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About Today's News Clips
"Today's News Clips" is published into your e-mail box on normal Citadel business days, and contains links to recent news about The Citadel, the state of South Carolina, and other topics of interest to professionals working at institutes of higher education.
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The Citadel in the News: Archive

May 2019

PUBLISH DATE STORIES
Thursday
May 30, 2019
1. The Lowdown - Plastics Research

96.3 interviews Citadel professor John Weinstein, Ph.D., about his plastic research.

Listen to the radio segment here.

Published in: 96.3 Ohm Radio - Online / Radio
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Thursday
May 30, 2019
2. Admitted child molester with Citadel ties Skip ReVille denied access to rehab program

Louis “Skip” ReVille, who pleaded guilty in 2012 to molesting nearly two dozen boys in the tri-county area over the span of a decade, will not be permitted to enter into a rehabilitation program for sexually violent predators before his 50-year sentence wraps, a judge ruled Wednesday. Circuit Judge Markley Dennis, who also handed down ReVille’s prison sentence in June 2012, denied Thompson’s motion, adding that he hopes ReVille can receive proper treatment after he serves his sentence. “I don’t know that, in my career, I’ve seen a more egregious case of criminal sexual conduct,” he said. ReVille is a former area youth sports coach, teacher, Bible group leader and foster parent with ties to The Citadel, where he also attended school, and Pinewood Preparatory School.

Other examples of coverage include:

WCSC - Live 5 News

WCBD - Channel 2

WCIV - ABC News 4

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Thursday
May 30, 2019
3. The Fount - School of Humanities & Social Sciences

As I write, it is Memorial Day Weekend-our special time to honor those who have sacrificed to defend our liberties and to rededicate ourselves to continuing their work to expand the boundaries of freedom for all. Those are themes that link many of the activities about which you'll read in this edition of the newsletter. They include the honor of attending--as the representative of our large number students, faculty, and alumni engaged in national security studies--the recent Joint Session of Congress at which NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg spoke in celebration of the 70th anniversary of the remarkable alliance that From left to right, Dean Bo Moore, Rwandan Defense attache Lt. Gen. safeguarded democratic values through the Cold Vincent Nyakarundi and former DOD African specialist, Rick Orth. War and beyond. They also include the opening of conversations to develop educational partnerships with counterparts in Rwanda which has emerged from its troubled recent past to become one of the most thriving republics on the African continent-and which celebrates July 4 as its Liberation Day. But, as always, most impressive are the individual efforts of our students and the faculty who mentor them to become the broadly educated, optimistic, and dedicated young men and women who represent the best of our heritage and lead it onto the new frontiers of the 21st Century. That, I think, is cause for additional celebration as we mark the unofficial start of summer.

Winfred B. Moore, Jr., PhD Colonel, SCM Dean of Humanities & Social Sciences

View the entire Spring 2019 issue here.

Published in: The Citadel School of Humanities & Social Sciences - Online
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Thursday
May 30, 2019
4. Asian American Pacific Islander Heritage Month: 10 Questions for Rodrigo (Rod) Rimando

May is Asian American Pacific Islander Heritage Month! To celebrate, we’re highlighting a few of the people at the Energy Department who are helping to change the world. Rodrigo (Rod) Rimando is a Senior Site/Field Liaison in the Office of Environmental Management. He's shown here at the Energy Department's museum.

7. What are some interesting hobbies or talents that most people may not know about you? I studied Shōrin-ryū (Okinawan martial art) and Arnis (aka, Eskrima – a Filipino martial art) as well as wrestled in high school. I played the trombone as a cadet in the Regimental Band at The Citadel, Military College of South Carolina. Over time, I gave up my nunchakus and escrima sticks for skewers and chop sticks and I gave up my brass instrument for stainless steel cooking utensils. Armed with the secrets of Filipino cuisine from my mother and having “worked” for my father who is a chef, the very early years of my employment were spent in restaurant kitchens. I have the physique to prove it.

Published in: energy.gov - Online
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Thursday
May 30, 2019
5. Charleston Battery’s home field is sold, redevelopment to start after the season
The longtime home field of the Charleston Battery has been sold and will be redeveloped after the professional soccer team closes out its 2019 season on Daniel Island. An affiliate of Atlanta-based Holder Properties Inc. purchased MUSC Health Stadium for $6.475 million on Friday, six weeks after buying the neighboring former Blackbaud Inc. headquarters building for $35.5 million. The latest deal kicks off a minimum six-month master planning process for the newly acquired 11-acre site, CEO John Holder said Wednesday. The Battery hasn’t finalized a location for a new home field, but it’s been in talks to return to its original 1993 venue next year: Stoney Field near The Citadel on the Charleston peninsula.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Thursday
May 30, 2019
6. Dorchester Academy’s Myers to take over John Paul II football program
John Paul II filled its football coaching vacancy this week. Dorchester Academy’s Chris Myers has been named the Warriors’ new coach. He replaces Kevin Wald, who left last month to take the job at Olympic Heights Community High School in Boca Raton, Florida. Myers has spent 11 years at Dorchester Academy, the last six as head coach. Dorchester went 3-7 this year but had back-to-back six win seasons in 2017-18. Myers was part of Dorchester state championship teams in 2001 and 2003 and played in college at The Citadel. He also was Dorchester’s athletic director since 2017. John Paul II is in its fourth year of 11-man football. After going 0-10 the first year, the Warriors went 13-10 the next two years and advanced to the school’s first SCISA 2A title game this year before losing to Florence Christian.
Published in: Island Packet - Online
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Thursday
May 30, 2019
7. 5 things to know about Lexington County Blowfish and 2019 season
Opening night for the 2019 Lexington County Blowfish season is 7:05 p.m. Thursday against the Forest City Owls at Lexington County Baseball Stadium. Here are five things to know about the team: 1. BLOWFISH BACKGROUND The Blowfish are a summer collegiate baseball team in the Coastal Plain League. The team was founded in 2006 in Columbia and played at Capital City Stadium from 2006-2014. The team is known as the “Blowfish” in honor of the Columbia-born band Hootie & the Blowfish. BLOWFISH 2019 ROSTER 5 Tyler Corbitt (The Citadel) INF 25 Shane Connolly (The Citadel) LHP 32 Will Abbott (The Citadel) RHP
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Wednesday
May 29, 2019
1. ‘Extreme heat’ led to Sullivan’s Island bridge closure on Memorial Day, officials say

The sudden closure of the Ben Sawyer Bridge on Monday — caused by “extreme heat” that expanded its steel structure to where it became stuck partially open — is a relatively rare occurrence and not a sign of a problem with its structural integrity, state transportation officials said. Coastal South Carolina has experienced record-setting high temperatures in recent days. The Charleston area on Monday experienced a high of 100 degrees, with an even higher heat index — hot enough to warp the steel bridge. After the metal had cooled enough, engineers removed a small portion of a swollen plate by taking a torch to the surface and essentially melting it away so that the bridge could again open and close, according to DOT. John Ryan, an assistant professor of civil engineering at The Citadel and who also runs Ryan Structural Engineers, was in contact with Sullivan’s Island officials Tuesday to learn more about what happened. “They torched away about a quarter of an inch … across one plate,” Ryan said. “My understanding is, from a structural standpoint, it was almost cosmetic … it doesn’t impact the function of the bridge whatsoever as far as I can tell.”

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Wednesday
May 29, 2019
1. Ben Sawyer bridge closes due to heat, reopens to cars

The Lowcountry's Chief Meteorologist Rob Fowler has been warning us about high temperatures for a while now, and if you spent any time outdoors over the holiday weekend, you know it was hot. And the heat isn't over. But on Memorial day, the record-breaking temperatures caused major trouble for drivers coming in and out of Sullivan's Island when the Ben Sawyer swing bride was shut down for hours, and officials say the temperature was to blame. We took those questions to a Civil Engineer professor at the Citadel. He explained heat can cause both steel and concrete to expand, which in this case, caused the materials to interfere, also known as fouling.

Watch the on-air coverage here:

4 pm

5 pm

6 pm

11 pm

Published in: WCBD - Channel 2 - Online / Broadcast
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Wednesday
May 29, 2019
2. Citadel alumnus awarded South Carolina’s highest civilian honor

Tommy Young, III, The Citadel Class of 1974, is being honored for his years of service and leadership with multiple organizations throughout the state. Gov. Henry McMaster awarded Young with the Order of the Palmetto at the Rotary Club of Spartanburg luncheon on April 30, 2019. Eight fellow South Carolinians wrote letters of recommendation on behalf of Young, including The Citadel president, Gen. Glenn Walters, USMC (Ret.). After graduating from The Citadel, Young joined his family’s business, Young Office Supply. He currently serves as the chairman and chief executive officer of Young Holdings and Young Office Environments, which employs more than 60 people and has annual sales exceeding $28 million.

Published in: The Citadel Today - Online
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Wednesday
May 29, 2019
2. Students from around the world compete at The Citadel to solve social and commercial challenges

Students from The Citadel, the College of Charleston, Nebraska Wesleyan University, Tallinn University and the University of Tartu (Estonia) come together each year for the Network Globally, Act Locally (NGAL™) program. The students will spend their time trying to create solutions for social and commercial challenges. The three-week international entrepreneurial program culminates in a pitch competition here at The Citadel, hosted by the Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business. Students teams from each of the institutions will pitch their ideas to a panel of distinguished judges from the business community. The competition will be on Fri. June 14 at 9 a.m. in Bond Hall, Room 165.

Published in: The Citadel Today - Online
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Wednesday
May 29, 2019
4. Sexual predator Skip ReVille expected in court for sentence reconsideration

A sexual predator from the Lowcountry is expected in court for a sentence reconsideration. Officials with the Ninth Solicitor’s Office said Louis “Skip” ReVille will have the court hearing this Wednesday at 10 a.m. In 2012, ReVille was sentenced to 50 years in prison after pleading guilty to 22 child-sex charges in Berkeley, Charleston, and Dorchester counties. He pleaded guilty to each of the 22 charges brought before the court, including second and first degree criminal sexual conduct with a minor, lewd contact on a minor, and criminal solicitation of a minor. ReVille admitted that he had 16 victims in Berkeley and Charleston counties and 6 in Dorchester County. At the time of his arrest, ReVille was working as an assistant principal at Coastal Christian Preparatory School. He has a history of coaching and teaching youth in the Charleston area, dating back to his time as a Citadel cadet, when he allegedly watched pornography with a camper inside his dorm room in 2002.

Also covered by WCIV - ABC News 4

Published in: WCSC - Live 5 News - Online
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Wednesday
May 29, 2019
5. Is Your Data Safe? A Cybersecurity Expert’s Perspective
For decades, security meant locking the doors and windows of your home, maybe turning on an alarm system, keeping your banking information and credit cards away from strangers, and placing your personal papers and passport in a safe. Dr. Shankar Banik, a professor in the Department of Cyber and Computer Sciences, NSA/DHS CAE-CDE program director and co-director of the Center for Cyber, Intelligence, and Security Studies at The Citadel, says cybersecurity is a problem that is managed, not solved. You can take precautions to minimize your vulnerability, but as recent high-profile attacks on the state of South Carolina, Target, Facebook, Twitter, Marriott Hotels and many, many other organizations demonstrate, no one’s information is totally safe.
Published in: Lowcountry Grad Center - Online
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Wednesday
May 29, 2019
6. Flip flops, tennis shoes that fell off freighter in 2018 could soon be hitting SC beaches
Looking to score a nice new set of flip flops or running shoes this summer? Head to the beach. Scrape off the barnacles. Wipe off the slime. These beauties could be right off the boat — the Maersk Shanghai that lost containers full of gear like it off North Carolina. The only real hitch is you’ll likely have to find them one at a time. But the gear might well be out there — or headed this way. Since the containers spilled last year, more than 100 flip flops and shoes have shown up on beaches across the Atlantic, from Ireland to the Bahamas. There haven’t been any confirmed sightings in South Carolina, but litter clean-up crews don’t keep track of individual footwear or brands they find. And they find plenty of footwear. The problem is, they find it all over the place. Howard Hogue, the Isle of Palms’ Beach Santa litter collector, has found flip flops as far off the beach as the municipal parking lot. Cargo ships lose shipping containers because of crew mistakes, high winds, or storms at sea, according to the Smithsonian Institute. More than 10,000 containers are lost each year, an average of about one per hour. Each shred counts. Some seven tons of plastic or rubber litter float in Charleston Harbor at any given time, according to research by The Citadel — everything from tire shreds to drink bottles.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Wednesday
May 29, 2019
7. The Plague of Meddling Political Busybodies
Who knows what might be better or best for you? You or those in the government? We all make mistakes and misjudgments, but who is most likely to have a wider and deeper appreciation of your wants and desires, you or a bureaucrat in an often-faraway government agency? Who is more likely to have an insight into the options and opportunities for achieving your wants and desires, you or a handful of politicians focused on their own goals and political purposes? Expressed in this general way, most of us would say that each of us knows the answers to these questions better than any politicians or bureaucrats. If I am your next-door neighbor, and I proceed to impose my views on you about the ends you should pursue and the best means to attain them, most likely you would resent and resist this insistent know-it-all busybody interfering in your life. Who am I to tell you what you should live for and how to do it? Richard M. Ebeling, an AIER Senior Fellow, is the BB&T Distinguished Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel, in Charleston, South Carolina. Ebeling lived on AIER's campus from 2008 to 2009.
Published in: AIER American Institute for Economic Research - Online
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Wednesday
May 29, 2019
8. The Comeback Kids: Brittany Freiberg
Sometimes when people move away from their hometown they don't plan on coming back. That's what Brittany Freiberg thought when she moved to South Carolina. But after fifteen years she found herself back in Rockford and ready to be a part of movement to make the city better. After growing up in Rockford, Brittany Freiberg promised herself she'd leave the forest city after graduating from Lutheran High School. Brittany lived up to that promise attending the College of Charleston. She spent her college years studying health promotion. After graduation she got a job at the Citadel, a military college in Charleston. “I just really found my niche within the nonprofit sector and created a life and a network there and was just happy. When I lived there I never thought I would come back to Rockford.” But she was wrong. After more than a decade she traded the sand for snow and moved back to her hometown to be with her husband.
Published in: WIFR - Rockford, IL - Online / Broadcast
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Wednesday
May 29, 2019
9. Moncks Corner native discusses new director role with SC Conservation Bank
Raleigh West has always had a soft spot for the outdoors and the Lowcountry. Ensuring future generations could have the same opportunities and memories that filled his childhood—hunting, fishing and spending time in nature, undefiled by development—were key motivators behind his decision to leave a career in real estate years ago and join forces with a conservation-minded nonprofit. West served as executive director of Lord Berkeley Conservation Trust from 2013 to 2019, until accepting his recent appointment as director of the the South Carolina Conservation Bank. His new head role became official on May 9 when he was confirmed by the Senate. After graduating from Pinewood Preparatory School in Summerville, West attended Wofford College, where he secured his undergraduate degree and later obtained his MBA from The Citadel. It was around that time West said his interest in conservation—planted in his heart as a boy—blossomed into something more. His natural environment called out to him to take action.
Published in: The Berkeley Independent - Online
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Wednesday
May 29, 2019
What's Poppin': 15+ ways to beat the heat with
It's a short week, but that doesn't mean you should short change your dining experiences. Here's where to eat and drink (out of the heat) this week: Saturday The Barrel Charleston hosts happy hour from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. A $10 cover charge will cover your first drink and a $5 donation to The Citadel Foundation.
Published in: Charleston City Paper - Online
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Tuesday
May 28, 2019
1c. His grandfather fought for the U.S. in Vietnam. Citadel’s Class of ’64 paid him back.
The way the story is told in Alex Pang-Riddle’s family, U.S. soldiers were pinned down on a mountain in the central highlands of Vietnam. His grandfather, a young man named K’Sao Krajan, was a member of the Montagnard tribe indigenous to those highlands. Krajan, like some 61,000 other members of that ethnic minority in Vietnam, had been trained to fight alongside Green Berets against the North Vietnamese and the Viet Cong during the Vietnam War in the 1960s. When the military school’s Class of 1964 found out that Pang-Riddle, Krajan’s grandson, was enrolled at The Citadel, members of the class decided to sponsor him with a scholarship. Pang-Riddle graduated with the Class of 2019 and plans to return to The Citadel this fall to pursue a master’s degree in exercise science. Pang-Riddle said members of the Class of 1964 learned of his connection to the Montagnard people through a GoFundMe account he had set up, and through a symposium that was held aboard the aircraft carrier Yorktown at Patriots Point in Mount Pleasant in 2015.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Tuesday
May 28, 2019
1d. There are nearly 900 photos of the SC men that died in Vietnam. Only 4 are still missing.
Janna Hoehn recognizes the nearly 900 faces of the South Carolina men who died in the Vietnam War. Like the pieces of a puzzle, Hoehn has spent the past eight years trying to find more than 58,000 photos of the men who died in Vietnam to create a comprehensive portrait. State by state, she has contacted family members, requested public documents and reached out to newspapers to see if anyone can provide a face to go with a name. Overall, she said the project has a little less than 1,000 photos left nationwide. In South Carolina, the group has collected 891 photos. Just four more are needed to represent the 895 men from the Palmetto State who died. South Carolina has a deep history with the military. The Vietnam War was no different. At least 86 men who died in the war were alumni from The Citadel. One of those casualties was Army Capt. Terry Cordell. When his helicopter was shot down, he became the first Citadel graduate and one of the first American officers to die in Vietnam.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Tuesday
May 28, 2019
2a. A Marine’s crazy, four-day courtship, and the ring he’ll never get to deliver
Before he left on a 10-day training maneuver earlier this month, he called his mom to tell her the engagement ring was almost ready. It had Grandma’s diamonds. And Marine 1st Lt. Hugh Conor McDowell designed it himself. He’d propose as soon as he returned, he confided. But he never got the chance. Conor, 24, had asked Kathleen Isabel Rose Bourque to move across the country only four days after they met for the first time, face-to-face. That surprised his parents and floored hers. Kathleen packed a bag — just a small carry-on was all she would bring to her new life — in the decisive, cinematic moment of their love story. They met through Hinge, a dating app, rather than any of the D.C. places they’d both been hanging out in for years, missing each other countless times. She liked that Conor’s profile picture was a sweet mother-son shot of him taken during the ring ceremony at The Citadel.
Published in: Washington Post - Online
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Tuesday
May 28, 2019
2a. Ep. 6: Dr. J. Goosby Smith on Inclusive Leaders & Spiritual Growth

Dr. J Goosby Smith leads the Ethical and Inclusive Leadership Development seminar at AWI; her module helps emerging leaders understand who they are and why they do what they do. Jaye is on the faculty of the Baker School of Business at the Citadel, where she also holds the position of Assistant Provost for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion. Her personal path of spiritual growth brought her talents to AWI where she can now include the role of the spirit in the formation of inclusive leaders. Jaye reminds us that things done in the spirit of love are unifying, and that is just good business.

Listen to the podcast here.

Published in: Applied Wisdom Institute - Online
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Tuesday
May 28, 2019
2b. Soldier surprises sister on her birthday during sweet Memorial Day homecoming
Amber Clark, a sophomore at Ramsey High School, was already having a pretty good day Thursday. It was her birthday and she was chosen to introduce the Ramsey High School band at a Memorial Day ceremony-- in advance of the The Big Blue Marching Band’s trip to Washington, D.C. to perform in the Memorial Day parade. Just as Amber was about to take her seat again on the Ramsey High School football field, Principal Michael Thumm coaxed her back to the podium in a rouse to acknowledge her birthday, asking her what’s the one thing she would want as birthday present. Then her sister, Sophie-Leigh Baxter Clark pulled up in a golf cart. Sophie-Leigh has been stationed in South Korea for 18 months and surprised Amber, who didn’t know she was coming home on a six-day leave, according to northjersey.com. Sophie-Leigh is a 2013 graduate of Ramsey High School and a 2017 graduate of The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina where she majored in history and minored in criminal justice and homeland security.
Published in: NJ Advance Media - Online
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Tuesday
May 28, 2019
3a. Lisek among first Citadel nursing program grads
Samantha Lisek of Sims is a member of The Citadel’s first graduating class of nursing students. Lisek earned a Bachelor of Science degree in nursing and is among 20 undergraduates and one cadet nursing student who share the honor of making history for the college as the inaugural nursing class. Lisek graduated during The Citadel Graduate College commencement ceremony held May 14 in McAlister Field House. Graduates accepted their diploma from Citadel alumnus and retired Marine Corps Gen. Glenn W. Waters, who was officiating as president for the first time. Before graduating, the class took part in the college’s first nurse-pinning ceremony May 2 in Buyer Auditorium on campus. The ceremony is a longstanding tradition in the nursing industry and represents a symbolic welcoming of new nurses into the profession.
Published in: The Wilson Times - Online
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Tuesday
May 28, 2019
3b. Richard Flender accepts Army commission
Reserve Officer Training Corps programs produce almost 70 percent of the officers who enter the Army each year, and more than 100 of them will come from The Citadel. Richard Flender, of Sutherlin, is one of the members of the class of 2019 who accepted an Army commission. Flender participated in the commissioning ceremony held on May 3.
Published in: Danville Register & Bee - Online
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Tuesday
May 28, 2019
3b. The Citadel commissions Taylor
ROTC programs produce almost 70 percent of the officers that enter the Army each year, and more than 100 of them will come from The Citadel in 2019. Jonathan Taylor of Davidson is one of the members of the Class of 2019 who accepted an Army commission. Taylor participated in the commissioning ceremony held on Friday, May 3 in McAlister Field House. Every year, the commencement ceremony for the South Carolina Corps of Cadets is held the day after the commissioning ceremonies. Approximately 35 percent of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets Class of 2019 are now officers in all branches of the United States Armed Forces.
Published in: Independent Tribune - Online
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Tuesday
May 28, 2019
3c. College notes
Gary McKenzie of Fredericksburg earned a Master of Science in Leadership degree from The Citadel, Charleston, S.C.
Published in: The Free Lance-Star - Online
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Tuesday
May 28, 2019
3c. Education Briefs
Noah Harvey-Fonvil of Carthage, earned a civil engineering degree from The Citadel. Harvey-Fonvil graduated during the South Carolina Corps of Cadets commencement ceremony on Saturday, May 4 in McAlister Field House. Graduates accepted their diplomas from Citadel alumnus Gen. Glenn W. Walters, USMC (ret.), who was officiating as president for the first time. He is also one of the members of the Class of 2019 who took their commissioning oaths on Friday, May 3, in Summerall Chapel. Approximately 35 percent of the S.C. Corps of Cadets Class of 2019 are now officers in all branches of the U.S. Armed Forces.
Published in: The Pilot - Online
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Tuesday
May 28, 2019
4a. 'Today, my heart is full:' 3-year-old shows appreciation for veterans at Warbird Park
A three-year-old boy brought his mother to tears on Memorial Day with how he showed his thanks to our veterans. Keri Leachman said her daughter had flight school at the airport, so she took her three-year-old son, Brian, to Warbird Park in the Market Common area while they waited. They took a look around at the planes, plaques and monuments when they came upon one for a combat veteran. Leachman said her son then looked up at her and said, "I go give him a kiss and say thank you." Leachman says she has two boys active duty and a daughter who will attend the Citadel next year and then also join the USMC. She says, "We couldn't be more proud of all of them and the paths they've chosen!"
Published in: WPDE - Myrtle Beach - Online
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Tuesday
May 28, 2019
4b. Battle Ground Academy’s 130th graduating class offered $10.3 million in scholarships

Battle Ground Academy held its graduation on Sunday, May 19, celebrating the matriculation of 93 students. Highlights of BGA’s 130th graduating class include: Eli Mayberry has been appointed to the U.S. Naval Academy, Annie Arvizu to the United States Military Academy and Zachary Bankemper to The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina.

Published in: Brentwood Home Page - Online
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Tuesday
May 28, 2019
4b. Emmanuel Christian School graduates 13 in Class of 2019 at Hartsville
Thirteen members of the Class of 2019 received their diplomas Friday night during graduation ceremonies at Emmanuel Christian School in Hartsville. The members of the Class of 2019 include Jackson Stewart Carroll Roach (The Citadel)
Published in: SC Now - Online
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Tuesday
May 28, 2019
4b. TSA celebrates Class of '19
homas Sumter Academy celebrated its 2019 graduating class on May 18. The hard work by the 22 graduates paid off as they were offered more than $8 million in scholarships and grants. Additionally, the class of 2019 working with Central Carolina Technical College earned 366 transferable dual-enrollment college credits. Graduates will be attending such institutions as Wofford College, The College of Charleston, Clemson University, the University of South Carolina Honors College and The Citadel.
Published in: The Sumter Item - Online
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Tuesday
May 28, 2019
5a. SC’s newest startup bank in years is ready to expand its horizons
South Carolina’s first startup bank in more than a decade is starting to build up its brick-and-mortar footprint as it settles into its second year of operations. Beacon Community Bank, which opened its doors on East Bay Street in downtown Charleston in early 2018, began taking deposits and making a mix of commercial and consumer loans this month on the other side of the Ravenel Bridge. It took over a former Ameris Bank office at 966 Houston Northcutt Blvd. Automobile dealer Tommy Baker said he hatched the idea for Beacon soon after the mid-2016 sale of Southcoast Community Bank, where he had been a director. The Baker Motors founder eventually lined up more than dozen other lead investors, including restaurateur Bill Hall and Lt. General John Rosa, the now-retired president of The Citadel.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Tuesday
May 28, 2019
5b. SC hires and promotions
William S. “Wilson” Jackson IV has joined Turner Padget Graham & Laney PA as an associate attorney based in the Charleston office. His practice is focused on personal injury and insurance litigation. Previously, he was as a judicial clerk for Judge D. Garrison Hill of the S.C. Court of Appeals. He has a bachelor’s degree from The Citadel and a law degree from the University of South Carolina School of Law.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Tuesday
May 28, 2019
5c. First S.C. Hemp Summit: Chamber partners with others to put focus on possibilities
The S.C. Hemp Farmers Association, the Orangeburg County Chamber of Commerce and the Orangeburg Area Small Business Development Center teamed up on May 17 for the first S.C. Hemp Summit held at Yonder Field near Bowman. Lucas Snyder, emcee of the summit and graduate of The Citadel, previously won a business plan competition promoting a hemp-based business. Lucas is the founder and executive director for the South Carolina Hemp Farmers Association.
Published in: The Times and Democrat - Online
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Tuesday
May 28, 2019
5d. Pause to honor the fallen on Memorial Day
At 10 a.m. Monday, the Daktronics Room at the Swiftel Center will be the setting for the annual and traditional program in observance of Memorial Day. Prior to the start of the ceremony, the Brookings High School Band, under the direction of Ron Stary, will play a medley of patriotic martial music. Additionally, the band will play the National Anthem and at various intervals throughout the gathering. Lt. Col. Richard Reid, South Dakota Air National Guard (Ret.), will then deliver the keynote address. A native of Kennebunkport, Maine, the colonel was a distinguished Air Force ROTC graduate and earned his commission at the Citadel (the Military College of South Carolina). A professional engineer, Reid currently serves as associate dean of Engineering for Academics and Extension at South Dakota State University.
Published in: The Bookings Register - Online
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Tuesday
May 28, 2019
5e. GOP women legislators lead in big ways
Navigating tricky political terrain is just another day at the Statehouse for a distinct minority in elected office: Republican women. In red South Carolina, there are two Republican women in the S.C. Senate (4 percent of the chamber) and 11 Republican women in the S.C. House (about 9 percent of the chamber). Republican men account for 54 percent of the Senate (25 of 46 members), and 56 percent of the House (69 of 124 members). But while the few GOP women occupy powerful positions, their voices are powerful in both chambers and on both sides of the aisle. “While we are small in number, we are pretty remarkable,” S.C. Rep. Nancy Mace, R-Daniel Island, told Statehouse Report this week. Before being elected to office, Mace already made history as a woman: she is the first female graduate of Charleston military college The Citadel.
Published in: Statehouse Report - Online
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Tuesday
May 28, 2019
5f. The GOP wants to retake SC congressional seat. But who will take on Joe Cunningham?
Republicans are eager in 2020 to wrest back control of South Carolina’s coastal congressional seat, but a top-tier candidate has yet to emerge. The absence of one is raising questions about whether the party is having difficulty fielding a contender who can excite donors and mobilize the base, locally and nationally, to take on a popular Democratic incumbent. The GOP’s answer could be Nancy Mace. A self-fashioned conservative firebrand, Mace has a resume that would play well on the campaign trail. She was the first female graduate of the Citadel, the formerly all-male military college. In 2014, she showed off her outsider credentials by launching a long-shot bid against incumbent Lindsey Graham for the GOP nomination in the U.S. Senate, where she won 6 percent of the vote in a seven-way primary.
Published in: The State - Online
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Tuesday
May 28, 2019
6a. CSU revered as a top Lowcountry university
It’s not just the Charleston region’s luxurious beaches, proximity to the port and Southern hospitality drawing in new residents—and vacationers at top speed—nearly three dozen added to the population daily, according to stats from the Charleston Regional Development Alliance. It’s quality of education at local four-year universities that add to the area’s enticing features. According to local economic development experts, the grouping of universities like College of Charleston, The Citadel, Medical University of South Carolina and Charleston Southern University are among the bundling of prestigious names that headline secondary education in the Lowcountry.
Published in: The Gazette - Online
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Tuesday
May 28, 2019
6b. Charleston revamping its height rules, architectural review
Just like any building that has stood for more than 85 years, Charleston’s Board of Architectural Review may be due for some refurbishment. And the city is poised to do just that, as a consultant has proposed extensive revisions to rules that govern the height of new buildings on the peninsula. City Council, board members and others learned about those changes during a two-hour work session Thursday at the Charleston Museum. Generally speaking, the changes would: Create special districts for the city’s hospital district, emerging WestEdge development, the Columbus Street terminal property, Laurel Island, as well as The Citadel’s and College of Charleston campuses that would be left alone for the time being.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Tuesday
May 28, 2019
7. CSPAN air's Ronald Reagan's commencement address at The Citadel
Published in: CSPAN - Broadcast
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Tuesday
May 28, 2019
7b. The Martyrs of the Race Course, 1865
The Charleston Daily Courier reported the following story on May 1st, 1865: THE MARTYRS OF THE RACE COURSE CHARLESTON, South Carolina — The ceremonies of the dedication of the ground where are buried two hundred and fifty-seven Union soldiers, took place in the presence of an immense gathering yesterday. Fully ten thousand persons were present, mostly of the colored population. The ground had been previously laid out, the mounds of the graves newly raised, and a fine substantial fence erected around the enclosure by twenty-four colored men, "Friends of the Martyrs," and members of the "Patriotic Association of Colored Men." The exercises on the ground commenced with reading a Psalm, singing a hymn, followed by a prayer. The procession was formed shortly after nine o’clock, and made a beautiful appearance, nearly every one present bearing a handsome boquet of flowers. The colored children, about twenty-eight hundred in number, marched first over the burial ground, strewing the graves with their flowers as the passed. Let's keep in mind that Charleston was a primary target for the Union during the Civil War. It was from there on April 12th, 1861 that South Carolina militia forces including cadets from the Citadel fired the first shots of the war by bombarding Fort Sumter into surrender. Because of that, Union Forces laid siege for well over a year.
Published in: American Cowboy Chronicles - Online
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Tuesday
May 28, 2019
7c. The Citadel Graduate College: New Student Orientation
We are so excited to welcome you to The Citadel! Whether you are finishing your bachelor's degree or working on your master's degree, we are here to help every step of the way. Please join us on Wednesday, August 21st from 5:15-8pm to learn more about the Graduate College and many of the resources available to you. We look forward to answering your questions and helping you navigate The Citadel. At this orientation, you will be able to see the campus, meet with key resources, get your Campus ID and parking pass, and answer any remaining questions that you may have!
Published in: Eventbrite - Online
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Tuesday
May 28, 2019
8. BAYSDEN, PHILIP "PHIL"
BAYSDEN, Philip Bruce "Phil," 71, of Mechanicsville, Va., passed away suddenly, yet peacefully on Sunday, May 19, 2019. He was preceded in death by his parents, Bruce and Hazel Baysden. Phil grew up in Elizabethtown, N.C., and graduated from Citadel Military College of South Carolina. He retired from the U.S. Marine Corps as a Major then went on to work as a realtor in the Stafford, Va. area.
Published in: Richmond Times-Dispatch - Online
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Tuesday
May 28, 2019
9. Braves, Yankees set rosters for legends game at The Joe, Dan Uggla headlines
The Charleston RiverDogs have announced the Braves' and Yankees' rosters for the upcoming Legends in the South Alumni Game in advance of the Friday, May 31st event. New to this year’s event, Braves and Yankees Legends will face off in a softball game format at The Joe. Chip Cannon was a standout two-way player at The Citadel before going in the eighth round of the 2004 draft by the Blue Jays. The California native reached as high as Triple-A in Toronto’s system before being inducted into The Citadel Athletic Hall of Fame in 2013.
Published in: WCIV - ABC News 4 - Online
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Tuesday
May 28, 2019
9. Southern Scene: Hall of Famer Beth Daniel ready for Charleston to shine at U.S. Women’s Open
Tricia Nimocks opened The Greenery Florist in downtown Charleston in 1978. The sage-colored single house, built one-room wide from the street view with a double-decker side porch that’s perfect for a glass of sweet tea and a warm breeze, also has been home to Tricia and her family for the past 40 years. Nimocks, who knows the roads of Charleston intimately as both a native and longtime deliverer of flowers, got behind the wheel of her Ford C-Max for the start of an hour-long tour. In the backseat, giving a running commentary on Charleston past and present, sat LPGA Hall of Famer Beth Daniel, Tricia’s younger sister. “It was pretty slow and peaceful when we were growing up,” said Daniel, “and we knew everybody. Now we don’t know anybody.” Much has changed in Charleston since Bob and Lucia Daniel were married in The Citadel’s Summerall Chapel in 1950. So much of what Beth and Tricia knew growing up is gone, paved over and built up by progress. But there’s a lot that hasn’t changed, too.
Published in: GolfWeek - Online
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Tuesday
May 28, 2019
9. Wallace, Jones named F1S' top athletes of year
West Florence’s Cooper Wallace and Wilson’s Kiki Jones are the Florence One Schools male and female athletes of the year. “It means everything,” Wallace said. “It just shows hard work pays off.” Jones is just as happy. “It means a lot to be recognized as not just the athlete of the year from my school, but from across the district,” Jones said. “Nobody gave us much of a chance,” said Wallace, who has signed to play football at The Citadel. “But this just shows how much success we really had this season. With the new coaches coming in, they changed everything and helped me grow as a player and as a coach.”
Published in: SC Now - Online
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Thursday
May 23, 2019
1. Citadel professor’s thoughts now that it’s game over for HBO’s “Game of Thrones”

The Citadel’s Michael Livingston, Ph.D., answers some final questions after the season finale of the popular TV show

Spoiler warning

After eight years, 73 episodes, and countless theories, memes, and articles – Game of Thrones has come to and end. When season eight was just getting started, though, Michael Livingston, Ph.D., earned national attention. He was interviewed by multiple news outlets, from Vice to Live 5 News, asking the big question: who will win the game of thrones. The Citadel’s website also received a shout-out on a CNN article recapping the final episode, but we’re pretty sure it was an accident. (Search for “Citadel” and tell us what you think!) Livingston is often interviewed on medieval matters due to his regular column on tor.com, a science fiction and fantasy website. He is also an award-winning writer who has published a trilogy of historical fantasy novels and multiple nonfiction books. Here are some of his thoughts about this season.

Published in: The Citadel Today - Online
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Thursday
May 23, 2019
2. Medal of Honor request for Citadel grad killed in Vietnam heads to Washington
A package of documents seeking the first Medal of Honor for a graduate of The Citadel is on its way to Washington, D.C. The 77-page collection of items supporting the medal posthumously for Vietnam helicopter pilot Capt. Hugh Reavis Nelson Jr. first goes to the office of the North Carolina congressman who represents Nelson’s hometown. From there, it will go to the Department of the Army for what could be a yearlong, extensive review. The argument in favor of the medal came after a grassroots alumni group, led by Class of 1964 graduate and Air Force veteran Ted Curtis, took a second look at the mission that took Nelson’s life on June 5, 1966, in South Vietnam. The Citadel issued a statement this week in advance of Memorial Day acknowledging Nelson and all of the school’s graduates who have died in service of the nation. “Hugh Reavis Nelson, who was killed in action in Vietnam, is one of the college’s heroes, and we honor his memory along with more than 700 Citadel graduates who made the ultimate sacrifice for our country and our freedom,” said John Dorrian, vice president in the Office of Communications and Marketing. “The Citadel’s administration applauds efforts by alumni to recognize the bravery of our fallen,” he added. While no Citadel graduates have been awarded the medal, one former cadet is a recipient. John Thomas Kennedy was given the Medal of Honor for service against the Moro people of the Philippines in 1909, but he was at The Citadel for only a year before transferring to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in New York.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Thursday
May 23, 2019
4. New campaign encourages alternative commuting habits

Ask almost any resident what the two biggest problems facing Daniel Island and Cainhoy are and you’ll hear people say traffic, twice. With population growth happening every day in the Charleston region, including the Cainhoy peninsula, it can feel like the end will never be in the rearview mirror. But a new plan called “Reboot the Commute” might have a different solution to calm the morning and afternoon traffic jams caused by folks going from work to home and vice versa. Reboot the Commute is a business-led initiative that spurs local employers to help reduce the inescapable traffic issues in Charleston. The campaign was created by the Economic Leadership Council of the Charleston Regional Development Alliance (CRDA). On April 30, 18 local businesses, including Daniel Island-based Benefitfocus, committed themselves to reducing area traffic as a part of the project. According to a press release on the subject, the combined workforce of the businesses totals 39,000 employees. Local organizations that have committed to encouraging their employees to #ReboottheCommute: The Citadel

Published in: Daniel Island News - Online
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Thursday
May 23, 2019
5. Three area residents commissioned at The Citadel
ROTC programs produce almost 70% of the officers that enter the Army each year, and more than 100 of them will come from The Citadel this year. Local members of the Class of 2019 who accepted Army commissions include: • Braeden Bartrum of Frederick, Md. • Andrew Diaz of Frederick • Devan Wilson of Shenandoah Junction, W.Va. They participated in the commissioning ceremony on May 3.
Published in: Herald-Mail Media - Online
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Thursday
May 23, 2019
5. Tunkhannock’s Dymond Graduates from The Citadel
Matthew Dymond of Tunkhannock earned a Mechanical Engineering degree from The Citadel. He graduated during the South Carolina Corps of Cadets commencement ceremony on Saturday, May 4 in McAlister Field House.
Published in: Rocket-Courier - Online
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Thursday
May 23, 2019
6. The Next Big Bang – Human Consciousness and the Universe’s Ultimate Secret

For at least two hundred years science has been telling us that any ideas of spirituality we might hold dear are little more than ignorant leftovers of a superstitious past – foolish relics. But the truth is, physics itself, that most foundational of all sciences, has now progressed far beyond that initial, dismissive assessment, to a conceptual worldview far more accepting of spirituality than ever before. To grasp the nuts and bolts of this new science, then, is to understand the nuts and bolts that support a new, evolving and far more sophisticated grasp of spirit than has ever before been available to us. This new conceptual framework is absolutely critical to our grasp of spirit, and, frankly, for those previously unfamiliar with the discoveries of modern physics, this new framework may at first seem nothing short of “other worldly” itself – as the old saying goes, the truth can at times be far stranger than fiction. So let’s start by taking a close look at what the new physics has to tell us. Jim Stempel is the author of seven books, including nonfiction, historical fiction, spirituality, and satire. His articles have appeared in numerous journals including North & South, HistoryNet, Concepts In Human Development, New Times, Real Clear History, and the History News Network. His exploration of warfare, The Nature of War: Origins and Evolution of Violent Conflict examined war from a psychological perspective, while his newest novel, Windmill Point, was released to considerable critical acclaim. He is a graduate of The Citadel, Charleston, South Carolina, and lives with his wife and family Maryland. Feel free to explore his website at www.jimstempel.com.

Published in: Wake Up World - Online
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Thursday
May 23, 2019
9. Comeback Cougars: With 20 come-from-behind wins, College of Charleston leads the nation
This season the Cougars have: • A total of 20 come-from-behind victories, which leads the nation. • Four straight come-from-behind wins that include two against Towson, one each against The Citadel and Delaware • A 9-8 victory over The Citadel in which the Cougars erased a six-run deficit. • Scored 41 percent of their runs in the sixth through eighth innings. • Have batted .300 against opponents’ bullpens. Their biggest comeback of the season came against The Citadel and was capped off by Bradley Dixon’s home run-robbing catch in right field on the final out in the ninth inning. It was the final play at Patriot’s Point for the fifth-year senior. “I’m sure that Citadel game will be one that our seniors remember for a while,” Holbrook said. “Bradley’s catch, the way we fought back and won. That’s who we’ve been all season.”
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Wednesday
May 22, 2019
1. Planeside ceremony for the return of 1st Lt. Hugh McDowell, The Citadel Class of 2017

By Cpl. Edward Bartlinski, The Citadel Class of 2008, PIO, Maryland Transportation Authority Police

I was deeply saddened when I learned of the passing of 1st Lt. Hugh C. McDowell from the Washington, D.C. area after he was injured when a light armored vehicle overturned at Camp Pendleton, California. He was 24 years old. Lt. McDowell had been in the Marine Corps since May 5, 2017 after graduating from The Citadel where he accepted a commission as a Second Lieutenant. His lifelong dream was to become a Marine. After commissioning, he attended the Basic Officer Course, Infantry Officer Course and the Light Armored Reconnaissance Leader’s Course. Lt. McDowell was assigned to the 1st Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion, 1st Marine Division, where he was a platoon commander. While training, an accident occurred when the light armored vehicle rolled over injuring 6 other Marines and resulting in the death of Lt. McDowell, who was from Chevy Chase, Maryland. To welcome Lt. McDowell home on the airfield were his parents, fiancé and her mother. Joining them were members of the Maryland Transportation Authority Police, BWI Airport Fire Department, family and alumni from The Citadel. Lt. McDowell will be buried at Arlington National Cemetery with full military honors.

Published in: The Citadel Today - Online
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Wednesday
May 22, 2019
2. Abington-area residents in the news

Dymond takes oath

CHARLESTON, SC — Matthew Dymond, of Tunkhannock, is one of the members of the Class of 2019 at The Citadel who took their commissioning oaths just before graduating from the South Carolina Corps of Cadets.

Published in: The Abington Journal - Online
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Wednesday
May 22, 2019
2. Carthage man graduates from The Citadel
A Carthage man is among 28 of the Marine Corps' newest officers from the South Carolina Corps of Cadets at The Citadel.
Published in: Sanford Herald - Online
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Wednesday
May 22, 2019
2. Names and Notes for May 22

Cadets graduate from The Citadel

The following local members of the S.C. Corps of Cadets accepted diploma during The Citadel’s Commencement ceremony on May 4: Luke Barone of North Augusta, criminal justice; Meryl Prince of Johnston, criminal justice; Briggs Smith of North Augusta, biology; Preston Wilson of North Augusta, exercise Science; Kyle Neira of Graniteville, business administration; Sarah Zorn of Warrenville, mechanical engineering; Aaron Gurley of Beech Island, mechanical engineering; and Samuel Flippen of Aiken, criminal justice.

Published in: Aiken Standard - Online
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Wednesday
May 22, 2019
3. Former Will County board chief of staff joins Wight & Company
Chicago-based integrated design and delivery firm Wight & Company added Ragan Pattison as director of its state and local government market. Most recently the Will County board chief of staff, Pattison also served as a member of the county’s board and commissioner of the county’s forest preserve. One of the first female graduates of The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, Pattison earned her bachelor’s degree in political science with a concentration in American government. She attended Mississippi College School of Law in Jackson, Mississippi, where she served on the school’s chapter of Habitat For Humanity, raising money and building new homes for Hurricane Katrina victims. Pattison also has had a successful career practicing criminal defense, family and governmental law.
Published in: RE Journals - Online
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Wednesday
May 22, 2019
4. Freedom Is Why Immigrants Come to America
America! The word has meant hope, opportunity and freedom for tens of millions of people over the last two and half centuries. For a good part of those 250 years, the words on the Stature of Liberty in New York harbor have rang true. Until the early part of the 1900s, the United States was more or less an open land for all new comers. Especially European immigrants needed neither passport nor visa to enter America for most of that time through the various ports of entry, especially that of New York City. (The first major immigration restrictions came in 1880s with limitations on the arrival of Chinese migrants, followed by similar limitations on Japanese immigrants. These were crudely racial in their rationales.) Richard M. Ebeling, an AIER Senior Fellow, is the BB&T Distinguished Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel, in Charleston, South Carolina. Ebeling lived on AIER's campus from 2008 to 2009.
Published in: AIER American Institute for Economic Research - Online
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Wednesday
May 22, 2019
5. GLEAVES JR., James L.
James L. Gleaves Jr., of Wytheville, Va., passed away Tuesday, May 14, 2019. He was born in Wytheville, Va., on January 8, 1924, to the late J. Lucian and Morton Sudduth Gleaves. A 1941 graduate of Wytheville High School, Gleaves was attending the Citadel in Charleston, S.C., when he enlisted in the Army Air Corps. He served stateside and with the 23rd Fighter Control Squadron in the China-Burma-India Theatre for the remainder of World War II. Honorably discharged as a First Lieutenant in 1946, he married Dorothy Vernon of Wytheville, Va., and enjoyed a 57 year marriage until her death in 2004. A 1948 graduate of the University of Virginia, Gleaves continued his education at UVA receiving his law degree in 1951. He was a special agent for the Federal Bureau of Investigation from 1951 through 1953 serving in their Philadelphia and Newark offices. A memorial service will be held 7 p.m. Wednesday, May 29, 2019 at the Wytheville Presbyterian Church conducted by The Reverend Edwin Lacy. The family will receive friends Wednesday from 5 p.m. until service time. A private graveside service will be held by his immediate family at West End Cemetery.
Published in: The Roanoke Times - Online
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Wednesday
May 22, 2019
5. IREDELL JONES IV
Iredell Jones IV, 79, died on Sunday, May 5, 2019, in Phoenix, Arizona. Born in Columbia, he was a son of Iredell Jones III and Sarah P. Jones. Mr. Jones was a graduate of The Citadel, where he served and was a recipient of the "Star of the West" award and was also captain of the Summerall Guards (performing marching group). He was a U.S. Air Force veteran and served two tours of duty in Vietnam. He was a retired airline pilot. Graveside services will be held at 10 a.m. on Saturday at The Church of the Holy Cross Cemetery with Father Michael Ridgill officiating. The family will receive friends following the service at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Boykin Sanders, 1430 Raccoon Road, Sumter, SC 29154. Online condolences may be sent to www.sumterfunerals.com
Published in: The Sumter Item - Online
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Wednesday
May 22, 2019
6. Citadel baseball season ends with loss in SoCon Tournament, final record TBD

The Citadel’s baseball season ended Tuesday with a 7-3 loss to Western Carolina in the Southern Conference Tournament at Fluor Field in Greenville. The Bulldogs ended coach Tony Skole’s second season with a record of 12-43, pending the outcome of a suspended April 9 game with College of Charleston. That game was halted due to weather with the Bulldogs up 3-2 after five innings at Riley Park. The ninth-seeded Bulldogs jumped to a 3-1 lead after three innings on freshman Tyler Corbitt’s first career home run, an RBI single from Lane Botkin and a bases-loaded walk by Tilo Skole. But No. 8 seed Western Carolina (21-30) rallied with four runs in the fifth and move on to face No. 1 Samford in the double-elimination part of the tournament. Starting pitcher Jordan Merritt (3-8) took the loss for The Citadel, allowing five runs on six hits in four innings.

Examples of other coverage include:

WCSC - Live 5 News

Catamount Athletics

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Wednesday
May 22, 2019
6. Winning: Love of baseball drives success for MSU head coach Chris Lemonis

Mississippi State head coach Chris Lemonis is quietly competitive. It's not often his feistiness boils over. Yet at his core, Lemonis is a fierce competitor -- a passion that is deeply rooted in his college days at The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina. "It wasn't the easiest of times going to a military school," he said. "But we had really good baseball during that time and we had the times of our lives." After receiving an academic scholarship, Lemonis reluctantly agreed to take a tour of the academy in the fall of his senior year of high school. As he wandered the drill fields and checkered courtyards, he'd had enough. He was ready to go home to Myrtle Beach. He hated it. Baseball ultimately changed his mind. A few months later, Lemonis received a call from Citadel coach Chal Port. The Bulldogs had an opening for him. Swallowing his initial disdain for the school, Lemonis accepted the walk-on spot. The Citadel sits in the heart of Charleston, just minutes from the Ashley River. Known for its discipline and devotion to a military tradition, the school is rigid, rough and strict -- so much so 17 percent of students don't return after their freshman year. "When you're a freshman you go through the worst year of your life together," Louisville head coach and former Citadel player Dan McDonnell said. The regulated lifestyle of the school begins on Matriculation Day, a cadet's first official day on campus. Freshman, or "knobs" as they are known in reference to the bald trim the male recruits were required to bear at the time, are assigned to a company and issued their bluish-grey and white-panted uniforms. A physical fitness test comprised of push-ups, crunches and a one and a half-mile run also is required of all students once per semester. The obligatory prim and properness of a uniformed soldier was nothing new to Lemonis. Three of his family members had joined the armed forces, though his attending a military school was more by happenstance than desire.

Published in: The Commercial Dispatch - Online
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Wednesday
May 22, 2019
7. Aliquippa's M.J. Devonshire one of 11 WPIAL players in Big 33
It will be a busy Memorial Day weekend for Aliquippa’s M.J. Devonshire — in two different sports. Devonshire, a senior supreme athlete at Aliquippa High School, will be in Shippensburg Friday and Saturday, trying to win PIAA track championships. When he’s finished, he’ll immediately head to Harrisburg to get ready for the final football game of his high school career. Devonshire will play in the 62nd annual Big 33, a high school football all-star game that matches Pennsylvania against Maryland on Memorial Day. The other seven players from the WPIAL playing in the Big 33 are McKeesport linebacker Wyatt Thomas (The Citadel signee), Woodland Hills defensive back Mike Coleman (Toledo), Seneca Valley linebacker Jake Stebbins (Cornell), Central Catholic defensive end Brian Dallas (undecided), North Hills offensive lineman Lirion Murtezi (Navy), Thomas Jefferson offensive lineman Dom Serapiglia (Tulsa) and Latrobe offensive lineman Trent Holler (East Carolina).
Published in: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette - Online
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Tuesday
May 21, 2019
1. Former Citadel commandant among those selected for 82nd Airborne Division Hall of Fame
As seen in Stars and Stripes, by Rachel Riley (Tribune News Service) The 82nd Airborne Division will induct its second Hall of Fame class on Wednesday, May 22, during All American Week, the North Carolina-based division’s celebration of paratroopers past and present. The 10 a.m. ceremony will take place at Fort Bragg’s Hall of Heroes. Twenty-one paratroopers were inducted in the inaugural class last year. Sixteen will be added this year, including paratroopers involved in conflicts going back to World War II. This year’s class includes the Hall of Fame’s first chaplain, first chief warrant officer and its third woman.
Published in: The Citadel Today - Online
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Tuesday
May 21, 2019
2. SC lawmaker apologizes for anti-abortion materials Rep. Nancy Mace felt had targeted her
A male South Carolina lawmaker apologized Monday for distributing anti-abortion materials that state Rep. Nancy Mace felt targeted her after she shared her personal story of being raped as a teenager. Though state Rep. Josiah Magnuson said he stands by his anti-abortion beliefs, he apologized in a closed-door meeting of House Republicans for the way he handled the situation, according to multiple lawmakers in the room. Afterward, Mace told The Post and Courier she appreciated the apology and has accepted it. During a debate last month over a “fetal heartbeat” bill that would ban abortions after around six weeks, Mace proposed an amendment to add exceptions in cases of rape or incest. The Daniel Island Republican went on to detail how she had been sexually assaulted as a teenager, a story that she shared publicly for the first time last year.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Tuesday
May 21, 2019
3. Hugh Conor McDowell, Marine first lieutenant, dies in training accident
1st Lt. Hugh Conor McDowell, a Marines platoon commander, died May 9 on maneuvers in a military training accident at Camp Pendleton in San Diego County, Calif. The former Chestertown resident was 24. Lt. McDowell was commanding a 13-ton, eight-wheeled reconnaissance vehicle that carried seven crew members. The vehicle rolled over in a depression that had recently experienced heavy rains. Born in Washington, D.C., he was the son of Michael H C McDowell, a Belfast-born journalist and Canadian Broadcasting Corp. editor. His mother was Susan Marie Flanigan, a former Gallaudet University public relations official who was born in Baltimore. His parents met while his mother lived in Bolton Hill. He earned a bachelor of science degree from The Citadel and immediately joined the Marine Corps. He was commissioned the day before he graduated and was provost marshal of the 1st Battalion and in Alpha Company.
Published in: Baltimore Sun - Online
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Tuesday
May 21, 2019
4. CresCom Bank and World Affairs Council of Charleston Reward Students for Analysis of Hot Topics in Global Issues
At an award ceremony on April 17, 2019, Joe Bonacci, Senior Vice President for CresCom Bank, presented three Charleston County Public High School students with 2019 John M Settle, Sr./World Affairs Council of Charleston Awards. The Settle Awards are presented annually to students who demonstrate excellence in their studies of world history and foreign affairs. Through its sponsorship, CresCom Bank also presented the winning students with the latest Kindle devices to assist in furthering their studies. The annual Settle Awards are named after John M. Settle, Sr., a graduate of Charleston High School and the Citadel. Settle was CEO of Community First Bank until 2002, and prior to being CEO he was Chairman Emeritus of Community First Bank, which later became CresCom Bank.
Published in: Charleston Regional Business Journal - Online
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Tuesday
May 21, 2019
5. Lowcountry lawmaker pushes for tougher distracted driving laws with DUI-Electronics bill

So far in 2019, South Carolina car crashes have killed 326 people. State Rep. Bill Taylor believes a new distracted driving bill could lower the fatality rate in the years to come. Rep. Taylor's proposed "DUI-E" (Driving Under the Influence of Electronics) bill calls for electronic devices to only be used with a hands-free Bluetooth connection.

Currently, you could get a $25 citation if caught texting while driving in South Carolina If the proposed hands-free law goes into effect, it would cost a driver $100 with no points for the first offense, followed $300 and 2 points for any subsequent violation. The DUI-E bill didn’t pass this session, but Rep. Bill Taylor says he will file a new bill in the house in December.

(Note: The reporter uses the Johnson Hagood Stadium as a demonstration in her story.)

Published in: WCIV - ABC News 4 - Online
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Tuesday
May 21, 2019
6. Citadel baseball’s had its worst season. Can Bulldogs turn it around?
The Citadel has endured the worst season in the Bulldogs’ proud baseball history this year, losing 22 straight games at one point and posting the program’s worst overall and Southern Conference records. The second year of coach Tony Skole’s rebuilding effort has resulted in a 13-42 overall record (.236 winning percentage) and a 5-19 SoCon mark (.208) that are the worst since the school began keeping records in 1965. “Excruciating,” is how Skole, a football and baseball standout during his playing days at The Citadel, puts it. And yet, the Bulldogs arrive at the SoCon Tournament in Greenville with the closest thing to momentum they’ve had since March. The Citadel snapped that 22-game skid with two victories at Western Carolina on Friday and Saturday, the Bulldogs’ first road wins of the season. They open the SoCon Tournament at 10 a.m. Tuesday at Fluor Field in Greenville against that same Western Carolina team. The winner of the single-elimination game enters the double-elimination phase of the tournament against top-seeded Samford at 9 a.m. Wednesday.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Tuesday
May 21, 2019
7. The Citadel’s Peden and Corbitt Earn All-Conference Honors
The Citadel had two players receive postseason honors on Monday when Ben Peden was named to the All-Southern Conference Second Team and Tyler Corbitt was named to the All-Freshman Team. The teams were selected by the league’s head coaches. Peden, who will be playing in his hometown for the conference tournament, finished the regular season hitting .310 with 15 doubles, two triples, eight home runs and 36 RBIs. The senior is the reigning SoCon Player of the Week after helping the Bulldogs to a series victory at Western Carolina last weekend. Peden is currently on a five-game hit streak in which he has collected multiple hits in four of those games. He leads the team with 21 multi-hit games on the season and 13 multiple-RBI contests. Corbitt was named to the all-freshman team after hitting a team-best .332 with 68 hits, 15 doubles, one triple, 21 RBIs and 36 runs scored. He has a pair of double-digit hitting streaks on the season, including a season-long 12-game streak in early March.
Published in: WCSC - Live 5 News - Online
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Tuesday
May 21, 2019
8. 7 FCS vs. FBS Power 5 Football Matchups That May Be Upsets in 2019

The crowning FCS upset of an FBS program remains Appalachian State beating Michigan in 2007, but what gets overlooked is the Wolverines should have been better prepared considering their opponent was coming off two straight national titles. The FBS too often gets caught napping against the lower tier of Division I college football, even schools in Power 5 conferences. Last year. Nicholls topped Kansas and Illinois State beat Colorado State as part of the seven FCS wins over FBS teams. Where and when will it happen in 2019? Sound the upset alarm again, here are seven potential FCS upsets of Power 5 programs:

The Citadel at Georgia Tech (Sept. 14)

The Citadel will have its triple-option offense, now led by quarterback Brandon Rainey, but Georgia Tech is switching from the same attack under new head coach Geoff Collins. The last Southern Conference win over an FBS team belongs to The Citadel (23-21 over South Carolina in 2015).

Published in: Athlon Sports - Online
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Monday
May 20, 2019
1. 'I Serve as a Stepping Stone' - photos from Sarah Zorn's senior year

In 2018, Sarah Zorn became the Citadel’s first female regimental commander. The Times followed her through her senior year as she sought to change the culture of an institution that long denied entry to women.

The New York Times also included the piece in "11 of Our Best Weekend Reads" and this Sunday's "Weekend Briefing."

Published in: The New York Times - Online
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Monday
May 20, 2019
2. With Bastin Hall construction underway, Citadel president and contractors tour site
With the first phase of construction underway on the future home of the Baker School of Business, the leaders of the construction company heading the project took the president of The Citadel on brief tour of the site on on Thursday, May 16. The chairman and founder of the Greenville based THS Constructors, Inc. wanted to come to his alma mater to see the project for himself. Howard Suitt is a member of The Citadel Class of 1948, graduating with a Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering. He founded Suitt Construction in 1968. Suitt has been responsible for placing over $12 billion in construction value, representing a total installed cost of approximately $36 billion for more than 2,000 projects.
Published in: The Citadel Today - Online
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Monday
May 20, 2019
3. Young love lost, an only son gone, after fatal training accident at Camp Pendleton

Kathleen Isabel Bourque sat on the edge of a rock outcropping at the beach. Wearing a white, eyelet slip dress and a camouflage Marine Corps blouse, she urged eight-month-old Ruthie, her black Labrador puppy, to jump up next to her. The place was a spot where the love of her life and soulmate, Marine Corps 1st Lt. Conor McDowell, frequently photographed her — sometimes in the same white dress. “He called it my angel dress,” Bourque said. It was what she was wearing the first time they met — on July 11, 2018, in her hometown of Salisbury, N.C. “I saw him and it was like looking into the eyes of God,” she said, Wednesday, May 15. “I just knew he was the one. He had on his Captain America shirt, khaki pants and his favorite pair of brown boots. He was tall, built and he had the most intense eyes; they were beautiful bright green. He had the thickest, darkest eyelashes and gorgeous thick, black curly hair.” That memory is one she will cling to forever because physically, Bourque, 22, will never see McDowell again. McDowell, 24, a platoon leader with the 1st Light Armored Battalion at Camp Pendleton, died May 9 during a training exercise on the base.

Syndicated by:

Stars and Stripes

Daily Republic

Published in: The Orange County Register - Online
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Monday
May 20, 2019
4. Charleston Police seek people to help with training exercise
The Charleston Police Department is looking for people to participate in a critical incident scenario for training purposes. WCBD-TV reports Charles Francis of the Charleston Police Department says the scenario will consist of multiple suspects acting in a coordinated active shooter incident. For the scenario to be successful, he says they’re looking for role players to act like innocent bystanders to make the training as realistic as possible. Francis says the opportunity allows CPD to interact and involve the community and allows the public to feel what a scenario of this magnitude could be like. The scenario will be staged at the Citadel Campus on Thursday, May 23, from 8 a.m. to Noon. Anyone willing to participate is asked to email LT. Murray at murrays@charleston-sc.gov.
Published in: The Associated Press - Online
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Monday
May 20, 2019
5. 'Game of Thrones' finale recap: Ashes to ashes

Editor's note: Warning: This article contains spoilers for the series finale of "Game of Thrones."

And so, our song of ice and fire ends as we all said it would: In extended council meetings and elective monarchy! Congratulations to anyone who correctly called King Bran in their "Game of Thrones" office pool. You definitely earned that Starbucks gift card. As dawn rises on the reign of Bran the Broken, we are treated to a triumphant shot of Tyrion arranging chairs for 30 solid seconds. He's very nervous for the first small council meeting of this new era, and you would be too if Bronn was your Master of Coin. Brienne's there too, as Head of the Kingsguard, along with a freshly-knighted Ser Podrick.

Sam must have taken some online courses at Citadel.edu, because he checks into the meeting as the new Grand Maester.

(The Citadel is a location in the series.)

Published in: CNN Entertainment - Online
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Monday
May 20, 2019
6. Awards & Recognitions

GRADUATIONS

Ryan Pulliam of Burlington graduated May 4 from The Citadel with a degree in political science.

Published in: The Courier-Tribune - Online
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Monday
May 20, 2019
6. Phillips graduates from The Citadel
Cole Phillips, of Spruce Pine, son of James and Sandy Phillips, earned a Civil Engineering degree from The Citadel. Phillips graduated Saturday, May 4, during the South Carolina Corps of Cadets commencement ceremony in McAlister Field House. Graduates accepted their diploma from Citadel alumnus Gen. Glenn W. Walters, USMC (Ret.), who was officiating as president for the first time. The Citadel Class of 2019 includes 528 cadets, veteran students and active duty students. The graduates come from 32 states and seven countries. About 35 percent of the class accepted commissions as U.S. military officers in all branches of service before graduation. The ceremony followed three days of the Corps’ commencement-related actives, which included an awards convocation, commissioning ceremonies for cadets becoming military officers and The Citadel’s Long Gray Line parade. The top academic programs for the Class of 2019 were business administration, criminal justice, mechanical engineering, civil engineering and political science.
Published in: Mitchell News-Journal - Online
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Monday
May 20, 2019
6. The Citadel graduation
A local student graduated from The Citadel during the South Carolina Corps of Cadets commencement ceremony on May 4 in McAlister Field House. Cameron Lambert of Thomasville earned a Modern Language degree from The Citadel.
Published in: The Courier-Tribune - Online
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Monday
May 20, 2019
6a. 15 students sign for military service or university

The military will have 15 new members following the Richmond County Military Signing Ceremony held at Richmond Senior High School Wednesday where the young people were recognized for their commitment to a military branch or military university.

The military will have 15 new members following the Richmond County Military Signing Ceremony held at Richmond Senior High School Wednesday where the young people were recognized for their commitment to a military branch or military university.

Published in: Richmond County Daily Journal - Online
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Monday
May 20, 2019
6b. 82nd Airborne Division to induct second Hall of Fame class

The 82nd Airborne Division will induct its second Hall of Fame class on Wednesday during All American Week, the division’s celebration of paratroopers past and present.

Maj. Gen. Reuben H. Tucker, who died Jan. 6, 1970, at the age of 58. He commanded the 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment in combat from 1942-1945 from Sicily to Germany and, at 31 years old, was the youngest regimental commander during World War II. During his command, while fighting at Anzio beachhead, the 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment earned the nickname the “Devils in Baggy Pants.” He also commanded the 504th during the Waal River Crossing, capturing the Nijmegen Bridge as part of Operation Market Garden. As a colonel, he was one of the most decorated officers in the Army. For his actions during World War II, he was awarded two Distinguished Service Crosses and a Silver Star. He later served as the commanding general of Fort Dix and the commandant of cadets at the Citadel.

Published in: The Fayetteville Observer - Online
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Monday
May 20, 2019
6b. Primary Preview: Two seek Republican nomination for District Attorney

For the first time in years, Cumberland County residents will see a district attorney’s election that doesn’t feature longtime DA David Freed. Freed was sworn in as the U.S. attorney for the Middle District of Pennsylvania in November 2017, and M.L. “Skip” Ebert was appointed to fill the remainder of Freed’s term. Ebert is seeking to retain the position permanently, but faces challenger Jaime Keating, former first assistant district attorney in the county, for the Republican Party nomination. Sean Patrick Quinlan is the only Democrat on that party’s ballot Tuesday.

Skip Ebert Age: 70 Political Party: Republican Residence: Carlisle Education: The Citadel, Military College of South Carolina, with a political science degree; master’s degree from Boston University; law degree from Dickinson School of Law

Published in: The Sentinel - Online
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Monday
May 20, 2019
6b. Strange Inheritance with Jamie Colby
Verbatim: I'm Jamie Colby, and today I'm driving along the Southern California coastline in San Diego. I'm here to meet a woman who says her strange inheritance took her on a journey to meet someone she never really got to know when he was alive her own father. My name is Nancy Crego-Powers, and my father, Arthur V. Crego, left a collection that took him a lifetime to accumulate. For starters, Nancy asks me to check out the oldest item in her father's collection. When World War II breaks out, Art enters the famed Citadel Military College in South Carolina. It's there he falls in love with a vivacious 18-year-old named Janet wade.
Published in: Fox Business Network - Broadcast
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Monday
May 20, 2019
6c. No more Dixie Plantation at College of Charleston
The College of Charleston has rebranded its 800-plus-acre former plantation to reaffirm its "commitment to diversity, inclusion and community." The college's Board of Trustees voted unanimously last month to support interim President Steve Osborne's recommendation to rename Dixie Plantation as the College of Charleston at Stono Preserve. While the term "Dixie" has seen less local official use, the song with the same name has stirred its share of unease. In 1992, after a high-profile, racially charged incident at The Citadel, the school stopped its tradition of singing "Dixie" during football games.
Published in: San Francisco Gate - Online
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Monday
May 20, 2019
7. Iredell Jones IV
Jones, Iredell IV (Idy) 79, passed away May 5, 2019 in the presence of his family. Idy was a 1961 graduate of the Citadel Military College of SC where he received many honors - Commander of the Summerall Guards, the first sophomore to win Star of the West, Senior Class Secretary, Who is Who in American Colleges and many others. Upon graduation he joined the US Air Force and rose to the rank of Captain. He was a Vietnam War Veteran who served two tours. He became a career airline pilot, flying for Braniff International Airlines and American Trans Air. He was known by friends and co-workers for his friendship, humor, happiness, and expert flying skills. A military honors funeral will be held in Sumter, SC at The Church of the Holy Cross on May 25th at 10am.
Published in: Las Vegas Review-Journal - Online
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Monday
May 20, 2019
8. Cougars cap sweep of Delaware; Bulldogs win 2nd straight; Clemson routed by Wake Forest

The Citadel got six shutout innings from freshman Lathan Todd in a victory over Western Carolina in the regular-season finale at Hennon Stadium. The Bulldogs (12-42, 5-19 Southern Conference), who recently snapped a 22-game losing skid, won their second straight to win the series.

Other examples of coverage include:

WCSC - Live 5 News

Catamount Sports

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Monday
May 20, 2019
9. Undrafted, but Undeterred as Tryout Players Work to Make the Team
Sterling Sheffield, Ventell Bryant and Noah Dawkins were invited to the Bengals rookie minicamp for a tryout and signed with the team after one day. Here is the story of their journeys to Cincinnati. Travel 700 miles south to find another linebacker, Noah Dawkins from The Citadel. With 12 scouts in attendance at Citadel’s pro day, Dawkins is relaxed, focused and locked in. He’s about to showcase his potential 4.3 speed in the 40-yard dash. As he takes his first few steps, he suddenly he feels a pop. It’s his left hamstring, booming in pain.
Published in: Bengals News - Online
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Monday
May 20, 2019
Andrews soccer standout signs to The Citadel
As a kid in Mount Pleasant, Elissa Reckdenwald started her athletic career as a competitive dancer and did so until she was in the eighth-grade. Her freshman year of high school, she and her family moved from Mount Pleasant to Andrews and with the move, Reckdenwald decided to give up dance and play soccer for Andrews High, a sport she played off and on recreationally. In a ceremony on May 16 in the Andrews High School media center, Reckdenwald officially announced she will be attending the The Citadel to further her education and play soccer for the Lady Bulldogs. Reckdenwald originally applied to The Citadel because father and grandfather are both alumni, and after visiting the school, she fell in love with the campus. She also participated in an ID camp at The Citadel and had a chance to meet her new teammates.
Published in: South Strand News - Online
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Monday
May 20, 2019
Britt Receives David Knight Graduate Scholarship
University of Tennessee at Chattanooga men's cross country student-athlete Mark Britt is the recipient of the David Knight Graduate Scholarship the Southern Conference announced Friday. He is one of 10 student-athletes who will be honored for their accomplishments at the Southern Conference Honors Dinner in Hilton Head Island, S.C., on Tuesday, May 28. This year's honorees include: Bob McCloskey Insurance Scholarship recipients Logan Miller (The Citadel)
Published in: Chattanooga Mocs - Online
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Monday
May 20, 2019
Winners announced in Best of Prep Sports Awards

Male Scholar Athlete of the Year Travis Lott, Stratford Football and Baseball

Lott is a Top 10 student academically at Stratford and has a future ahead at The Citadel. He has received both academic and baseball scholarships to the military school and was recently awarded the Star of the West summer scholarship. The Star of the West, The Citadel’s most prestigious scholarship, is intended to encourage study and research abroad among full-time cadets intending to apply for highly competitive graduate schools

Published in: The Berkeley Independent - Online
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Thursday
May 16, 2019
1. Meet some of The Citadel’s recent graduates who are getting straight to business

Meet three graduates from the Class of 2019 who are already putting their business degrees to work. The Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business educates and develops innovative leaders of principle to serve the global community. Through its teaching, scholarship and service, the school demonstrates its commitment to its core values: integrity and respect for others, professional and intellectual development, and excellence through valuing innovation, diversity, and continuous improvement. The Citadel’s business degrees are some of the most popular programs in all areas of the college. More graduates from the Class of 2019 earned a bachelor’s in business administration, both within the South Carolina Corps of Cadets and the Evening Undergraduate programs. In The Citadel Graduate College, a master’s in business administration was the second most popular degree with the Class of 2019. Learn what you can do with a business degree from The Citadel.

Published in: The Citadel Today - Online
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Thursday
May 16, 2019
2. 15 Richmond County students sign up to join military, go to military schools
Fifteen Richmond Senior High School students were recognized during a military signing ceremony on Wednesday. Six will join the Marine Corps, four are going into the Army, one is enlisting in the Air Force, three are attending The Citadel and one is going to Norwich University. Grantham J. Freeman, Kyle T. Goodwin and Billy C. Wilson are all headed south to The Citadel. Goodwin also cited the history of South Carolina’s military college as a reason for making it his choice. “And there’s a lot of structure, I like structure,” he said. “I’m really excited.” Freeman agreed with Goodwin about the structure, and is also fond of the location. “It’s a great environment and Charleston is a very beautiful, historic city,” he said. “Everybody knows The Citadel is always the greatest — better than Norwich.” Freeman will major in security and intelligence studies; Goodwin in political science; and Wilson in criminal justice.
Published in: The Richmond Observer - Online
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Thursday
May 16, 2019
3. Mu Alpha Chapter Represents at the 74th Annual Meeting of the Sixth District
The Mighty Sixth District of the Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc. held its 74th Annual Meeting at the Sheraton Imperial Hotel in Durham, NC from May 2nd to May 5th, 2019. The meeting was attended by a record number of registered members of the district and their spouses. The Charleston delegation included members of the Mu Alpha Chapter, which were led by First Vice District Representative and Chapter Basileus Kurt Walker. Walker was re-elected to the position where he will serve for another year. Vice Basileus Reginald Terry was the recipient of the district’s Father of the Year award. Terry works at Julian Mitchell School of Math and Science as a Behavior Management Specialist and is father to J’Khari Miller, of the College of Charleston, was the winner of Undergraduate Grant Scholarship and Blakely Epps of the Citadel Military College was winner of the Founders’ Memorial Scholarship.
Published in: Charleston Chronicle - Online
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Thursday
May 16, 2019
4. West Islip heads to the polls
School districts across Long Island will be heading to the polls on Super Tuesday, May 21, to decide on school budgets and board of education trustees. Compitello has been a West Islip resident for 66 years. He attended West Islip Public Schools, from K-12, and graduated in 1969. When asked why he wants to be on the school board, Compitello said, “I feel like I owe the community something.” “It’s payback time,” he chuckled. After graduating from high school, Compitello attended The Citadel: The Military College of South Carolina. He graduated in 1973 as a distinguishednaval graduate with a B.A. in history. Upon graduation, Compitello was commissioned as a United States naval officer and served for 22 years until retirement. After retiring from the Navy, with numerous decorations, Compitello attended Dowling College and graduated in 1997 with an M.A. in education. He went on to teach at West Islip High School from 1997-2017.
Published in: The Islip Bulletin - Online
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Thursday
May 16, 2019
5. Nixing Dixie: College of Charleston renames its plantation ‘Stono Preserve’
It’s unclear where the name Dixie Plantation came from, but it’s clear where it’s going: to history’s dustbin. The College of Charleston has rebranded its 800-plus-acre former plantation in southern Charleston County, a change that its outgoing president said “reaffirms who we are as a university and our commitment to diversity, inclusion and community.” The college’s Board of Trustees voted unanimously last month to support interim President Steve Osborne’s recommendation to rename Dixie Plantation as the College of Charleston at Stono Preserve. Osborne said Wednesday — his last day as interim president before incoming President Andrew Hsu takes over — the college had discussed the name for about a year and he was a big supporter of the change. Reaction so far, he said, has been positive. The rebranding also comes at a time when some local developers are dropping the word “plantation” from their neighborhoods. While the term “Dixie” has seen less local official use, the song with the same name has stirred its share of unease. In 1992, after a high-profile, racially charged incident at The Citadel, the school stopped its tradition of singing “Dixie” during football games.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Thursday
May 16, 2019
6. Patriot Art Foundation Launches
In 2010, internationally renowned artist Mary Whyte set out on an inspirational seven-year mission to paint fifty large-scale watercolor portraits of current day American veterans. WE THE PEOPLE: Portraits of Veterans in America is Whyte’s remarkable series depicting military veterans of all ages and in all walks of life. Images including a Missouri dairy farmer, Rhode Island lobsterman, Pennsylvania science teacher, South Carolina single mother, and 46 other moving portraits will be showcased together – culminating in a timeless portrait of and for the American people. The exhibition opens this October in Charleston. The mission of the Patriot Art Foundation is to seek a better world for our veterans through initiatives in art, history, education, leadership and imagination. The Foundation is organizing a working board of veterans, military leaders, business leaders, educators and artists. Partner organizations currently include The Citadel, the University of South Carolina Press and the Charleston Symphony Orchestra.
Published in: The Island Connection - Online
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Wednesday
May 15, 2019
1. ‘A patriot’: Father praises Marine killed in training accident in California
As seen on News4, Washington, D.C., by Darcy Spencer A marine killed in a training accident in California who had deep ties to the D.C. area is being remembered as a leader and upstanding patriot. First Lieutenant Hugh Conor McDowell was killed in an accident that wounded six other Marines at Camp Pendleton. He had grown up in Chevy Chase, Maryland, and attended St. John’s College High School in Northwest. McDowell graduated from The Citadel Military College in South Carolina and became a Marine Corps officer in May 2017. His father, Michael McDowell, told News4 in a Skype interview that McDowell was a leader, “a patriot in the right way” and had achieved his lifelong dream in becoming a Marine. “He was a leader. He loved leading the young kids. He would never allow them to be hazed or bullied,” Michael McDowell said. McDowell was engaged to his soulmate, with whom he wanted to have six children, his family said. His fiancee, Kathleen Isabel Rose Bourque, remembered McDowell as a “beacon of strength and ferocity and courage and grace.” A training crash involving a vehicle roll-over cut his life short. The McDowells, grieving the loss of their only child, want to ensure no other family feels that pain.
Published in: The Citadel Today - Online
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Wednesday
May 15, 2019
2. Critical infrastructure security and community resilience workshop series
The Citadel’s National Security Agency designated National Center of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense Education is hosting a workshop that’s open to the public, but specifically intended for local leaders and the owners of high-priority infrastructure that are critical to the Department of Defense (DoD). The Jack Voltaic 2.5 Cyber Workshop will focus on the key relationships between commercial-critical infrastructure and DoD-critical missions. It will be held from 8 a.m. – 6 p.m. on Thurs., May 21 in Grimsley and Thompson Halls on The Citadel campus.
Published in: The Citadel Today - Online
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Wednesday
May 15, 2019
3. AAC&U visits The Citadel while on the road

Photo: AAC&U’s Tia Brown McNair (third from right) conducted a site visit at the TRHT Campus Center at The Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina.

Tia Brown McNair, vice president for diversity, equity, and student success and executive director for the TRHT Campus Centers, participated in two site visits to the Truth, Racial Healing & Transformation (TRHT) Campus Centers at Spelman College and Millsaps College on April 4 and 5, respectively. On April 9, McNair facilitated a workshop titled “Intentionality by Design: Equity, Inclusive Excellence, and Quality” at Trinity University in San Antonio. On April 10, McNair delivered the opening keynote, “Equity and Assessment: Inextricably Linked for Student Success and for Social Justice,” at the Assessment Network of New York’s 7th Annual Conference in Saratoga Springs, New York. On April 24, McNair participated in a site visit to the TRHT Campus Center at The Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina in Charleston, South Carolina.

Published in: The Citadel Today - Online
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Wednesday
May 15, 2019
4. It took SC Rep. Nancy Mace 25 years to share she was raped. She never expected this.
When state Rep. Nancy Mace decided to share her personal story of being raped at 16, she thought the speech would make her fellow Republicans think twice about an abortion bill. Weeks later, she felt targeted instead. On Monday, the House Republican Caucus will decide how to respond to the recent actions of Rep. Josiah Magnuson, who last week distributed a postcard and a letter to lawmakers that described rape as a “misdeed of the parent.” When state Rep. Nancy Mace decided to share her personal story of being raped at 16, she thought the speech would make her fellow Republicans think twice about an abortion bill. Weeks later, she felt targeted instead. On Monday, the House Republican Caucus will decide how to respond to the recent actions of Rep. Josiah Magnuson, who last week distributed a postcard and a letter to lawmakers that described rape as a “misdeed of the parent.” When The Citadel announced it would begin accepting women, Mace said earning a degree from the military college became something she had to prove to herself she could do. She now credits the school with saving her life. “It’s hard for women who are strong, like I am, in the way that something like this affects us. A lot of times we blame ourselves. It’s something you can’t believe happened, and you ask yourself, ‘How did I let this happen to me?’ It’s very difficult to overcome,” she said.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Wednesday
May 15, 2019
5. Former South Carolina City Mayor Dies at 78
The former mayor of Greenville, South Carolina, has died at the age of 78. The Greenville News reports William Douglas Workman III died Sunday at his Lowcountry home. The retired U.S. Army Reserve Colonel first became mayor in 1983 and was reelected twice. A 1961 graduate of The Citadel college in Charleston, Workman's political career started in 1969 when he was elected as a trustee of the county school board. He later served two years on the Greenville City Council before being elected mayor. Workman was defeated in the 1995 mayoral race by current Mayor Knox White. Workman also worked as a journalist at The Greenville News and the Charleston News and Courier and taught at Greenville Technical College, where he was later appointed dean of the school's health sciences.
Published in: US News & World Report - Online
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Wednesday
May 15, 2019
6. Reboot the Commute Encourages Area Employers to Help Reduce Region’s Traffic Congestion

Eighteen local businesses with a total workforce of more than 39,000 announced today their commitment to reducing the three-county region’s traffic congestion as part of an effort to Reboot the Commute. Reboot the Commute is an employer-led traffic mitigation campaign, spearheaded by the Economic Leadership Council of Charleston Regional Development Alliance (CRDA), that challenges other employers to help reduce regional traffic congestion. It includes an online guide that organizations can use to implement positive changes by encouraging alternative commuting strategies like telecommuting, staggered start times, ridesharing, and connecting employees to local transit resources like CARTA and LowcountryGO. The 18 organizations who have committed to encouraging their employees to #ReboottheCommute: Benefitfocus Boeing South Carolina Booz Allen Hamilton Charleston Metro Chamber of Commerce Charleston Regional Development Alliance Charleston Southern University Charleston Trident Association of Realtors The Citadel College of Charleston Evening Post Industries Google South Carolina The InterTech Group Kiawah Island Golf Resort Medical University of South Carolina Roper St. Francis Healthcare South Carolina Aquarium Trident Health Trident Technical College

Published in: Charleston Regional Business Journal - Online
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Wednesday
May 15, 2019
7. College of Charleston rally stuns Citadel as Bulldogs drop 21st straight; Clemson, USC prevail

Bradley Dixon robbed Cole Simpson of a pinch-hit game-tying home run in the top of the ninth to put the finishing touches on College of Charleston’s 19th comeback win of the season in a 9-8 victory over The Citadel on Tuesday evening at Patriots Point. The victory pushes College of Charleston’s (33-19) win streak to five and marks the Cougars’ third consecutive come-from-behind win. Charleston erased a six-run deficit - the largest shortfall the Cougars have overcome in a win this season - after trailing 7-1 in the fourth inning. The Cougars completed the comeback with a five-run eighth to reverse an 8-4 deficit and hand The Citadel (10-41) its 21st straight loss.

Also covered by WCSC - Live 5 News

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Tuesday
May 14, 2019
1. The Citadel Graduate College Class of 2019
Approximately 400 graduate and evening undergraduate students accepted diplomas during The Citadel Graduate College’s commencement ceremony on Saturday, May 4 in McAlister Field House. Graduates accepted their diploma from Citadel alumnus Gen. Glenn W. Walters, USMC (Ret.), who was officiating as president for the first time. The top graduate programs for the Class of 2019 included a education, business administration and project management. The top evening undergraduate programs for the graduating class included business administration, nursing and electrical engineering. The 20 men and women who earned Bachelor of Science in Nursing degrees were the first class to graduate from the CGC’s new evening undergraduate nursing program.
Published in: The Citadel Today - Online
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Tuesday
May 14, 2019
2. 'You're one of the good ones': Tributes are paid to 'unique' Marine platoon commander, 24

A Marine killed in a training accident at Camp Pendleton on Thursday morning was named as 1st Lieutenant Hugh Conor McDowell from Washington, D.C. The 24-year-old platoon commander was crushed when a light armored vehicle overturned during a battalion training exercise at the sprawling military base in southern California. He died en route to hospital. Six other Marines from the 1st Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion, 1st Marine Division, were taken to hospital but were not seriously hurt. Lt. McDowell's father, Michael McDowell, called his son a 'leader' and a 'warrior' in a moving tribute on Facebook. 'There is a massive hole in our hearts and there will be for the rest of our lives. He was our only beloved child.'

Published in: Daily Mail - Online
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Tuesday
May 14, 2019
3. All Socialisms Are Antisocial
Those who have seen the 1982 Steven Spielberg movie Poltergeist may remember the scene when the little girl touches the snowy screen of her family’s television and says, “They’re here,” meaning the evil ghostly forces bringing death and destruction. Well, they are here: socialism, nationalism, protectionism, and political paternalism. The ghosts of collectivisms past have returned, and their harmful effects will be the same as any experienced in the past. We seem to be in the midst of what may be a dangerous return to the worst political ideas and policies of the 20th century. We must first understand that philosophically they all originate from a common root. The group, the tribe, the nation, the race, the social class are declared to be superior to and all-controlling over the individual members of society. The words “freedom” and “liberation” are widely used by all the proponents of these variations on the collectivist theme, but their use, in fact, has nothing to do with either freedom or liberation. They reflect instances of George Orwell’s “newspeak” in his famous anti-totalitarian novel 1984. The meanings of words are turned on their heads and are used in ways opposite to their original meanings. Hence, political control and manipulation means to have real personal freedom from tyranny; and complete intolerance and censorship of views and actions inconsistent with the “progressive” and democratic socialist views of the world means to have real intellectual and social liberation from oppression. Richard M. Ebeling, an AIER Senior Fellow, is the BB&T Distinguished Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel, in Charleston, South Carolina. Ebeling lived on AIER's campus from 2008 to 2009.
Published in: AIER American Institute for Economic Research - Online
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Tuesday
May 14, 2019
4. 157 graduate from Charleston School of Law
The largest graduating class in six years received diplomas on May 12 from the Charleston School of Law during an annual May commencement ceremony at McAlister Field House on the campus of The Citadel. Some 157 students graduated today, joining more than 2,000 past graduates to bring the total number of students who have earned a law degree from the school to more than 2,200, school officials said. Law school President Ed Bell said the new graduates reflected the school’s continuing commitment to its motto, “pro bono populi,” or “for the good of the people.” For example, the Class of 2019 contributed more than 26,500 hours of volunteer service to local communities, the state and the nation, according to school records.
Published in: Moultrie News - Online
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Tuesday
May 14, 2019
5. William Workman III | Obituaries
William Douglas Workman III, husband of Patti Fishburne Workman, died May 12, 2019 in Walterboro. Born in Charleston on July 3, 1940, Bill was the son of the late William Douglas Workman Jr. and Heber Rhea “Dimples” Thomas Workman. His early childhood was spent in Walterboro until the end of World War II, when his family moved to Columbia. Bill was graduated from Dreher High School in Columbia, and was a graduate of The Citadel class of 1961. He then served in the United States Army as a member of the S-2 (Intelligence) 7 Artillery Group in Thule, Greenland, and subsequently in the Office of the Chief of Staff for Intelligence in the Pentagon in Washington, D.C. Bill’s military service continued after his active duty, serving in the U.S. Army Reserve before retiring as a Lieutenant Colonel. In lieu of flowers, any donations should be sent to either The Citadel Development Foundation, 171 Moultrie Street, Charleston, SC 29409, or to the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America, 322 Eighth Avenue, 7th Floor, New York, NY 10001. Parker-Rhoden Funeral Home, 117 Paul Street, Walterboro, SC 29488 is in charge of arrangements.
Published in: Walterboro Live - Online
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Tuesday
May 14, 2019
6. Preview of Citadel vs. College of Charleston

Verbatim: TOMORROW NIGHT, THE INNER CITY RIVALRY WILL BE RENEWED AS. THE COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON WILL HOST THE CITADEL, FOR THE BULLDOGS, THEY'VE ONLY GOT 4 GAMES LEFT IN THE REGULAR SEASON TO TRY TO BREAK THEIR CURRENT 20 GAME LOSING STREAK, THE LONGEST IN SCHOOL HISTORY, BEFORE THEY TAKE PART IN THE PLAY IN GAME OF THE SOCON TOURNAMENT NEXT TUESDAY. MORNING, THE COUGARS, COMING OFF A SWEEP OF TOWSON OVER ON PATRIOTS POINT OVER THE WEEKEND ARE CURRENTLY SITTING IN 2ND PLACE IN THE CAA, THIS ONE BEGINS AT 6PM TOMORROW NIGHT, ONE COLLEGE FOOTBALL NOTE, THE CITADEL ANNOUNCED TODAY THAT BOBBY RUFF HAS BEEN PROMOTED TO FULL TIME ASSISTANT COACH, HE. LL BE IN CHARGE OF TIGHT ENDS AND TACKLES, RUFF JOINED THE PROGRAM LAST YEAR AS A DEFESINVE QUALITY CONTROL COACH, RUFF IS A LOWCOUNTRY NATIVE HAVING GRADUATED FROM WEST ASHLEY AND WENT ON TO PLAY LINEBACKER OVER AT CHARLESTON SOUTHERN, WHERE HE HELPED LEAD THE BUCS TO A PAIR OF CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIPS, REMEMBER WE COVER THE NEWS 24-7 ON LIVE 5 NEWS DOT COM.

Watch the on-air coverage here.

Published in: WCSC - Live 5 News - Broadcast
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Tuesday
May 14, 2019
Dexter Coakley reflects on football journey from Wando to Dallas Cowboys
It was never a goal. It was barely a dream. Dexter Coakley realized that when it came down to it, he was an undersized kid from South Carolina who was playing football because football was there to be played. Growing up in Mount Pleasant, there weren’t any professional teams around, so he never spent much time thinking, “What if … ” All these years later, he still can’t believe it turned out like it did. “Dexter Coakley is a guy that I despised for four years when I was a Citadel guy and he was an Appalachian State guy,” Hall official Andy Solomon joked. “He’s a good guy … for an Appalachian State guy.”
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Monday
May 13, 2019
1. Tributes pour in after revered Marine platoon commander dies in Camp Pendleton accident

A training accident involving a light armored vehicle at Camp Pendleton, Calif., has left a Marine officer dead and six enlisted Marines injured. The LAV-25 rolled over on Thursday during a battalion training exercise, killing 1st Lt. Hugh Conor McDowell, a platoon commander with the 1st Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion, according to the 1st Marine Division. McDowell died en route to hospital. The other six Marines were in stable condition with non-life-threatening injuries. McDowell, 24, grew up in Washington D.C. and was the only child of Michael McDowell and Susan Flanigan, who moved to Chestertown, Md., after he left St John's College High School. A graduate of The Citadel military college in Charleston, S.C., McDowell completed his Light Armored Reconnaissance course in March and had only recently picked up his platoon.

Also covered by The Baltimore Sun.

Published in: The Washington Examiner - Online
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Monday
May 13, 2019
2. The South Carolina Corps of Cadets Class of 2019

More than 500 members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets accepted diplomas during The Citadel’s commencement ceremony on Saturday, May 4 in McAlister Field House. About 35% of the class accepted commissions as U.S. military officers in all branches of service just prior to graduation. Graduates accepted their diploma from Citadel alumnus Gen. Glenn W. Walters, USMC (Ret.), who was officiating as president for the first time. The top academic programs for the Class of 2019 included business administration, criminal justice, mechanical engineering, civil engineering and political science.

Published in: The Citadel Today - Online
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Monday
May 13, 2019
2. Top jobs for School of Engineering graduates; what they say about The Citadel
The Citadel School of Engineering is one of the oldest programs in America and is consistently ranked among the top 25 programs in the nation. The School of Engineering offers four bachelor of science, four master of science, and 13 graduate certificate programs. The majority of the cadets and students studying the fields of civil, construction, electrical and mechanical engineering, as well as project management, are employed before they graduate, with nearly 100 percent are employed within two months of graduation. Approximately 80 percent of those graduates stay in South Carolina for their careers. Meet some of The Citadel Class of 2019 School of Engineering graduates.
Published in: The Citadel Today - Online
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Monday
May 13, 2019
3. SLED: N. Charleston man steals CofC student’s transcripts to get into graduate programs, land Boeing job

Agents have arrested a North Charleston man accused of stealing a College of Charleston student's transcript in order to get into graduate programs and land a job at Boeing. The South Carolina Law Enforcement Division arrested 38-year-old Billy Joe Bell and charged him with identity fraud. He was locked up at the Charleston County Detention Center. According to SLED investigators, in May of 2018, Bell went to the registrar’s office at the College of Charleston and brought several documents including a sworn affidavit in order to change a student’s personal information to that of his own. Court documents state Bell also obtained a student’s College of Charleston’s identification number with the intent to fraudulently obtain the victim’s official College of Charleston academic transcript and undergraduate degree. SLED says Bell used the documents in an attempt to get into graduate programs at the Citadel and West Governor’s University, and get a job at Boeing.

Other examples of coverage include:

WCIV - ABC News 4

WYFF - Greenville, SC

The State

Published in: WCSC - Live 5 News - Online
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Monday
May 13, 2019
4. Area students graduate from South Carolina Corps of Cadets

Three local residents were among more than 500 members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets accepted diplomas during The Citadel's commencement ceremony May 4 in McAlister Field House.

Local graduates include:

• Devan Wilson of Shenandoah Junction, W.Va., criminal justice

• Andrew Diaz of Frederick, Md., exercise science

• Braeden Bartrum of Frederick, business administration

Graduates accepted their diplomas from Citadel alumnus Gen. Glenn W. Walters, who retired from the U.S. Marine Corps and was officiating as president for the first time. The Citadel Class of 2019 includes 528 cadets, veteran students and active-duty students. The graduates came from 32 states and seven countries. About 35% of the class accepted commmissions as U.S. military officers in all branches of service prior to graduation. The ceremony followed three days of the corps' commencement-related actives, which included an awards convocation, commissioning ceremonies for cadets becoming military officers and The Citadel's iconic Long Gray Line parade. The top academic programs for the Class of 2019 included business administration, criminal justice, mechanical engineering, civil engineering and political science.

Published in: Herald-Mail Media - Online
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Monday
May 13, 2019
4. College Notes
Griffin Swope of Fredricksburg has graduated with a degree in history, and Jacob Ligon of Fredericksburg has graduated with a degree in business administration from The Citadel, Charleston, S.C.
Published in: The Free Lance-Star - Online
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Monday
May 13, 2019
4. Colleges name graduates, dean's list for Paulding students

The Citadel More than 500 members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets accepted diplomas during The Citadel's commencement ceremony on Saturday, May 4, in Charleston, South Carolina.

Local graduates included:

• Philip Davis of Dallas, Social Science.

• Paul Carney of Dallas, Criminal Justice.

Published in: West Georgia Neighbor - Online
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Monday
May 13, 2019
4. Matthew Dymond, of Tunkhannock, graduates from The Citadel
Matthew Dymond, of Tunkhannock, earned a Mechanical Engineering degree from The Citadel. Dymond graduated during the South Carolina Corps of Cadets commencement ceremony on Saturday, May 4 in McAlister Field House.
Published in: My Dallas Post - Online
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Monday
May 13, 2019
5. Upward Bound prepares WHS student for college
The Upward Bound program through Appalachian State University — an academic preparation program for first-generation and low-income students — is helping many students in the region feel prepared for post-secondary education. One student graduating from the program after starting as a ninth-grader is Noah Pearson. Pearson is a senior at Watauga High School and plans to attend The Citadel, a military college in South Carolina, as a student in the school’s civil engineering program. “They’ve helped me get on my right path for the future and they’ve helped several others do the same,” Pearson said. “I think it’s something that’s priceless. There’s no words to describe how thankful I am and what they’ve done for me and are doing for many others.” Pearson said he had originally heard about Upward Bound from his cousins in Tennessee who were in the program and participated through East Tennessee State University. He then became interested in the program when Gersonde came to his school and did a presentation on Upward Bound.
Published in: Watauga Democrat - Online
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Monday
May 13, 2019
6. LTC Roy A. (Tony) Moss Selected as Fork Union Military Academy's Commandant of Cadets
Fork Union Military Academy today announced the selection of LTC Roy A. (Tony) Moss, US Army (Ret.), to serve as Fork Union Military Academy's Commandant of Cadets. Moss has been on the staff of the college-prep boys boarding school in Fork Union, Virginia, since 2018 serving as Chief Financial Officer. Moss served 21 years on active duty with the United States Army, retiring at the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. He joined the staff of Fork Union Military Academy in the summer of 2018 as Chief Financial Officer. Prior to that, LTC Moss was Director of Cadet Admissions and Director of Cadet Training at the University of North Georgia, a senior military college. LTC Moss also served as Senior Military Science Instructor and Executive Officer in the ROTC Department at The Citadel. LTC Moss is a graduate of The Citadel, receiving his Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration. He earned his Master of Business Administration degree from Benedictine College in Atchison, Kansas. His military education includes the Field Artillery Officer Basic, the Infantry Advanced Course, and the US Army Command and General Staff College.
Published in: PR Web - Online
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Monday
May 13, 2019
6. UCI Medical Affiliates Completes New Executive Leadership Team
UCI Medical Affiliates, the nonmedical management company of Doctors Care urgent care and Progressive Physical Therapy, is pleased to announce the completion of its new executive leadership team. The new team aims to usher in a new era of health care excellence. As announced previously, Curtis Franke, MD, MBA, was promoted to chief medical officer and president of Doctors Care, P.A. In his new role, Franke oversees the organization’s medical office, which is responsible for clinical outcomes including quality of care and service. Franke started with the company as a staff physician in 2008. He was named regional medical director for the Lowcountry in 2010, managing 13 centers. Board certified in family medicine, Franke earned a Bachelor of Science degree in biomedical science at Texas A&M University, and a Doctor of Medicine degree at University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. He was the chief resident of his family practice residency at the Medical University of South Carolina and received a Master of Business Administration from The Citadel in Charleston, S.C.
Published in: Columbia Regional Business Report - Online
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Monday
May 13, 2019
7. Bulldogs Fall in Weather-Shortened Contest

Mother nature played a role in The Citadel’s final home game of the season as a pair of lightning delays played a part in ETSU’s 9-0, eight-inning victory Sunday afternoon at Joe Riley Park.

Other examples of coverage include:

The Post and Courier

Bristol Herald Courier

Published in: WCSC - Live 5 News - Online / Broadcast
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Monday
May 13, 2019
8. Cincinnati Bengals sign The Citadel’s Noah Dawkins as NFL rookie free agent
Citadel linebacker Noah Dawkins got two invitations to try out at NFL rookie mini-camps in the last two weeks. The second one paid off, as the Cincinnati Bengals announced Saturday that they had signed Dawkins as a undrafted free agent. The Bengals also signed Temple wide receiver Ventell Bryant and Maine linebacker Sterling Sheffield, according to reports. Dawkins, 6-0 and 226 pounds, participated in the Seattle Seahawks’ rookie mini-camp two weeks ago. Dawkins had 66 tackles and 13½ tackles for loss for The Citadel as a senior and led the team with 5½ sacks. The All-Southern Conference pick also intercepted two passes and led the team in sacks for three straight seasons. At The Citadel’s pro day, Dawkins ran the 40-yard dash in 4.41 seconds despite tweaking his hamstring during the sprint. He had reportedly run a 4.37 the week before The Citadel’s pro day and made ESPN analyst Mel Kiper’s “big board” of 300 draft prospects before the NFL draft.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Thursday
May 9, 2019
1. Two Citadel nursing professors are recognized for excellence in practice
Two nursing professors from The Citadel are the proud recipients of an award that celebrates registered nurses in our state who exemplify excellence in nursing practice and commitment to the profession. Both Helen Ballestas, Ph.D., and Robin Matutina, Ph.D., were presented a Palmetto Gold Award at a gala held on April 27 in Columbia. “It’s been a monumental year for The Citadel’s nursing program. In addition to graduating The Citadel’s first class of nurses, two of our faculty members were recognized as some of the very best nurses in the state,” said Amy Joseph, Ph.D., head of the Swain Department of Nursing. “Both Helen and Robin are active leaders in the nursing community and this award is well deserved.” The Palmetto Gold Gala is hosted by by the Palmetto Gold Nurse Recognition and Scholarship Program. For the last 18 years, the program has worked to honor both employees and facilities with the Palmetto Gold Award, which recognizes nurses for their outstanding accomplishments.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom - Online
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Thursday
May 9, 2019
2. The Fallacy of a Government Shutdown, the Reality of Freedom Lost

Another partial federal government “shutdown” began on December 22, 2018. The impression from the media and other commentaries easily suggested that the political and economic sky was about to fall. Various government departments were closed and some government services were reduced. And the fear was fostered that soon masses of people would be dying in the streets or driven from their homes owing to the lack of government spending. The Democrats and Republicans, of course, all played the blame game by pointing the finger of responsibility to the other side for government’s not being able to fully do its presumed numerous necessary duties. Donald Trump insisted that it was all because the Democrats would not appropriate the $5.7 billion to build his wall along the southwestern border. The Democrats insisted they were ready to fund every government department through the end of the fiscal year in September 2019, except for the Department of Homeland Security, which has responsibility for border security; they were ready to pass a continuing resolution to fund Homeland Security into February of this year, and then talk about border barriers.

Published in: Future of Freedom Foundation - Online
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Thursday
May 9, 2019
3. A roundup of spring 2019 university and college graduates, near and far

The Citadel, Greensboro: Leah Fenwrick-Wallace, Criminal Justice degree

Published in: Greensboro News & Record - On
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Thursday
May 9, 2019
4. Decatur's Neil graduates from The Citadel

Decatur's Neil graduates from The Citadel ... Peter Neil of Decatur recently earned a mechanical engineering degree from The Citadel in Charleston.

Published in: The Decatur Daily - Online
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Thursday
May 9, 2019
5. MSU Spring Commencement is May 11

Sarah Fink of Hollsopple, Pennsylvania, will be the afternoon commencement speaker for the Caudill College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences. She is a candidate for both a Bachelor of Arts in Government with a minor in international studies and a Certificate in Intelligence Studies with an emphasis in regional analysis. Fink was an Undergraduate Research Fellow since Fall 2017. She was a former vice president of the Cicero Society, an organization to promote intellectual diversity through open discourse and debate and represented MSU as an accomplished D-1 athlete on the Rifle Team for the 2016-17 and 2017-18 seasons, where she earned multiple top scores. She is also a member of Kappa Delta sorority, where she held leadership positions. She was an undergraduate representative for the Caudill College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences Strategic Planning Committee. She was also a member of MSU’s Model European Union, the Political Science Club and the College Republicans. Fink is also a member of Daughters of the American Revolution, where she participated in organizational events like Shoeboxes for Soldiers and traveled to participate in the organization’s Continental Congress in Washington, D.C. Fink plans to continue her education by enrolling in the Master of Arts in Intelligence and Securities Studies program at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina. She hopes to one day work as an intelligence analyst for the FBI or the Department of Homeland Security.

Published in: The Morehead News - Online
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Thursday
May 9, 2019
6. 25 Best Week 1 Games in FCS College Football

Towson at The Citadel (Aug. 31)- In last year's win, quarterback Tom Flacco and Towson had only seven fewer rushing yards than The Citadel’s triple-option offense – on 30 fewer carries.

Published in: Athlon Sports - Online
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Thursday
May 9, 2019
CITADEL NOT DETERRED
Mountain View tight end Brendan Heatherman recently suffered a torn ACL but that didn’t stop The Citadel from extending an offer to the Class of 2020 prospect. Heatherman suffered the injury at a recent showcase camp after he had collected several Division I scholarship offers.
Published in: Fredericksburg Free Lance Star Newspaper - Online
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Thursday
May 9, 2019
CLEMSON BASEBALL: Tigers blast Bulldogs in 17-3 home win
The Clemson Tigers bounced back into the win column in a big way after dropping two straight games to Big South opponents Sunday and Tuesday, as they defeated The Citadel Bulldogs by a final score of 17-3 Wednesday night at Doug Kingsmore Stadium. With the home team (29-20 record) posting an 11-run fourth inning, the visiting team (10-37 record) from Charleston found trouble getting offense for most of the game. It marked the first game between Clemson and The Citadel at Doug Kingsmore Stadium since 2004.
Published in: thetandd.com - Online
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Wednesday
May 8, 2019
11. This mom of 6 went to night school for years, got her master's, then fulfilled her dream of becoming a cop

Jennifer Petrone says her lifelong dream was to become a police officer, even if it seemed out of reach for a long time. However, after years of hard work and late nights, the low-country South Carolina mother of six has made that dream a reality. Now serving as a police officer for the city of Beaufort, South Carolina, but before landing that coveted job, she spent years working on two different degrees and a certificate at night school. Petrone recently graduated with a Master of Arts in Social Science from the graduate college at The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, according to a news release from the institution. While the Charleston-based college has been known for its full-time undergraduate corps of cadets, it also offers graduate and undergraduate degree programs for non-cadet students via evening classes.

Published in: The Blaze - Online
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Wednesday
May 8, 2019
2. Celebrating two graduates from the Zucker Family School of Education on National Teacher Appreciation Day

Meet two graduates from the Class of 2019 who will go on to teach others The Zucker Family School of Education cultivates undergraduate and graduate students into principled educational leaders capable of, and committed to, transforming our schools into learning communities where all children and youth succeed. With a focus toward learner-centered education, graduates from The Citadel’s education programs are effective in educating a diverse learner population to high academic standards. The Citadel’s Master of Education is one of the most popular graduate programs offered. In fact, more graduates from The Citadel Graduate College Class of 2019 earned a M.Ed. than any other degree.

Learn what you can do with an education degree from The Citadel.

Published in: The Citadel Today - Online
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Wednesday
May 8, 2019
2. Remembering Cicely McCray

Cicely McCray served as the assistant director of Enrollment Management for Continuing Education at The Citadel Graduate College. Anyone who received an email from Cicely McCray would see these words on her signature line, “in service to students and the community.” According to her supervisor, Emily Thomas, that sentence reflected how Mrs. McCray lived her life. “After we learned of Cicely’s death, members of The Citadel Graduate College team shared words that described our friend and colleague,” said Thomas, who is assistant dean of The Citadel Graduate College. “Those words included: positive, vibrant, strong, confident, vivacious, generous and ‘a passion for education.’ Cicely leaves a legacy of personal service at The Citadel and other places where she made an impact, including her church where she was known for a deep commitment to her faith. She will be greatly missed.”

Published in: The Citadel Today - Online
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Wednesday
May 8, 2019
3. MSU Spring Commencement is May 11
Morehead State University will hold its 2019 Spring Commencement ceremonies Saturday, May 11, at the Academic-Athletic Center (AAC). During the two programs, President Joseph A. (Jay) Morgan will confer degrees on nearly 1,200 graduate and undergraduate students. Sarah Fink of Hollsopple, Pennsylvania, will be the afternoon commencement speaker for the Caudill College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences. She is a candidate for both a Bachelor of Arts in Government with a minor in international studies and a Certificate in Intelligence Studies with an emphasis in regional analysis. Fink plans to continue her education by enrolling in the Master of Arts in Intelligence and Securities Studies program at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina. She hopes to one day work as an intelligence analyst for the FBI or the Department of Homeland Security.
Published in: The Morehead News - Online
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Wednesday
May 8, 2019
Tigers Host Presbyterian and the Citadel in Midweek Games

Presbyterian (22-25) @ Clemson (28-19) Tuesday 6:00 PM

The Citadel (10-36) @ Clemson Wednesday 6:00 PM

After splitting a two game weekend set with Gardner Webb, Clemson is back in action with a pair of instate games. Presbyterian comes into town Tuesday after dropping two of three to Winthrop over the weekend. PC sits at fifth in the Big South standings. Outfielder Nick Guimbarda enters Tuesday with a five game hitting streak. Guimbarda was a high school teammate of Clemson great Seth Beer at Lambert High School in Suwanee, GA. The Blue Hose will follow up Tuesday’s game by heading down the road to Atlanta for a Wednesday night game with Georgia State. It’s been a rough season for the Citadel, as the Bulldogs sit in last place in the SoCon standings with a 3-10 conference record. The ‘Dogs are coming off being swept by rival Wofford in their final home series of the year. Back in March, the Citadel put a scare in South Carolina by rallying from down eight runs, but unlike their football team in 2015, the ‘Dogs couldn’t knock off the Gamecocks, falling 10-9.

Other examples of coverage include:

WCSC - Live 5 News

Clemson Sports Talk

Published in: SB Nation - Online
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Tuesday
May 7, 2019
1. Class of 2019 graduation rewind

An atmosphere of jubilation percolated across campus in the final days of the 2018-19 academic year, with several event-filled days dedicated to celebrating the achievements of The Citadel Class of 2019.

Take a look back at the 2019 commencement activities here.

Published in: The Citadel Today - Online
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Tuesday
May 7, 2019
2. Citadel mom of six fulfills dream of becoming police officer
Jennifer Petrone told her family her lifelong goal was to become a police officer. Now, in her Beaufort Police Department uniform, she credits her family as key to her success. She also stands as an example to her six children, proving that determination can transform a seemingly-unobtainable goal into reality. Petrone is a member of The Citadel Graduate College Class of 2019, graduating May 4 with a Master of Arts in Social Science. She worked on her master’s at the same time her son, Eian, joined the U.S. Marine Corps and her oldest daughter, Briona, became a member of The South Carolina Corps of Cadets. Petrone earned a bachelor’s in Criminal Justice through The Citadel’s Evening Undergraduate Program in 2015. She earned a graduate certificate in Leadership Studies between her undergrad and graduate degrees.
Published in: The Citadel Today - Online
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Tuesday
May 7, 2019
3. Local author wins six screenplay awards in five months
Talk about a winning writer. Jo-Ann “Jody” Bierer Wilhelm of Summerville is incredulous at this point. On Saturday night, she beat out 28 other feature screenplay finalists by winning Best Feature Screenplay at the Oklahoma Twister Alley (International) Film Festival for her full screenplay, “Where’s Stephanie?” This award follows her winning five other Best Screenplay awards at various film festivals since December, drawing accolades from the entertainment industry. Nationally, there are more than 3,000 film festivals annually and not all have a screenplay category. Wilhelm is a retired educator who earned her bachelor’s degree and Master of Arts in Teaching from the University of South Carolina and continued post master’s studies at The Citadel.
Published in: The Summerville Journal Scene - Online
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Tuesday
May 7, 2019
5. The Presidential Political Circus Has Begun
Like the carnival side shows at the circus, the candidates for the Democratic party nomination — do I even need to name the more than 20 of them? — are all standing in front of their respective campaign tents trying to attract the potential voter onlookers to join them inside, hope for that campaign contribution and support during the primaries so they will enter the center ring of the political circus big top and face Mr. Congeniality, Donald Trump, come November 2020. The prize? Long term, to occupy for four years that most famous public-housing project in the United States: the White House. Short term, to collect as many donations as possible that can later but used to hire your friends, wield influence, and build a political machine. So what are these Washington, D.C., public-housing desirers offering to the all-too-gullible citizens, too many of whom always seem to be naively or connivingly on the lookout for something for nothing? Richard M. Ebeling, an AIER Senior Fellow, is the BB&T Distinguished Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel, in Charleston, South Carolina. Ebeling lived on AIER's campus from 2008 to 2009.
Published in: AIER American Institute for Economic Research - Online
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Tuesday
May 7, 2019
6. Atwell, Robert
Robert Leroy Atwell Jr., died on Sunday, July 21, 2013. Roy, the son of Robert Leroy Atwell and Lucy Williams Atwell, was born in Richmond, Va., on September 9, 1937. He graduated from Thomas Jefferson High School and The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, where he finished first in his class. Following his graduation from The Citadel, Roy served four years in the United States Air Force achieving the rank of Captain prior to his discharge. Roy later earned his PhD in Nuclear Engineering from the University of Virginia.
Published in: SWVA Today - Online
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Tuesday
May 7, 2019
ECU coach helps golfers drop in to action
Fellowship of Christian Athletes has been part of the foundation of all coach Mike Houston-led football teams, from Lenoir-Rhyne to The Citadel to James Madison and now at East Carolina, which he reinforced as the keynote speaker Monday for the second annual Taylor Memorial Golf Classic. The golf event was put on as a joint effort by University City Kiwanis and FCA, benefiting FCA along with other agencies that work with local children like Riley’s Army, Aces for Autism, Young Life, Camp Whole Heart and others.
Published in: Reflector - Online
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Tuesday
May 7, 2019
Georgia sports roundup: Baseball moves up in rankings following Florida sweep
The Georgia baseball team needed to have a big weekend after getting swept by Mississippi State in its last series. And the Bulldogs responded in a big way by sweeping the Florida Gators this weekend. The Bulldogs went 4-0 this past week as they also picked up a mid-week win over The Citadel. The successful week led to a bump in the rankings, as Georgia is now ranked No. 7 in the Baseball America rankings and No. 8 in the D1Baseball rankings.
Published in: Dawg Nation - Online
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Monday
May 6, 2019
1. Citadel Graduates Its 1st Female Regimental Commander

For the first time in the Citadel's 176-year history, the formerly all-male military college in South Carolina will graduate its first female regimental commander.

Listen to the on-air coverage here.

Published in: National Public Radio - Online / Radio
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Monday
May 6, 2019
1. The Citadel presents special awards to four cadets and two faculty members during commencement
The Citadel honored four of its most outstanding cadets and two distinguished faculty members during the South Carolina Corps of Cadets commencement Sat., May 4. The awards recognize the two cadets with the highest grade point averages, the most courteous member of the graduating class, a cadet and a faculty member who achieved academic excellence, and a faculty member for his or her love of teaching.
Published in: The Citadel Today - Online
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Monday
May 6, 2019
3. Photos: Graduation day at The Citadel

The Citadel celebrates the graduation of approximately 500 members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets on Saturday, May 4, 2019

View the photo gallery here.

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Monday
May 6, 2019
3a. 21 down, 9,979 to go: The Citadel graduates its first class of nursing students

By 2030, a major nursing shortage has been predicted for South Carolina — the fourth worse in the country. So that’s why The Citadel’s first-ever graduating class of nursing students is seen both as a welcome addition to the state’s health sector and a sure path to future employment. “I’m coming away prepared to work as a nurse,” said Emily Banks, who was among the first 21 graduates from the school’s new Bachelor of Science in Nursing program. At a pinning ceremony just before commencement, department head Dr. Amelia Joseph emphasized the projected shortage. “The baby boomer nurses are leaving the profession,” she said. Last fall, the National Center for Health Workforce Analysis also detailed the projected shortage. Its data said that in the next 12 years South Carolina will need around 10,000 additional nurses.

Published in: The Citadel Today - originally from The Post and Courier - Online
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Monday
May 6, 2019
4. Citadel Offers Military History On-line

Explore the greatest military achievements and the most excruciating defeats. Learn lessons from witnessing historic military acts of courage, skill and leadership genius, as well as epic mistakes leading to war. Some of the most distinguished minds in military history today will teach students enrolled in The Citadel Graduate College’s new Master of Arts Degree in Military History. The fully online program is accepting applications now, for the courses that will begin in the fall of 2019.

Also covered in The Island Eye News

Published in: The Island Connection - Online
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Monday
May 6, 2019
5. 5 Game of Thrones predictions based on medieval history (major spoilers)
As the mist fades and the sun rises over Winterfell, the characters in Game of Thrones are being given no time to relax, despite defeating the Night King and his horde of undead soldiers. Now the united armies of Jon Snow and Daenerys Targaryen (what’s left of them) will march south, to face the mercenary army of Cersei Lannister, allied with Euron Greyjoy, in a winner takes all battle for the Iron Throne. The game of thrones is afoot. Looking to history, Michael Livingston, medieval military historian at the Citadel Military College in South Carolina, predicts what’s to come in the final three episodes of Game of Thrones.
Published in: The Telegram - Online
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Monday
May 6, 2019
5a. From ex-Citadel baseball coach, a fund-raising app that gives back
For high school coaches, fundraising is a job that never ends. There’s always a need for new equipment and uniforms, money for travel costs and facility upgrades. But for his James Island High School team’s latest effort, baseball coach Matt Spivey wanted something different than the usual crowdfunding apps now in vogue. “Everybody is doing crowdfunding now,” Spivey said. “But you hear all the time that the kids don’t have to do anything to raise the money. And that’s important for our kids, that it’s not just ‘Get a list of names and see if they will give us money.’” Spivey found his solution in mPower6, a youth-sports fundraising company founded by former Citadel baseball assistant coach David Beckley. The system connects youth and high school sports fundraising efforts with charities or other worthy causes.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Monday
May 6, 2019
5b. Town Square: Maj. Gen. Glenn A. Bramhall honored
Maj. Gen. Glenn A. Bramhall was recently presented the Distinguished Service Medal during his retirement ceremony at the Army National Guard Readiness Center in Arlington, Va., where he has served as Special Assistant for Air Defense to the Director of the Army National Guard. General Bramhall is a 1979 graduate of The Citadel. He is a graduate of numerous military schools to include: Airborne School, the United States Army’s Command and General Staff College, Infantry Brigade Commander’s Course, and he holds a Master of Science in Strategic Studies from the U.S. Army War College, Carlisle Barracks, Penn. He and his wife, Faith, reside in Spartanburg. Their family includes Ian and Cindy Bramhall, Evan and Allee Bramhall, Benjamin Bramhall, and grandchildren, Molly, Zoey, and Charlie.
Published in: Go Upstate - Online
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Monday
May 6, 2019
5c. FLEXSPACE announces Brendan Jones as Director of Operations
FLEXSPACE, a provider of warehouse storage solutions, announced that Brendan Jones has recently joined FLEXSPACE as Director of Operations. In this role, Mr. Jones will be responsible for leading the company’s operational strategy, project management, supplier management- both domestic and international, and management of internal teams to ensure consistent client delivery. Brendan joins FLEXSPACE from Soft-tex International, where he managed all aspects of the company’s South Carolina warehouse facility. Mr. Jones was the primary architect of the company’s inbound and outbound growth while also managing a 20+ person team across five functional areas. Brendan holds a MS in Project Management from The Citadel, a BS in Business Administration from the College of Charleston and is also an active PMP(Project Management Professional) through PMI.
Published in: Automation - Online
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Monday
May 6, 2019
5d. This Week in History: May 6-12, 2019
1999 – Nancy Mace becomes the first female cadet to graduate from The Citadel military college. Mace (R) was elected to the South Carolina House of Representatives in 2017.
Published in: Independent Sentinel - Online
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Monday
May 6, 2019
6. Biden to test appeal among black voters in South Carolina

Joe Biden will have his first chance this weekend to demonstrate whether he can attract the type of diverse coalition that twice sent Barack Obama to the White House. The former vice president has opened his presidential campaign with explicit appeals to white, working class voters across the Midwest, pledging his allegiance to unions and promising to rebuild the middle class. His premier trip to South Carolina as a 2020 contender on Saturday will gauge whether his message will resonate among black voters whose support will be crucial in winning the nation’s first southern primary.

Photo: Former Vice President Joe Biden takes a selfie following the funeral for former U.S. Sen. Ernest "Fritz" Hollings at the Summerall Chapel on The Citadel campus Tuesday, April 16, 2019, in Charleston, S.C. Biden delivered one of the eulogies for his former Senate colleague. Hollings died earlier this month at age 97.

Also covered by WCSC - Live 5 News

Published in: The Associated Press - Online
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Monday
May 6, 2019
7. Is This the Man Who Lost the Vietnam War?
In 1989, this writer had occasion to interview four-star General William Childs Westmoreland, now 86, formerly U.S. military commander in South Vietnam and at the time of the interview a retired Chief of Staff of the Army. Westmoreland was from South Carolina; his ancestors fought for the Confederacy. His father wanted his son to become a lawyer. “Informed and well-read, he encouraged me in a broad range of activities, from studies to boxing and playing the flute,” recalled the four-star retired general in his 1976 memoirs, A Soldier Reports. Famous friend James F. Byrnes (South Carolina Senator, Secretary of State) steered him instead from South Carolina’s famous military school, The Citadel, toward West Point. He was graduated as an artillery officer in 1936 and soon had served in army bases around the country.
Published in: The National Interest - Online
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Monday
May 6, 2019
7a. Veterans’ suicide awareness theme of art show on Branford Green
Veteran suicide has been a problem for years, but some local residents working with a New York artist will try to shine some light on the issue in events Monday and Tuesday on the Branford Green. “Bringing Awareness to the Veterans Suicide Crisis” will feature an art installation by Long Island artist Scott LoBaido, which is currently at the tail end of a tour of the original 13 colonies. The event will begin with an opening ceremony at 6:30 p.m. Monday at the Branford Green flagpole, with Carolyn Sires and her therapy dog, Blue. Staten Island, N.Y. artist Scott LoBaido's “Bringing Awareness to the Veterans Suicide Crisis” art installation installed recently at The Citadel in South Carolina. The project will be installed on the Branford Green Monday and Tuesday, with an opening ceremony taking place at 6:30 p.m. Monday.
Published in: New Haven Register - Online
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Monday
May 6, 2019
7b. 2019 Settle Awards go to CCSD students for knowledge of global issues
Three students from Charleston County School District (CCSD) won the 2019 John M. Settle/CresCom Bank Award for outstanding achievement in global issues. The World Affairs Council of Charleston and CresCom honored Spencer Margosian of Wando High School, Byron Murphy from Burke High School, and Military Magnet Academy’s Amyah Wright during a ceremony at The Citadel’s Holliday Alumni Center April 17, 2019. This award is named after the late John M. Settle, Sr., a graduate of the former Charleston High School and The Citadel, and Chairman Emeritus of Community FirstBank (now CresCom Bank). The students submitted incisive essays analyzing challenges as diverse as competition with China to Global Health policy.
Published in: Moultrie News - Online
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Monday
May 6, 2019
8. Bulldogs Drop Heartbreaker on Senior Day

The Citadel dropped a heartbreaker Sunday afternoon as Wofford scored twice in the ninth to hand the Bulldogs a 4-3 defeat on Senior Day. Score: Wofford 4, The Citadel 3 Records: Wofford (29-19, 11-6 SoCon), The Citadel (10-36, 3-15 SoCon) Series: Wofford wins 3-0 Location: Charleston, South Carolina (Joe Riley Park)

Also covered by The Post and Courier

Published in: WCSC - Live 5 News - Online
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Monday
May 6, 2019
Eastside Eagles baseball is mixing up a recipe for success, beats Blue Ridge in playoffs
Eastside baseball coach Scott Erwin has become quite the accomplished chef over his 18-year coaching tenure. Erwin has consistently mixed a blend of championship ingredients to help the Eagles find themselves in the postseason on an annual basis. Erwin may have created his masterpiece this year as he taken a heaping amount of talent, a roster full of camaraderie, a pinch of youth and has mixed a season’s worth of unity to have the Eagles two wins away from playing for the Class AAAA championship. Junior Wyatt Spurrier has committed to The Citadel, while freshman David Mershon is being courted by numerous Division 1 programs.
Published in: Greenville Online - Online
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Monday
May 6, 2019
Former Lakewood standout Buffalo playing final year at Boise State after 3 at The Citadel
Former Lakewood High School standout defensive back Khafari Buffalo played the first three years of his college football career with The Citadel in Charleston. As a graduate student transfer, Buffalo is taking his talents out of the state of South Carolina for his final year. Way out of state. Buffalo is heading out west - to Boise, Idaho, to be exact - to play for Boise State in the 2019 season. Buffalo's biggest reason for leaving The Citadel was he wasn't fully able to be himself there. "It was a long four years," said Buffalo who redshirted in 2015. "It was a challenging four years with my personality. I'm always smiling. It's a strict, straightforward school, so I had to adjust." Last season with the Bulldogs, Buffalo recorded 38 tackles, including 28 solo stops and one for a loss, an interception, six pass breakups and a quarterback hurry. "One thing Khafari could always do was run," Citadel head football coach Brent Thompson said. "He just needed to develop his skills. We started him off at safety and then we moved him out to corner(back), which I think is a bit of what got him recruited at Boise. When you're a 6-foot-1(-inch) corner, you're gonna be able to match up against 6-1 to 6-4 wide receivers."
Published in: The Sumter Item - Online
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Friday
May 3, 2019
1. Honoring cadets and active duty students at 2019 awards convocation
The Citadel honors some of its best and brightest with more than 50 awards, celebrating achievements in academics, leadership and service One of the first major events during the commencement season at The Citadel is the annual awards convocation for the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. The awards are presented to cadets and active duty students in recognition of their outstanding accomplishments.
Published in: The Citadel Today - Online
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Friday
May 3, 2019
1a. Introducing American’s newest military officers
Nearly 200 Citadel cadets accept commissions during campus ceremonies Approximately 35% of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets Class of 2019 are now officers in all branches of the United States Armed Forces. The commissioning ceremony for cadets going into the Army was held in McAlister Field House, while the ceremonies for the cadets going into the Air Force, the Navy and the Marines was held in Summerall Chapel. The Class of 2019 has 104 cadets accepting Army commissions, 34 accepting Air Force commissions, 28 accepting Marine Corps commissions, 19 accepting Navy commissions, and one accepting a Coast Guard commission.
Published in: The Citadel Today - Online
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Friday
May 3, 2019
2. The Citadel's first nurse pinning ceremony

Before graduating, The Citadel's first class of nurses took part in the college’s first Nurse Pinning Ceremony at 3:30 p.m. on Thurs., May 2, in Buyer Auditorium on campus.

Watch the on-air coverage here.

Published in: WCSC - Live 5 News - Broadcast
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Friday
May 3, 2019
2a. Inaugural Class Of Nurses Graduating From The Citadel May 4
The Citadel’s first class of nursing students will accept their Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degrees during commencement ceremonies on May 4, 2019. The group of 20 evening undergraduates, and one cadet nursing student, will share the honor of making history for the college as the inaugural nursing class. Before graduating, they will take part in the college’s first Nurse Pinning Ceremony at 3:30 p.m. on Thurs., May 2, in Buyer Auditorium. The ceremony is a long standing tradition in the nursing industry and represents a symbolic welcoming of new nurses into the profession. Most members of the nursing Class of 2019 will remain in South Carolina, where, according to a projection by RegisteredNursing.org, one of the worst nursing shortages in America will take hold by 2030, topped only by New Jersey, Texas, and California. Many in the class already have already accepted jobs. Others have secured positions for the next step in their educational careers. All 21 are committed to dedicating their futures to improving the health of others through caring and expertise, taking The Citadel’s core values of honor, duty and respect with them.
Published in: Charleston Business Magazine - Online
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Friday
May 3, 2019
3. 2020 BEST COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES IN SOUTH CAROLINA
Some of the best 2020 colleges and universities in South Carolina take top honors among southern institutions of higher education. Nearly half the schools in the Palmetto State have earned recognition among similar colleges and universities. The following schools have earned recognition among southern colleges and universities. The Citadel – Also known as the Military College of South Carolina, the Citadel has a strong academic and leadership focus, and the college requires all students to live on campus. There are no Greek societies on campus, but there are plenty of co-curricular activities. This school is the second best in the nation for veterans, and it also ranks high as a best-value school. In-state tuition is $12,516 annually.
Published in: The Ed Advocate - Online
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Thursday
May 2, 2019
1. Dr. Dena Garner earns Governor’s Award for Excellence in Scientific Research
The Citadel Director of Undergraduate Research, Dena Garner, Ph.D., is the recipient of one of the top science awards presented by the state of South Carolina. Governor Henry McMaster presented Garner with the Award for Excellence in Scientific Research at a Predominately Undergraduate Institution at a ceremony in Columbia on May 1, 2019. Garner is a full professor in the Department of Health and Human Performance, the Director of Undergraduate Research and the Assistant Provost for Research and Policy at The Citadel. In these roles, she leads and promotes research and scholarly activity campus wide, works to secure external grants for undergraduate research and directly leads cadets and students by facilitating their engagement in research projects.
Published in: The Citadel Today - Online
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Thursday
May 2, 2019
2. Daniel Esteban, the 2018 runner-up, recognized as this year’s best-drilled cadet
A sophomore comes out on top after finishing in second place during the 2018 Star of the West competition Daniel Esteban is the South Carolina Corps of Cadets’s best-drilled cadet. Esteban, who is from Greenville, South Carolina, went up against nearly 40 cadets for the title during The Citadel’s Star of the West competition Wed., May 1.
Published in: The Citadel Today - Online
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Thursday
May 2, 2019
3. Inaugural class of nurses graduating from The Citadel May 4
The Citadel’s first class of nursing students will accept their Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degrees during commencement ceremonies on May 4, 2019. The group of 20 evening undergraduates, and one cadet nursing student, will share the honor of making history for the college as the inaugural nursing class. Before graduating, they will take part in the college’s first Nurse Pinning Ceremony at 3:30 p.m. on Thurs., May 2, at McAlister Field House on campus. The ceremony is a long standing tradition in the nursing industry and represents a symbolic welcoming of new nurses into the profession. Where they’re going next Most members of the nursing Class of 2019 will remain in South Carolina, where, according to a projection by RegisteredNursing.org, one of the worst nursing shortages in America will take hold by 2030, topped only by New Jersey, Texas, and California.
Published in: Charleston Regional Business Journal - Online
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Thursday
May 2, 2019
4. The Citadel inducts first class into Chi Alpha Sigma
The Citadel athletic department inducted 17 cadet-athletes into its inaugural class of the Chi Alpha Sigma national scholar-athlete society Tuesday evening in a ceremony held inside McAlister Field House. Chi Alpha Sigma is the first national scholar-athlete society to honor those collegiate student-athletes who have excelled in both the classroom and in athletic competition. Chi Alpha Sigma recognizes college student-athletes who receive a varsity letter in their sport, achieve junior academic standing or higher after their fifth full time semester, and earn a 3.4 or higher cumulative grade-point average. The Citadel became a member in February. Senior Associate Athletic Director Kathy Kroupa serves as the department advisor, while Faculty Athletic Advisor Dr. Chip Taylor serves as the faculty advisor.
Published in: Citadel Sports - Online
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Thursday
May 2, 2019
5. Goodbye, Mr. Miceli
Augie Miceli, 86, is retiring after 60 years as a math teacher at Calvert Hall College High School in Towson. Miceli first came to the school in 1958 as an assistant football coach. His varsity teams included his son, Augie Jr., class of 1982. His more than 6,000 students have included a grandson, Augie, ’20 – and several faculty and staff members, four of whom shared their sentiments about Miceli with the Review. Miceli went to the The Citadel, a military college in Charleston, S.C., and served two years in the U.S. Army. “You could see that background in his teaching,” Heidrick said. “There was regimentation, and a strategy for how we could best achieve our goals. We were going to get the most out of every one of his classes.”
Published in: Archdiocese of Baltimore - Online
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Thursday
May 2, 2019
6. Citadel football’s Noah Dawkins gets his NFL shot — two of them

On The Citadel’s pro day in March, Noah Dawkins sat dejectedly on the side of the practice field, a towel over his head. With NFL scouts watching, the Bulldogs’ linebacker had tweaked his hamstring just a few strides into his 40-yard dash. He finished the 40, but wouldn’t be able to complete the position drills that followed. “I was highly upset,” Dawkins said. “Because I couldn’t do anything further. I did my best to finish some position drills at the end, and tried to show some resilience.” Even though pro day didn’t go as planned, the 6-0, 226-pound Dawkins showed enough that day and over his career to earn invitations to two NFL rookie mini-camps. Dawkins has been invited to the Seattle Seahawks’ mini-camp this weekend and to the Cincinnati Bengals mini-camp next weekend. “I feel great,” Dawkins said. “I just wanted to have the opportunity, and now that I have it I want to take advantage of it.”

Also covered by The Citadel Sports

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Wednesday
May 1, 2019
1. Celebrating success: The South Carolina Corps of Cadets Class of 2019
The Citadel Class of 2019 has much to celebrate. Approximately 500 members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets (SCCC) are being awarded diplomas on May 4, and are progressing to their next step in life whether it be a career as a military officer; a job as a working professional; attending graduate, medical or law school, or serving in internships. Additionally, the very first cadet to graduate from The Citadel with a Bachelor of Nursing degree, Cadet Abigail Koger, is part of this class.
Published in: The Citadel Today - Online
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Wednesday
May 1, 2019
2. The Citadel Graduate College celebrates the Class of 2019
The Citadel Graduate College Class (CGC) of 2019 has 456 graduates who have earned either graduate degrees, or undergraduate degrees through the evening or online (non-cadet) programs. That number includes the 20 men and women who earned Bachelor of Science in Nursing degrees through the CGC’s new evening undergraduate nursing program. Several hundred graduates will walk the stage in McAlister Field House at 3:30 p.m. on May 4 to accept their diplomas during the CGC commencement ceremony. The ceremony follows several days of special events including the first nursing graduation pinning ceremony in the history of the college and an awards gathering. All of The Citadel Graduate College commencement information and instructions can be found here.
Published in: The Citadel Today - Online
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Wednesday
May 1, 2019
3. The Citadel’s legacy of tradition continues with the Class of 2019
Attending The Military College of South Carolina is a tradition for some families that dates back generations. That presents a special opportunity for cadets and students to receive their diplomas on stage from a mother, father, or another close family member who is a Citadel graduate. The South Carolina Corps of Cadets Class of 2019 has 58 legacy students who invited special presenters. The Citadel Graduate College Class of 2019 has 18 legacy students who invited special presenters. The Citadel’s Evening Undergraduate Studies program Class of 2019 has 3 legacy students who invited special presenters.
Published in: The Citadel Today - Online
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Wednesday
May 1, 2019
4. Citadel part of business collaboration to reduce traffic gridlock in the Lowcountry

Eighteen local businesses with a total workforce of more than 39,000 announced today their commitment to reducing the three-county region’s traffic congestion as part of an effort to Reboot the Commute. Reboot the Commute is an employer-led traffic mitigation campaign, spearheaded by the Economic Leadership Council of Charleston Regional Development Alliance (CRDA), that challenges other employers to help reduce regional traffic congestion. It includes an online guide that organizations can use to implement positive changes by encouraging alternative commuting strategies like telecommuting, staggered start times, ride-sharing, and connecting employees to local transit resources like CARTA and LowcountryGO.

Also covered by Lowcountry Biz SC

Published in: The Citadel Today - Online
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Wednesday
May 1, 2019
5. Inaugural class of nurses graduates from The Citadel
The Citadel’s first class of nursing students accepted their Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degrees during commencement ceremonies on May 4, 2019. The group of 20 evening undergraduates, and one cadet nursing student, will share the honor of making history for the college as the inaugural nursing class. Before graduating, they took part in the college’s first Nurse Pinning Ceremony at 3:30 p.m. on Thurs., May 2, at McAlister Field House on campus. The ceremony is long standing tradition in the nursing industry and represents a symbolic welcoming of new nurses into the profession.
Published in: Index-Journal - Online
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Wednesday
May 1, 2019
6. Got questions about South Carolina teachers’ May 1 protest? We’ve got answers.
At 9:45 a.m. Wednesday, several thousand teachers and their supporters will march two blocks from the S.C. Department of Education to the Statehouse for a day of protests, speeches and picketing. In a state without teacher unions or a recent history of mass teacher protests, parents and teachers are bound to have some questions about what’s going on. Will the teachers be punished? Not likely. Teachers are allowed to take personal leave days. Unlike most workers in South Carolina, teachers are protected by a law that says their bosses must give a reason for firing them and give an opportunity to appeal the decision. Although some state and local government officials have condemned the event, labor historian Kerry Taylor of The Citadel said it’s unlikely they will take punitive action against the teachers. “The Legislature is limited in what they can do because of the great support that teachers wield and the support that they maintain in the larger community,” Taylor said.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Wednesday
May 1, 2019
7. Yay dragons, boo battle plans: A spoiler-filled breakdown of Game of Thrones' ‘horrible tactical siege’ of Winterfell

Spoiler warning.

For the millions who tuned in to the latest episode of Game of Thrones, “The Long Night” was a thrilling hour-and-a-half of television. But the massive battle scenes in the episode threw up some red flags for Michael Livingston, professor of English and medieval history at the Citadel Military College in South Carolina. “Tactically, strategically, logically, none of this is making any sense for this battle,” said Livingston. The author of the Game of Thrones books, George R.R. Martin, was open about the influences history had on the world, Westeros, and the story which unfolds. Outside of the dragons and army of the undead, much of the events of the show resemble medieval history — specifically the War of the Roses, the 15th century English civil war. But the resemblances do not carry over into how this siege battle played out, according to Livingston. “It’s absolutely a horrible tactical siege,” he said.

Published in: The Chronicle Herald - Online
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Wednesday
May 1, 2019
8. Ayanna Shivers named mayor; Chris Williams sworn-in as chairman pro tem
Mexico City Council member Ayanna Shivers was left speechless Monday after the council selected her as the first African American woman to serve as the city’s mayor. Chris Williams, who was sworn in for his fourth term on the council, was named chairman pro tem. Shivers was nominated by council member Vicki Briggs. The prospect of serving as mayor is exciting and it shows that Mexico is progressing, Shivers said. Mexico’s first black mayor was Herman O. Tolson, who served from 1974-75 and the first female mayor was Virginia Robertson who served from 2005 to 2010. Shivers was born and raised in Mexico but, like many young people from rural communities, Shivers left for college with no particular plan to move back. She received her bachelor’s degree from the University of Oklahoma, then a master’s in education from the CITADEL in SOUTH CAROLINA and a Ph.D. in education from the University of Southern Mississippi. She spent 18 years working as a school counselor in SOUTH CAROLINA, but she would come spent time with her family in Mexico every summer. Eventually, she realized the same problems she was trying to solve in the community in SOUTH CAROLINA existed in her hometown.
Published in: Mexico Ledger - Online
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Wednesday
May 1, 2019
9. What 19th-Century Foreign Writers Said about American Freedom and Prosperity
If you look at the results of relatively open and competitive market economies over the years, the decades, and especially the last two centuries, the only conclusion that can reasonably be reached is that free market liberal-oriented societies provide the conditions and opportunities for constant and continuous material and social betterment for the vast majority of those living in such political-economic systems. If one reflects for a moment on the fact that the historically normal and natural condition of man for all of recorded history up to about three centuries ago was abject and horrendous poverty and compare that with all that has happened during, especially the last two hundred years, the transformation in the human circumstance has been nothing short of remarkable if not seemingly miraculous. Richard M. Ebeling, an AIER Senior Fellow, is the BB&T Distinguished Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel, in Charleston, South Carolina. Ebeling lived on AIER's campus from 2008 to 2009.
Published in: AIER American Institute for Economic Research - Online
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Wednesday
May 1, 2019
9a. DEUWARD G.F. BULTMAN JR.
Deuward George Frederick Bultman Jr., 94, widower of Helen Murray Bultman, died on Monday, April 29, 2019, at his home. Born in Sumter, he was a son of the late D.G.F. Bultman and Dorothy Phelps Bultman. Mr. Bultman graduated from Edmunds High School in Sumter, where he was president of the student body and earned three letters in athletics (football, basketball and swimming). He attended The Citadel before joining the Army Aviation Cadet Program and received his wings and commission at the age of 19. He flew B-17 and B-29 aircraft in World War II. He was recalled in 1951 and served in the 55th Fighter Bomber Squadron and the 57th Fighter Interceptor Squadron in Alaska during the Korean War, flying F-84 and F-94 jet fighters.
Published in: The Sumter Item - Online
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Wednesday
May 1, 2019
Georgia baseball bounces back with 9-0 win over The Citadel in North Augusta
After going 0-4 last week, the ninth-ranked Georgia baseball team bounced back and blanked The Citadel 9-0 at SRP Park in North Augusta, South Carolina. The Bulldogs improved to 34-12 on the year thanks to a strong start from Logan Moody, who started on the mound for the second time in his Georgia career. Moody kept his string of solid appearances going with five quality innings on the mound, allowing no runs on just one hit. The Bulldog bullpen was equally impressive and Georgia’s staff as a whole faced just one more than the minimum 27 batters. Georgia’s defense also helped the stable of arms by turning three double plays in the contest.
Published in: The REd & Black - Online
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Wednesday
May 1, 2019
Knights lose seven seniors
The Stratford High School baseball team finished the spring with a 15-11 mark after going 0-2 in the Class 5A playoffs, losing to Ashley Ridge and Lexington in the District VI bracket. The postseason was the last for more than a handful of seniors, a group dedicated in the class room too. Catcher Travis Lott will suit up next year for the Citadel following a stellar senior campaign on Crowfield Boulevard. Lott batted .440 with a 0.577 on-base percentage while knocking in 19 runs.
Published in: The Gazette - Online
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Wednesday
May 1, 2019
LOCAL SPORTS BRIEFS: Opp sets another personal record with The Citadel
Draughn High grad Amber Opp set another personal record competing for The Citadel’s women’s track and field team over the weekend at the Southern Conference Outdoor Championships. For the Bulldogs’ women, who scored 25 points to finish in fourth place, Opp broke her former personal record with a time of 40:43 in the 10k. The performance earned her the No. 8 spot in The Citadel’s record book. The Bulldogs soon will find out which cadet-athletes will qualify the NCAA East preliminary round in Jacksonville, Florida
Published in: The News Herald - Online
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