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The Citadel in the News: Archive

January 2019

PUBLISH DATE STORIES
Tuesday
January 22, 2019
1. Civil rights activist panel inspires individuals to take a stand

An MLK week documentary viewing and panel discussion, hosted by the Matthew J. Perry Chapter of the National Black Law Students Association on Jan. 17 in USC’s law school, showcased the efforts of African-American women actively engaged in the fight for equal rights. This event was inspired by Martin Luther King Jr. and other leaders' contributions to the Civil Rights movement. The purpose of this particular panel was to honor the history and lesser-known individuals of the Civil Rights movement and engage individuals to take a stand in the continued fight for civil rights. Louise Brown was one of the nurse assistants that instigated the Charleston hospital workers' strike. Although this strike was unsuccessful, Kerry Taylor, who teaches at the Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina, described the importance and impact that this strike had on South Carolina politics. “The energy coming out of the Charleston strike led directly to grassroots voter mobilizations that manifested itself in the election of the first African-American elected officials into the state legislature, eventually the state senate, since Reconstruction," Taylor said.

Published in: Daily Gamecock - Online
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Tuesday
January 22, 2019
2. Citadel, UofSC band with three other universities to tackle ocean health/climate change issues

he first multi-academic institution center in South Carolina to study the effects of ocean health-related illness and the interactions from climate change is initializing its operations. Funded by a $5.7 million grant from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), more than 20 researchers from five colleges and universities are beginning their work aimed at better protecting human health through the new Center for Oceans and Human Health and Climate Change Interactions. The University of South Carolina, College of Charleston, The Citadel, Baylor University, and the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science were awarded the NIEHS grant in the fall of 2018 for the center that is headquartered at the University of South Carolina’s (USC) Arnold School of Public Health, in Columbia. The Center will be led by Geoffrey I. Scott, clinical professor and chair in the USC Department of Environmental Health Sciences. The Center’s deputy director is Paul A. Sandifer, director of the Center for Coastal Environmental and Human Health at the College of Charleston. Scott and Sandifer will work with a team of scientists who are faculty leaders at all five institutions. Additionally, researchers and environmental public health practitioners from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the U.S. Geological Survey, the Interstate Shellfish Sanitation Conference, and the Lowcountry Alliance for Model Communities will participate.

Published in: Charleston Business - Online
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Tuesday
January 22, 2019
3. Human Health : Oceans, Human Health, Climate Change Focus of Unique New $5.7 Million Alliance

The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences has awarded a $5.75 million grant to establish a Center for Oceans and Human Health and Climate Change Interactions, a multi-academic institution to study the effects of ocean health-related illness and the interactions from climate change. The Center will be headquartered at the University of South Carolina's (USC) Arnold School of Public Health in Charleston, S.C. and involve more than 20 researchers from five colleges and universities, including the University of South Carolina, The College of Charleston, The Citadel, Baylor University, and the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES). The Center will be led by Geoffrey I. Scott, clinical professor and chair in the USC Department of Environmental Health Sciences. The Center's deputy director is Paul A. Sandifer, director of the Center for Coastal Environmental and Human Health at the College of Charleston. Scott and Sandifer will work with a team of scientists who are faculty leaders at all five institutions. Additionally, researchers and environmental public health practitioners from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the U.S. Geological Survey, the Interstate Shellfish Sanitation Conference, and the Lowcountry Alliance for Model Communities will participate.

Published in: Market Screener - Online
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Tuesday
January 22, 2019
4. SC business calendar

FEB. 16 & 23 - USING QUICKBOOKS: The Charleston Area Small Business Development Center and The Citadel Baker School of Business hold a two-session workshop on the basics of using Quickbooks accounting software. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Bond Hall, 171 Moultrie St., Charleston. $159. Advance registration required. Go to www.charlestonsbdc.com/ for details.

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Tuesday
January 22, 2019
5. Rockefeller Capital Management Continues to Expand in Atlanta

Rockefeller Capital Management (“Rockefeller” or the “Firm”) today announced that two private wealth advisory teams focused on ultra-high-net-worth clients have joined the Firm in Atlanta. The Higgins Hall Group and The Embleton Curtis Quackenbush Group both join Rockefeller Global Family Office from Merrill Lynch. The Higgins Hall Group and The Embleton Curtis Quackenbush Group are the latest additions to Rockefeller’s growing Atlanta office. The Higgins Hall Group, founded and led by David P. Higgins and Michael P. Hall, is team of seven professionals who join from Merrill Lynch’s Private Banking & Investment Group. The Embleton Curtis Quackenbush Group, a team of eight, join from Merrill Lynch Wealth Management. This group is led by John F. Embleton, William C. Curtis, P. Schuyler Quackenbush Jr. and Evan B. Georgiou. Prior to joining Rockefeller, Embleton was a Senior Vice President, Wealth Management Advisor and Senior Portfolio Manager at Merrill Lynch, where he joined in 2008. Embleton started his career in wealth management at Morgan Stanley in 1990 and is a graduate of The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina.

Examples of other media sources reporting this story include:

The Business Journals

Atlanta Business Chronicle

SC Now

Business Wire

 

 

Published in: sectorpublishingintelligence.co.uk - Online
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Tuesday
January 22, 2019
6. Today in History

In 1994, Shannon Faulkner became the first woman to attend classes at The Citadel in South Carolina. (Faulkner joined the cadet corps in Aug. 1995 under court order but soon dropped out, citing isolation and stress from the legal battle.)

Published in: The Progress - Onlline
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Tuesday
January 22, 2019
Citadel football’s Brent Thompson talks new defense, new coaches
After The Citadel won three of its final four football games — and held mighty Alabama to a 10-10 tie in the most famous halftime score of the season — the Bulldogs hit the offseason with renewed optimism for 2019. They will also go into spring practice, which starts Feb. 7, with new schemes and plans on defense, as head coach Brent Thompson gives that side of the ball a makeover coming off a second straight 5-6 season. Thompson has hired former Navy assistant Tony Grantham as the Bulldogs’ new defensive coordinator, taking over for Blake Harrell, who left after five seasons at The Citadel for the same position at Kennesaw State.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Tuesday
January 22, 2019
Rifle shoots short in winless weekend
No. 13 NC State rifle went to Lincoln, Nebraska where it went 0-2 against No. 8 Navy and No. 10 Nebraska in another unsuccessful weekend amidst a down year for the program. On Saturday, Jan. 19, the Pack (3-6, 2-6 GARC) lined up against Navy (8-4, 4-2 GARC) who topped NC State on Oct. 13, 2018, 4676-4664 in Annapolis, Maryland. Both freshman Emily Fisher and senior Claire Spina set career-high scores, but Navy outperformed the Pack in the smallbore and in the air rifle to take the match 4644-4625. The following day showed a similar result against the Nebraska Cornhuskers who also edged out NC State 4627-4606. Sunday was another strong day for Fisher who finished with a smallbore score of 579, breaking her personal-best for the second day in a row. The freshman led all competitors in the smallbore and finished 3rd in the aggregate score, with a score of 1163, after a team-high score of 584 in air rifle. Nebraska, after an 0-5 start, improved to 6-5 and 4-3 in the GARC. The Cornhuskers also narrowly topped Navy this weekend 4652-4650. The Pack has only managed wins against The Citadel, Akron and Army this season. The 3-6 season is a disappointment after an 11-7 record last year that included a sixth-place finish out of nine teams at the GARC Championships against some of the best competitors in the nation.
Published in: The Technician - Online
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Tuesday
January 22, 2019
UNCG wins at East Tennessee State, hosts The Citadel on Thursday
The UNC-Greensboro men’s basketball went into one of the most hostile environments in the Southern Conference and did what no other team has been able to do this season: knock off East Tennessee State in Freedom Hall. UNCG jumped out to a lead and didn’t surrender it once in a 75-68 victory. The victory moves the Spartans to 17-3 on the season and 6-1 in Southern Conference play. The Spartans are now also alone in second place in the SoCon standings with four straight home games ahead, beginning with The Citadel at the Greensboro Coliseum at 7 p.m. Thursday. Also, the win snapped an eight-game winning streak for ETSU and stopped a 10-game winning streak for the Buccaneers on their home court.
Published in: News and Record - Online
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Friday
January 18, 2019
1. Diseases from the sea being studied by three South Carolina colleges

Living on the coast is getting riskier to your health. Vibrio, the disease-causing germ that closes oyster beds, could soon find it way to your drinking water. It could infect you if you swim with an open wound. Algal blooms exacerbated by a heating climate could make the germ outbreaks worse and spread other toxins. hat’s why 20 scientists from three South Carolina universities — The Citadel, the College of Charleston and the University of South Carolina — and two other schools nationally are teaming up to form one of four Oceans and Human Health Centers on Climate Change Interactions. Their job is to devise a forecast system to provide early public warnings of threatening environmental conditions. “Just as we do with with weather forecast now,” said Geoff Scott, chairman of the Environmental Health Sciences department at USC, who is heading up the effort. They’re not talking about some future problem. Already incidences of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease are on the rise; vibrio, the bacteria that closes oyster beds when it is found, is a leading cause, and it will be studied. As waters warm and seas rise, saltwater vibrio is expected to be pushed closer to drinking water supplies and the hot months last longer that incubate it.

Examples of other media sources reporting this story include:

 Center for Environmental Science

The Citadel Newsroom

The College of Charleston

Lowcountry Biz SC

Charleston CEO

 

 

 

 

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Friday
January 18, 2019
2. Governor names McCarty new South Carolina adjutant general

South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster is appointing a longtime deputy in the state's Military Department to be its new adjutant general. McMaster said Thursday he wants Maj. Gen. R. Van McCarty to oversee the state's Army National Guard, Air National Guard, volunteer State Guard and the state's Emergency Management Division. McCarty is a 1982 graduate of The Citadel and has a 36-year military career. McCarty served as deputy to the current adjutant general, Maj. Gen. Robert E. Livingston Jr. Livingston plans to retire if McCarty's appointment is approved by the state Senate. Livingston has served eight years as adjutant general. He was the final person voted into the office. Voters approved a constitutional amendment in 2014 putting the job into the governor's Cabinet.

Published in: News & Observer
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Friday
January 18, 2019
2.1 The S.C. National Guard has a new commanding general

Gov. Henry McMaster has named Maj. Gen. Van McCarty as South Carolina’s new adjutant general. McCarty, a 1982 graduate of The Citadel and a veteran of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, replaces Maj. Gen. Robert Livingston, who has served as adjutant general since 2011. McCarty is the first appointed head of the state’s Military Department. South Carolina’s adjutant general had been the only elected adjutant general in the nation prior to a constitutional amendment approved by voters in 2014. “He’s a great man and a great soldier,” McMaster said. “He is more than qualified.” The S.C. Military Department includes the S.C. Army National Guard, the S.C. Air National Guard, the S.C. State Guard and the Emergency Management Division and other elements. “We will do everything we have to to ensure our young men and women in the state of South Carolina are well represented,” McCarty said. He said his number one priority will be recruiting and retention of soldiers. McCarty, the S.C. National Guard’s deputy adjutant general, was commissioned as a U.S. Army Reserve field artillery officer into the S.C. Army National Guard. Since then he has served in numerous roles, including commander of headquarters and headquarters battery, 1st Battalion, 178th Field Artillery (Forward) in Operation Iraqi Freedom in 2005, and commander of headquarters and headquarters battery, 151st Field Artillery Brigade Forward 6, Operation Enduring Freedom, Afghanistan, in 2008.

Published in: The State - Online
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Friday
January 18, 2019
2.2 Van McCarty named new leader of South Carolina's military

South Carolina Governor Henry McMaster has named a new leader for the state's military forces, and the first ever to be appointed to the position. Thursday, McMaster introduced Maj. Gen. Van McCarty as his pick to succeed Maj. Gen. Bob Livingston as the state's Adjutant General. Livingston is retiring from duty after serving as the state's top officer since 2011. He's the last elected adjutant general, because of a law change in 2014 that made the position appointed beginning in 2018. McCarty is a 1982 graduate of The Citadel. He's been serving as the deputy adjutant general in recent years. Over his career, he's served in multiple commanding units, and has helped lead the response to natural disasters in the state. "Our business is important, and there's nothing I can do that's more important that I do than to make sure [the military] is trained, equipped, and ready," McCarty said. The adjutant general oversees the state's Army National Guard, Air National Guard, volunteer State Guard and the state's Emergency Management Division.

Published in: WLTX.com - Online
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Friday
January 18, 2019
3. A civilian commentator said women shouldn't serve in all combat jobs...

Veterans are pushing back against a Wall Street Journal op-ed, in which a woman with no military experience argued that women do not belong in combat units. Heather Mac Donald, of the conservative Manhattan Institute think tank, wrote that putting male and female service members together for long periods of time, "Guarantees sexual liaisons, rivalries and breakups, all of which undermine the bonding essential to a unified fighting force." She cites an unnamed Marine commander, who said that during his unit's Afghanistan deployment, things went downhill when a female team assigned with interacting with local women arrived at their forward operating base. All Marines in ground combat military occupational specialties open to women must meet physical standards specific to their jobs, regardless of gender, said retired Marine Gen. Glenn Walters, who served as assistant commandant from 2016 to 2018. The underlying issue is not whether women are in combat MOSs, but whether Marines can respect everyone on their team, said Walters, who is now president of The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina.

Published in: Business Insider - Online
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Friday
January 18, 2019
4. Robby Robbins heads SCDOT Commission

Robert D. "Robby" Robbins of Summerville was named chairman of the South Carolina Department of Transportation (SCDOT) Commission on Thursday during the commission’s monthly meeting in Columbia. Robbins, a commissioner representing the 1st Congressional District, had been serving as vice chairman of the commission. He joined the SCDOT Commission in 2016. Robbins, a Summerville attorney, is a graduate of the University of South Carolina and the USC School of Law. He was 1st Circuit deputy solicitor from 1997-2003 and 1st Circuit solicitor in 2004. Robbins was a member of the Dorchester County Sales Tax Transportation Authority from 2004 to 2015. He is married to Mary Bryce Robbins, and they have a son and a daughter.

Published in: The Times and Democrat - Online
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Friday
January 18, 2019
5. The Azalea Festival Garden Tour sites

The Cape Fear Garden Club 2019 Azalea Garden Tour opens at 10 a.m. Friday, April 5, at the home of Linda and Steve Smits, 1925 S. Live Oak Parkway with musical entertainment and a parade of Cape Fear Garden Club Azalea Belles accompanied by the Citadel Summerall guard.

Published in: StarNewsOnline.com - Online
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Friday
January 18, 2019
Matt Frierson finds his shot, but it’s not enough for Citadel at Samford
Matt Frierson located his shooting touch on Thursday night at Samford. But The Citadel basketball team that won nine of its first 11 games remains AWOL. Frierson made eight 3-point shots and scored 27 points to end his personal slump, but The Citadel’s late rally came up short in an 80-77 loss to Samford at the Hanna Center in Birmingham, Ala. The loss was The Citadel’s sixth straight, dropping coach Duggar Baucom’s team to 9-8 overall and 1-5 in the Southern Conference. A month ago, The Citadel was 9-2 overall and 1-0 in the SoCon. “We certainly played hard enough to win,” Baucom said on his post-game radio show. “But we didn’t execute well enough to win.” Frierson, a senior and one of the top 3-point shooters in college basketball, had gone two straight games without making a trey. But he ended an 0-for-19 skid in the first half and went on to make 8 of 15 from deep.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Friday
January 18, 2019
The Citadel Comes Up Short, 80-77, at Samford
Brandon Austin scored a career-high 28 points, including six 3-pointers and Samford held on to defeat The Citadel 80-77 Thursday night, breaking a three-game losing skid. osh Sharkey scored 23 points — 16 after halftime — with four 3-pointers, eight assists and three steals for Samford (12-7, 2-4 Southern Conference). Myron Gordon added 13 points. The teams launched 78 shots from beyond the arc, The Citadel making 17 of 46 and Samford 13 of 32. Not all probiotics are created equal. How do you choose the one that is right for you? The Citadel banged down three straight 3-pointers, cutting the gap to 74-71 before Austin drained a 3 from NBA distance, stretching the lead to six points with just under two minutes to go. Matt Frierson cut that in half with yet another 3-pointer for The Citadel, but the Bulldogs missed twice from distance in the next 90 seconds and Samford made three of four at the foul line. The free throws were enough to survive a Lew Stallworth 3 at the buzzer for The Citadel.
Published in: WCSC TV-5 (Charleston) - Online
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Thursday
January 17, 2019
1.1 McMaster budget proposes college tuition freeze for 2019-2020

A section of Governor Henry McMaster’s 2019-2020 proposed Executive Budget attempts to put a stop to the rising cost of tuition for higher education in South Carolina. McMaster announced his proposed budget on Monday, which includes an appropriation of $36 million in recurring funds for colleges and universities. “I think that’s great,” College of Charleston Sophomore Bailey Gibson said. “I think that’s great to freeze tuition and not have kids pay more because a lot of kids can’t even afford it now.” The proposal would increase funding for higher education institutions by six percent if the school does not increase in-state tuition and fees for the next academic year. “This executive budget takes the first step toward reining in these rising costs by proposing a freeze on tuition and fees for in-state students at our state’s technical schools, colleges and universities for the 2019-2020 academic year,” McMaster said in a cover letter included with his proposed budget. South Carolina has seen significant increases in tuition in recent years. “Rising tuition rates is a concern for students and a concern for me just because I don’t want to have to worry about how I’m going to pay for more after I’ve already struggled to pay for what I have to pay for,” College of Charleston Freshman Anaya Waugh said.

Published in: WCSC TV-5 (Charleston) - Online
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Thursday
January 17, 2019
2. Citadel ranked No. 1 online MBA in SC by US News & World Report

The Citadel Graduate College offers No. 1 Online MBA program in the state of South Carolina, ranked by U.S. News & World Report in an announcement Jan. 15. Of all of the South Carolina colleges and universities offering master’s degree programs in business administration online, The Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business, offered through The Citadel Graduate College, is ranked the highest. “The Citadel’s MBA program has educated busy professionals on campus in the evenings for decades, but has only been offered 100 percent online since 2016, making this achievement especially meaningful,” said Col. Michael R. Weeks USAF (Ret.), Ph.D., dean of The Tommy and Victoria School of Business at The Citadel. “We have military service members and MBA candidates studying around the country and the world, fulfilling our mission to educate and develop principled leaders as broadly as possible.”

Published in: The Moultrie News - Online
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Thursday
January 17, 2019
2.1 The Baker School of Business offers #1 Online MBA program in South Carolina

The Citadel Graduate College offers the #1 Online MBA program in the state of South Carolina, as ranked by U.S. News & World Report in an announcement made Jan. 15. Of all of the South Carolina colleges and universities offering master’s degree programs in business administration online, The Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business, offered through The Citadel Graduate College, is ranked the highest. “The Citadel’s MBA program has educated busy professionals on campus in the evenings for decades, but has only been offered 100 percent online since 2016, making this achievement especially meaningful,” said Col. Michael R. Weeks USAF (Ret.), Ph.D., dean of The Tommy and Victoria School of Business at The Citadel. “We have military service members and MBA candidates studying around the country and the world, fulfilling our mission to educate and develop principled leaders as broadly as possible.” The Citadel’s online MBA has more than 70 students participating in the spring of 2019. It moved up to the #90 slot on the new, nationwide U.S. News & World Report list, from #205 the previous year.

Published in: Lowcountry Biz SC - Online
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Thursday
January 17, 2019
High school notebook: Schickel sold The Citadel on his versatility
Evan Schickel was recruited by The Citadel to play quarterback. But in case it doesn’t work out for the Massaponax senior under center, he has the ability to help out elsewhere. Panthers head coach Eric Ludden said Schickel’s ability and willingness to do whatever it takes made him attractive for The Citadel’s coaching staff. Schickel orally committed to the Bulldogs recently, coming off a senior season in which he rushed for 1,101 yards and 16 scores, while passing for 337 yards and five touchdowns. The Bulldogs and Panthers both run the option offense. “He fits into their system really well,” Ludden said. “But they also know sometimes when you recruit quarterbacks, it’s all or nothing. If a kid doesn’t pan out as a quarterback you’re kind of stuck with him. With Evan, I’m sure he’ll be a successful quarterback. But they like the fact that he’s very versatile and multiple.”
Published in: Fredericksburg.com
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Thursday
January 17, 2019
The Citadel Names Tony Grantham Defensive Coordinator
Tony Grantham has been named the new defensive coordinator and linebackers coach at The Citadel. The hire was announced by head coach Brent Thompson Tuesday morning. The Citadel head coach Brent Thompson has announced that Tony Grantham has been named the new defensive coordinator and linebackers coach for the Bulldogs. Grantham joins the Bulldogs after spending the previous season coaching the outside linebackers at the United States Naval Academy. Grantham spent the 2017 season as the defensive coordinator at Western Illinois where he guided a defense that ranked 22nd against the run, sixth in interceptions, 13th in takeaways, 23rd in sacks and 13th in tackles-for-loss. Prior to his time at WIU, Grantham spent three seasons as the linebackers coach and special teams coordinator at Louisville where he worked alongside his brother, Todd. Tony helped the Cardinals win 26 games and make a bowl game all three seasons. Louisville finished in the top 20 in total defense in two of his three seasons and the Cardinals forced 81 turnovers over those three years.
Published in: WCSC TV-5 (Charleston) - Online
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Wednesday
January 16, 2019
1. Veterans: Women Are Already In Combat, So Stop Saying They Shouldn't Be In Combat Unit

Heather Mac Donald, of the conservative Manhattan Institute think tank, wrote that putting male and female service members together for long periods of time, "Guarantees sexual liaisons, rivalries and breakups, all of which undermine the bonding essential to a unified fighting force." As of Nov. 30, a total of 120 enlisted female Marines and 36 officers were serving in MOSs that had been restricted to men only, according to Manpower and Reserve Affairs. That includes 21 female 0311 Rifleman; three Light Armored Vehicle crew members; two 0331 machine gunners; and three 0341 Mortarmen. Two other female Marines have passed the Infantry Officer Course. "I think there were some people who thought that once the MOSs were opened up we would have a groundswell of maybe thousands of women who wanted to do that for living in the Marine Corps," Walters told Task & Purpose. "That didn't happen, but that didn't surprise us either." The underlying issue is not whether women are in combat MOSs, but whether Marines can respect everyone on their team, said Walters, who is now president of The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina. "I don't care whether you're in an infantry outfit or a logistics outfit, or an aviation outfit, or an admin outfit – it doesn't matter," he said. "You can't win effectively on the battlefield unless everybody on the team knows their job as the MAGTF [Marine Air-Ground Task Force] and actually goes and executes it to perfection. You can't execute to perfection unless everybody on the team respects each other."

Published in: Task and Purpose - Online
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Wednesday
January 16, 2019
2. Citadel cadet honored to serve as escort during Governor McMaster’s inauguration ceremony

For more than a century of South Carolina governor inaugurations, Citadel cadets have been part of the ceremony. Among the cadets receiving the honor for Governor Henry McMaster’s swearing-in last week was Cadet David Days of Chester, Regimental Executive Officer for the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. “A real big part of mine is to represent my school and my fellow cadets and classmates,” he told South Carolina Radio Network. “So every opportunity to do that is welcome.” Days, Regimental Commander Cadet Col. Sara Zorn and 27 others were in Columbia for the ceremony. The regimental commander, regimental executive officer and all of the battalion commanders are automatically selected to participate. Two Citadel bagpipers played at the ceremony and the prayer service prior to the inauguration. Days said all were proud and privileged to represent the Citadel and South Carolina. “There’s a lot of great schools in South Carolina: Clemson, South Carolina, Furman, Claflin,” he said. “You could keep going on and on, but to be a part of that and do that for the governor was really cool.” Days said, while cadets are aware of the tradition, he was more focused on his role as a football player his freshman year than he was an opportunity to be an escort at the Capitol his senior year.

Published in: South Carolina Radio Network - Online
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Wednesday
January 16, 2019
3. Ludwig von Mises as the Victim of Quinn Slobodian’s Intellectual Dishonesty

We live at a time when one of the worst accusations that can be thrown at someone is the charge of “racist.” Have that word tied to your name and it not only results in moral condemnation, it potentially throws into discredit almost anything and everything that person has said or done. That makes it a serious matter when an individual never identified with such racist views or values has that accusation attached to them. Wellesley College historian, Quinn Slobodian, has recently attempted to attach such a charge to Austrian economist Ludwig von Mises. In an article on, “Perfect Capitalism, Imperfect Humans: Race, Migration, and the Limits of Ludwig von Mises’s Globalism” (Contemporary European History, Dec. 2018), Professor Slobodian says that Mises, in some of his writings, rationalized racist attitudes and policy perspectives, especially concerning race relations in the United States. The actual facts show this is a fundamentally baseless accusation that attempts to taint and tarnish the reputation of one of the leading economists of the 20th century, and one of the most consistent and outspoken defenders of the classical liberal ideal of political, social and economic liberty and the free society.

Published in: AIER American Institute for Economic Research - Online
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Wednesday
January 16, 2019
4. USM lessons helped alumni reach top of U.S. military

When Michael Dumont entered the University of Southern Maine (USM) as a criminology major, he was going to be a police officer. The second of seven kids from Brunswick, Maine, he worked a bit after high school. He spent a year in a technical school, and was filling part-time shifts as a local cop when he enrolled at USM. The university made him think bigger. “USM exposed me to what was going on locally, nationally and internationally,” Dumont said. “I think that’s what piqued my interest for what was possible for me.” Today, Dumont is one of the highest ranking officers in the U.S. Navy — a vice admiral — and he’s not alone among USM alumni. Dumont says the school is linked to “an unheard of” number of top admirals and generals who graduated in the 70s, 80s and 90s. “When I look back at my time at USM, I had really wonderful professors who were invested in their students,” he said. “There was a theme of public service or giving back.” It’s really surprising when I talk to other people who didn’t come out of the military academies or from The Citadel (The military college of South Carolina) or Norwich (University),” he said. “For all of us to come out of USM, it’s amazing.”

Published in: maine.edu - Online
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Wednesday
January 16, 2019
5. Jack Lane Ferrell, Jr

Jack Lane Ferrell, Jr., 78, passed into eternal life before dawn on Tuesday, January 8th at Vibra Hospital in Mount Pleasant, SC. Called Lane by family, he was JACK to most. Until his sudden illness, his routine at that hour had been to drive to Hardees near his home in Summerville, where he and his friends would fellowship over life and coffee as they began the day. Jack was born in Atlanta to Jack, Sr. and Jeanele ​​Moore Ferrell. ​He grew up in Savannah and enlisted in the U.S. Navy in 1957, ​beginning his 20 year Naval career as a submariner spanning years of the Cold War. He married Theus Smith in July 1962, a 54-year marriage. Jack's career moved them and their children ​​between east-to-west coast postings. The family settled in Summerville after his Navy retirement, where Jack began a second career with South Carolina Law Enforcement Division at the Citadel. He retired from SLED in 1996. Of all his years in service, his Navy years were the ones closest to his heart.

Published in: The Summerville Scene - Online
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Wednesday
January 16, 2019
Citadel hires son of ex-Clemson coach; names new defensive coordinator
The Citadel has hired former Navy assistant Tony Grantham as the Bulldogs’ new defensive coordinator, football coach Brent Thompson announced Tuesday. Thompson also has hired Turner West, son of former Clemson coach Tommy West, as the team’s new special teams and recruiting coordinator. Grantham was the outside linebackers coach at Navy last season, the third of his three stints at the U.S. Naval Academy. He was also the Midshipmen’s outside linebackers coach from 2008-13, and coached the defensive line and linebackers from 2003-06. Grantham replaces Blake Harrell, who left The Citadel after five seasons to become defensive coordinator at Kennesaw State. Turner West comes to The Citadel from Austin Peay, where he was linebackers coach for one season. He spent four years as a defensive assistant with the NFL’s Dallas Cowboys, and before that worked at Middle Tennessee, UAB and Samford. West played wide receiver at Memphis from 2006-10 for his father, Tommy West, who was Clemson’s head coach from 1993-98.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Wednesday
January 16, 2019
Jets' Andre Roberts Named to Pro Football Writers of America All-NFL Team
Jets kick returner Andre Roberts was named to the Pro Football Writers of America All-NFL Team. Roberts, who was selected to his first Pro Bowl in December, led the NFL in kickoff yards (1,174) and his 1,498 total return yards were fifth-most in franchise history. The nine-year veteran finished second in the league with a 29.4-yard kick return average and became the first Jet since Darrelle Revis in 2011 to make the Associated Press first-team All-Pro earlier this month. The Citadel product was also named to the PFWA All-AFC team, along with safety Jamal Adams, as a kick and punt returner. Roberts led the league with a 14.1-yard punt return average and finished second with 324 punt return yards.
Published in: newyorkjets.com - Online
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Monday
January 14, 2019
1. Cadets create indoor farm inside shipping containers
As seen in Mother Earth News - Inside three shipping containers on the campus of The Citadel, a military college in South Carolina, cadets are learning how to grow lettuce crops in a controlled indoor “farm” setting, producing organic produce in an environment that can withstand unpredictable weather conditions and disease. The cadets’ hands-on education comes from The Citadel Sustainability Project, in which the first shipping container functions as a hydroponic cultivation system for lettuce crops, the second container is a testing ground for various growing systems, and the third container will be outfitted by cadets who design and build the growing equipment as part of a corresponding independent study. The Citadel STEM Center of Excellence initiated the project in 2016 as an interdisciplinary collaboration. Of the 20 or so students who are members of the Sustainability Club, several are STEM Scholars. We also have electrical engineers who are completing a design project on hydroponics. We’ve had students from almost every campus department — engineering, biology, business — who have worked with the project. Prior to their graduation, Alex Richardson, who studied engineering, and Cameron Brown, who studied business, managed the growing container with the help of other students motivated by a passion for the environment.
Published in: The Citadel News Room - Online
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Monday
January 14, 2019
2. Citadel cadets resurrect flying club to help address pilot shortage worldwide

The Citadel Flying Club has entered a new chapter to help address a looming shortage of military and commercial pilots. The club was created in 1939 but dissolved in the 1970s. Now, after almost four decades of dormancy, the club is operational again with about 240 members. Organizers hope the endeavor can give cadets at the military college a leg up in pursuing a career in aviation. The club offers subsidized flight training to its members and hopes to award scholarships for cadets. The club has purchased an old Citadel training center at the Charleston Executive Airport on Johns Island. “We have a team of cadets that are going to go out there and paint it and make it kind of match Citadel colors and logo,” said Kirk Faris, the Citadel Flying Club’s president. “That’s where we are going to officially begin our official operations with more cadet flight training in February.” Over the next two decades, almost 800,000 new pilots will be needed to fuel the aviation industry, according to the most recent projections from Boeing.

Published in: WCSC TV-5 (Charleston) - Online
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Monday
January 14, 2019
9th Annual Charleston Marathon
Yesterday, the 9th Annual Charleston Marathon kicked off near Burke High School, passing through Hampton Park, and The Citadel campus and into North Charleston. Runners saw no shortage of sideline supporters cheering them on as they ran by. "ic: we've run, oc: they pass thu, " as in years past the marathon partnered with engaging creative minds an educational non-profit that provides arts-integrated programming in local schools.
Published in: WCBD TV-2 (Charleston) - Online
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Monday
January 14, 2019
Gibson, Halvorsen pace W. Carolina past The Citadel 94-82
Kameron Gibson and Matt Halvorsen each scored 16 points, Carlos Dotson grabbed 14 rebounds and Western Carolina beat The Citadel 94-82 on Saturday. The Catamounts (5-14, 2-4 Southern Conference) built a 27-10 lead in the first 10 minutes and never trailed. Halvorsen wrapped up scoring at the end of the half with three foul shots after getting fouled on a 3-point attempt for a 47-35 lead. Connor Kern’s 3-pointer 3½ minutes into the second half capped a 13-3 run for the Bulldogs (9-7, 1-4) to bring them within 50-48. Halvorsen’s 3 and D.J. Myers' layup with 11:54 left capped a 13-2 for the Catamounts and they were back up 63-52. Onno Steger scored 14 for Western Carolina and Adam Sledd and Marcus Thomas each scored 11. Lew Stallworth scored a career-high 32 points on 12-of-18 shooting with nine rebounds and eight assists for the Bulldogs. Zane Najdawi added 20 points and Hayden Brown 16.
Published in: WCSC TV-5 (Charleston) - Online
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Friday
January 11, 2019
1. The Citadel announces new provost and dean of college

he Citadel has selected a new second in command, the university’s president announced on Thursday. Sally Selden, Ph.D, SPHR will serve as provost and the dean of college starting in June. Selden is now the provost and vice president of academic affairs at The University of Lynchburg where she has worked for 18 years. She helped lead the insitution’s strategic planning process alongside the board of trustees. Prior to that, she was a professor of management in the College of Business and Economics in Lynchburg. In her role as provost, Selden will be responsible for all matters pertaining to academic functions of the college and is the second-ranking official. As the college’s chief academic officer, the provost provides leadership in all academic areas, including curriculum and instruction, research and scholarly activity, program development and accreditation, admissions and financial aid and academic support services. President of Citadel, Gen. Glenn M. Walters, USMC (Ret.) said Selden brings a proven commitment to scholarship and high impact learning experiences. "Her expertise will help transform the lives of our cadets and students as they prepare for the future,” Walters said.

Examples of other media sources reporting this story include:

Charleston Business Magazine

Charleston CEO

Lowcountry Biz SC

Moultrie News

Radio.com

University of Lynchburg

 

 

 

 

Published in: WCSC TV-5 (Charleston) - Online
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Friday
January 11, 2019
2. McMaster takes oath of office, lawmakers optimistic about productivity

anuary 9 was a day of promises and pledges from South Carolina politicians. Top leaders in government took their oath of office Wednesday morning, including the chief executive. On a sunny and cold winter day, the rhythm of the capital city came from the steps of the Statehouse. A South Carolina tradition brought political friends and foes together for a ceremony to symbolize a commitment to public service.Cadets from The Citadel received instructions on escorting family members, dignitaries and lawmakers to the site where the state's executive leadership made a promise to the people it serves.

Published in: WCIV TV-4 (Charleston) - Online
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Friday
January 11, 2019
3. Mac-Off

What: Charleston’s annual mac and cheese bake-off with over 13 competing restaurants will feature live music by the Black Diamond Band, kitchen demos, ax-throwing, beer, kids activities and more. When: 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Jan. 12 Where: Johnson Hagood Stadium at The Citadel, 68 Hagood Ave., downtown Charleston Price: $15 general admission More Info: charlestonmacoff.com

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Friday
January 11, 2019
4. The 2019 Charleston Marathon is this weekend. Here’s what you need to know.

Thousands of runners will run through the Charleston area Saturday for this year’s Charleston Marathon, which will effectively shut down several well-traveled roadways throughout the peninsula. The marathon, set to begin around 6:50 a.m. near Burke High School, at 244 President St., will shut down designated roads along the route until 10 a.m., according to the Charleston Police Department. Motorists and those in the areas along the route should expect closures and delays for the duration of the race. Participants will begin on Fishburne Street near Burke, then continue north on Hagood Avenue to Huger Street. Then, runners will turn east on Huger Street, proceed north on Elmwood Street and then enter Hampton Park. From Hampton Park, participants will enter the Citadel Campus and continue south, exiting the campus on Hagood Avenue. After reaching Hagood, runners will turn west on Fishburne and continue south on Lockwood Boulevard to Broad Street. They then will turn south on Chisolm Street and take Murray Boulevard until they eventually turn north on King Street and continue into North Charleston.

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Friday
January 11, 2019
Citadel can’t hang with ETSU before biggest crowd of season
The Citadel’s largest crowd of the season, including a couple hundred sign-waving cadets, turned out to watch the Bulldogs’ basketball team Thursday night at McAlister Field House. Unfortunately, the Bulldogs could not give the fans a glimpse of the form that got The Citadel off to a 9-2 start this season. ETSU broke open a fairly close game with a dominant run to start the second half, cruising to a 98-73 victory before 1,253 fans and handing The Citadel its fourth straight loss. Daivien Williamson led five Bucs players in double figures with 24 points as ETSU improved to 14-4 overall and 4-1 in the Southern Conference. The Citadel is 9-6 and 1-3 in the league with Western Carolina coming to McAlister on Saturday. Lew Stallworth scored 18 points and Kaiden Rice 17 for the Bulldogs, but senior Matt Frierson had his streak of 52 straight games with at least one 3-pointer snapped, going 0 of 5 from deep. “They are probably the biggest team we’ve played this year,” Stallworth said after ETSU blocked seven shots and out-scored the Bulldogs by 46-24 in the paint. “Their bigs are really good and mobile and can crash the boards and block shots. They definitely have the size of a Power 5 team and that kind of mold and look to them.”
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Friday
January 11, 2019
Nanook Rifle defeats the Citadel in first meet of 2019
he Alaska Nanook Rifle team competed for the first time in 2019 with a matchup against the Citadel down in Charleston South Carolina. The Nooks were able to start their year-opening road trip with a win, defeating the Citadel 46-69 to 45-59. This was a tri-meet also involving the Citadel Women's rifle team, who shot a 19-82 point score in the Air Rifle, but did not compete in the smallbore. Kellen McAferty shot a match-high 11-74 thanks to 588 points in the smallbore and 586 in the Air Rifle. Haley Castillo had the highest Air Rifle score with 595 points. She also finished with a 575 point Smallbore score to finish second overall. The Nooks will now head to Columbus Ohio for a tri-meet against Ohio State and Ole Miss on Saturday, and Ole Miss and Akron on Sunday.
Published in: Webcenter11.com - Online
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Friday
January 11, 2019
The Citadel loses to ETSU 98-73
The Citadel Bulldogs lost their third straight conference game Thursday night to ETSU. The Bucs came out hot early in the first half of the game, but the Bulldogs were relentless and cut the lead to just 7 points going into the half. In the first half, ETSU shot 48.6% from the field compared to the Bulldogs' 28.2%. Rebounding was another issue for the Citadel. ETSU had 50 rebounds Thursday night while The Citadel had just 31. The second half got out of hand for the Bulldogs. ETSU outscored The Citadel by 22 points in the second in route to the 98-73 win. Next up The Citadel hosts Western Carolina on Saturday at 1p.m.
Published in: WCBD TV-2 (Charleston) - Online
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Friday
January 11, 2019
UAF rifle opens road trip with win over Citadel
The University of Alaska Fairbanks rifle team started its new-year road trip with a victory over The Citadel in Thursday’s dual meet of nationally ranked NCAA Division I programs. The Nanooks, ranked sixth in the College Rifle Association Coaches Poll, claimed a 4,669-4,559 win over the No. 24 Bulldogs in The Citadel’s Inouye Marksmanship Center in Charleston, South Carolina. The Nanooks outscored the Bulldogs 2,316-2,247 in smallbore and won the air rifle with a 2,353 total to The Citadel’s 2,312. Kellen McAferty emerged as the dual meet’s top shooter with a 1,174 aggregate (combined) total. The freshman from Littlerock, Washington, won the smallbore with a 588 score and took third in the air rifle with 595. McAferty capped a Nanooks sweep of the top three places in air rifle.
Published in: newsminer.com - Online
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Friday
January 11, 2019
Williamson, ETSU had The Citadel its fourth straight loss
Daivien Williamson scored a career-high 24 points Thursday night and Jeromy Rodriguez had his 10th double-double of the season to help ETSU beat The Citadel 98-73 for its sixth win in a row. The Citadel (9-6, 1-3 Southern Conference) has lost four straight following a seven-game win streak. Williamson was 9-of-13 shooting, hitting four 3-pointers, while Rodriguez finished with 10 points and 14 rebounds. Tray Boyd scored 16 points and Isaiah Tisdale 14 with five assists for ETSU (14-4, 4-1). The Buccaneers, who never trailed, took a 38-31 lead into the break before using a 24-3 run to open the second half to take control. The Citadel made just 1 of 12 from the field and committed five turnovers during the first seven minutes of the second half.
Published in: Island Packet - Online
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Thursday
January 10, 2019
1. Dr. Sally Selden to serve as The Citadel provost and dean of the college
The president of The Citadel has selected his new second in command. Sally Selden, Ph.D., SPHR, will take over as provost and dean of the college in June. Selden is in her 18th year at University of Lynchburg (UL) in Virginia where she served in numerous leadership positions. Most recently, as provost and vice president for academic affairs, Selden helped lead that institution’s strategic planning process alongside the board of trustees. Prior to that, she was a professor of management in the College of Business and Economics at UL. “Dr. Sally Selden brings with her a proven commitment to scholarship and to leading high impact learning experiences. Her expertise will help transform the lives of our cadets and students as they prepare for the future,” said Gen. Glenn M. Walters, USMC (Ret.), president of The Citadel.
Published in: The Citadel News Room - Online
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Thursday
January 10, 2019
2. Lawrence Keefe Sworn in as U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Florida

Lawrence “Larry” Keefe, of Shalimar, Florida, took the oath of office this morning from Chief District Judge Mark E. Walker to become the 41st U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Florida. Mr. Keefe was nominated by President Donald Trump on August 16, 2018, and confirmed by the U.S. Senate on January 2, 2019. Mr. Keefe succeeds Christopher P. Canova, who has served as U.S. Attorney for the district since September 4, 2015, when U.S. Attorney Pamela Cothran Marsh resigned. U.S. Attorney Keefe and his wife Lynn have been married for 30 years. Lynn has practiced medicine in Northwest Florida for more than two decades and was the first pediatrician to establish a pediatrics practice in Niceville, Florida. The Keefe family has four adult sons. Two have careers in public service in the U.S. Secret Service and the U.S. Air Force, one is an attorney at a Miami law firm, and the youngest is a senior on an athletic scholarship at The Citadel: The Military College of South Carolina.

Published in: PR Newswire - Online
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Thursday
January 10, 2019
3. FLORIDA News: TALLAHASSEE, Lawrence Keefe Sworn in as U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Florida

Lawrence “Larry” Keefe, of Shalimar, Florida, took the oath of office this morning from Chief District Judge Mark E. Walker to become the 41st U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Florida. Mr. Keefe was nominated by President Donald Trump on August 16, 2018, and confirmed by the U.S. Senate on January 2, 2019. Mr. Keefe succeeds Christopher P. Canova, who has served as U.S. Attorney for the district since September 4, 2015, when U.S. Attorney Pamela Cothran Marsh resigned. U.S. Attorney Keefe and his wife Lynn have been married for 30 years. Lynn has practiced medicine in Northwest Florida for more than two decades and was the first pediatrician to establish a pediatrics practice in Niceville, Florida. The Keefe family has four adult sons. Two have careers in public service in the U.S. Secret Service and the U.S. Air Force, one is an attorney at a Miami law firm, and the youngest is a senior on an athletic scholarship at The Citadel: The Military College of South Carolina.

Published in: States Top Leading News - Online
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Thursday
January 10, 2019
4. The Charleston Mac Off

The festival features popular Lowcountry restaurants facing off to win the title of “Best Mac & Cheese in Charleston.” Competing chefs will showcase their version of the classic dish, playing with different cheeses, pasta shapes, toppings, and cooking methods. In addition to the numerous local restaurants serving up the city’s best mac-and-cheese dishes, the event offers free parking, live music, vendors and a childrens area featuring games, arts & crafts, bounce houses, etc… The Citadel’s Johnson Hagood Stadium will host the Charleston Annual Mac-Off from 11 am to 4 pm. Time: 11 a.m. – 4 p.m. Location: Hagood Stadium at The Citadel, 68 Hagood Avenue, Charleston

Published in: citymomsblog.com - Online
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Thursday
January 10, 2019
5. Attack upon ‘Star of the West’ – Actual First Shot of the Civil War?

The American Civil War, a four-year conflict between the North and South from 1861-65 primarily over the issues of slavery and states’ rights, was the most devastating conflict in the nation’s history. While there is debate over how many people were killed or wounded during the war, there is general agreement that the Civil War caused over a million military casualties, including more than 700,000 deaths, plus an unknown number of civilian casualties. Most historians agree that the opening shot fired in the Civil War was the attack on Fort Sumter at 4:30 in the morning on 12 April 1861, in Charleston Harbor, South Carolina. However, recognition for firing the first shot of the war should perhaps go to a cadet from the South Carolina Military Academy (The Citadel), George Edward Haynesworth, for earlier firing a cannon at the merchant ship Star of the West, on 9 January 1861.

Published in: genealogybank.com - Online
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Thursday
January 10, 2019
5.1 Respond Software and Norwich University Defend NCAA College Football Playoff Championship

On Monday, January 7, 2019, the Clemson Tigers and Alabama Crimson Tide faced off for one of the largest sporting events in the country, the National Collegiate Athletic Association's (NCAA) fifth National Championship game of the College Football Playoffs. As with any large-scale public event, the game also made the stadium, its sponsors and the nearly 75,000 attendees potential targets for malicious cyber activity. In a first-of-its-kind partnership at a major stadium event, cybersecurity students from Norwich University's Applied Research Institute (NUARI) and the stadium security professionals teamed with Respond Software's A.I.-based decision automation software, the Respond Analyst, to defend during the big game. The cybersecurity team monitored, analyzed and resolved over 243,000 monitored events and threats during game day. "Protecting an event of this scale is no easy feat and near impossible with people alone," said Mike Armistead, CEO, Respond Software. "Norwich's trained cybersecurity students expertly leveraged Respond's technology to ensure the event was safeguarded against security breaches." "Our trained cybersecurity students were invigorated by the game day energy and worked around the clock to ensure every staffer, fan and player was protected against cyberthreats throughout the College Playoffs, all with the support of Respond's cutting-edge software," said Phil Susmann, VP of Strategic Partnerships, Norwich University.

Published in: PR Newswire - Online
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Thursday
January 10, 2019
6. Citadel’s Matt Frierson made himself a great 3-point shooter - and a marked man

Two weeks ago, Citadel basketball coach Duggar Baucom was in his McAlister Field House office on a Sunday afternoon, rearranging the furniture after new carpet was installed. He heard a basketball bouncing in the gym and went to investigate. It was senior guard Matt Frierson, at 2 p.m. on a day off, putting up shot after shot in an empty gym. “I told my wife, ‘Come here, I want to show you something,’” Baucom said. “I said, ‘Right there is the price of greatness that nobody ever sees. That’s why he’s one of the best in the country, because he puts in the time.’ “Just the loneliness in the gym, nobody there but him.” That’s how Frierson has earned his reputation as one of the top 3-point shooters in the nation. The 6-2, 160-pounder from Laurel, Md., ranks second in Division I, averaging 4½ 3-pointers per game. He’s third in total 3-pointers made with 63, and he’s the top 3-point shooter in the Southern Conference among players with at least 100 attempts, shooting 43.8 percent. No wonder he’s also No. 1 on opposing team’s scouting reports.

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Thursday
January 10, 2019
Bucs look for redemption against The Citadel
It’s been 324 days since East Tennessee State and The Citadel have met on the basketball court. For ETSU coach Steve Forbes, Thursday night’s game between the two schools in Charleston, South Carolina, is a chance at redemption of sorts. Last season, the Bucs closed the regular season with three losses in a row. While the results against Wofford and Furman — two upper-echelon Southern Conference teams — could be forgiven, Forbes says a loss to The Citadel still sticks with him. “That’s one we needed to get,” Forbes said of the 84-82 defeat at Freedom Hall. “That was a hard loss, probably the worst one for me personally.” As it turned out, the losing streak was a killer for ETSU. Not only did it keep the Bucs from winning the SoCon’s regular-season title, it kept them from earning a bid to the NIT. Forbes said ETSU probably deserved to lose the game against The Citadel in Charleston earlier in the season when they escaped with a 73-71 victory as Alex Reed’s last-second, wide-open 3-point try was off the mark. The Bucs went 2 for 23 from 3-point range and gave up 11 threes to the Bulldogs.
Published in: Johnson City Press - Online
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Thursday
January 10, 2019
Catamounts Open Road Swing at Mercer

On the heels of their first Southern Conference victory of the 2018-19 season, the Western Carolina men’s basketball team hits the road as the Catamounts travel to Mercer on Thursday for a 7 p.m. contest inside Hawkins Arena. The game will be streamed on ESPN+ (subscription required). The Catamount Sports Network will provide coverage with Gary Ayers and Daniel Hooker on the call. Saturday’s game can be heard on WWCU-FM, Power 90dot5 in Cullowhee, 105.7-FM/540-AM WRCG in Sylva as well as online at www.catamountsports.com. Live stats will also be available. Western Carolina travels to The Citadel on Saturday for a 1 p.m. tip-off. That game can be seen on ESPN+ as well as locally on WYCW-62 as part of the SoCon/Nexstar television package.

Published in: catamountsports.com - Online
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Wednesday
January 9, 2019
1. Staying fit in space: exploring exercise through project-based learning

An excerpt from Science Scope, January 2019, Volume 42 -- Science Scope is the National Science Teachers Association peer-reviewed journal for middle level and junior high school science teachers. The publication published a collaborative project by three professors from The Citadel who are committed to supporting STEM and literacy education at all levels. “Staying fit in space” provides an interdisciplinary unit middle school teachers can use, based on a project during which students researched the effects of exercise in space. Part of their research was conducted in coordination with NASA and Citadel alumnus/astronaut, Col. Randy Bresnik, while he was commanding a mission on the International Space Station.

Published in: The Citadel News Room - Online
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Wednesday
January 9, 2019
2. The Citadel named one of 10 most innovative schools in the South

As seen in The Post and Courier, by Jeff Hartsell -- Citadel freshman Joseph Taffner straps on a pair of virtual-reality goggles that make him look like an alien wearing headphones. He chooses a ski run from the digital menu and is off, carving his way down the mountain with no fear of face planting. At the end of the run, there’s no trudge to the lift line. Taffner is in The Citadel’s “Makerspace” in Daniel Library, an emerging technologies lab and one of the military school’s features that helped its recent recognition from US News and World Report. The Makerspace lab includes 3-D printers, a milling machine, a large format printer and other technologies, including the VR goggles, computer-assisted design software and lessons in hologram making. Virtual-reality skiing provides Taffner and other cadets a welcome break during finals week. “I’m in here a lot, probably three or four times a day,” said Taffner, a mathematics major from upstate New York. “You can come here to not be in the barracks. I can make whatever I want on the printers, and it’s very relaxing.” The Makerspace also is important in providing cadets with the hands-on experience that can pay off in the job market.

Published in: The Citadel News Room - Online
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Wednesday
January 9, 2019
3. Bernice Sandler, ‘Godmother of Title IX,’ Dies at 90
When Bernice Sandler was a schoolgirl in the 1930s and ’40s, she was annoyed that she was not allowed to do things that boys could do, like be a crossing guard, fill the inkwells or operate the slide projector. When she was older, teaching part-time at the University of Maryland, she was told that she wasn’t being hired for a full-time job because “you come on too strong for a woman.” Another interviewer complained that women stayed home when their children were sick. Another rejected her by saying that she was “just a housewife who went back to school.” By that time, which was 1969, Dr. Sandler was more than annoyed. She was good and mad. And that led her to become the driving force behind the creation of Title IX, the sweeping civil rights law of 1972 that barred sex discrimination by educational institutions that received federal funding. Dr. Sandler, who died on Saturday at 90, was known as “the godmother of Title IX.” She was central to its development, passage and implementation. But once she got involved in Title IX, she devoted the rest of her life to combating sex discrimination. She spent two decades as the director of the Project on the Status and Education of Women at the Association of American Colleges. She delivered more than 2,500 presentations and served as a consultant to numerous institutions, including the Citadel, the South Carolina military college, as it edged toward coeducation with a “female assimilation plan.”
Published in: The New York Times - Online
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Wednesday
January 9, 2019
3. SC business calendar

USING QUICKBOOKS: The Charleston Area Small Business Development Center and The Citadel Baker School of Business hold a two-part workshop on the basics of using Quickbooks business accounting software. 9 a.m.- 1 p.m. Bond Hall, 171 Moultrie St., Charleston. $159. Advance registration required. Go to www.charlestonsbdc.com/ for details.

Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
January 9, 2019
4. Town of Summerville considers smoking ban for public parks and special events

Residents who want to spark up here may soon have to do so outside of public parks. The town is considering a smoking ban that also would apply to downtown special events. Summerville banned smoking in restaurants and bars several years ago, but this ordinance would ban smoking at special functions, including the annual Flowertown Festival that draws thousands of guests every year, and the Italian Feast. Officials are considering creating designated smoking areas at public parks with containers to dispose of cigarette butts. The ban could include e-cigarettes. Other municipalities, including Charleston, already have taken this step. Charleston City Council voted to ban smoking at public parks in May, and the ordinance takes effect this month. Similar bans already are in place on the campuses of the Medical University of South Carolina, the College of Charleston and The Citadel.

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Wednesday
January 9, 2019
A look at how Duggar Baucom has built up The Citadel
It’s happening. The Citadel is becoming a relevant basketball program in one of the toughest seasons in SoCon history. The Bulldogs are starting to build a foundation and culture in and around Charleston, thanks to fourth-year head coach Duggar Baucom. This summer, I had a chance to catch up with Baucom and talk about the upcoming season, and we told you at Mid-Major Madness that The Citadel would be a dark horse, and the Bulldogs have proven to be just that early on through non-conference play and now into league action. Creating a winning culture at any program that hasn’t won on a regular basis is not easy, however, and to do it at a military school is even tougher. Thanks to The Citadel basketball media relations director Milledge Austin, I was able to take in a few minutes of the Bulldogs’ shoot-around and practice ahead of their big SoCon clash with Furman lasts Saturday afternoon at Timmons Arena. I left even more impressed with Baucom, his staff, and how they are helping build on to an already solid foundation for The Citadel hoops program.
Published in: Mid-Major Madness - On
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Wednesday
January 9, 2019
Gunter, Williams added to ECU football staff
J.P. Gunter and Tarron Williams have accepted positions on the ECU football staff in key administrative support roles according to an announcement by head coach Mike Houston on Tuesday. Gunter was named director of player personnel and recruiting, while Williams will serve as director of player development. Both have assumed their duties immediately. Gunter's arrival in Greenville follows a nine-year stay at The Citadel, which included eight full-time seasons coordinating the program's special teams and recruiting efforts. In 2015, he helped the Bulldogs capture their first Southern Conference championship since 1992 and earn a subsequent FCS Playoff appearance during Houston's final year as head coach before following with another title and postseason showing in 2016.
Published in: WITN - Online
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Wednesday
January 9, 2019
Letter: Citadel basketball
As a former head basketball coach at three colleges I feel qualified to recognize a talented and very entertaining basketball team. I’d like to offer some insight on Citadel basketball this year. The team is well coached and enjoyable to watch. If you’re a basketball fan, you should come to the games. I commend Jeff Hartsell for his outstanding coverage of this Citadel team. As the Bulldogs head into conference play, I should point out that Southern Conference teams are as talented and competitive as they have been in many years. I have followed the Southern Conference since the 1950s when I was growing up in West Virginia. And my college coach, Everett Case, started the Southern Conference. It was the first basketball conference in the country. Now there are 32. So I feel confident saying Southern Conference teams are among the most competitive. These young men are truly student-athletes and represent their school and conference in a very positive way. I assure you they would greatly appreciate your support. Go Dogs. Les Robinson Pettigrew Street Sullivan’s Island
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Wednesday
January 9, 2019
List: Former AAAAAAA football players on college rosters
Below are former Georgia high school players from current Class AAAAAAA schools who were on college football rosters during the 2018 season. The work was compiled by Steve Slay and formatted for AJC.com by Todd Holcomb. Phil Davis, The Citadel; Matthew Campbell, The Citadel; Phil Davis, The Citadel
Published in: Atlanta Journal-Constitution - Online
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Wednesday
January 9, 2019
South Carolina upsets No. 14 Mississippi State
He started as a freshman on a Final Four team. His sophomore year wasn’t bad but it wasn’t great. As a junior through 13 games this year, it was mostly, “What is wrong with him?” He heard all of it. And it was past time for it to stop.Kotsar played the game of his life in South Carolina’s 87-82 overtime upset of No. 14 Mississippi State on Tuesday, scoring a career-high 25 points and hitting every clutch shot down the stretch. The junior from Estonia, three games removed from a concussion and only a few days since Frank Martin said the Gamecocks needed something more from whoever started next to Chris Silva, was on every loose ball and every big rebound. The Citadel’s Summerall Guards performed at halftime, offering a home-court twist. As they prepared to leave the court, they marched in formation chanting, “U-S-C, Fight Cocks Fight.”
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Tuesday
January 8, 2019
SC not represented on Senate military panel for first time in decades
For the first time in six decades, South Carolina is expected to have no representation on the U.S. Senate’s armed services panel this year, ending a lengthy stretch for a state where military might has historically played a key role. U.S. Sens. Lindsey Graham and Tim Scott, both South Carolina Republicans, are set to leave the Senate Armed Services Committee for other high-profile positions. Graham is poised to become the chairman of the powerful Senate Judiciary Committee, while Scott sits on several major panels, including Banking, Finance and the Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee. Their likely departures will conclude a remarkable streak: The Palmetto State has consistently had at least one senator on the Armed Services Committee every year dating as far back as 1958. But the state has already declined from its military heyday, said Citadel political scientist Scott Buchanan, who pointed to the loss of the Charleston naval shipyard in the 1990s as an example of setbacks the state has already faced. “Part of this has to do with the downsizing of the military, in broad terms, and the military not having as many bases as it once did,” Buchanan said. “So is this going to have a big impact on the state? It’s already had a big impact over the past 20 years. The amount of military presence is not what it once was.” At this point, Buchanan said he expects the remaining military installations in South Carolina — including the Marine Corps Depot Recruit on Parris Island, Joint Base Charleston, Fort Jackson, Shaw Air Force Base and McEntire Joint National Guard Base — to be safe given their ongoing relevance to defense operations.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Monday
January 7, 2019
1. Scrap live animal mascots, PETA says after Bevo charges at Uga before the Sugar Bowl

One South Carolina university has already said it has no plans to stop using its live mascots. The Citadel, a military college located in Charleston, says it has two live animal mascots - Boo and The General. Like Uga, Boo and The General are English bulldogs. In fact, The General comes from the same bloodline as Uga, according to The Citadel’s website. In spite of PETA’s wishes, they are not going anywhere, except for the sideline, according to a spokesman for The Citadel. “Boo and (The) General will continue to proudly serve their beloved institution as mascots,” spokesman John Dorrian said Thursday, according to postandcourier.com. “They are cherished members of The Citadel family, and are well-cared for at all times.” The Citadel owns both bulldogs and solicits donations on its website to help with the “feeding and care” of its mascots. “Boo and General’s main duty is to provide morale for the Corps of Cadets, faculty and staff and all of the Bulldog athletic teams,” according to the website. “Other duties include barking at opposing teams, eating numerous dog biscuits throughout the day and being pampered by the cadets (who) help take care of them while school is in session.”

Published in: Ft. Worth Star-Telegram - Online
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Monday
January 7, 2019
2. Scrap live animal mascots, PETA says after Bevo charges at Uga before the Sugar Bowl

One South Carolina university has already said it has no plans to stop using its live mascots. The Citadel, a military college located in Charleston, says it has two live animal mascots - Boo and The General. Like Uga, Boo and The General are English bulldogs. In fact, The General comes from the same bloodline as Uga, according to The Citadel’s website. In spite of PETA’s wishes, they are not going anywhere, except for the sideline, according to a spokesman for The Citadel. “Boo and (The) General will continue to proudly serve their beloved institution as mascots,” spokesman John Dorrian said Thursday, according to postandcourier.com. “They are cherished members of The Citadel family, and are well-cared for at all times.” The Citadel owns both bulldogs and solicits donations on its website to help with the “feeding and care” of its mascots.

Published in: The Sun Herald - Online
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Monday
January 7, 2019
3. McKee speaks at Columbia Breakfast Rotary

Citadel sophomore Marshall McKee recently spoke to the Columbia Breakfast Rotary Club about his study abroad experience after returning from a semester in Cyprus. McKee is a graduate of Columbia Academy and is the recipient of the Tandy Rice Scholarship at The Citadel, the military college of South Carolina. He is the son of Ken and Macie McKee.

Published in: The Daily Herald - Online
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Monday
January 7, 2019
4. A&M cadets honor veterans with home game celebration

On a cool, clear central Texas evening, November 18, 2018, the town of College Station, home of Texas A&M University, celebrated their community of military veterans with a football game extravaganza, during which the Aggies faced the Blazers from the University of Alabama at Birmingham. “Texas A&M is a senior military college that produces a lot of officers for this nation’s military,” said Houstonian Army Brig. Gen. (Ret.) Joe E. Ramirez, Jr., Commandant of the Texas A&M Corps of Cadets, “so events like this allow us to present our future officers and honor our veterans. It's very special to all of us.” The event included a pass and review of the institution’s cadets, presided over by admirals and generals from throughout the U.S. armed forces. Texas A&M University commissions an average of 240 officers yearly, with veterans from all five branches of the U.S. military hailing from the central Texas campus. Only the Virginia Military Institute and The Citadel in South Carolina produce moreprivate university officers.

Published in: dvidshub.net - Online
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Monday
January 7, 2019
5. Classical Liberalism and the Limits to Compromise

The tense and seemingly polarized political environment in America today has raised the issue of whether there is some way to reduce the ideological and government-policy conflicts by finding some middle way between the “extremist” positions of “left” and “right.” The fundamental question in all of this is, Can and should liberty be compromised in the pursuit of such a middle-of-the-road alternative? Senior staff members of the Niskanen Center have issued what amounts to a manifesto making the case for such a middle way in an article titled, “The Center Can Hold: Public Policy for an Age of Extremes” (December 2018). The authors are Brink Lindsey, Will Wilkinson, Steven Teles, and Samuel Hammond. They basically argue that neither the libertarians nor the progressives and democratic socialists have the only or full and correct answer to America’s or the world’s social, political, and economic problems. There are elements of truth, reasonableness, and experience within both of these “extremes,” and the lesson to be learned, they argue, is to construct a compromise between the two.

Published in: American Institute for Economic Research (AIER) - Online
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Monday
January 7, 2019
Magee, Hoover lead hot-shooting Wofford past The Citadel

Fletcher Magee scored 24 points, Nathan Hoover added 22 points and Wofford routed The Citadel 112-81 on Thursday night. Magee made7 of 10 from the field, including 6 of 9 from 3-point range, and Hoover was 10-of-13 shooting for the Terriers (11-4, 3-0 Southern Conference). All five starters scored in double figures as Cameron Jackson, Keve Aluma and Storm Murphy scored points 14 apiece. Zane Najdawi led The Citadel (9-4, 1-1) with 18 points. Alex Reed scored 16, Lew Stallworth added 14 points and Tyler Burgess 13. The Terriers more than held their own in a matchup of two of the nation's top 3-point shooting teams. Wofford, 14th nationally with 10.4 made 3-pointers per game, made 15 of 26 (58 percent) from distance. The Citadel, No. 1 nationally at 14 3-pointers made per game, hit 11 of 32 (34 percent). The Bulldogs' Matt Frierson, No. 1 in the nation coming in with 5.08 made 3s per game, was held to one 3-pointer and six points.

Examples of other media sources reporting this story include:

The Washington Post

The Seattletimes.com

WCIV TV-4 (Charleston

WSPA.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

Published in: USA Today - Online
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Monday
January 7, 2019
Millennium volleyball star commits to The Citadel

Millennium High School senior Makaya Middleton has pledged to follow in her father’s footsteps by pursuing a career in the Air Force. She will do so by attending The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, on a volleyball scholarship so she can study criminal justice. She would like to be a lawyer. “It was a relatively easy decision,” said Makaya, who lives in Litchfield Park. “I already had my mind set on the military. I just love the style of it and the opportunity it provides for you. “In terms of the scholarship, I didn’t want my dad to pay for it because he paid for a lot, with club volleyball and all the extra traveling. I figured I would do my dad a solid and get free college.” Located in Charleston, South Carolina, The Citadel is one of six U.S. senior military colleges. It has 18 academic departments divided into five schools offering 29 majors and 38 minors. The military program consists of cadets pursuing bachelor’s degrees who live on campus, while civilian degrees are offered through eight undergraduate and 24 graduate programs.

Published in: Westvalleyview.com - Online
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Monday
January 7, 2019
Thomas Finley Coffey, Sr.

Thomas Finley Coffey Sr., 72, husband of Carolyn Burriss Coffey, died on Friday, Jan. 4, 2019, as a result of injuries received in an automobile accident. Born on Jan. 9, 1946, in Kingstree, he was a son of the late William Columbus Coffey Sr. and Adela Bozard Coffey. He was a 1968 graduate of The Citadel, a former Rotarian and Paul Harris Fellow. Fin was the owner of Rigby Oil Co., a member of the Mullet Club, an avid hunter, fisherman, and a loyal member of Manning United Methodist Church. Surviving in addition to his wife are two sons, Thomas Finley Coffey Jr. and Frank Burriss Coffey (Georgina); four grandchildren, Wells, Finley Anne, John and Meredith Coffey; a brother, William C. Coffey Jr. (Betty), all of Manning; two sisters, Carolyn Coffey Boucher of Greenville and Jane Coffey Sandel (Bobby) of Roanoke, Virginia; and numerous nieces and nephews. A funeral service will be held at 3 p.m. on Monday at Manning United Methodist Church with the Rev. Kem Thomas officiating. Burial will follow at Manning Cemetery. Pallbearers will be A.B. Jordan, Ferrell Cothran, Harold Furse, Harold Wilcox, Tommy Cooper and Tommy Bozard. Honorary pallbearers will be Frank Drose, John Kneece, Bob Tarrant, W.E. Horton, faithful employees of Rigby Oil Co. and members of the Mullet Club.

Published in: The Sumter Item - Online
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Friday
January 4, 2019
1. Citadel’s live Bulldogs remain on duty, despite PETA response to Sugar Bowl dustup
The Citadel’s live bulldog mascots, Boo and General, have never had to face down Bevo, the 1,700-pound steer that represents the University of Texas. That task fell Tuesday night to Uga, the University of Georgia’s live bulldog, who almost found himself on the business end of Bevo’s 58-inch horns before the Sugar Bowl in New Orleans. Video of Bevo’s close encounter with Uga went viral, and prompted the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals to release a statement urging Texas, Georgia and other schools that use live animals as school mascots to retire them. The Citadel, one of several schools in the state that uses live animal mascots, has responded with an emphatic “no.” “Boo and General will continue to proudly serve their beloved institution as mascots,” Citadel spokesman John Dorrian said Thursday. “They are cherished members of The Citadel family, and are well-cared for at all times. “The Citadel long ago adopted the bulldog as our mascot after an article described our football team as playing ‘with the tenacity of a bulldog.’ That’s an ethos we are very pleased to perpetuate amongst our college community, and Boo and General play a critical role.”
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Friday
January 4, 2019
1.1 The Citadel to keep live mascots in wake of bulldog bedlam at Sugar Bowl, PETA statement

The moment instantly went viral on social media. Uga, the University of Georgia mascot, was set to meet Texas mascot Bevo the steer on the sidelines of the Mercedes-Benz Superdome during the Sugar Bowl Tuesday night in New Orleans. Instead, cameras caught Bevo charging toward Uga, who along with photographers narrowly escaped a horn. PETA was unhappy to say the least, crafting a memo to teams telling them to end the use of live mascots. “This frightening near-tragedy is yet another example of the reason most colleges and professional sports teams retired their live-animal mascots decades ago,” the statement said in part. “And the handful who haven’t yet should quickly follow suit.” The Citadel in downtown Charleston has two live bulldogs named Boo and General who are mainstays at football games. Despite the call from the animal rights group, the school plans to keep them. “Boo and General will continue to proudly serve their beloved institution as mascots,” Citadel spokesman John Dorrian said in a statement. “They are cherished members of The Citadel family, and are well-cared for at all times."

Published in: WCSC TV-5 (Charleston) - Online
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Friday
January 4, 2019
2. Citadel senior’s ‘say yes’ attitude leads to No. 2 national ranking among ROTC cadets

Early in his Citadel career, Matthew Wilder received some words of wisdom. “I don’t remember who it was but someone told me to take every opportunity that you can,” said Wilder, a Citadel senior and company commander in the Corps of Cadets. “So I just decided to say yes to everything.” That “say yes” philosophy, paired with a driving work ethic, has propelled Wilder, an electrical engineering major from Apex, N.C., to a No. 2 ranking on the national order of merit list for ROTC cadets. It’s the second year in a row that a Citadel cadet has achieved a top 10 ranking on the prestigious list, which is prepared annually by the U.S. Army Cadet Command. Last year, 2018 graduate Robert Weigand was No. 7 on the list. The order of merit ranking is based on grade-point average, performance on the Army physical fitness test, college athletic participation and performance during ROTC training and the advanced ROTC camp at Fort Knox, Kentucky. “Cadet Wilder is among the very best and we are fortunate to have him in the S.C. Corps of Cadets. This is a major accomplishment and a testament to The Citadel’s outstanding Army ROTC program,” said Col. John Cyrulik, U.S. Army, professor of Military Science at The Citadel.

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Friday
January 4, 2019
3. The Citadel named one of 10 most innovative schools in the South

Citadel freshman Joseph Taffner straps on a pair of virtual-reality goggles that make him look like an alien wearing headphones. He chooses a ski run from the digital menu and is off, carving his way down the mountain with no fear of face planting. At the end of the run, there’s no trudge to the lift line. Taffner is in The Citadel’s “Makerspace” in Daniel Library, an emerging technologies lab and one of the military school’s features that helped its recent recognition from US News and World Report. The Makerspace lab includes 3-D printers, a milling machine, a large format printer and other technologies, including the VR goggles, computer-assisted design software and lessons in hologram making. Virtual-reality skiing provides Taffner and other cadets a welcome break during finals week. The Makerspace also is important in providing cadets with the hands-on experience that can pay off in the job market. “It’s vital, because these are the skills that people will need,” said Dan Hawkins, the academic technology librarian at The Citadel. “Employers are looking for people with the ability to solve problems, for people with practical experience in working with their hands, and people with digital skills. The stuff you can learn here in Makerspace is exactly that.”

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Friday
January 4, 2019
4. CCRP 2nd Annual Black History Celebration | Holiday Alumni Center | Friday, 08. February 2019

The Charleston County Republican Party and The Citadel Republican Society will host a memorable event in celebration of Black History Month. This event will afford us the opportunity to recognize and pay tribute to local African Americans who have worked hard and earned their way, while always reaching back to do good in our community.We are excited to have Dr. Ben Carson as our featured speaker this year. He will be joined by his wife, Mrs. Candy Carson.We will honor:* Ken Battle, Commissioner for South Carolina Minority Affairs* Eric Mack, Chairman of CCSD Board* The Honorable Tamara C. Curry, Charleston County Probate Court associate judge and the first African-American president of the National College of Probate Judges (NCPJ)* Art Gilliard, Director of Art Forms & Theatre Concepts* Rep. Samuel Rivers Jr, former SC Representative of District 15In addition to Dr. and Mrs. Carson and the honorees, we will have prominent special guests in attendance. We hope you will join us in honoring these citizens for their accomplishments.

Published in: us.eventbu.com - Online
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Friday
January 4, 2019
So far, so good for Citadel basketball. But now comes an unusually strong SoCon.
For Citadel basketball, it’s so far, so good. But now comes the SoCon. No Citadel team ever won more games before Christmas than this year’s squad, which entered the holiday with a 9-2 record, including wins over six Division I teams and losses only to Clemson and Texas, both on the road. “Considering that we have to play three guarantee games (for money), it can’t get much better than that,” said Bulldogs coach Duggar Baucom. Now comes the hard part: A Southern Conference that is more stacked with good teams than it’s been in years. The SoCon boasts five teams that already have at least 10 wins each, and ranks No. 14 in conference RPI, ahead of the Colonial Athletic Association and Sun Belt, among others. The Citadel already owns a SoCon victory over Mercer, and begins the new year with road games at Wofford on Thursday and at Furman on Saturday. Those teams are a combined 22-6.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Friday
January 4, 2019
The Citadel vs. Wofford
…Two of our basketball teams in action tonight, the basketball teams in action tonight, The Citadel and the College of Charleston, starting with the Bulldogs they're at Wofford tonight looking. To move up to 2 and 0 in so con play, but Wofford was tough, and the Bulldogs aren't able to get it done, they lose 112 to 81, Wofford was great from the field, they shot over 67 percent from the field compared to the Bulldogs. 44 point 3 percent, The Citadel's Zane Najdawi, Alex Reed and Lew Stallworth were all able to score in double digits, and Matt Frierson reached the 1000 point mark…
Published in: WCBD TV-2 (Charleston) - Online
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Friday
January 4, 2019
UPDATE 22-NCAAB Results

Results from the NCAAB games on Thursday (home team in CAPS)(start times are EST): 112 Citadel Bulldogs 81 Furman Paladins

Published in: NCAA.com - Online
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Friday
January 4, 2019
Wofford welcomes Citadel to SoCon battles with blowout win
Even at full strength, The Citadel might not have had enough for Wofford on Thursday night. Short-handed, the Bulldogs were blown out by 112-81 as the Terriers put all their weapons on display at Richardson Indoor Stadium in Spartanburg. Wofford star Fletcher Magee led five Terriers in double figures with 24 points as the Terriers improved to 11-2 overall and 3-0 in the SoCon. The Citadel (9-4, 1-1) had its defense exposed for the second straight game, allowing Wofford to shoot 67.2 percent from the floor and 15 of 26 from 3-point range. The Citadel played without starting guard Connor Kern (illness) and reserve forward Hayden Brown (ankle). Forward Kaelon Harris, who had started 10 of the first 11 games, came off the bench and played 10 minutes before leaving with injury. Senior Zane Najdawi scored 18 points for the Bulldogs, Alex Reed had 16 and Lew Stallworth 14. But senior guard Matt Frierson, blanketed all over the court by a Terrier defender, got off only four shots, making one field goal and scoring six points.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Thursday
January 3, 2019
1. 18 Memorable People We Met Across the Country in 2018
Three Black Belts and 70 Push-Ups -- Sarah Zorn can do more than 70 push-ups in two minutes. She holds black belts in three karate disciplines. There is much more about Ms. Zorn’s character, patriotism, intellect and leadership skill that impressed the Citadel enough to name her this year as the first female regimental commander — the top cadet — in the Southern military school’s 175-year history. But her physical prowess is an important part of her story.
Published in: The New York Times - Online
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Thursday
January 3, 2019
2. The 30 Best Moments for Women in 2018
10. Sarah Zorn, 21, becomes the first woman to serve as a regimental commander. The Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina, named Sarah Zorn as regimental commander on March 20, making her the first woman to hold the highest ranking cadet officer role.
Published in: Cosmopolitan - Online
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Thursday
January 3, 2019
Furman looks for confidence boost as it tries to shake first losing streak
The high-performance machine that had been Furman men’s basketball for 12 games sputtered and lurched as 2018 finished. With a fresh set of months on the calendar and two Southern Conference home games in three days on deck, the Paladins plan to repair their machine by getting back to the essence of their style of play. Furman (12-2, 1-1) gets that opportunity beginning Thursday at 7 p.m. when it hosts Mercer (5-8, 0-1) at Timmons Arena. Following that game is a 4 p.m. Saturday encounter at home against The Citadel.
Published in: Greenville News - Online
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Thursday
January 3, 2019
The Citadel at Wofford men’s basketball preview

Wofford men’s basketball has had trouble recently against The Citadel, which has used its uncommon style this season to get off to one of the best starts in program history.

The Citadel at Wofford

When: 7 p.m. Thursday

Where: Richardson Indoor Stadium Video broadcast: ESPN+ Audio broadcast: Wofford/IMG Network

Records: The Citadel (9-3, 1-0 Southern Conference); Wofford (10-4, 2-0)

Top scorers: The Citadel – GS G Lew Stallworth (17.9 points, 6.3 rebounds); Sr. G Matt Frierson (17.4 points); Sr. F Zane Najdawi (13.8 points, 7.3 rebounds); So. G Kaiden Rice (13.3 points). Wofford – Sr. G Fletcher Magee (17.5 points); Sr. F Cameron Jackson (15.2 points, 7.9 rebounds); Jr. G Nathan Hoover (12.8 points).

Notes: The Citadel lost Saturday, 110-94, at home against Longwood (10-5) from the Big South Conference. But before that, the Bulldogs had won seven straight. Their previous 9-2 mark was the best record after 11games since 1979-80 and the nine wins before Christmas was the most in program history. The seven-game win streak included games against James Madison, South Florida, High Point and a Southern Conference game against Mercer. It was the longest winning streak at The Citadel since the Bulldogs under former head coach Ed Conroy won 11 straight in 2009. … The Citadel is sixth-best of 10 Southern Conference teams, according to the NET (NCAA Evaluation Tool) rankings. UNC Greensboro is first at No. 53 and Wofford is second at No. 55. …

Published in: Go UpState - Online
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Wednesday
January 2, 2019
1. The Marines’ former second-in-command takes the reins at The Citadel
Retired Gen. Glenn Walters returned to his alma mater as its 20th president in the fall of 2018 and found The Citadel had changed for the better. Opportunities for veteran students had expanded. Popular new programs had been added in engineering, nursing and cybersecurity. The Corps of Cadets had just admitted its most diverse class in history. Perhaps the most striking change of all: For the first time in the public military college’s 175-year existence, a female cadet is leading the Corps as regimental commander this year. When Walters was a cadet, the only women he saw on campus were working in the mess hall or the administrative building.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Wednesday
January 2, 2019
2. A Hilton Head man got a Christmas call from President Trump. Here’s why

President Donald Trump wished members of the military a Merry Christmas from the Oval Office. The representative for the Coast Guard is originally from Hilton Head Island, S.C. By The White House President Donald Trump spoke to a representative of every branch of the military from the Oval Office through videoconference call on Christmas Day, and one of them is originally from Hilton Head Island. Lt. Matthew Spado, a command duty officer for Sector Juneau and a member of District 17 of the United States Coast Guard, was selected to represent the entire branch of the military in speaking with the president on Tuesday. Although he is stationed in Alaska, Spado grew up on Hilton Head and went to school at The Citadel in Charleston. Spado, who characterized his job as the “911 center for coastal command” in Southeast Alaska, said Wednesday he took the opportunity to demonstrate to the president the work of the Coast Guard. “It was a very proud moment for me to speak to the president and represent the Coast Guard,” he said.

Published in: The Island Packet - Online
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Wednesday
January 2, 2019
3. CBS This Morning

An excerpt from the video clip: 

Now we want to take a look back at some of the people we introduced you to this year and there is a theme. Women who inspire. We went to The Citadel in South Carolina to watch Cadet Colonel Sarah Zorn in action. Zorn is the first woman to lead the cadets in the military academy's 176-year history…

Published in: CBS This Morning - Online
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Wednesday
January 2, 2019
4. Dominion Energy Announces Leadership Team for SCANA Operations

Dominion Energy (NYSE:D) today announced the formation of a new operating segment that will contain SCANA Corporation's existing operating and services companies, and announced the members of its leadership team. W. Keller Kissam, who has become president-Electric Operations, Southeast Energy Group. He continues to be responsible for all non-nuclear generation and transmission and distribution operations at South Carolina Electric & Gas Company (SCE&G). Kissam has also been named president of electric operations for Dominion Energy's wholly owned subsidiary, SCE&G; Kissam, a Citadel graduate, began his career at SCANA in 1988 and has worked in gas transmission and distribution operations and electric operations. He became an officer in the company in 1993, and began his current role as chief operating officer and president-Generation, Transmission & Distribution at SCE&G in 2017.

Published in: Benzinga.com - Online
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Wednesday
January 2, 2019
5. College basketball game times, TV schedule

Thursday, Jan. 3 -- The Citadel at Wofford, 7 p.m., ESPN+

Published in: NCAA.com - Online
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Wednesday
January 2, 2019
6. Lew Stallworth finds home at The Citadel, 3 schools and 2,500 miles later

Lew Stallworth is a basketball junkie. If it’s on TV and involves a ball and a hoop, he’s there. “Any level of basketball, he loves,” Citadel coach Duggar Baucom says of his new point guard. “Lew will talk NBA with you; he’ll talk WNBA with you. Now that’s kind of scary.” No surprise, then, that Stallworth knew about The Citadel before Bulldog coaches knew about him. “I was watching a UCLA game when Lonzo Ball was playing (in 2016-17),” said Stallworth, who played high school basketball in the Los Angeles area. “And the announcers talked about how UCLA played at the second-fastest pace in the nation, behind The Citadel. “That was the first time I heard of The Citadel. I did my own research and learned about how prolific of a scoring team they were.” Two years later, Stallworth finds himself at the controls of that prolific scoring team. A graduate-student transfer on his third Division I team and some 2,500 miles from home, Stallworth is averaging 17.5 points, 6.9 assists and 6.5 rebounds for a 9-2 Citadel team that is off to its best start since 1979-80.

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Wednesday
January 2, 2019
7. The Citadel Announces Early Signing Class

The Citadel head football coach Brent Thompson has announced the signing of 14 future cadet-athletes who will attend The Citadel and begin playing football for the Bulldogs in the fall of 2019. The list includes five linebackers, three defensive backs, three defensive linemen, two offensive linemen and one running back. Eight of the incoming recruits are from South Carolina, while three are from Georgia, two from Texas and one from Japan.

Published in: WCSC TV-5 (Charleston) - Online
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Wednesday
January 2, 2019
Freshman report: Which first-year players played vs. Oklahoma

1. Eyabi Anoma (12) -- Louisville, Arkansas State, Ole Miss, Texas A&M, UL-Lafayette, Arkansas, Tennessee, LSU, Mississippi State, The Citadel, Auburn, Oklahoma

Published in: 247 Sports - Online
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Wednesday
January 2, 2019
Lawrence-Forristall matchup in title game highlights news from Bartow college athletes
Jaylon Pugh (Furman Fr., Cartersville) — Pugh made a pair of free throws and had one rebound in only two minutes of action Saturday during the Paladins’ 79-56 loss at East Tennessee State. Pugh has appeared in eight games this season averaging 3.5 points and 1.6 rebounds in just under 10 minutes per appearance. Furman (12-2, 1-1 Southern Conference) hosts Mercer Thursday night and The Citadel Saturday afternoon.
Published in: The Daily Tribune News - Online
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