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The Citadel in the News: Archive

December 2018

PUBLISH DATE STORIES
Monday
December 17, 2018
Black American National Security & Foreign Policy Next Generation Leaders
Muhammad Fraser-Rahim, Ph.D., Executive Director, Quilliam International and Assistant Professor, The Citadel -- Dr. Muhammad Fraser-Rahim is the Executive Director, North America for Quilliam International, the world's oldest counter-extremist organization with HQ's in the United Kingdom and offices in Washington, DC where he overseas policy issues centering around rehabilitation, demobilization and deradicalization against violent extremism. In addition, he is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Intelligence and Security Studies at The Citadel. He is an expert on violent extremism issues both domestically and overseas and a scholar on Africa and Islamic history. Follow his work here, and connect with him on LinkedIn and Twitter. Expertise: Counterterrorism, Deradicalization, Demobilization and Rehabiliation of Former Extremists, African Affairs, Islam, Muslim Communities in the West
Published in: newamerica.org - Online
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Friday
December 14, 2018
Car tires and brakes spew harmful microplastics
Car tires and brake pads wear down with use. Road surfaces wear down, too. All that spews synthetic rubber and other materials into the air. And they don’t just disappear. They linger in the form of tiny particles. Many are light enough to float in the air. Indeed, a new study found that almost nine in every 10 of the small particles sampled from the air around three busy highways came from vehicle tires, brake systems and roads themselves. The researchers classify these particles as microplastics. (Actually, not all the materials are truly made of plastic.) Some materials that cars and roads give off can be hard to identify. That’s because they become coated in dust and other tinier bits of debris. “These [tire] particles are stealthy,” says John Weinstein, who was not involved in the study. An environmental toxicologist, he works at the Citadel in Charleston, S.C.
Published in: sciencenewsforstudents.org - Online
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Friday
December 14, 2018
CBO: Federal Deficit Continues to Grow
The federal deficit increased to $782 billion in Fiscal Year 2018 and is likely to exceed $1 trillion per year by 2020, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) reports. “Monthly Budget Review for September 2018,” published by CBO in October, estimates the federal budget deficit has grown by $116 billion since Fiscal Year 2017. The deficit also increased as a percentage of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) for the third consecutive year. Richard Ebeling, a professor of economics at The Citadel and a policy advisor for The Heartland Institute, which publishes Budget & Tax News, says the persistent federal budget deficits are caused by excessively rapid spending increases, not revenue shortfalls. “In simplest terms, government budget deficits increase when spending grows at a faster rate than tax revenues are increasing.” Ebeling said. “In the case of the United States, for the Fiscal Year that ended September 30, 2018, Uncle Sam took in approximately $3.33 trillion in tax revenues, while total spending for the fiscal year was around $4.11 trillion, resulting in a budget deficit of about $782 billion.”
Published in: Heartland Institute - Online
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Thursday
December 13, 2018
1. All-Southern Conference Faculty and Staff Team announced

The Southern Conference named its All-Southern Conference Faculty and Staff Team on Wednesday, with two representatives each from all 10 member schools being recognized by the league. While the selections were left up to each institution’s discretion, the recipients all shared the common characteristics of demonstrated service to the institution and contributions to campus life and the local community. Faculty members selected have demonstrated strong contributions to teaching, research and/or service, while staff members are being recognized for bringing out the best in others and creating conditions for success. The faculty and staff recipients include: The Citadel’s Dr. Matthew Zommer and Lori Hedstrom; ETSU’s Dr. Amy Greene and Ronda Gross; Furman’s Dr. William Pierce and Vince Moore; Mercer’s Dr. R. Scott Nash and Jim Tessmer; UNCG’s Dr. Gabriela Stein and Melanie Carter; Samford’s Dr. Mark S. Gignilliat and Ginger Robertson; Chattanooga’s Dr. Jamie Harvey and Melanie Ribaric; VMI’s Col. Tom Baur, who is being honored posthumously, and Col. Vern Beitzel; Western Carolina’s Dr. Yue Cai Hillon and Mark Haskett; and Wofford’s Dr. William Eddie Richardson and Elizabeth Dashiell Wallace.

Published in: The Citadel News Room - Online
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Thursday
December 13, 2018
2018 All-SoCon Faculty & Staff Team Announced
The Southern Conference named its All-Southern Conference Faculty and Staff Team on Wednesday, with two representatives each from all 10 member schools being recognized by the league. WCU’s two honorees included Dr. Yue Cai Hillon from the College of Business as the faculty recipient and longtime University photographer Mark Haskett as the staff member. While the selections were left up to each institution’s discretion, the recipients all shared the common characteristics of demonstrated service to the institution and contributions to campus life and the local community. Faculty members selected have demonstrated strong contributions to teaching, research and/or service, while staff members are being recognized for bringing out the best in others and creating conditions for success. The other faculty and staff recipients include: The Citadel’s Dr. Matthew Zommer and Lori Hedstrom; ETSU’s Dr. Amy Greene and Ronda Gross; Furman’s Dr. William Pierce and Vince Moore; Mercer’s Dr. R. Scott Nash and Jim Tessmer; UNCG’s Dr. Gabriela Stein and Melanie Carter; Samford’s Dr. Mark S. Gignilliat and Ginger Robertson; Chattanooga’s Dr. Jamie Harvey and Melanie Ribaric; VMI’s Col. Tom Baur, who is being honored posthumously, and Col. Vern Beitzel; and Wofford’s Dr. William Eddie Richardson and Elizabeth Dashiell Wallace. Each member of the All-SoCon Faculty and Staff Team will be presented a plaque and honored at a home basketball game at his or her institution. Hillon and Haskett will be honored at the Catamount home men’s basketball game against Mercer on February 14.
Published in: catamountsports.com
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Thursday
December 13, 2018
Beyond GDP to a New Road to Serfdom
It is a commonplace that there is more to life than money and the material benefits that it may provide someone. We often make trade-offs between income-earning work opportunities and more time with family or friends, or between risky but well-paying employment and a calmer and less stressful job that does not pay as well. We might decide whether it is worth forgoing some amount of personal material wealth for a more pleasant and healthy environment. The question is, Should government be trying to measure and manage these and other things like them, instead of each of us finding the right balance and values for ourselves? Columbia University professor and Nobel Prize winner in economics Joseph E. Stiglitz thinks that it is more the government’s role to sort these things out, and, by implication, less each of ours as individuals. In a recent article titled “Beyond GDP,” Stiglitz points out that the usual measurements of economy-wide economic well-being fall short and leave out a lot of important things that make up a happy, fulfilling, and better life. Correct and recalibrate the measurements, and government can be trusted to take care of a lot of the rest.
Published in: American Institute for Economic Research (AIER) - Online
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Thursday
December 13, 2018
Former Sumter standout Johnson makes All-Sun Belt 2nd team

Women's rifle - Senior Lauren Pringle led The Citadel with an aggregate score of 1,087 against Georgia Southern. Among men and women, the former Gamecock was ninth in smallbore and 10th in air rifle. Lee Central High graduate Tierra Price of The Citadel competed individually against North Georgia. The junior finished with a score 1,017, ranking 14th among men and women in smallbore and 17th in air rifle.

Published in: Simter Item - Online
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Wednesday
December 12, 2018
Charleston's new law could improve how hate crimes are counted
City Council's passage of a "hate intimidation" ordinance on Thurs. Nov. 27 was eclipsed by a lengthy debate on the city's upcoming plastic bag ban. But unlike that ordinance, this one passed unanimously, and it's already in effect, making it the first such law passed by any municipality in South Carolina, which has no hate crime law of its own. In council meetings and in interviews with the City Paper, some of the city's top officials, including Mayor John Tecklenburg and Charleston Police Chief Luther Reynolds, said they felt it was time for the city to go after acts of targeted violence. The new ordinance punishes any crimes made "with the intent to intimidate another person" on the basis of "race, color, creed, religion, ancestry, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, physical or mental disability, or national origin." It imposes the maximum penalties the city can levy: $500, 30 days in jail, or both. The Medical University of South Carolina and The Citadel, both located downtown, each reported one hate crime related to race, ethnicity, or ancestry in 2017.
Published in: Charleston City Paper - Online
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Wednesday
December 12, 2018
Garrett ‘Gary’ Wilson
Garrett Edward was born Nov. 15, 1927, in Peoria, Illinois, the son of Charles and Alma (Schrepfer) Wilson. Gary was raised in Peoria and then was selected to attend Castle Heights Military Academy in Lebanon, Tennessee. After graduating from the military academy, he went on to college at the Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina, where he earned a civil engineering degree and the rank of 2nd Lieutenant. He joined the U.S. Army and served from Feb. 1, 1952 until Jan. 31, 1954. On May 16, 1952, Gary was joined in marriage to Janet Eileen McLennan at Fort Bliss in El Paso, Texas. After his time in service, Gary returned to Peoria, where he continued a career with the State of Illinois Highway Department as a civil engineer. In 1959, he transitioned to Janssen and Schaefer Construction and then Gunther Construction in Galesburg, Illinois, where he spent 23 years. Gary retired on May 1, 1992, and he and Janet moved to Hayward. Gary enjoyed hunting, fishing, golfing and snowmobiling, and Monday evening dinners at the Chippewa Inn with his close group of friends. He was active with organizing the Tuesday Men’s Golf League at Hayward Golf Couse and caring for the yard at the United Methodist Church in Hayward. He had a pilot’s license and loved to fly his Cessna 182.
Published in: Sawyer County Record - Online
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Wednesday
December 12, 2018
Tennis: Brothers inducted into S.C. Hall of Fame; Mauldin's Gurley wins award
Brothers Charles and Richard Hardaway of Greenville have been inducted into the South Carolina Tennis Hall of Fame. Charles Hardaway, who played six years at Greenville High School in the 1960s, won five state high school singles titles and six doubles titles. A four-year starter at The Citadel, Charles played state and southern tournaments between 1985 and 2010, excelling in doubles and winning eight state championships. Charles and his family funded two varsity courts at the University of South Carolina and two at the Kroc Center in Greenville, where Charles serves as a volunteer tennis instructor for underserved students at Legacy Charter High School.
Published in: Greenville News - Online
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Tuesday
December 11, 2018
1. The New York Times: documenting the story of The Citadel’s first woman regimental commander
The New York Times is following the journey of Cadet Col. Sarah Zorn who is the first woman Regimental Commander of The South Carolina Corps of Cadets. Most recently, documentary photographer, Alyssa Schukar (@alyssaschukar)who is assigned to cover the story from May 2018 through May 2019, submitted two Instagram stories. One can be found on @nytimes, alongside stories about China and elections, as seen in this screen capture.
Published in: The New York Times - Online
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Tuesday
December 11, 2018
2. SC land slipping away from families amid fragile claims and explosive growth

The situation wasn’t always bleak. African-Americans enjoyed new opportunities at the rise of Reconstruction, when initiatives such as the S.C. Land Commission made more land available to blacks in the Palmetto State than anywhere else in the South, said Citadel professor Faith Rivers James. At the time, many white landowners were eager to dump their former plantations — often low-lying and unproductive land that they could no longer afford.

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Tuesday
December 11, 2018
NEPC Elects New Partners and Announces the Promotion of Principals for 2019
Matt Rowell joined NEPC in 2011 and has been a vital contributor to and leader of our Insurance advisory business. He facilitates asset allocation studies, manager searches, performance measurement, and various technical projects. His work spans multiple client types and investment pools, including health, life and property/casualty insurance, healthcare systems, defined benefit and defined contribution plans. Matt’s expertise includes portfolio construction, risk management and implementation of customized private markets programs. In addition to his consulting responsibilities, he is also a member of the Global Asset Allocation Research Advisory Group and Liability Driven Investing (LDI) Research Advisory Group. Prior to NEPC, Matt was a senior analyst at Wells Fargo & Company’s Alternative Strategies Group, Inc. He has also worked for Wachovia Corporation’s Evergreen Investments. Matt received his B.S. from The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina
Published in: Business Journals - Online
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Tuesday
December 11, 2018
Semo vs. The Citadel
Brewer and Redhawks focus on final exams this week before hitting the road for a weekend game. Semo will play at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina at noon Saturday.
Published in: KBSI-FOX - Online Sports Clip
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Monday
December 10, 2018
1. Chatham, Florham Park, Madison college students earn degrees, honors

Christopher Gamba of Florham Park was named to the Dean's List for academic achievement in the spring 2018 semester at The CITADEL, CHARLESTON, S.C. The Dean's List at The CITADEL is a recognition given to cadets and students whose grade point average is 3.20 or better, with no grade below a. "C" for work in a semester. Two local students at Gettysburg (Pa.) College studied abroad during the spring 2018 semester.

Published in: newjerseyhills.com - Online
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Monday
December 10, 2018
2. Fremont man named trooper of the year for second time

For the second time in eight years, a Fremont man has been named trooper of the year for the Ohio Highway Patrol's Fremont Post. Austin Young, who has served at the Norwalk and Fremont posts of the patrol since 2010, was chosen by his peers and supervisors as the top officer for the post thanks to a his dedication to serving, his enthusiasm, and his work ethic, Post Sergeant Mike Walter said. "Austin is just a good man," Walter said. "He's nice to everyone, has the work ethic and the enthusiasm it takes to be a good officer." As a trooper, Young is responsible for catching traffic violations along Sandusky County's many highways and responding to traffic crashes. Walter said traffic crashes can be a challenge for troopers, because they can be time onsuming and require focus and attention to detail. When he first started at the Fremont Post, Young worked the midnight shift, primarily seeing impaired driving and traffic stops. Young is a graduate of Ross High School and The Citadel, a military school in South Carolina. He lives in Fremont with his wife, Angela.

Published in: News Messenger - Online
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Monday
December 10, 2018
3. Imam WD Mohammed, the Patron Saint of American Islam: Personality, Intellectual Teachings and Reformation

This essay explores the American Muslim Revivalist, Imam WD Mohammed (1933–2008) and his contribution to the intellectual, spiritual, and philosophical thought of black American Muslims in America. The research explores the intersection of the Africana experience and its encounter with race, religion, and Islamic reform. It also brings about the emergence of an American school of Islamic thought, created and established by the son of the leader of the former Nation of Islam leader who rejected his father’s teachings and embraced normative Islam on his own terms. His interpretations of Islam were not only U.S. American—they were also modern and responded to global trends in Islamic thought. His interpretations of Blackness were not only American, but also diasporic and pan-African.

Published in: Journal of Muslim Minority Affairs - Online
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Monday
December 10, 2018
Anderson: A paean to student athletes
Look to the surrounding columns for straight politics this week — I have another axe to grind. Like the night follows the day, election time passes and basketball season begins. So does letter-writing season. If you are anywhere near the middle of your career as an academic, you spend a good bit of your evening time in November and December writing letters of recommendation to push in front of admissions committees, graduate departments, and so on. Heaven help you if you are a senior scholar — it’s a wonder any Christmas shopping gets done at all. There is a structured predictability to the academy: the Law School Admissions Test is given several times throughout the year, but the most important “take” is in the early fall. This LSAT falls in such a way as to allow students to finish the test, get their scores, and get their applications to their aspirant law schools early: law school is expensive, and getting your application in early is crucial to getting a shot at the few scholarships available. I recently had the honor of driving an SUV in caravan with one of my colleagues — also in an SUV — to The Citadel Symposium on Southern Politics in Charleston.
Published in: The Ledger - Online
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Friday
December 7, 2018
1. Amid nursing shortage, SC graduating more nurses with bachelor’s degrees

South Carolina has one of the most severe nursing workforce shortages in the country, but it may be making strides to make up the difference, a new report from the University of South Carolina shows. The USC study shows nursing schools in this state for the first time are graduating more students with bachelor’s than associate’s degrees. USC researchers surveyed nursing school leadership; the findings represented graduation in the 2016-2017 year. The finding is significant, researchers wrote, given recommendations from the Institute of Medicine that 80 percent of nurses should have at least a 4-year degree by 2020. But given the limited numbers of nurses with that level of education, South Carolina’s goals are more modest. At the end of the 2017 academic year, 50 percent of nurses in South Carolina had a baccalaureate or higher degree, according to the S.C. Office of Healthcare Workforce.

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Friday
December 7, 2018
2. Citadel football rides tide of momentum into off-season

As the sun went down behind the mountains around Western Carolina’s Whitmire Stadium on Nov. 3, it was easy to wonder about the future of Citadel football. Third-year coach Brent Thompson had to suspend five players before that game, several of them team leaders, and the Bulldogs stumbled through a disjointed first half on the way to a 24-10 halftime deficit against a struggling WCU team. At that point, The Citadel had lost five of its first seven games of the 2018 season, and 11 of its last 15 dating to 2017. “When you have a losing record, everything can spiral out of control,” said quarterback Brandon Rainey. “We lost a bunch of close games, but our guys bounced back. We got down at halftime at Western Carolina, and nobody quit.” Rainey, the sophomore who made his starting debut at QB that day at Western Carolina, ran for 188 yards and a TD as the Bulldogs rallied for a 38-24 victory. The next week, Rainey piled up 217 yards and accounted for two TDs as The Citadel came from behind again for a 42-27 win over Samford.

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Friday
December 7, 2018
3. Sapakoff: Furman, others top Gamecocks, Clemson basketball in this Palmetto State ranking

Three months before the NCAA Tournament Selection Committee must choose seven other teams to join Spartanburg’s Zion Williamson and Duke at the Columbia Regional. But still … March Madness math includes pre-Christmas calculations. Early returns, even if analyzed before gifts are returned, mean something.

5. The Citadel A big drop-off here after Clemson, which beat The Citadel 100-80 on Nov. 6. But the Zane Najdawi-led Bulldogs (7-2) are off to their best season in 14 years, have five straight wins and have played a tougher schedule than either the Tigers or Gamecocks. Oh, and the Citadel is tied with Wofford and Furman atop the Southern Conference (all 1-0).

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Friday
December 7, 2018
4. HS girls soccer: Exeter's Long signs NLI to play at The Citadel

Hayley Long had plenty of inspiration. Her older sister, Jessica, was the starting goalie for the Exeter High School girls soccer team in three straight state title games, the Blue Hawks winning two of them. Her brother, Hunter, is playing tight end for a Boston College football team that was ranked as high as No. 17 in the country this season. Hayley made sure the Long family went 3-for-3 with collegiate athletics. The Exeter senior participated in National Signing Day on Nov. 14, signing an athletic scholarship to play womens soccer at The CITADEL, the military college located in SOUTH CAROLINA. Long will continue her sports passion while pursuing her goal to work in the military and one day join the FBI. She credits her siblings for fueling some of that passion.

Published in: seacoastonline.com - Online
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Thursday
December 6, 2018
1. Citadel Army ROTC cadets in nation’s top ten for two years in a row

For the second consecutive year a Citadel cadet is among America’s top ten Army Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) cadets. Each fall the U.S. Army Cadet Command selects ten college seniors for its national order-of-merit list. Matthew B. Wilder, an electrical engineering major in The South Carolina Corps of Cadets’ November Company is number two on the list. Wilder’s ranking was announced via the Army ROTC social media platforms Dec. 5 as part of a ten-part countdown. “Cadet Wilder is among the very best and we are fortunate to have him in the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. This is a major accomplishment and a testament to The Citadel’s outstanding Army ROTC program,” said Col. John Cyrulik, U.S. Army, professor of Military Science at The Citadel. Wilder is originally from Apex, North Carolina. He will join the Army Corps of Engineers as a second lieutenant after graduation.

Published in: The Citadel News Room - Online
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Thursday
December 6, 2018
1.1 U.S. Army Aims For Tougher Fitness Standards Despite Amount Of Overweight Recruits

A recent study shows the health of young adults from 10 southern states a hindrance to the United States Army, and a subsequent national security crisis. In a report released by The Citadel, the Army has seen an overall increase of overweight recruits who can't pass entry-level physical fitness tests. The results of the study coincides with the Army's decision to raise the level of a recruit's fitness and combat readiness, prompting the military to release a website to get future soldiers ready in advance of their basic training. The Citadel conducted the survey this year with the U.S. Army Public Health Center and the American Heart Association and determined that overweight military recruits has led to more training injuries and an overhaul with a preemptive training process. According to the study, the states of Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Tennessee, Arkansas, South Carolina, and North Carolina have the worst fitness and cardio levels for incoming recruits. Eduardo Sanchez, the chief medical officer for prevention and chief of the Center for Health Metrics and Evaluation for the American Heart Association, said geography and local education systems play a role in shaping these young adults.

Published in: Newsweek - Online
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Thursday
December 6, 2018
2. Citadel Carillonneur honors George H.W. Bush for National Day of Mourning

Citadel Carillonneur and Chapel Music Director, honored the late president, George H.W. Bush, and his lifetime of service to the country on the National Day of Mourning as Stecker played the customary 94 tolls of the bourdon. bell along with other music in the Thomas Dry Howie Carillon bell tower at noon Wednesday, Dec. 5, 2018 at The Citadel in Charleston.

Published in: YouTube - Online
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Thursday
December 6, 2018
2.1 From The Post and Courier: Citadel Carillonneur honors George H.W. Bush for National Day of Mourning

Mitchell Stecker, Citadel Carillonneur and Chapel Music Director, honored the late president, George H.W. Bush, and his lifetime of service to the country on the National Day of Mourning as Stecker played the customary 94 tolls of the bourdon bell along with other music in the Thomas Dry Howie Carillon bell tower at noon Wednesday, Dec. 5, 2018 at The Citadel in Charleston.

Published in: The Citadel News Room - Online
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Thursday
December 6, 2018
2.2 Citadel Carillonneur honors George H.W. Bush for National Day of Mourning

Mitchell Stecker, Citadel Carillonneur and Chapel Music Director, honored the late president, George H.W. Bush, and his lifetime of service to the country on the National Day of Mourning as Stecker played the customary 94 tolls of the bourdon bell along with other music in the Thomas Dry Howie Carillon bell tower at noon Wednesday, Dec. 5, 2018 at The Citadel in Charleston.

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Thursday
December 6, 2018
3. The Citadel honors late president George H.W. Bush with special ceremony

The Citadel held a special ceremony to honor former President H.W. Bush on this National Day of Mourning, which included the tolling of the bells. The program began at noon with the customary 94 tolls of the bourdon bell – one for each year of the former president’s life.

Published in: WCBD TV-2 (Charleston) - Online
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Thursday
December 6, 2018
5. Behind Zane Najdawi’s double-double, Citadel off to best start in 14 seasons

The Citadel extended its win streak to five straight with a 127-93 victory over Johnson & Wales on Wednesday at McAlister Field House. Senior Zane Najdawi scored 23 points and grabbed 10 rebounds to lead the 7-2 Bulldogs, who are off to their best start since an 8-2 record at the beginning of the 2004-05 season. The 5-game win streak is their longest since 2009-10. Point guard Lew Stallworth, winner of back-to-back Southern Conference basketball player of the week awards, registered his fourth double-double of the season with 19 points and 10 assists. Kaiden Rice had 16 points, Matt Frierson 15, Connor Kern 14 and Quayson Williams 10.

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Thursday
December 6, 2018
5.1 Johnson and Wales vs. The Citadel

An excerpt from the sports clip: "

] "To News 2's Brianne Welch for a look at whats coming up next in sports, The Citadel Bulldogs looking for another win tonight, we're talking some hoops action then more college football ahead of bowl games next in sports start this…"
Published in: WCBD TV-2 (Charleston) - Online
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Thursday
December 6, 2018
5.2 Furman basketball team savoring first-ever appearance in Top 25 poll

Furman coach Bob Richey wants his players to savor the program’s first appearance in the AP Top 25 basketball poll, yet also remember how much work it took to get there. He’s hoping that approach will keep the 25th-ranked Paladins building toward something bigger. “The reality of it is this was not just something that was created by this team,” Richey told The Associated Press. “There’s a lot of people that are involved in this and have paved the way for this to happen.” Furman’s next game is Saturday at USC Upstate in Spartanburg at 4:30 p.m. The Paladins will host Charleston Southern on Dec. 11. Furman and The Citadel will play Jan. 5 in Greenville and Jan. 31 at McAlister Field House in Charleston.

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Wednesday
December 5, 2018
1. Charleston joining growing list of SC coastal communities banning plastics
Charleston’s recently passed ban on single-use plastic and foam items means more than half of the Lowcountry’s coastline extending from Beaufort County to the Isle of Palms will have at least some form of a restriction on the most common types of litter found in the region’s waterways. With all 11 communities that have enacted similar ordinances, bans now cover about 1,143 square miles along the South Carolina coast. In addition to Charleston, they are Mount Pleasant, Isle of Palms, Sullivan’s Island, Folly Beach, Surfside Beach, Hilton Head Island, Bluffton, Beaufort, Port Royal and Beaufort County. Citadel physiology professor John Weinstein and his students have found over the past few years that at least 7½ tons of plastic is breaking down in the Charleston Harbor, creating what are called microplastics that are then ingested by fish, birds, turtles, shrimp, oysters and more. Weinstein said studies are showing that these tiny pieces of trash ultimately slow down animals’ growth and their reproduction. “That’s going to have population-level effects,” he said. “Once you start removing populations of shrimp, let’s say, that is going to have ecosystem effects and community-level effects.” He said banning the items can only be seen as a positive effort to curb the problem. “Speaking as a private citizen, I’m encouraged there’s a grassroot effort to ban these types of plastics because I know from my own research that they’re having an adverse impact on the environment,” he said.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Wednesday
December 5, 2018
Cherokee NJROTC cadets visit The Citadel, Patriot's Point
Twenty-six Cherokee High School NJROTC students visited Charleston’s Patriots Point and The Citadel on Nov. 16-17, 2018. Cherokee’s trip started with a visit to The Citadel, a four-year public military college established in 1842 in historic Charleston, South Carolina. The Citadel offers a unique classic military college education for men and women that focuses on leadership and academic excellence. Graduates of The Citadel are not required to serve in the military; however, about 35 percent of each class commission as military officers. Cadets enjoyed a guided tour by Taylor, a former Citadel cadet that graduated last year. According to Cadet Commander Heather Whitt, “the Citadel was a fantastic experience. We were toured around its beautiful campus, and, during the tour, we were able to witness an everyday cadet’s life as they were milling about the campus, getting ready for their fall break.”
Published in: The Rogersville Review - Online
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Wednesday
December 5, 2018
Citadel's Stallworth earns 2nd straight SoCon award
he Citadel Bulldogs' starting point guard received another honor this week. Lew Stallworth was named the SoCon player of the week for the second straight week. A Citadel basketball player hasn't received that award in back to back weeks since the 1984-85 season. Coach Baucom says Lew works incredibly hard and has great energy, and there are also other reasons he has been so successful. Duggar Baucom said, "A lot of the reason that he's SoCon player of the week twice is because guys are making shots to get him assists. They're hugging our shooters to get him his points, and he recognizes that. That's a great thing because he's a humble kid, and just an awesome kid." Lew Stallworth said, "Coach Baucom in the recruiting process he told me he likes to play fast and more up tempo and needed a guard to do that, so I kind of patent my game after Russell Westbrook getting down the court fast and getting to the paint, so that's really my game. I can shoot the three, but there's so much shooting around me that it's just easy to be myself." The Bulldogs play at home Wednesday at 7 p.m.
Published in: WCBD TV-2 (Charleston) - Online
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Wednesday
December 5, 2018
Local CFB players
Russell Hubbs, The Citadel - Hubbs, the former Northwestern High linebacker, wrapped up his college career with a 43-14 win over rival Charleston Southern. Hubbs notched four tackles, including 1.5 for a loss and a half-sack, and also broke up a pass in the win.
Published in: The Herald - Online
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Wednesday
December 5, 2018
Roundup: Several Emerald alumni earn starting spots on college teams

Here are the final regular season stats for the top college football players from the Lakelands: Rod Johnson, The Citadel, A-Back, Junior, Played in 4 games before a season-ending injury. Had 93 yards and 2 TDs on 27 carries, while catching 1 pass for 24 yards. Also returned 11 kickoffs for a total of 281 and 1 TD; Von Ramsey, The Citadel, LB, Freshman, Did not participate

Published in: The Index Journal - Online
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Wednesday
December 5, 2018
What Mike Houston said during his introductory press conference
Mike Houston was welcomed as the 22nd head coach in East Carolina football history on Tuesday morning inside Harvey Hall at the Murphy Center in Greenville, North Carolina. Houston comes to ECU from James Madison University, where he compiled a 37-6 record and won a 2016 FCS national championship. The North Carolina native has coached at James Madison, The Citadel and Lenoir-Rhyne over his eight-year college head coaching career, going 80-25 overall. Houston also started his coaching career at Forbush High School in North Carolina before moving to TC Roberson High School. He takes over as ECU's next head coach after three failed years of the Scottie Montgomery era, where the Pirates posted three wins each season and went 9-27 overall.
Published in: 247 Sports - Online
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Tuesday
December 4, 2018
McMillan Pazdan Smith: Helping build a more beautiful Charleston
The downtown Charleston offices of architecture, planning and interior design firm McMillan Pazdan Smith embody the spirit of the company. Located in a renovated historic building across from the iconic Mother Emanuel Church, the industrial chic interior is completely open, so ideas can flow across desks, departments and areas of expertise. Inside, the office thrums with creative collaboration as the firm’s team marries art and science for great design. McMillan Pazdan Smith has built this magnetic and caring culture by assembling, retaining, and developing a tremendous team of growing talent — all with a focus on serving clients and their beloved Charleston community with excellence. As a firm that leverages cutting-edge technology to create beautiful, cost-effective and enduring design, McMillan Pazdan Smith continues to prove the depth of their enthusiasm for their clients and the city in which they live. Their diverse portfolio of public and private clients includes Charleston Waterfront Hotel, Charleston and Berkeley County school districts, The Dewberry Hotel, College of Charleston, The Citadel, Porter Gaud, IFA Group, The Boeing Company, Volvo, and many others.
Published in: Charleston Regional Business Journal - Online
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Tuesday
December 4, 2018
Professor retires after 48 years; Remembers his Towson accomplishments
Don McCulloh, a professor in the Department of Business, will be retiring at the end of this semester after being part of Towson’s campus for 48 years. McCulloh, has been a member of many departments on campus including different positions in administration. The Towerlight had the chance to speak with McCulloh about his time as a part of Towson’s community. This interview has been edited for brevity and clarity. I grew up in Baltimore City. I went to Baltimore City Public Schools. I went to Baltimore City College High School, a very fine institution. We were number two in the city, and at the time I thought it was number one because I went there of course. I went away to college, I went to the Citadel, down in South Carolina, the military college. I went into the United States Air Force after college and served during the Vietnam period. I got out, I went to work with the General Motors Corporation and worked there for five years. I got out, applied to Towson, and was interviewed, and I’ve been here ever since.
Published in: Towson University Towerlight - Online
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Tuesday
December 4, 2018
Turner Cockrell memorial service to be held before Vanderbilt leaves for Texas Bowl
A memorial service for Vanderbilt tight end Turner Cockrell, who died last week after a battle with cancer, will be held Dec. 17 in Kennesaw, Ga. The date is wedged between Vanderbilt's final exams, which end Dec. 15, and the Commodores’ trip to Houston to play Baylor in the Dec. 27 Texas Bowl. Vanderbilt football has not yet announced plans to attend the service as a team, but that may come later. The Commodores just started planning their bowl practice schedule Sunday night. TRAGEDY: Vanderbilt football player Turner Cockrell dies after battle with cancer TRIBUTE: High school teammates honor Vanderbilt football player Turner Cockrell at The Citadel football game LOOK BACK: Vanderbilt athletics has experienced death of young athletes in recent years
Published in: The Tennessean - Online
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Tuesday
December 4, 2018
Waccamaw High catcher to play for The Citadel

It took just one visit to The Citadel for Waccamaw High baseball player Luke Montenery to fall in love with the college. Now, he will officially be attending school once he graduates high school. On Nov. 14 in the Waccamaw High School media center, Montenery officially signed his National Letter of Intent to play baseball for The Citadel. Joining him were his parents, grandparents, coaches and teammates. “It’s a surreal moment,” Montenery said. “To be able to achieve something that not a lot of people are able to do and something I’ve been dreaming of for a long time. The end goal was to play college baseball and to be able to do it at a Division I level is really fulfilling.” Montenery said The Citadel not only provides him with a chance to be successful playing baseball, but also will provide him with a great education. “The coaching staff is incredible,” he said. “Their coaching style plays into what I can do as a player. Not to mention their educational programs are one of the best in South Carolina. I feel when I graduate from there, that will open a lot of doors for me.” Montenery is the 22nd Waccamaw baseball player to sign with a college program in the last 14 years, according to Warriors head coach Jeff Gregory, and the sixth to sign with a Division I program.

Published in: South Strand News - Online
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Monday
December 3, 2018
1. Cadet Richard DeKold named Schwarzman Scholar
Cadet Richard “Chad” DeKold, a member of The Citadel Class of 2019, and 2nd Battalion Commander for the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, is one of the students selected to receive a prestigious Schwarzman Scholarship. DeKold, who attends The Citadel on a U.S. Army ROTC scholarship, is in the Honors Program and is pursing two majors: Intelligence and Security Studies, and Political Science with a focus on International Politics and Military Affairs. He is studying Chinese as his minor. The Schwarzman Scholars program was started in 2016 with the goal of preparing the next generation of global leaders. The 147 college students selected for the Schwarzman Scholars Class of 2020 will pursue a Masters in Global Affairs with concentrations in public policy, economics and business, or international studies at Schwarzman College which is part of Tsinghua University in Beijing. According to the program announcement, the selection process is designed to identify the most promising young leaders from around the world.
Published in: The Citadel News Room - Online
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Monday
December 3, 2018
1. The South’s Next Great Wildlife Artist

From his home base in the North Carolina mountains, Ryan Kirby is bringing an unbridled passion for the outdoors to the canvas—and giving the sporting art world a jolt of youthful energy. The hardest part, Ryan Kirby insists, is painting the animal’s foot—the cloven hoof of an elk or a deer, or the pebbly texture of a wild turkey’s tridactyl W. “No, really,” he says earnestly, aware that I’m not quite with him on this point. “Painting an animal’s foot on the ground, with the right proportions, the balance, so the animal actually feels like it’s stepping and walking yet still connected.” He shakes his head. A big exhalation. “If I get the muscle structure just right, and the tendons and the highlights in the hair and all the angles, then that place where the foot meets the ground is the starting point in understanding how the animal relates to its environment.” Nor is Kirby content to live the cloistered life of an artist. He’s active on social media and acts as an ambassador for sporting art wherever he travels. During each of his SEWE visits, for example, Kirby has spoken to cadets at the Citadel, giving a multimedia presentation designed to inspire a new generation to pursue the outdoors and art.

Published in: Garden and Gun - Online
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Monday
December 3, 2018
2. Holiday Classic tennis tournament shines; local girls win Eddie Herr doubles

Local adult tennis is in full bloom this weekend on Daniel Island. That is, until the rain hit around midday on Saturday at Family Circle Tennis Center. “We got a lot more matches played than I thought we would,” FCTC operations director Rob Eppelsheimer said. The Holiday Classic presented by Wally Burbage Allstate has the largest number of participants for an adult tournament in the state for a second straight year. This 12th annual event at FCTC has 277 participants. Burbage, who usually participates in the tournament, was pleased a few years ago when the Holiday Classic’s fund-raising enabled MUSC to establish a cancer treatment room at MUSC’s Hollings Cancer Center. The treatment room was named in memory of the deceased Dr. John von Lehe, a longtime friend and former wrestling teammate of Burbage’s at The Citadel.

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Monday
December 3, 2018
The Citadel opens SoCon play with comeback win over Mercer
In a resurgent Southern Conference, a resurgent Citadel basketball team is in first place — for a few weeks, at least. The Bulldogs rallied from nine points down for a 79-69 win over Mercer on Saturday at McAlister Field House, winning their SoCon opener and extending their win streak to four games. League play begins in earnest in late December. Senior Zane Najdawi scored 18 points and grabbed seven rebounds, and point guard Lew Stallworth put up a double-double with 16 points and 10 rebounds as The Citadel improved to 6-2 overall and 1-0 in the SoCon, ranked No. 8 in the country in conference RPI last week. “I told the guys before the game that if we just go out and focus for 40 minutes and give us a good 40 minutes, you’ll get to lead the league for a month,” said Citadel coach Duggar Baucom. “Our first 20 (minutes) weren’t very pretty, but in the last 20, they showed a lot of grit, toughness and, most importantly, togetherness.” Ross Cummings scored 22 points to lead Mercer (4-4, 0-1).
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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