citadel, throws the ball with an unusual twist. He’s a sidearm reliever — a rare breed in baseball — and his unique throwing style begs people to watch. The throwing motion has worked for Barbee for the last 10 years. He started throwing with a lower arm slot in middle school after he saw Craig Kimbrel, then an all-star closer for the Atlanta Braves, fool hitters with his unique pitching motion. Barbee’s sidearm success landed him a spot on The Citadel as a walk-on his freshman year. He’s pitched sparingly with the Bulldogs and has a 3.38 ERA through 18 2/3 innings, but regardless of how he performs on the mound, he knows he’ll always be a sidearm pitcher. Barbee last attempted to pitch overhand in a practice game with The Citadel last fall, and it did not go well.
Published in: Go Upstate - Online
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Monday
July 1, 2019
1a. Sarah Zorn, Class of 2019, speaks at national JLAB competition

As seen in Defense Visual Information Distribution Service

It was a weekend of leadership, mentorship and learning June 21-25 during the JROTC Leadership and Academic Bowl at Catholic University of America. Cadets from across the globe and all services came together for the annual competition. During the weekend, the top three percent of teams of cadets competed in academic and leadership competitions and were treated to the advice from multiple guest speakers. Cadets also had the opportunity to visit local historic sites to learn about Washington’s history. During the welcome ceremony June 21, 2nd Lt. Sarah Zorn, the first woman in the 175-year history of the Citadel to serve as regimental commander, spoke to cadets and shared some inspirational moments from her past. “My journey started much like yours. I was in junior ROTC in high school. This opportunity was given to me through adversity. After my mother passed, I chose a different life in South Carolina,” she shared. “I changed my life, which changed my attitude, and changed my attitude which changed my life. Sometimes the only thing between you and what you want are air and opportunity. Sometimes, even through your greatest challenges life gives you your best opportunities.” She said a major figure in her past was her JROTC instructor.

Published in: The Citadel Today - Online
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Monday
July 1, 2019
1b. Citadel’s chaplain stays busy during summer furlough
The South Carolina Corps of Cadets may be gone for the summer, but there are still plenty of people busy with their work at The Citadel. That includes the spiritual work, and community service, of Chaplain Joe Molina, the chaplain to the Corps of Cadets and the director of religious activities. Molina is spending his time preparing to lead over 60 different ministry chaplains and coordinators, who represent more than 15 diverse religious groups. The team works together during the school year maintaining a strong religious foundation for the cadets’ ethical and moral formation, an important role in the production of principled leaders. Additionally, the chapel staff consists of six members, including Molina, who are all actively engaged in the planning and preparations for the upcoming school year. Among their many activities, the staff are responsible for pastoral care and coordinating management of the Columbarium.
Published in: The Citadel Today - Online
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Monday
July 1, 2019
1c. The Citadel and CCSD partner to assist teachers with degrees
The initiative to give Colleton County teachers an easier path to graduate degrees will be expanded next school year. The Zucker Family School of Education at The Citadel is making it easier for teachers in rural counties to earn their master of education degrees. The most recent example is a partnership between The Citadel Graduate College and Colleton County School District. The two institutions are providing up to 20 Colleton County teachers the opportunity to earn master of education (M.Ed.) in literacy education degrees at a lower cost and closer to where they work and live. This is will be the second time The Citadel and Colleton County School District have cooperated to advance literacy education. Eight Colleton teachers graduated from The Citadel Graduate College with M.Ed.’s in literacy education in May. It worked so well, the program is being renewed with the hope of enrolling even more teachers. The 2019 Colleton-Citadel Literacy Cohort graduates were Sally Burgis, Kawaii Elliott, Julie Hiott, Michelle Phillips, Carey Polk, Jessica Reid, Taylor Rentz and Brittney Williams. In addition to earning their M.Ed. in literacy education, they received graduate certificates in literacy education and have met coursework requirements to receive the South Carolina Read to Succeed Literacy Teacher and Literacy Coach teaching endorsements.
Published in: Walterboro Live - Online
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Monday
July 1, 2019
2a. One year after Charleston apologized for slavery, a broader conversation has begun
A year after Charleston City Council narrowly voted to apologize for the city’s role in slavery and the slave trade, members still disagree about whether it was a necessary move. Meanwhile, Mayor John Tecklenburg said the city continues to look at its next steps, which include a new hire announced Thursday: Lawyer and Charleston native Amber Johnson will lead the city’s new office of Diversity, Racial Reconciliation and Tolerance. The resolution recognized that in its early history, the city benefited from slavery as a port city; it also administered punishment to enslaved blacks bolstered by city ordinances. Meanwhile, colleges and universities are examining their own roles in slavery. The College of Charleston and The Citadel are among five South Carolina universities — and 40 nationwide — in the Universities Studying Slavery Consortium. At The Citadel, Dr. Felice Knight is researching its past and is expected to present her findings next year, spokesman Col. John Dorrian said. The school already has edited its “Guidon,” a book for incoming freshmen, to more accurately reflect the Citadel’s history. “We have found that the institution did hold a number of slaves and that there were members of the institution that were part of the slave-owning class at that time,” Dorrian said. “There is certainly evidence that slaves were held by members of the institution itself. ... What we want to do is we want to learn from the past and acknowledge it, teach it, understand it so we can all move forward.” In 2017, The Citadel won a $30,000 grant to begin its AAC&U Truth, Racial Healing, and Transformation Center. The school also is taking part in the National Coalition Building Institution, which provides training on issues of race and navigating difficult conversations, fostering empathy and understanding.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Monday
July 1, 2019
2b. The fight goes on to preserve, explain SC’s role in the Revolutionary and Civil wars

Many historians have felt that South Carolina’s role in the Civil War — the cradle of secession where the Confederacy fired the first shots — worked to obscure its significant role in the Revolutionary War, said historian Eric Emerson, director of the S.C. Department of Archives and History. Millions of people have driven through one of South Carolina’s final Civil War battlefields with no clue they were doing it. Of course, the battle of Tullifiny Crossroads in Jasper County is not marked from Interstate 95, despite its standing as the only battle fought by The Citadel’s full Corps of Cadets, as well as a rare engagement when the infantry, naval officers and marines fought together. Citadel history professor Kyle Sinisi said Tullifiny Crossroads was the battle where Citadel cadets fought and suffered casualties, unlike the corps’ far more celebrated role in firing on the Union supply ship Star of the West at the dawn of the Civil War. “It doesn’t factor enough into The Citadel’s history or at least The Citadel’s sense of its history,” Sinisi said. “It’s not that Tullifiny doesn’t have a presence (a mural in Daniel Library depicts the battle) or that there are cadets or alumni who don’t know about it. It’s just the focus tends to be on the Star of the West, and that’s a terrible shame because somebody was killed and a bunch of guys were wounded at Tullifiny.” Bostick said the key to raising awareness of and interest in these battles is promoting the stories that unfolded there, such as the impression Citadel cadets made on a Confederate sergeant from Georgia, who wrote in his memoirs, “Those Charleston people are the damned politest people I’ve ever been around in my life. (Because the cadets always were asking permission to fire).”

The Post and Courier also publishing a similar article, 22 SC sites where the fighting was fiercest in the Revolutionary and Civil wars

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Monday
July 1, 2019
2c. Connellsville played major role leading to French and Indian War
Connellsville was the front line for imperial strife in the mid-18th century, as Dr. David Preston illustrated in a lecture Friday evening at the Connellsville Canteen. Preston, the author of “Braddock’s Defeat, The Battle of the Monogahela on the Road to Revolution,” is also a Westvaco Professor of National Security Studies at The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina.
Published in: Daily Courier - Online
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Monday
July 1, 2019
3. College news
Two local students were among 528 members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets who received diplomas during The Citadel’s commencement ceremony May 4 in Charleston, S.C. Local graduates include: Alexander Johnson of Waldorf; political science. Evan Aragon of Mechanicsville; history.
Published in: Maryland Independent - Online
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Monday
July 1, 2019
3. Teacher Honor Roll / Education Notebook
Lucas Beal of New Haven accepted an Army commission and participated in a commissioning ceremony at The Citadel in South Carolina.
Published in: Journal Gazette - Online
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Monday
July 1, 2019
4. New leadership at 3 Dist. 50 elementary schools
Greenwood County School District 50 will have at least three new principals leading the district’s elementary schools in the 2019-20 school year. On Wednesday, the district announced Christine Rogers and Leroy Platt as the principals of Mathews and Pinecrest elementary schools, respectively. Rogers was assistant principal at Hodges Elementary in 2018-19. Previously, she was an assistant principal, director of school counseling, counselor and career development facilitator at Hannah Middle School in Berkeley County School District. She earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration and accounting from Charleston Southern University and her masters of education in school counseling from The Citadel.
Published in: Index-Journal - Online
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Monday
July 1, 2019
4. Wiser assumes command at Henderson Hall
Headquarters and Service Battalion, Headquarters Marine Corps Henderson Hall has a new commander. U.S. Marine Col. Robert Wiser assumed command from Col. Keith Couch Friday during the transfer of colors inside Smith Gymnasium. Wiser is a graduate of The Citadel and was commissioned in December 1994 through the Officer Candidate Class Program. He deployed to Afghanistan in June 2006 where he served as the transportation officer in the CJ-4.
Published in: Pentagram - Online
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Monday
July 1, 2019
5. Commentary: Charleston Neck is livable thanks to one man’s anti-pollution fight
The Magnolia project in the Charleston Neck is underway again, and the vast Laurel Island landfill is teed up for a matrix of development possibilities. It always was just a matter of time. A 2008 comprehensive regional study by urbanists Neil Peirce and Curtis Johnson described the Neck as a “rare opportunity to handle inevitable growth without sprawl.” Get its redevelopment right, the consultants said, and many other regional development upgrades will evolve. But there’s history in this futurescape that offers instructional perspectives about the viability of the Neck — and living and dying on what we now consider a promised land. Most of us have never heard of Cecil Franklin Jacobs, the brash and politically fearless hero in this tale. Let us celebrate his service and leadership anew. In 1942, Jacobs went directly from his Wacona, Georgia, high school graduation to World War II combat in both the European and Pacific theaters. He earned a Bronze Star for valor and a Purple Heart. Post-war, he graduated from The Citadel, earned his medical degree at the Medical College of Georgia and a master’s in public health at the University of North Carolina.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Monday
July 1, 2019
5. Fifty years ago, Life magazine stunned the country with photos of 217 men. All had died during one week in Vietnam.

In its famous issue of June 27, 1969 — 50 years ago this week — Life presented Americans with the faces of their dead. It was “a span of no special significance,” the magazine wrote, and “the numbers of the dead are average for . . . this stage of the war.” It was a stunning illustration of the toll the war was taking, and became a classic of wartime journalism. This was not a snapshot of a fallen soldier here and there, or a few paragraphs in the local newspaper. (Gearing got seven paragraphs inside the Rochester Democrat and Chronicle.) Here were scores and scores of faces in one grim “yearbook” of the killed in action. Many of the pictures were precious family photos taken before military service. They showed high school boys in coats and ties, young men in crew cuts and dark-rimmed glasses, and teenagers in graduation caps and gowns. Often, soldiers were pictured who had been killed together. Lt. Col. Robert H. Carter, 35, commander of a battalion, was killed by sniper fire during a fierce battle in Kontum on May 27, 1969. He had helicoptered to the fight and was cut down as he tried to return to the chopper. A graduate of The Citadel who earlier had been awarded the Silver Star for bravery, he uttered “killed in combat,” to a soldier who reached him as he died.

Published in: Washington Post - Online
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Monday
July 1, 2019
6a. Remembering Ken Byrd, Class of 1974
Aberdeen Town Commissioner Ken Byrd, 66, died unexpectedly at home on Wednesday, June 26. “It was with shock and sadness that I received the news from our town manager of sudden passing of Commissioner Ken Byrd,” said Aberdeen Mayor Robbie Farrell. “We had just sat together at a board meeting on Monday night and there was no indication of any health issues he might have had,” he added. “His wealth of experience as a career officer in the United States Air Force brought a lot of ideas and insights to the Aberdeen Town Board, and he was passionate about many things concerning Aberdeen and Moore County.” The son of a career Air Force officer, Byrd graduated from Cocoa Beach High School in Florida, near Cape Canaveral. He attended The Citadel in Charleston, Class of 1974, and had continued a close association with the college throughout his life. He was a volunteer director for The Citadel’s Alumni Association, overseeing activities in the Eastern North Carolina area. “I can’t say enough about how involved he was with our Alumni Association,” said Tom McAlister, The Citadel’s Alumni Association executive director and associate vice president of Alumni Affairs.
Published in: The Citadel Today - Online
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Monday
July 1, 2019
6b. 'Augie' Miceli, longtime Calvert Hall football coach and math teacher, dies
Augustine “Augie” Miceli Sr., the longest-tenured faculty member at Calvert Hall College High School, who taught thousands of students in a 60-year career as math teacher and football coach, died Saturday of acute myeloid leukemia at the Gilchrist Center hospice in Towson. He was 86 years old. Mr. Miceli, the gregarious son of Italian immigrants, channeled the academic struggles he experienced in high school into his approach to teaching, arriving before school and staying afterward to provide extra guidance to students who needed it, said his son, Augie Miceli Jr., 55, of Towson. An Army veteran, Mr. Miceli attended The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina, and served two years in Berlin during 1950s. He married his wife, Angela, and bought a house in Parkville, where the couple raised three children. The family vacationed every summer to Ocean City, where the Micelis had purchased four apartment units, staying in one while renting out, cleaning and maintaining the other three.
Published in: Baltimore Sun - Online
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Monday
July 1, 2019
7a. Citadel basketball adds transfer point guard
Last year, point guard Lew Stallworth transferred to The Citadel and capped off a journeyman college basketball career with an All-Southern Conference season. Central Connecticut State point guard Tyson Batiste will try to make a similar leap next season with the Bulldogs. Citadel coach Duggar Baucom announced Friday that Batiste, a 6-2, 185-pounder, will join the Bulldogs as a graduate-student transfer for the 2019-20 season. Batiste played in 83 NCAA Division I games, including 52 starts, during his three years at CCSU. He put up a 1.50 assist-to-turnover ratio and averaged 3.9 points, 2.6 rebounds and 2.5 assists per contest in 23.5 minutes per outing. He shot 42.9 percent from the field and 37.7 percent from beyond the 3-point arc. “We are really excited to have Tyson join the Bulldog basketball family,” Baucom said. “Tyson brings both size and experience to a very talented, but young, backcourt.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Monday
July 1, 2019
7b. Tennis column: St. George becoming a real tennis town
Tennis hasn’t just been revived in St. George. It’s alive and better than well. From a broken down, over-grown dilapidated two-court facility a decade ago, St. George tennis has blossomed into a scenic complex all of its own, thanks to the hard work of many and especially New York City transplant Barbara Jones. Today, Jones and St. George tennis delight in their Junior Team Tennis as well as the impact their program has had on tennis and kids at nearby Woodland High School, not to overlook the facility’s team entries in the adult Lowcountry Tennis Association. St. George Junior Team Tennis even has three of its graduates on the rosters of college tennis teams. Courtney Simmons is at Virginia Wesleyan University, Tromaine Cobbs is at The Citadel and Tyree Miller is at South Carolina State. “They began lessons with us in their fifth and six grades,” said Jones, the executive director of the St. George Youth Sports League.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Monday
July 1, 2019
8. Skole to serve as assistant for Collegiate National Team
The Citadel head baseball coach Tony Skole has been named an assistant coach for the 2019 Collegiate National Team, announced by the organization on Friday. The team will have a Citadel feel as former Bulldog standout, assistant coach and current Louisville head coach, Dan McDonnell will serve as the head coach. Additionally, former Bulldog player, assistant coach and current Mississippi State head coach, Chris Lemonis will serve as a taskforce member. The remainder of the coaching staff includes South Carolina head coach Mark Kingston, St. Mary’s head coach Greg Moore and the Pittsburgh Pirates’ coordinator of instruction Dave Turgeon.
Published in: Moultrie News - Online
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Monday
July 1, 2019
9. 1 thing to remember from every game in the 2019 College World Series
It was One Shining Moment for Vanderbilt Wednesday night. Oops ... wrong round ball. But song or not, the evening was glittering enough for the Commodores, and college baseball in general. One more time, June in Omaha meant high drama, players to remember and moments to savor. Here’s one for all 15 games. Louisville 4, Mississippi State 3: The Citadel Bowl. Louisville coach Dan McDonnell and Mississippi State coach Chris Lemonis were teammates and roommates at The Citadel in the 1990s, and so close as buddies, they were in each other’s weddings. When chance tossed them in the same College World Series game, they both wanted badly to win, without the other having to suffer much. But, oh, how Lemonis felt the pain. A Mississippi State team that had become renowned for its rallying ways — with a nation’s leading 28 come-from-behind victories — saw the other side of baseball fortune. The Bulldogs let a 3-0 lead get away with two Cardinal runs in the seventh and two more in the ninth. Then they shook hands and patted each other’s backs.
Published in: NCAA - Online
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