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About Today's News Clips
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The Citadel in the News: Archive

October 2018

PUBLISH DATE STORIES
Wednesday
October 31, 2018
1. Climate change may make earthquakes in Charleston more dangerous

Rising seas have the potential to inundate homes and close roads, and new research shows they also could make it more likely that solid ground will liquefy during a major earthquake. Charleston’s peninsula already is vulnerable to this phenomenon, known as liquefaction. Dozens of city blocks were created by filling edges of the peninsula, and downtown has relatively loose soils and a high water table. The region also is a hotspot for earthquakes, with a fault line along the Ashley River that leads to frequent minor tremors and occasional major ones. Geological history has shown that major quakes happen about once every few hundred years. The 1886 earthquake, the worst ever recorded in the Southeast, seriously damaged nine out of every 10 brick buildings in Charleston and killed more than 100 people. While it’s unclear when the next big quake will hit; the water table looms as a growing concern as the earth warms and seas rise. Previous studies have found the relative depth of groundwater rises along with the sea.

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Wednesday
October 31, 2018
2. Absentee Voting Gains Popularity

At the voter registration and election commission in Moncks Corner, voters were lined up Tuesday to cast absentee ballots. Pat and John Richardson said they did so because of her medical issue, and to make sure they take part in a civic duty. "It winds up being local once you have to go vote yourself. You have to see, ok, if I don't do this then I have to accept what's happening whether I like it or not," said John Richardson.Doctor DuBose Kapeluck is chairman of the political science department at The Citadel. He says research shows absentee voting has increased from 20% in 2004 to 40% today. "It’s been a real divisive politics in the past two years. And even before. And so I think people are taking this election pretty seriously," Dr. Kapeluck said. He said studies have shown well-known candidates tend to benefit slightly more from absentee voting.

Published in: WCIV TV-4 (Charleston) - Online
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Wednesday
October 31, 2018
3. Presentation by the Republic of Georgia’s Ambassador to the United States
Bakradze will invite the audience to weigh in on questions such as, “How serious is the threat posed by resurgent authoritarianism across the globe?” and “What must the world’s democracies do to compete successfully in the years ahead?” David Bakradze, the Georgian Ambassador to the U.S., will have an open discussion with students, faculty and staff of The Citadel, the College of Charleston and members of the Charleston community during a visit to The Citadel campus on Thursday, Nov. 1. The discussion, “The New Cold War: Democracy v. Authoritarianism in the Post-Soviet Era,” is free and open to the public. Bakradze will invite the audience to weigh in on questions such as, “How serious is the threat posed by resurgent authoritarianism across the globe?” and “What must the world’s democracies do to compete successfully in the years ahead?”
Published in: Charleston Business Magazine - Online
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Wednesday
October 31, 2018
4. The Citadel Symposium on American Leaders and Leadership in World War I
Experts and scholars on World War I will give presentations and join a panel discussion during The Citadel Symposium on American Leaders and Leadership in World War. 8:30 a.m. – 4:45 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 3 Bond Hall, Room 165, the Citadel. Free and open to the public. Experts and scholars on World War I will give presentations and join a panel discussion during The Citadel Symposium on American Leaders and Leadership in World War I Saturday, Nov. 3. The all-day symposium will feature Edward Lengel, scholar and author; Richard Faulkner, professor in the Department of Military History at the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College; Herbert Frandsen, professor emeritus at the Air War College; Lawrence Sondhaus, professor in the Department of History and Political Science at the University of Indianapolis; and Matt Davenport, scholar and author. The event is sponsored by The Citadel Department of History, Daniel Library, and The Krause Center for Leadership and Ethics. To view the full symposium schedule, please view the Symposium Itinerary webpage.
Published in: Charleston Business Magazine - Online
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Wednesday
October 31, 2018
5. Citadel’s Fraser-Rahim publishes “Enslaved and Freed African Muslims: Spiritual Wayfarers in the South and Lowcountry”

Muhammad Fraser-Rahim, Ph.D., an assistant professor in The Citadel Department of Intelligence and Security Studies is the author of Enslaved and Freed African Muslims: Spiritual Wayfarers in the South and Lowcountry, an online exhibit launched Oct. 26. The slave ships docking in early colonial America carried enslaved people from a variety of religious and cultural backgrounds, including West African Muslims. Though the historical record is scantly populated with their history, it reveals that the West African Muslims brought to America carried their Islamic faith and cultural practices with them. Fraser-Rahim is an expert on violent extremism issues with areas of specialty on transnational terrorist movements, counter-terrorism, Islamic intellectual history, Islam in America and contemporary theology in the Muslim world and African affairs. He has conducted research in more than 40 countries on the African continent and has worked and studied throughout the Middle East, which is reflected in this and many of his projects.

Published in: https://today.citadel.edu/citadels-frasir-rahim-publishes-enslaved-and-freed-african-muslims-spiritual-wayfarers-in-the-south-and-lowcountry/ - Online
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Wednesday
October 31, 2018
6. Name droppers: A life among the fishes

Elena Burgess of Woodland was awarded gold stars by The Citadel for achieving a 3.7 grade point average or higher during the 2018 spring semester. Cadets and students who achieve gold star recognition are also placed on The Citadel’s dean’s list. The Citadel, with its iconic campus located in Charleston, South Carolina, offers a classic military college education profoundly focused on leadership excellence and academic distinction. Graduates are not required to serve in the military but about one-third of each class commission as officers in every branch of U.S. military service. Graduates of The Citadel have served the nation, their states and their communities as principled leaders since the college was founded in 1842.

Published in: Davis Enterprise - Online
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Wednesday
October 31, 2018
7. Shivers details Senate wish list

As the Nov. 6 election closes in, candidate Ayanna Shivers is continuing to knock on doors and learn more about what makes people tick in state Senate District 10. She said she's not running to be just another politician. Shivers is interested in making sure people are being heard. It's about people, not politics. "Knocking on doors has been positive," she said last week. "I don't have dark money. It's a grass roots campaign." She is running against incumbent state Sen. Jeanie Riddle, Republican, who is the state senator for the district that includes Callaway County. Riddle assumed that seat in 2015, and was previously elected to the Missouri House of Representatives in 2008. Shivers has a different background. She earned a Master of Theology in Theological Studies degree in 2015 from Liberty University in Lynchburg, Virginia. She received a Doctor of Philosophy in Education in 2008 from The University of Southern Mississippi in Hattiesburg. She also has a Master of Education in School Counseling, earned in 2001 at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina, and a Bachelor of Art in Journalism, earned in 1994 at the University of Oklahoma in Norman.

Published in: Fulton Sun - Online
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Wednesday
October 31, 2018
8. Rob Sussman

To Fordham law school when I returned after college again back to New York City I went to The Citadel insurance in South Carolina. Okay let's military school that's correct and so when you ask who am I I would say I been raised in. Military training since high school cuz high school managing your t cell pressure and during the summers I went to a somewhat. Summer naval campsite learn sailing during the summer and not been marching during the winter is okay woman that would. Mean that your branch of service Marine Corps exactly thank you had everything as salient margin yet all right there exactly so when. I went to The Citadel they have all the ROTC branches they are and I after observing all of them and. The instructors I said want to make a decision to go with the with the best and I win tonight at. Plantemoran Coronado after graduation I went through OCS was commissioned a second lieutenant record okay all right anatomy by military experience there. I went into the marine corps actually under they are rough plc law program as a judge advocate so really yes okay. After I graduated the said all of this I never did pass my physical for my eyesight at the time so. I never had a contract to go into the service from the senate all but the recruiter always said you know. If you go to medical school or law school, you could get a waiver you probably get a waiver to go. To the service side kept on the back of my mind after graduating The Citadel I went to have the opportunity to.

Published in: WXDE-FM
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Wednesday
October 31, 2018
9. APSU Womens Golf repeat as Town and Country Invitational Champions

The champs stay the champs. Austin Peay State University women’s golf team successfully defended its title at the 2018 Town and Country Invitational; what’s more, senior Reagan Greene ensured that the individual title would return to Clarksville by taking the top individual honor.The victory—which was Austin Peay’s first under head coach Amy McCollum—brought to a close Austin Peay’s fall campaign on the highest possible note. The Govs followed their school-record 288 from the opening round with a 290, finishing with a 578, holding off Tennessee Tech by two shots. Belmont (594), Lipscomb (596) and Cumberland (606) were the top-five team finishers. The Govs return to action in late February for the Oyster Match Play Challenge, hosted by The Citadel in Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina, February 25th-26th, 2019.

Published in: Clarksville Online - Online
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Wednesday
October 31, 2018
9.1 As close losses mount, so does frustration for Citadel football

It began in the season-opener at Wofford, when The Citadel rallied from a 21-0 deficit to tie the score, then had four shots at the end zone from the Terriers’ 5-yard line in the final 25 seconds. And lost. The next week against Chattanooga, the Bulldogs led by a touchdown in overtime. And lost. It continued Oct. 13, when The Citadel, down three points to ETSU, had the ball and a chance to win in the final minutes — and gave up a 42-yard interception return for a touchdown to lose. And it boiled over last Saturday. The Bulldogs, down four points to rival Furman, had two chances to go ahead late in the game — and gave up a 20-yard fumble return for a touchdown to lose by 28-17. Afterwards, Brent Thompson was as angry as he’d ever been in 30 games as the Bulldogs’ head coach.

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Wednesday
October 31, 2018
9.2 RAW: The Citadel’s Brent Thompson previews Western Carolina

The Citadel returns to the road on Saturday as the Bulldogs (2-5, 2-4) head to Western Carolina to face the Catamounts (3-5, 1-5). Watch Brent Thompson’s preview of the game.

Published in: WCSC TV-5 (Charleston) - Online
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Tuesday
October 30, 2018
1 The Citadel Graduate College celebrates 50 years of educating leaders

The Citadel Graduate College educates students in classrooms on campus and online around the world. However, fifty years ago it began as a small program providing a resource in the Lowcountry where there was a gap for working adults and homemakers who wanted to earn an undergraduate degree in the evening. Then called the Evening College, it was co-educational from the beginning with classes held on The Citadel campus taught by a co-ed faculty. The student population was primarily focused on becoming teachers. In 1994, it transitioned into The College of Graduate and Professional Studies, eventually renamed The Citadel Graduate College in 2007. Today’s Citadel Graduate College Now, The Citadel Graduate College is an expansive resource for working professionals, offering 10 evening undergraduate degrees and 67 graduate program options including certificates in a civilian atmosphere on campus, with many classes also available online.

Published in: Lowcountry Biz SC - Online
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Tuesday
October 30, 2018
2. Upcoming news from The Citadel – November and December 2018

Presentation by the Republic of Georgia’s Ambassador to the United States;  Citadel professor of history and author of new textbook;  Keith Knapp, to present at College of Charleston;  The Citadel Symposium on American Leaders and Leadership in World War I;  Bulldog Business Bowl announces semi-finalists;  Keynote presentation by Professor Scott Buchanan Lecture and book signing with John Warley;  Homecoming 2018 100th anniversary commemoration of World War I;  Muhammad Fraser-Rahim speaks at 9/11 Memorial Museum;  Bulldog Business Bowl teams present elevator pitches;  81st annual Christmas Candlelight Service at The Citadel;  The Citadel Archives and Museum website launches

Published in: The Citadel News Room - Online
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Tuesday
October 30, 2018
3. Historians to commemorate Washington’s visit to Fort LeBoeuf

George Washington really did sleep here, or in Waterford anyway, during his visit to the French commander at Fort LeBoeuf on Dec. 15, 1753. The Fort LeBoeuf Historical Society will mark the 265th anniversary of Washington’s visit this Dec. 15 with a “Trail to a Nation” celebration. The event will feature talks by award-winning historian David Preston during lunch and dinner programs. “It’s going to be a celebration of George Washington’s first public mission, the mission that kind of kickstarted the rest of his career, military wise,” said event Chairman Patrick Jenks. The Trail to a Nation event also will include the raffle of a framed print depicting Washington’s visit donated by Pittsburgh-area artist John Buxton. Medallions designed by Joan Mancuso of Erie to commemorate the anniversary of Washington’s visit will be available for purchase. The event also will include re-enactors and special displays at the Fort LeBoeuf Museum.

Published in: The Citadel News Room - Online
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Tuesday
October 30, 2018
4. The Citadel Encourages Diversity through Listening

It’s been a little more a than year since the Citadel started its Truth, Racial Healing and Transformation Center. One of the goals is to help the once all-male military college in Charleston acknowledge its history in perpetrating racism and continue to evolve into a more inclusive community. The school is now holding what it calls CitListen sessions to encourage change through conversation. “They’re designed to get people to interact with each other through personal story telling, deep intentional listening and connections across differences through our common humanity,” says Dr. J. Goosby Smith. She’s an associate professor and Assistant Provost for Diversity Equity and Inclusion at the school. She also helps lead the CitListen sessions with Dr. Larry G. Daniel, a professor and Dean of the Zucker Family School of Education. The school recently held its first CitListen session in September, inviting members of the media to join faculty to see how it works. Typically, groups of ten to twenty people come together to build trust and share personal reflections. Much of it is based on stories.

Published in: S. C. Public Radio - Online
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Tuesday
October 30, 2018
5. VFW Scholarship Helps Veteran Continue His Studies at Military College

Juan Campana was born in Ecuador and immigrated to the United States at a young age. Entering the United States Marine Corps after September 11, 2001, he spent four years as a Combat Engineer. He served two tours in Iraq during Operation Iraqi Freedom and at Camp Lejeune in Jacksonville, N.C.Once Campana retired from the military, he continued to work in other capacities for the United States government. Campana then enrolled into The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina and wants to use his Intelligence and Security Studies major to return to work in the federal government after graduation. As he was receiving a free haircut at Sport Clips on Veteran’s Day, Campana heard about the VFW’s “Sport Clips Help A Hero Scholarship” for the first time. When his GI Bill was exhausted two years later, he was recommended to apply by his campus chapter of Student Veterans Association. The scholarship has made all the difference to Campana’s future.

Published in: Veterans of Foreign Wars - Online
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Tuesday
October 30, 2018
6. Eighth year as top public college in South by U.S. News & World Report

or the eighth consecutive year, U.S. News & World Report ranks The Citadel as the #1 public college in the South offering up to a master’s degree. The Citadel ranks #3 Best College in the South, when private and public schools are combined, up from #4 last year. The Citadel moved up to #1 for Best College for Veterans in the South, from the #2 position last fall. Additionally, The Citadel is in the top ten for Most Innovative Schools in the South for the first time. At #9, The Citadel leads South Carolina institutions along with the College of Charleston, which tied for the spot. According to U.S. News & World Report, the innovative schools rankings come from input from the colleges and nominations from peers ”for those making the most innovative improvements in terms of curriculum, faculty, students, campus life, technology or facilities.” Another first for The Citadel is being ranked in the top ten for Best Undergraduate Teaching, at #8. The college ranks #3 Best Undergraduate Teaching in the South.

Published in: CRBJ - Online
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Tuesday
October 30, 2018
7. Why President Trump Should Stop Pouting About the Fed And Move Toward Separating Money from the State

Dear Bob, I have a new article on the website of the American Institute for Economic Research (AIER) on, “Government, Gold, and Separating Money from the State.” President Trump complains and pouts that the Federal Reserve is not allowing him to have the same zero interest rates that the Obama Administration enjoyed, while academic economists praise the knowledge, wisdom and judgment of the Fed governors to get interest rates and the economy “just right.” Both point to the danger and undesirability of political control of the monetary printing press. The classical economists and classical liberals of the 19th century demonstrated the wider wisdom that controlling money had to be out of the direct command of government, with the accompanying case for the classic gold standard under which any changes in the money supply, inside or outside of the banking system, was to be primarily guided and determined by market-based supply and demand for the commodity used as money.

Published in: Economic Policy Journal - Online
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Tuesday
October 30, 2018
8. Ex-SC Rep. Harrison tells jurors he did not lie or illegally use his elected office

A heated verbal duel between ex-S.C. Rep. Jim Harrison and special prosecutor David Pascoe — about honor, lies and money — marked the last day of testimony Friday in the Columbia Republican’s public corruption trial. “You got paid (illegally) to be a legislator!” Pascoe accused Harrison, as a Richland County jury of seven women and five men looked on. “Absolutely not!” Harrison almost shouted back. Pascoe — a graduate of The Citadel, the Charleston military college where cadets promise not to lie, cheat or steal — told his fellow Citadel grad Harrison, “It’s a shame they didn’t teach you the ‘Honor Code!’ ” “I was a member of the Honor Court,” Harrison responded. “I’m not sure you were!” “Yes, I was,” shot back Pascoe. ”So why don’t you tell this jury what’s the first thing you are taught at my school?”

Published in: The Herald Sun - Online
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Tuesday
October 30, 2018
9. A woman’s place is in the president’s home at College of Charleston

Imagine that if within days of the news that Glenn (Jeb) McConnell was stepping down after four glorious years as president of the College of Charleston that the trustees announced they were embarking on a national search for his replacement — and that no men need apply. Imagine the outrage. Old white guy legislators in Columbia would be tripping over themselves to cut the college’s state funding — all 9 percent of the budget. The College of Charleston’s search for a new president would have been national news. Fox, Rush and Breitbart would be on fire. And top women across academia would be applying to lead the College of Charleston, knowing they were not going to be “McConnelled” at the last minute by another Good Ole Boy brought in by his Good Ole Boy pals.s it not time? The College of Charleston, which proudly calls itself the oldest educational institution south of Virginia, was founded in 1770 and has had 22 presidents, all white men. Combined, C of C, the University of South Carolina, Clemson and the Citadel have been around for 744 years. They have had 85 presidents — all white men. And zero women.

Published in: The Post & Courier - Online
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Tuesday
October 30, 2018
Furman 28, The Citadel 17

Freshman JeMar Lincoln scored three touchdowns on keepers, and a strip sack leading to a touchdown in the final minutes put the game out of reach as Furman defeated The Citadel 28-17 Saturday. The Citadel was driving, trailing 21-17 with just under three minutes remaining. Furman slammed the door on any rally when Adrian Hope — the Southern Conference leader in sacks — brought down Jordan Black for an eight-yard loss and a fumble. Donavan Perryman returned the ball 20 yards for the final score, Furman’s first fumble recovery for a touchdown since 2012. It was a fitting end for the Southern’s oldest and most-contested football rivalry, the teams clashing for the 98th time in 105 years.

Published in: Index Journal - Online
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Tuesday
October 30, 2018
Local college/NFL players: former Bearcat named SoCon defensive player of the week
Donavan Perryman, Furman - Perryman was name Southern Conference defensive player of the week after playing a big role in Furman’s 28-17 win over The Citadel. The former Rock Hill Bearcat linebacker recorded 12 tackles and a sack and returned a fumble recovery 20 yards for a touchdown late in the game to seal the Paladins’ conference win over the Bulldogs. Perryman played a leading role in a Furman defense that limited The Citadel to just 157 rushing yards. The Bulldogs entered the contest ranked seventh in FCS football with 282.3 yards per game. The 17 points was The Citadel’s lowest scoring output this season. Perryman ranks sixth in the SoCon with 59 tackles. Markell Castle, Newberry - York’s Castle caught a touchdown pass and also threw one during the Wolves’ 31-17 loss to Wingate. Castle had three catches for 24 yards, including a 14-yard score midway through the first quarter, in addition to the 34-yard pass he threw to Indian Land’s Austin Gordon that gave Newberry at 14-7 lead in the second quarter. Castle also ran the ball once for a four-yard gain.
Published in: The Herald - Online
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Friday
October 26, 2018
1. The Citadel Flying Club is back in the air for the first time in decades
The Citadel Flying Club is one of the oldest, as well as the newest clubs on campus. Formerly known as The Citadel’s Aero Club, the club was started in 1939 by Cadet Robert George David, Class of 1940. Throughout the years, the Aero Club rapidly grew and consisted of over 70 cadets who had either obtained their solo license or were receiving instruction towards this license. At the time it was organized, the club elected Bob David as president. He paved the way for future generations to accomplish their dream flights. Under his leadership and the contributions of many others, the club possessed multiple aircraft including a Piper Cub which routinely landed in the middle of campus on Summerall Field. The small plane conducted regular takeoffs and landings for the entire South Carolina Corps of Cadets to witness. (Scroll down for a video). Unfortunately, the club began to fade away in the 1970s following the sale of the clubs aircraft. The organization transformed into the Flying Enthusiasts Club, with the last club meeting recorded in 1978. In the spring semester of 2018, the club was revamped. Cadet officers were elected and the club has quickly grown to become one of the largest on campus with more than 200 members. Then in September, The Citadel Flying Club began their first fundraiser to help cadet pay for flight training. The $15,000 goal was reached within the first 48 hours, after an extremely generous donation of $18,000 was provided by a Class of 1983 graduate. The fundraising goal has been increased to $25,000.
Published in: The Citadel News Room - Online
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Friday
October 26, 2018
2. Marine Corps Historian and Citadel Mark Clark Chair to speak on the Battle of Guadalcanal

The Citadel's Department of History invites the public to join the History Department for an informative lecture on World War II/Guadalcanal given by Dr. C. P. Neimeyer, USMC (ret.), The Citadel’s 2018 Mark Clark Chair. Dr. Neimeyer, a distinguished military historian, is the foremost expert historian of the United States Marine Corps. Dr. Neimeyer is lecturing next Tuesday evening, Oct. 30th, between 6:30 pm and 7:30 pm in Bond Hall Auditorium 165. The lecture is free and titled Guadalcanal: Fighting & Winning A Single Naval Battle. Public Lecture Content Description...In August 1942, the United States was presented with a rare strategic opportunity to go on the offensive in the Pacific war against Imperial Japan. The victory of the United States Navy at Midway just a few months before had opened this door for America. However, the focus of the U.S. Army and the Joint Staff war planners in Washington were rightfully focused on a “Europe First” strategy since Nazi Germany presented a far greater threat to allied security than Japan at that moment. Thus it was left up to General Douglas MacArthur’s joint and combined forces in Australia to tie down the Japanese on New Guinea while the Navy/Marine Corps team hastily launched a limited offensive in the southern Solomon Islands

Published in: The Moultrie News - Online
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Friday
October 26, 2018
3. Identity Politics: The New Totalitarianism

While many people are focused on the coming U.S. elections and which political party will have majority control in Congress, there is – and has been – a far more dangerous and deeper political struggle going on in the United States. It is called “identity politics,” and if its proponents are successful, it will threaten the very foundation of freedom in America. However inconsistent and incomplete, the history of America is a story of a great experiment in human liberty. The founding fathers laid its foundation in the Declaration of Independence, granting every person the right to life, liberty and pursuit of happiness. For all of recorded history, mankind had lived under various forms of governmental command and control, under which the ordinary person was a slave, serf or coerced subject of those in political power. The American Revolution challenged all of these premises and presumptions. Government was to secure each person’s right to life, liberty and honestly acquired property from the violence, fraud or theft of others.

Published in: The Epoch Times - Online
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Friday
October 26, 2018
4. Savannah resident named 2019 chairman of RBC Heritage

The Heritage Classic Foundation has announced that longtime Savannah resident Al Kennickell will serve as 2019 tournament chairman for the 51st annual RBC Heritage Tournament. Kennickell was born in Savannah and graduated from Jenkins High School in 1973. He accepted a football scholarship to The Citadel where he graduated in 1977. Upon graduation, he went to work at Kennickell Printing Co. (now The Kennickell Group), which is the family’s printing business. In 1981 he became the president, and the next year bought the business from the family, according to HCF. “Al is an excellent ambassador for the Heritage Classic Foundation,” Tournament Director Steve Wilmot said. “He and his staff were the masterminds behind the plaiding of the Harbour Town Lighthouse, a high-profile project that required a great deal of planning and engineering. Over 3,300 square feet of vinyl was printed and installed in just four days.” Kennickell’s duties as tournament chairman include acting as master of ceremonies at both the opening and closing ceremonies.

Published in: WTOC (Savannah) - Online
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Friday
October 26, 2018
Citadel basketball’s Zane Najdawi named to preseason all-SoCon team; Bulldogs picked 6th
Citadel senior Zane Najdawi has been named to the Southern Conference’s preseason all-Southern Conference team, and the Bulldogs are picked to finish sixth in the league by SoCon coaches. Najdawi, a 6-7 forward, averaged 15.5 points, 5 rebounds and 1.4 blocks per game last season, including 19.5 points, 6.2 rebounds and 2.1 blocks in SoCon play. He enters his final year of eligibility 18th in program history for points scored in a career (1,206) and third for blocked shots (140). Najdawi is just the second player in school history, and 27th in the SoCon, to rack up at least 1,000 points, 500 rebounds and 100 blocks.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Friday
October 26, 2018
North Charleston High School says good-bye to Attaway-Heinsohn Stadium
Former North Charleston High School football players and coaches will gather at venerable Attaway-Heinsohn Stadium for the last time on Friday night. The school will honor those players and coaches as the Cougars play host to Timberland in the final game scheduled for the stadium, which will be demolished after the season to make way for the Charleston County School District’s $43.7 million North Charleston Center for Advanced Studies.The planned center will offer technical training, such as auto repair, cosmetology and culinary arts, for students in five North Area high schools. “We just want to give people a chance to come out for the final game and celebrate this occasion,” said North Charleston athletic director Raymond Knauer.Among the outstanding athletes to play at Attaway-Heinsohn Field are Nehemiah Broughton, who went on to The Citadel and an NFL career with five NFL teams, and David Meggett, who played in the NFL with the Giants, Patriots and Jets.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Thursday
October 25, 2018
1. The Citadel School of Engineering Dean earns national recognition

The Dean of The Citadel School of Engineering is the recipient of one of the engineering industry’s preeminent awards, the American Society of Civil Engineers’ (ASCE) Edmund Friedman Professional Recognition Award. Col. Ronald W. Welch, U.S. Army (Ret.), Ph.D., P.E., F.ASCE, accepted the award recently at the ASCE conference in Denver. There is one recipient of the award annually, selected for “exemplary contributions to advancing the civil engineering profession, advancing new concepts in education, promoting professionalism, and developing civil engineering leaders,” according to ASCE.org. Other criteria include:

  • Exemplary professional conduct in a specific outstanding instance
  • An established reputation for professional service Objective and lasting achievement in improving the conditions under which professional engineers serve in public and private practice
  • Significant contribution toward improvement of employment conditions among civil engineers
  • Significant contribution toward improving the professional aspects of civil engineering education
  • Professional guidance of qualified young persons who would seek civil engineering as a career and professional development of young civil engineers in the formative stages of their careers
Published in: The Citadel News Room - Online
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Thursday
October 25, 2018
2. Ambassador of Georgia to the USA speaks at The Citadel Nov. 1

How serious is the threat posed by resurgent authoritarianism across the globe? What must the world’s democracies do to compete successfully in the years ahead? Those questions will be addressed by Ambassador Davit Bakradze in an open discussion at The Citadel. The ambassador’s address takes place at 6:45 p.m. Nov. 1 at the Holliday Alumni Center at 69 Hagood Ave. It is free and open to the public. Bakradze invites cadets, students, faculty, and staff of The Citadel, the College of Charleston, and members of the Charleston community to participate in the discussion. “Ambassador David Bakradze’s visit affords a rare opportunity for the citizens of our community to gain a better understanding of the challenges, and opportunities, that lie ahead on this new frontier of American national interests and values,” said ,” added Bo Moore, Dean of the School of Humanities & Sciences. A native of Tbilisi, Georgia, Bakradze earned advanced degrees in international economics and international law from Tbilisi State University. His many, prior positions of governmental leadership include service as Georgia’s Ambassador to Greece, Counselor of the Permanent Mission to the United Nations, and State Minister on European and Euro-Atlantic Integration.

Published in: The Citadel News Room - Online
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Thursday
October 25, 2018
3. The Citadel Graduate College celebrates 50 years of educating leaders

The Citadel Graduate College educates students in classrooms on campus and online around the world. However, fifty years ago it began as a small program providing a resource in the Lowcountry where there was a gap for working adults and homemakers who wanted to earn an undergraduate degree in the evening. Then called the Evening College, it was co-educational from the beginning with classes held on The Citadel campus taught by a co-ed faculty. The student population was primarily focused on becoming teachers. In 1994, it transitioned into The College of Graduate and Professional Studies, eventually renamed The Citadel Graduate College in 2007. Now, The Citadel Graduate College is an expansive resource for working professionals, offering 10 evening undergraduate degrees and 67 graduate program options including certificates in a civilian atmosphere on campus, with many classes also available online.

Published in: The Citadel News Room - Online
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Thursday
October 25, 2018
4. Meet Helen McCoy. At 101, she might be Citadel football’s oldest living fan.

It’s game day at Johnson Hagood Stadium, and the oldest living fan of Citadel football settles into her place. On the fourth-floor club level, Helen McCoy, 101, is seated smack in front of the window near the 40-yard line. She’s surrounded by family and fellow Citadel fans, gazing at her beloved Bulldogs on the green grass below. “We moved down here in 1976, and I’ve been a fan ever since,” Miss Helen says. Actually, it was 1967,” gently corrects her son, Peter. Whatever the date, Helen McCoy has been a Citadel fan for a long, long time. She’s the oldest member of The Brigadier Foundation, which raises money for athletic scholarships. And though such rankings are unofficial, she might be the oldest living Citadel fan. She will turn 102 on Dec. 4. “She’s a huge fan and really means a lot to us,” says Citadel football coach Brent Thompson. “I first met Miss Helen at the women’s football 101 class we held a couple of years ago, and immediately fell in love with her. “She’s so spirited about Citadel football, and I’d never met anybody that loved Citadel football as much as she does at that age.”

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Thursday
October 25, 2018
5. RAW: The Citadel’s Brent Thompson previews Furman

The Citadel (2-4, 2-3) hosts their rivals from the upstate in Furman (2-4). Watch head coach Brent Thompson’s preview.

Published in: WCSC TV-5 (Charleston) - Online
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Thursday
October 25, 2018
6. Furman week reminds Citadel coach of ‘one of worst coaching jobs I’ve done’

Brent Thompson has experienced many high points during three seasons as The Citadel’s football coach, including a 10-0 start to start to his career and hoisting a Southern Conference championship trophy in 2016. Another memorable moment came last weekend, when Thompson brought the coveted Silver Shako back to Charleston after a 12th straight victory over military school rival VMI. But the low point of Thompson’s 29 games at The Citadel is never far from his mind, he confessed Tuesday. And this week’s game against Furman, set for 2 p.m. Saturday at Johnson Hagood Stadium, brings that memory into painful focus. “I remind myself just about every day,” Thompson said of last year’s 56-20 loss at Furman. “I thought it was one of the worst coaching jobs I’ve done in preparing our guys to play football.

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Thursday
October 25, 2018
Inside Queens University's Rugby Team
EIGHT YOUNG MEN form a tight huddle on the football field at Myers Park Traditional, the elementary school that shares a border with Queens University of Charlotte. There are two hours of sun left on an August evening, and the guys are working on their scrum technique. Arms interlock shoulders, and heads face down; the men gather in a collective crouch. Sweat pours off the group, and the humidity and temperature conspire to create the summer steamer that is universally unloved in the city. As coach Frank McKinney approaches the squad, he repositions the rugby players slightly, instructing them how to leverage their upper bodies and gain an advantage over their opponents. McKinney’s rugby résumé includes roles such as head coach for Myers Park High School, assistant coach at The Citadel, and head coach of the Charlotte Tigers, a highly ranked youth all-star team.
Published in: Charlotte Magazine - Online
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Tuesday
October 23, 2018
1. My ring story: the band of gold means the world to my mother and me

My ring already means the world to me. This is why. I was born in less that ideal circumstances and was not presented with a lot of opportunities to take myself toward my goals except one, my mom. My mom is always my biggest fan and has been since day one, even though she was only 17 years old when I was born. She’s helped me through a lot, including a life-threatening illness. I was raised in Mullins, South Carolina. During the 1950s and 60s, it was a thriving town because of tobacco farming. Unfortunately, that changed and it became just another small, rural community with limited opportunities to offer its youth other than a few dead-end jobs. Through my mom’s encouragement, I became a well-rounded student-athlete in high school. I earned a four-year ROTC scholarship with the United States Marine Corps. I planned to use the scholarship to pay for my education at The Citadel, and as a means to start a career in the military. That plan for a military career changed in August of 2016 as I was starting my second year as a cadet. I learned that I had a stage four cancer growing inside my head and neck. I was told my chances for survival were slim to none. I began treatment that fall which ended shortly before Christmas. It left me a shell of my former self. My body was burned from three months of daily radiation treatments. I only weighed about 125 pounds due to the aggressive chemotherapy treatments

Published in: The Citadel News Room - Online
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Tuesday
October 23, 2018
2. My ring story: living The Citadel Code
“To revere God, love my country, and be loyal to The Citadel.” These are the first words in “The Citadel Code,” written by Gen. Charles P. Summerall. That code is one of my favorite parts of The Guidon, which is the small book freshmen receive when they arrive at The Citadel on Matriculation Day. That little book includes all of the information freshmen (or knobs as we call them) are required to know. This code has served me well during my time as a cadet. It also guided me toward cultivating a lifestyle based on honor, integrity and a desire to live a life in service to others. I come from the small town of Baxter, Georgia. There, most of the high school students start their jobs right after graduation or attend a local college. My choice to go out of state to attend The Citadel made my parents very proud. Others from my hometown were very excited for me as well. I made that choice because I wanted something different from my college experience. I longed to develop a very close group of friends; friendships that would last a lifetime forged through shared challenges and accomplishments. That is exactly what we get here at The Citadel during our four years working to attain our bands of gold.
Published in: The Citadel News Room - Online
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Tuesday
October 23, 2018
3. VMI drops the Silver Shako to The Citadel, 34-32

Neither team with the best record to show for the season, but this one is for all the bragging rights. Low and behold, it's tied at 14 to start the third, and the Bulldogs on the move. VMI Jordan Black was quick on his feet and finds a direct line for the house call. The Citadel goes up a touchdown, 21-14. But don't count the Keydets out just yet. Reece Udinski leading the charge down field, and finishes it off with a beautiful touchdown pass to Rohan Martin. A blocked extra point keeps VMI down 21-20. A costly miss. A quarterback like Black will make you pay. Again with the keeper, this time from 60 yards out. Black showing off the wheels into the end zone. The Dogs extend their lead 28-20. The Keydets hang tough and almost wrote a comeback in the final seconds, but a missed two point conversion keeps them within two, 34-32. The Citadel gets a win on the road, as VMI falls to 0-7 on the season.

Published in: WDBJ7 - Online
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Tuesday
October 23, 2018
3.1 New college rankings include several from SC; which one is the state’s best?

Clemson University ranks as the top college in South Carolina, according to a new study from personal finance website WalletHub. Of the 951 colleges included in the national study, seven S.C. colleges finished in the top 500, according to the study. The study ranked colleges based on selectivity (higher ranking for stricter admissions), cost, student-faculty ratio, campus safety and “campus experience,” according to the study. Erskine College, while it did not make the top 500, had the third-lowest student loan debt rates, according to the study. Meanwhile, The Citadel, which was ranked 473, had the fifth-highest student loan debt, according to the study. Claflin University and Columbia International University had some of the lowest returns on education investment of the 951 colleges surveyed, but CIU ranked as the 179th best college in the country. S.C. colleges that made the top 500: Clemson: 84 (16th in the South) Wofford College: 160 (35th in the South) Columbia International University: 179 Presbyterian College: 181 University of South Carolina: 218 North Greenville University: 321 The Citadel: 473 Read more here: https://www.thestate.com/news/local/education/article220429865.html#storylink=cpy

Published in: The State - Online
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Tuesday
October 23, 2018
3.1 New study ranks top 10 colleges and universities in SC

To help college-bound seniors make the most informed school choices, the personal-finance website WalletHub released its 2019 Best College and University rankings. WalletHub compared nearly 1,000 higher-education institutions in the U.S. based on 30 key measures grouped into seven categories, such as Student Selectivity, Cost & Financing and Career Outcomes. The data set ranges from student-faculty ratio to graduation rate to post-attendance median salary. Top 10 Colleges & Universities in South Carolina 1. Clemson University 2. Wofford College 3. Columbia International University 4. Presbyterian College 5. University of South Carolina 6. North Greenville University 7. The Citadel 8. Converse College 9. College of Charleston 10. University of South Carolina-Upstate

Published in: WCSC TV-5 (Charleston) - Online
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Tuesday
October 23, 2018
4. Charleston-area hires and promotions

Eric Pinto has joined Thomas & Hutton as a designer with the structural engineering group. He is based in the Mount Pleasant office. He has a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from The Citadel.

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Tuesday
October 23, 2018
5. Opportunity to weigh in on NSCC presidential search closes Friday

If you’d like to have a voice in the selection of the next president of Northeast State Community College, you have until 5:30 p.m. Friday to take online surveys.Tennessee Board of Regents member Tom Griscom of Chattanooga chaired the Presidential Search Advisory Committee and facilitated forums for finalists Bethany Flora Wednesday and Joel Welch Thursday. Welch earned his bachelor’s civil engineering degree at The Citadel, his master’s of civil engineering from the University of South Carolina and his Ph.D. in educational leadership from Clemson. He has held his current position at Forsyth since 2016. Before that, he held a variety of positions at Greenville Technical College including dean of business and technology, dean of the technical division, associate vice president of administration and dean of the engineering technical division. He also worked as an engineer before his education career.

Published in: Kingsport Times News - Online
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Tuesday
October 23, 2018
6. Democrat Johnson, Republican Smith battle for open House District 16 seat

John Johnson. Occupation: Retired after 30-plus years at AT&T. Runs small business and family farm. Education: master’s in business administration from The Citadel, Military College of South Carolina; bachelor’s degree in business administration from University of North Carolina-Wilmington. Pender High School. Career highlights: AT&T project manager overseeing large information technology projects.

Published in: Carolina Journal - Online
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Tuesday
October 23, 2018
At 63, I Threw Away My Prized Portrait of Robert E. Lee
When cadets of South Carolina’s military college, The Citadel, fired upon a Union steamer which was attempting to resupply the Federal-held Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor, the march to war quickened. When Texas voted to secede and joined six other states of the slaveholding Deep South to form the Confederate States of America, the United States Army garrison at Fort Mason was now in potentially hostile territory—a delicate position for any commander. But Lee was spared the task of navigating this uncertainty alongside his troops when he was ordered to “report in person” to Washington,
Published in: Calgary Sun - Online
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Tuesday
October 23, 2018
Eight area football players chosen for North-South all-star game
Two members of Mauldin's defense, two bound for the Southern Conference and a Mr. Football finalist were among the area players chosen for the 2018 Touchstone Energy Bowl. Rosters were announced Monday for the former North-South all-star game, scheduled for noon Dec. 15 at Brooks Stadium on the campus of Coastal Carolina University in Conway. Mauldin will be represented by outside linebacker Brendan Killough and defensive back Jalen Anderson. St. Joseph's two-way tackle Jacob Johanning, who has committed to Furman University, and Greenville offensive tackle Stephon Stokes, who has committed to The Citadel, were selected to play for the North squad.
Published in: Greenville News - Online
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Friday
October 19, 2018
1. Citadel Cadets working for the community, as part of Leadership Day

When you think of the Citadel, you might think of boots on the ground, but Wednesday, the Cadets gave that expression a new meaning. Cadets volunteered all over the Charleston area, as part of their leadership day. One of the groups, known as "The Stewards of Hampton Park," spent the morning beautifying Hampton Park. While other cadets, spent leadership day, working with children at Sea Island, Habitat for Veterans Housing and volunteering at over 40 other charitable locations. Citadel officials say cadets volunteer year-round as part of their curriculum however, leadership day, represents a unified campus working for the community. Leadership Day, initiated in 2011.

Published in: WCIV-4 (Charleston) - Online
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Friday
October 19, 2018
1. Serving our corner of South Carolina on Leadership Day
s the morning mist was still rising from Summerall Field, more than 1,000 cadets waited to board buses heading to more than 40 locations across the South Carolina Lowcountry. Their mission: learning to lead by first learning how to serve.Some of the work was hot. Some of it was dirty. But whether it was the more than 50 cadets helping build homes for veterans through…or the dozens wrestling invasive vines at The Citadel’s neighboring Hampton Park, …or lined up for review with much smaller cadets, or the many teaching children about heroes at more than 20 elementary schools around Charleston, most agree Leadership Day is one of the best days in the life of a cadet. “Many of us volunteer at another times of the year, but it is great to get out and get to know people in our community – away from campus,” said Cadet Logan Miller, Regimental Public Affairs Officer. “The volunteer work seems easy when we all do it together and know we are making someone else’s life maybe just a little bit better.” According to their teachers, Leadership Day is a memorable one for the hundreds of children who learn from the cadets too.
Published in: The Citadel News Room - Online
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Friday
October 19, 2018
1.1 The Citadel kicks off Leadership Day with day of volunteering

Cadets at The Citadel will follow a different routine Wednesday, trading their books for a day of volunteering. While cadets volunteer year-round, on Leadership Day each year learning through service learning is a unified campus-wide effort. At 7:40 a.m., operations get underway with The Citadel's new president, Gen. Glenn M. Walters, giving cadets an inspiring sendoff in Buyer Auditorium. After that, sophomore cadets lead freshmen as they depart to volunteer at more than 40 schools and community partner programs around the Lowcountry. The juniors participate in a daylong leadership ethics experience on campus. The seniors attend leadership training provided by the college’s business partners some of which include Blackbaud, Boeing, Hollings Marine Laboratory, the Medical University of South Carolina and Wells Fargo. Faculty and staff assist with Leadership Day planning and implementation, while others attend leadership diversity skills training. Walters will also spend time with 53 cadets working at a Sea Island Habitat for Humanity project for veterans on James Island, and then at James Simons Elementary school where cadets will teach students about heroism.

Published in: WCSC TV-5 (Charleston) - Online
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Friday
October 19, 2018
2. Mark May picks The Citadel to beat VMI
The Military Classic of the South is Saturday Oct. 20 when The Citadel Bulldogs play the Virginia Military Institute at VMI. The game has been played between the two Senior Military Colleges since World War II. The Citadel has owned the games in recent years, holding on to the coveted Silver Shako for eleven consecutive years, winning 15 of the last 17 matches. This year, two time Super Bowl champion and College Football Hall of Fame inductee , Mark May sides with The Citadel in the online program The Crowd’s Line College Football Show with Lou Holtz & Mark May. (Famed coach Lou Holtz seems to have predicted a different winner who will not be named.) Led by Citadel junior, Rhaei Brown, Regimental Public Affairs NCO and editor of the college’s Brigadier, cadets share their thoughts on the predictions.
Published in: The Citadel News Room - Online
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Friday
October 19, 2018
2.1 For The Citadel and VMI, the Silver Shako might mean everything this season
The coveted Silver Shako has spent much of the week on the sideline of The Citadel’s practice field, where it was in full view of the Bulldogs as they ran through their paces. “That’s how important it is to us,” coach Brent Thompson said of the Shako, the trophy that goes to the winner of the annual Military Classic of the South battle between The Citadel and VMI. “We made a special place for it in the lobby, and we’re proud of that, and we want to maintain control of it.” The Silver Shako (not “Shacko”, as one ESPN talking head put it this week) is on the line again Saturday when The Citadel plays at VMI in the 74th meeting between the military schools. And given the teams’ combined record of 1-10, it’s likely the only trophy either team will be competing for this season.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Friday
October 19, 2018
2.3 The Great ShakeOut: Learning more about earthquake impacts

When an earthquake occurs, a wave of energy pushes up through the earth. “Assessing how that energy, the shear velocity of that wave, will impact the top 100 feet of soil is allowing us to model the possible impacts that would be felt above ground here in the Charleston area should another big earthquake occur,” said Professor Simon Ghanat, Ph.D., a member of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering faculty with a specialty in seismic site response studies. “The largest earthquake in the history of the southeastern U.S. was right here in 1886 and killed more than 100 people.” Ghanat explained that Charleston is still considered an earthquake hotspot based on geological surveys. Working with him on the earthquake shear wave velocity project is Emmett Smith, who is majoring in civil and environmental engineering through The Citadel’s Evening Undergraduate Studies program. “I work for the city of Charleston and during the regular academic year take classes in the evenings at The Citadel,” Smith said. To get started Smith accessed data from several engineering companies, and then compiled it through a variety of formulas to estimate the shear wave velocity of the top 100 feet of the soil profiles. They are working to use the shear wave velocities to predict the response of soils at a variety of Charleston-area locations.

Published in: The Citadel News Room - Online
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Friday
October 19, 2018
3. Elon University inaugurates Connie Ledoux Book as its ninth president

Elon University officially installed Connie Ledoux Book as its ninth president on Thursday during a ceremony in the new Schar Center that spoke to Elon’s past and the future that lies ahead. The inauguration ceremony followed the start of Book’s tenure on March 1 and is the focal point of a multiday celebration highlighting Elon’s academic excellence, alumni engagement and continued growth. Schar Center was filled with thousands of students, faculty, staff, alumni, community leaders and delegates from a broad range of colleges and universities as Elon marked the installation of the first female president in the institution’s 129-year history.Offering Book’s introduction was retired Lt. General John W. Rosa Jr., president emeritus of The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, who in 2015 brought Book, then associate provost at Elon, to the Charleston, S.C., institution to serve as its first female provost. He called hiring Book “one of our greatest achievements,” noting that she set the gold standard for her position and had a profound impact on The Citadel during her short tenure there. Book stood out during her three years at The Citadel because of the way she grew as a leader, particularly as a person without a military background who stepped into the No. 2 position at a military college, Rosa said. As provost, she developed new academic programs including a nursing school, helped move faculty toward shared governance of the institution and expanded study abroad opportunities, he said.

Published in: elon.edu - Online
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Friday
October 19, 2018
3.1 Charleston leaders say Book helped create change for the community

At The Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina, the goal is to not stand out. . There, everyone is supposed to act the same. Cadets wear uniforms, have mandatory study hours and live in the campus barracks with a curfew all four years. But when Connie Book arrived there in 2015, she wanted to do anything but be just another community member. "She came from a background of a private school and we're a public school, so she brought a perspective about being entrepreneurial that we didn't automatically have," said Mark Bebensee, the interim provost at The Citadel. Everyone considered Book's presidency at Elon University a homecoming of sorts. She worked at Elon for 17 years, and when she was publicly announced president Oct. 9, 2017, she was greeted with familiar faces and warm hugs. But, for two and a half years, she served as provost of The Citadel, which she said was a time in her life where she grew tremendously. The role of the provost was a logical next step in her career. At Elon, she rose from a professor, department chair, an associate dean and eventually an associate provost. At The Citadel, she held the second highest position, managing all of the school's academic operations. And that responsibility presented her with opportunities for change.

Published in: Elon News - Online
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Friday
October 19, 2018
3.2 Here's Connie Book's full inaugural address

My heart is so full of thanks today in this beautiful new Schar Center, exactly as we had imagined as a gathering space. Just beautiful. ​I have a deep appreciation for each of you, for this great university and its student-centered mission. Elon University’s story is one of aspiration, of reaching, of always becoming. In 2015 I went on a professional journey of my own – an always-becoming journey – and left Elon to become the provost at The Citadel. While there, a faculty member shared the book, "Small Craft Advisory," with me. “A must-read for any transplant Charlestonian,” he told me. The autobiography is by Charleston native Louis D. Rubin, an English professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill who was considered one of the great scholars of Southern literature. Rubin loved sailing. In 1937, at age 13, he got it in his head to build a boat and sail into the dangerous confluence of the Ashley River and the Atlantic Ocean. He didn’t have much money, so he rounded up discarded wood, nails, tar, and in just a few months, crafted a sailboat. The day he tested the waters, his mother watched, hands on her head, worried about her son, but not intervening. As he courageously navigated the rough waters and guided his boat to the calmer sea, he felt an overwhelming sense of power. At 13, he had learned the valuable lesson of having an idea, a dream, grabbing hold, not letting the naysayers or his own poverty stop him. He called it his Liberating Act. He even capitalized that term in the book. A Liberating Act.

Published in: Elon News Network - Online
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Friday
October 19, 2018
4. Marine general nominated to lead Central Command

The Pentagon says President Donald Trump has nominated Marine Lt. Gen. Kenneth F. McKenzie Jr. for promotion to four-star rank and appointment as the next commander of Central Command. McKenzie currently is director of the staff that supports the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. If confirmed by the Senate, he would succeed Army Gen. Joseph Votel, who has led Central Command since March 2016. Central Command, based in Tampa, Florida, is responsible for U.S. military operations throughout the greater Middle East, including in Afghanistan, Iraq and Syria. McKenzie is a native of Birmingham, Alabama, and a graduate of the Citadel military college in South Carolina. He has commanded U.S. troops in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Published in: AccessWDUN.com - Online
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Friday
October 19, 2018
Football 2018, Game 6: The Citadel vs. VMI

The Citadel vs. VMI, to be played on Alumni Memorial Field at Foster Stadium in Lexington, Virginia, with kickoff at 1:30 pm ET on Saturday, October 20. The game will be streamed on ESPN3, and is also available via ESPN College Extra. Wade Branner will handle play-by-play, while Chip Tarkenton supplies the analysis. The contest can be heard on radio via the various affiliates of The Citadel Sports Network. WQNT-1450 AM [audio link], originating in Charleston, will be the flagship station. Luke Mauro (the new “Voice of the Bulldogs”) calls the action alongside analyst Cal McCombs. The sideline reporter will be Jay Harper.

Published in: The Sports Arsenal - Online
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Friday
October 19, 2018
RAW: The Citadel’s Brent Thompson previews VMI

The Citadel goes on the road this weekend to renew their rivalry with VMI. The Bulldogs come in at 1-4 while the Keydets sit at 0-6. Watch the full press conference with head coach Brent Thompson previewing the game.

Published in: WCSC TV-5 (Charleston) - Online
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Friday
October 19, 2018
VMI hopes Air Raid attack can outmatch The Citadel's ground game

A big game at VMI? Affirmative, sir. The Keydets (0-6, 0-5 SoCon) host The Citadel (1-4, 1-3) Saturday in the 74th Military Classic of the South. They’ll compete for The Silver Shako Trophy, a replica of a military dress hat worn by cadets at The Citadel and VMI. “I went to the Air Force Academy, and [this rivalry] is extremely similar to Air Force-Navy and Air Force-Army. I’m sure it’s similar to Army-Navy, as well,” VMI coach Scott Wachenheim said Monday. “It’s every bit as big a rivalry game as anybody else plays.” VMI passes more than any team in any NCAA division — 59 attempts per game — with its Air Raid offense. The Citadel runs the triple-option, and has totaled 70 pass attempts. If VMI could choose an opponent to defeat and snap a 23-game losing streak, which began two years ago on Oct. 15, The Citadel is it. The Keydets last captured The Silver Shako in 2002. The Bulldogs have beaten VMI 11 straight (the programs skipped a few seasons while VMI was a Big South Conference member 2003-13). The Citadel leads the series 41-30-2.

Published in: Roanoke.com - Online
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Wednesday
October 17, 2018
1The Citadel kicks off Leadership Day with day of volunteering

Cadets at The Citadel will follow a different routine Wednesday, trading their books for a day of volunteering. While cadets volunteer year-round, on Leadership Day each year learning through service learning is a unified campus-wide effort.

Published in: Live 5 WCSC - Online
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Wednesday
October 17, 2018
2Citadel coach Brent Thompson ‘haunted’ by one particular play in ETSU loss

Citadel football coach Brent Thompson admitted Tuesday to a little trouble sleeping since Saturday’s game against East Tennessee State.

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Tuesday
October 16, 2018
1. Hundreds of Cadet servant-leaders volunteering at 40+ locations Oct. 17
Medal of Honor Recipient Sgt. Kyle White kicks off event the night before Oct. 16; open to public The night before the campus community begins serving the Lowcountry for The Citadel’s Leadership Day 2018, cadets, students, faculty and staff will hear the inspiring story of Medal of Honor Recipient Sgt. Kyle J. White. Sharing his true story of servant-leadership, White will describe what happened on Nov. 9, 2007 while he was a platoon radio-telephone operator for the U.S. Army’s 173rd Airborne Brigade in Arnas, Afghanistan. After a rocket-propelled grenade knocked him unconscious, he awoke to an enemy round fragmenting near his head sending shrapnel into his face. Then he saw that one of his friends was down. (Image of Sgt. White courtesy of U.S. Army).
Published in: Citadel News Room - Online
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Tuesday
October 16, 2018
2.2 My ring story: an unexpected leader at my Dad’s formerly all-male college

I never intended to come to The Citadel when I was in high school. Before I was even born, my father had not intended to send any daughters to his alma mater, either. Cadet Ronald Crawley, '83 and Cadet Hunter Crawley, Class of 2019 Cadet Ronald Crawley, ’83 and Cadet Hunter Crawley, Class of 2019 In the 1990s, my father was one of the biggest supporters of single gender education around. But when he saw the first few women step through Lesesne Gate, everything changed. Even before I was born, my dad put my name down for a provisional appointment, and it was that provisional appointment that led me to explore The Citadel during my senior year of high school, and eventually apply to attend. Four years later, I serve as the first female Regimental Drum Major of The Citadel’s Regimental Band and Pipes as well as the President of the Citadel Women’s Rugby Club. If you had looked me in the eye in high school and told me that I would be leading a charge of fifteen women on a rugby pitch or representing my school by leading a group of over one hundred musicians on a national stage in the capital of the U.S., I would have laughed. I also would have laughed if you had told me that I would be so sentimental over a class ring.

Published in: Citadel News Room - Online
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Tuesday
October 16, 2018
3. My ring story: how the generosity of strangers helped change my life

It was spring break 2014. My family and I were on a college search adventure when we stopped at The Citadel. I knew nothing about the school, only that it was a military college. I certainly did not realize that this brief stop at The Citadel would start a life-changing transition taking me from my home in Kannapolis, North Carolina, to my new home in Charleston, South Carolina for the next four years. On September 20, 1996, I was born to Sonya Green-Miller and Vincent Miller. My mother always stressed the importance of a great education as I was growing up. She inspired me to work hard to succeed in school and instilled in me a desire to make a difference in the world some day, in my own way. I started applying to colleges at the beginning of my senior year in high school. My mother asked me about The Citadel, reminding me of our visit there. I told her that I was not considering it, thinking it was out of my reach, but she persisted in encouraging me to apply, and because they waived the application for me, I was able to do it. One week after submitting my application, I received an acceptance letter. I was thrilled because the turnaround time was so quick. I strongly felt that God wanted me there for a reason.

Published in: Citadel News Room - Online
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Tuesday
October 16, 2018
3.1 Pictures from the Citadel 2019 Ring Ceremony

Pictures from The Citadel 2018 Ring Presentation.

Published in: The Times and Democrat - Online
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Tuesday
October 16, 2018
4. Greenville Tech partners with The Citadel to offer online degree program for business students

A new partnership will allow students at Greenville Technical College to pursue a bachelor’s degree in business administration at The Citadel in Charleston. The two schools have signed an articulation agreement that allows GTC students to enroll online at The Citadel’s Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business, according to a news release. Under the agreement, students who earn an associate degree will have the opportunity to pursue a bachelor of science degree in business administration with four semesters of study. “We are pleased to offer our graduates a clear path to a bachelor’s degree from The Citadel,” said Dr. Jermaine Whirl, vice president of learning and workforce development with Greenville Technical College, in a statement. “Our mission is to transform lives through education, and this agreement allows us to partner to build on a strong academic foundation and extend the transformation that students begin with us.” The Tommy & Victoria Baker School of Business at The Citadel is accredited by The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB).

Published in: Upstate Business Journal - Online
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Tuesday
October 16, 2018
College news
Angelea Lance of Lampasas is part of the incoming class at The Citadel in Charleston, S.C.
Published in: Temply Daily Telegram - Online
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Friday
October 12, 2018
2My ring story: coming into the Corps broken did not break me

When I went to The Citadel Success Institute, a program pre-freshmen can take to get them ready for life in the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, I fell in love with the institution. Having met a group of outstanding friends already, I was set to arrive from my home in Winter Park, Florida with a four-year Navy contract, meaning my college was paid for. I was, by all accounts, the most physically and mentally prepared that I could have ever been to come to The Citadel.

Published in: The Citadel Today - Online
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Friday
October 12, 2018
3My ring story: dedicated to the brothers I lost

When I first met a Citadel alumnus during high school in my hometown of Simpsonville, South Carolina, he told me “everything you put into your ring will flow through you that first time that you put it on your finger on Ring Day.” I didn’t appreciate that statement very much then, but it made enough of an impression to stick with me over the next 6 years. This wasn’t my first time ever hearing of The Citadel, and it wasn’t the defining moment that led me to choose this bastion of antiquity as my home. I had family here.

Published in: The Citadel Today - Online
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Friday
October 12, 2018
4America’s obesity is threatening national security, according to this study

It’s well known at this point that just under 30 percent of Americans ages 17 to 24 ― the prime age to join the Army ― aren’t eligible to join.

But beyond that, almost a third of those who sit down with a recruiter to take the first steps are immediately disqualified.

Published in: Army Times - Online
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Friday
October 12, 2018
5Two finalists for Northeast president announced

Two people, one an employee of East Tennessee State University and the other working for Forsyth Technical Community College in Winston-Salem, N.C., are finalists to become the next president of Northeast State Community College.

Published in: Times News - Online
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Friday
October 12, 2018
6The Dangers of Totalitarian Planning, Past and Present

By Richard M. Ebeling, BB&T distinguished professor of ethics and free-enterprise leadership at the military college The Citadel

Liberty is a delicate idea and institution. While people say they want freedom, will fight under the banner of freedom, and sometimes even die for its preservation and advancement, determining what it actually means to be free and to live in a free society seems elusive and controversial.

Published in: The Epoch Times - Online
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Friday
October 12, 2018
7RAW: The Citadel’s Brent Thompson previews ETSU

The Citadel (1-3) play host to ETSU (5-1) on Saturday at Johnson Hagood Stadium. Watch full press conference with head coach Brent Thompson previewing the game.

Published in: WCSC Live 5 News - Online
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Friday
October 12, 2018
8The Citadel offers potent rushing attack

The term run-heavy certainly applies when it comes to The Citadel football offense.

Through four games, the Bulldogs (1-3 overall, 1-2 Southern Conference) have 255 rushing attempts to just 47 passes. Not surprising, other statistics are skewed heavily toward the run as well as the Bulldogs routinely operate out of a triple-option offense.

Published in: Times News - Online
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Friday
October 12, 2018
92018 Football, Game 5: The Citadel vs. East Tennessee State

The Citadel vs. East Tennessee State, to be played at historic Johnson Hagood Stadium, with kickoff at 2:00 pm ET on October 13, 2018.

The game will be streamed on ESPN3, and is also available via ESPN College Extra. Kevin Fitzgerald will handle play-by-play, while former Bulldogs quarterback Dominique Allen supplies the analysis. Danielle Hensley is the sideline reporter.

Published in: The Sports Arsenal - Online
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Friday
October 12, 2018
Gen. Walters first days as Citadel president to include Parents Weekend Events

Gen. Glenn M. Walters, USMC, began serving as the 20th President of The Citadel on October 8th.

A Presidential Change of Command Ceremony will occur during the Parents Weekend military review parade scheduled for 11 a.m. Saturday, October 13th on Summerall Field in the center of campus.

Published in: News 2 - Online
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Tuesday
October 9, 2018
1. McMaster appoints McQueeney to Patriots Point board

Gov. Henry McMaster has appointed W. Thomas McQueeney, a Mount Pleasant resident and insurance agent, to the Patriots Point Development Authority board of directors. McQueeney, a graduate of The Citadel, has worked as a State Farm insurance agent since 1982 and served on several boards in the area, including The Citadel board of visitors, The Citadel Foundation and the Medical University of South Carolina Children’s Hospital Development Board. “I am thankful to Gov. McMaster and elated to be a part of the amazing effort to provide a wide array of cultural upside to the community and state I love,” McQueeney said in a news release. The development authority’s board consists of nine members who each serve a term of four years. Three of the board members, including the chairman, are selected by the governor, and five members are appointed by the governor on the recommendation of the speaker of the House, Senate president pro tempore, Senate finance chairman, chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee and the adjutant general. The mayor of Mount Pleasant serves as an ex-officio member. “Our board is excited to have the addition of Tommy McQueeney,” board Chairman Ray Chandler said in the release. “He brings a wealth of development experience and is deeply rooted in the business community in Charleston and throughout the state.”

Published in: Charleston Regional Business Journal - Online
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Tuesday
October 9, 2018
2. Charleston Metro Homes Real Estate hires three new agents

Agents from Virginia to the Carolinas have signed on with a burgeoning local real estate firm. These agents have placed their licenses with Charleston Metro Homes. “The Coleman Blvd. office is delighted to welcome Tom Howell, Amanda Shannon and Drake Meeder, to our highly successful team,” said Broker/Owner Debbie Smith. Drake is originally from the upstate of South Carolina, and moved to the Charleston area in mid-2012. During his time here, he has learned what to look for when buying or selling a home and the nuances that accompany such an important life decision. When not working, he enjoys spending time with his wife and son, participating in sports, and sailing. His attentiveness to detail and goal-oriented mindset are two of Drake’s strongest attributes, while his skills in compassion and communication aid in the negotiation of real estate and representation of his clients. He holds a Master of Business Administration from The Citadel Graduate College and a Doctor of Pharmacy from the Medical University of South Carolina. Drake is available by phone (call or text) at 843-580-4433 or email at

Published in: The Moultrie News - Online
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Tuesday
October 9, 2018
3. Five reasons why students should use Merit

The Citadel uses Merit to celebrate the great things students do, such as making the dean’s list, studying abroad, participating in volunteer activities, landing an internship and more. Students receive recognition for their achievements on an online profile – a Merit page – that they can use for jobs, internships and references. So, why should you use Merit? We have compiled a few reasons. 1. Achievements can be shared with those who care about your success 2. Merit is easy to manage 3. Merit keeps collegiate accomplishments in one place 4. Merit achievements are verified by the college 5. Employers appreciate campus involvement

Published in: Citadel News Room - Online
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Tuesday
October 9, 2018
Cross country teams compete in Charleston
The St. Andrews women’s cross country team was represented by three individuals on Saturday at the Will Wilson Citadel Invitational/Charleston College Classic hosted by The Citadel at Johns Island County Park. Knights freshman Shawntez Mickens finished 56th with a time of 25:37.3. Lydia Randall finished in 64th place with a time of 27:12.4, and Kerri Paschall finished in 73rd place with a time of 37:00.5. 75 individuals competed in the race. The men’s and women’s cross country teams will travel to Hardeeville, South Carolina on Saturday, Oct. 20 to participate in the USCB Sandshark Invitational. The men run at 9:00 a.m., followed by the women at 9:45 a.m.
Published in: Laurinburg Exchange - Online
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Tuesday
October 9, 2018
Freedom’s Fletcher Abee commits to The Citadel for basketball
Freedom senior boys basketball player Fletcher Abee verbally committed over the weekend to play for The Citadel starting in the 2019-20 season. Abee, a 6-foot-2 combo guard, made his announcement on Twitter about a week after receiving the Bulldogs’ scholarship offer. He wrote: “First of all I want to thank God for giving me this opportunity and the ability to play the game of basketball. I want to thank all the coaches who have ever taken the time to work with me and who made me the player than I am today. I want to thank my teammates for always being there for me. And I also want to thank my family and loved ones for supporting me and believing in me all these years. “After much thought, I have decided to end my recruitment and commit to The Citadel to further my athletic career and my education.” Abee was named Northwestern 3A/4A Conference player of the year last season as a junior when he averaged 19.4 points, 3.4 rebounds, 5.3 assists and 1.6 steals per game, sporting a county-best 3.7 to 1 assist-to-turnover ratio in his first year running the point for the Patriots.
Published in: Morganton.com - Online
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Monday
October 8, 2018
1. Assistant commandant retires after 39 years of service to the Corps
The assistant commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. Glenn M. Walters retired Thursday after 39 years of service to the Corps. He is slated to become the 20th president of a military college in South Carolina called the Citadel, where he is an alumnus. Walters will be replaced by Gen. Gary L. Thomas, the deputy commandant, programs and resources, and former commander of the 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing. Thomas picked up his fourth star during a promotion ceremony held at the historic Marine Barracks, Washington, D.C., on Tuesday. In a video posted by the Marine Corps, Walters said he was proud of his efforts to get the MV-22 tilt rotor Osprey program back on track and leading Marines in combat. But, he said he was most proud of his work leading a Marine task force that arose in the wake of the nude photo sharing scandal known as Marines United and rocked the Corps in 2017.
Published in: Marine Corps Times - Online
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Monday
October 8, 2018
2. US spies see new threats from global rivals, and say it may be Cold War 2.0

As the intelligence community shifts its primary focus from counterterrorism to threats from Russia and China, some leaders voice a sense of deja vu and even eagerness at the challenge. "It has been a sort of reawakening of times of old, I will say," said Deputy Director Justin Poole of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, one of the 17 agencies and offices that make up the U.S. intelligence community. "It's a little more cold warrior-y." The remarks touched on themes hit a day earlier by Trump's director of national intelligence, Dan Coats, in a speech at The Citadel in South Carolina, in which he flayed China for meddling in the U.S. heartland. "China is also targeting U.S. state and local governments and officials. It is trying to exploit any divisions between federal and local levels on policy, and uses investments and other incentives to expand its influence," Coats said, without offering further details.

Published in: MSN - Online
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Monday
October 8, 2018
3. Koepper starts freshman year at The Citadel

Isaac Koepper of Waikoloa matriculated as part of The Citadel class of 2022. Freshmen enter The Citadel at a time when they can select from the most robust menu of academic programs available at the college, including the newest program, construction engineering. Majors among the most popular include business administration, mechanical engineering, biology, criminal justice and intelligence and security studies. The Citadel in Charleston, S.C., offers a classic military college education focused on leadership excellence and academic distinction. Graduates are not required to serve in the military.

Published in: Hawaii Tribune Herald - Online
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Monday
October 8, 2018
4. Mid-Morning With Aundrea

CBS interview with Regemental Commander Sarah Zorn.

Published in: CBS - Online
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Monday
October 8, 2018
4.1 81 percent of applicants to Citadel Military College of South Carolina were admitted for fall 2017

At Citadel Military College of South Carolina, 90 percent of undergraduate students are traditional students - age 24 or younger - and 89 percent are male, according to the latest disclosure from the U.S. Department of Education. The four-year public institution in Charleston enrolled 3,717 students in fall 2017, including 2,837 in undergraduate and 880 in graduate programs, data shows. 5 percent of undergraduates transferred from another college or university. 55 percent of undergraduates are residents of South Carolina, and 44 percent are residents of other states. 1 percent are citizens of foreign countries. The undergraduate student body is comprised mostly of students who identify as white (75 percent) and Black or African American (10 percent).

Published in: Palmetto Business Daily - Online
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Monday
October 8, 2018
5. Triple threat: Rev. Lisa Hawkins is a multifaceted person

Some people call the Rev. Lisa Hawkins a triple threat. She certainly is a dynamic and multifaceted individual who has spent her life taking care of others. Hawkins is not only trained to care for one’s soul but their mind and body as well. “She is very giving and has a heart of gold,” said Cheryl Roberson, the administrative assistant at Centenary United Methodist Church. Hawkins earned a Bachelor of Science degree in nursing in 1980 from Clemson University, a Master of Science in clinical psychiatric nursing in 1990 from the Medical University of South Carolina, and in answering God’s call into full-time ordained ministry, she earned a Master of Divinity from Candler School of Theology at Emory University. In 2003, Hawkins was ordained an elder in the South Conference of the United Methodist Church. She served as the first African-American female director of a Wesley Foundation in the South Carolina Conference from 2000 to 2014. She was the director/ campus minister of Charleston Wesley Foundation which serves College of Charleston, The Citadel, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston Southern University and Trident Technical College.

Published in: Hartsville Messenger - Online
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Monday
October 8, 2018
6. Ronny Dykes

Ronny Dykes, 78, of Pueblo, passed away on Oct. 4, 2018, after a brief illness. At the time of his passing, Ronny was a resident of The Citadel, Pueblo. He was born on Aug. 14, 1940, in Hobbs, N.M. He was preceded in death by his father, Johnny Porter Dykes; and mother, Lilla Belle (Rucker) Dykes; and brother, Bobby Neal Dykes. He is survived by a brother, Kenneth; two sisters, Charlotte Sammons and Charlene Dykes; and numerous nieces and nephews. Ronny worked a variety of jobs throughout his adult life and ultimately retired from the YMCA in 2007. He was a lifelong Christian who lived his faith on a daily basis. At the time of his passing, he was a member of Rocky Mountain Baptist Church. Cremation will take place at Roselawn Crematory. A memorial service will be scheduled at a later date.

Published in: The Pueblo Chieftain - Online
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Monday
October 8, 2018
6.1 NCAA roundup: BYU, Pitt stay unbeaten, plenty of close calls, The Citadel wins again

There were no upsets, but some close calls Friday night in NCAA Division I women’s volleyball — Rutgers almost broke through before losing in five to Ohio State — as teams like No. 11 Florida, Michigan State, Arkansas and Colorado all won in five. Top-ranked BYU and No. 7 Pittsburgh both won and remain the only unbeaten teams in the country. And break up The Citadel: The Bulldogs swept Chattanooga to improve to 8-8 overall and 3-2 in the Southern Conference for only the second time in history. The Citadel was 8-26 overall last season, 2-14 in the SoCon. If you’re not a Premium member, you’re missing out on the only comprehensive NCAA volleyball roundup anywhere, with all the recaps from the power-five conferences and so much more from around the nation in NCAA Division I women’s volleyball

Published in: volleyballmag.com - Online
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Monday
October 8, 2018
Bucs thump Bulldogs on homecoming
Defense has been the calling card for the East Tennessee State football team during its resurgence, and never has that been more true than Saturday. ETSU held Gardner-Webb in check all day in a 45-0 homecoming rout Saturday at Greene Stadium for its first shutout since the school brought football back four years ago. “It was very satisfying, first off, just to get a win,” ETSU coach Randy Sanders said. “The fact that we got the shutout was very nice. I’m excited for the defense.” Quay Holmes rushed for 105 yards and three touchdowns and Jacob Saylors added 101 yards and two scores for the Bucs (5-1), off to their best start since 1999. They also surpassed their win total from last seaso
Published in: Kingsport Times News - Online
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Friday
October 5, 2018
1The Citadel Latin Art and Culture Expo

10 a.m. – 2 p.m.
Saturday, Oct. 6
Mark Clark Hall, Buyer Auditorium
Free and open to the public

Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month at the Latin Art and Culture Expo on Saturday, Oct. 6 in Buyer Auditorium. The expo will include music by DJ Luigi Bravo of Latin Groove, food trucks, an art presentation by Palmetto Luna Arts, a show of traditional dress from Latin America by the Hispanic Business Association and dancing by Charleston Latin Dance. Additionally, cadets and students of The Citadel, Charleston Southern University, Trident Technical College and the College of Charleston will give a presentation titled “A Trip Around Latin America.”

Published in: The Citadel Today - Online
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Friday
October 5, 2018
2Our View: Military schools' reputations besmirched in mercy plea

”Every military person is taught, ‘do everything you can to obtain victory.’ When orders came giving you or me an assignment, it came with guidelines on how to complete the mission. Lee had no guidelines furnished. I beseech the court not to unduly punish him for a mistake made in the heat of battle.”

Those words were spoken Tuesday by Ted Andrews in defense of Lee Wimmer before his sentencing in federal court on charges he defrauded a number of investors — most of whom lived in Greenwood County and many of whom Wimmer sat with in church on Sunday mornings. Andrews is married to Wimmer’s mother.

Published in: Index-Journal
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Friday
October 5, 2018
3Pence accuses China of anti-Trump campaign

Vice President Pence on Thursday accused China of meddling in U.S. elections with the aim of hurting President Trump and the Republican Party, the latest sign of the administration taking a tough line against Beijing ahead of the November midterms.

In an address last week, Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats accused Beijing of targeting state and local government and “trying to exploit any divisions between federal and local levels on policy and us[ing] investments and other incentives to expand its influence” during a speech at military college The Citadel last week.

Published in: The Hill - Online
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Friday
October 5, 2018
4Citadel's Thompson to speak to TD Club

The Citadel football team is 10 points away from a 3-0 start in the Southern Conference. However, the Bulldogs are 1-2 in SoCon play and 1-3 on the season. Citadel head coach Brent Thompson said there is still a great opportunity awaiting his team over the rest of the conference schedule.

Published in: The Sumter Item - Online
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Friday
October 5, 2018
5Citadel set to co-host Charleston Classic

The Citadel cross country team along with College of Charleston and the Charleston County Park & Recreation Commission play host the inaugural Charleston Classic Collegiate Cross County Meet at Johns Island County Park on Saturday.

Published in: Citadel Sports - Online
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Friday
October 5, 2018
6Volleyball hits the road for pair of SoCon matches

The Citadel volleyball team will hit the road to continue conference play this weekend against Chattanooga and Samford. The two-day event will commence on Friday at 6 p.m. against Chattanooga and conclude Saturday at 8 p.m. against Samford.

Published in: Citadel Sports - Online
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Thursday
October 4, 2018
1Nine ways The Citadel encourages innovation

The Citadel is ranked among the most innovative public colleges and universities in the South. The ranking comes from the 2019 U.S. News and World Report, which also listed The Citadel as the No. 1 Public College in the South for the eighth consecutive year. To celebrate, we rounded up some of the ways the college has encouraged innovation on campus and in the community.

Published in: The Citadel Today - Online
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Thursday
October 4, 2018
2Laura Privette named 2018-19 Darlington County School District Teacher of the Year

North Hartsville Elementary School’s Laura Privette will represent Darlington County School District as Teacher of the Year for 2018-19.

Privette holds a Master of Education in School Counseling from The Citadel Graduate College. She also holds a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from Winthrop University.

Published in: SC Now - Online
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Thursday
October 4, 2018
3Milestones

The Citadel in Charleston, S.C. recently welcomed the Class of 2022. Local incoming cadet recruits include: Charleston Dodson, Dimitri Georgiadis and Andrew Parkhurst, of Henrico.

Published in: Henrico Citizen - Online
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Thursday
October 4, 2018
4Citadel Wrestling Releases 2018-19 Schedule

The Citadel wrestling program has released its schedule for the upcoming 2018-19 season. Among the Bulldogs, opponents include Southern Conference foes Chattanooga, Campbell and three-time defending regular-season champion Appalachian State.

Published in: Citadel Sports - Online
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Wednesday
October 3, 2018
1Veteran Spotlight: Sean Cleveland

Sean Cleveland retired from the Army as a professor in 2017 but was not ready to leave the classroom. He joined The Citadel’s Department of English, Fine Arts and Communications and the Center for Teaching Innovation to continue his passion of teaching literature and leadership to cadets and to help professors become even better teachers.

Published in: The Citadel Today - Online
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Wednesday
October 3, 2018
2How Tech Helps Colleges Monitor Athlete Performance

Citadel soccer player Logan Dix's eyes popped with surprise when she reviewed the data from the Bulldogs' first match of the season.

"I learned a lot," said the sophomore forward. "I learned that I ran way more than I ever thought during a match. I ran eight miles during the game, and you don't feel like you are running that much."

Published in: Athletic Business - Online
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Wednesday
October 3, 2018
3The Bad Economics of Short-Run Policies

By Dr. Richard M. Ebeling, BB&T Distinguished Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel

Bad economics can bring about or grow out of bad politics. But the question is, what are bad economics and bad politics? Unless this is clearly and correctly identified, a bad situation can be made worse, and a good situation can be turned into a bad one. So sorting this out is crucial to having a free and prosperous society.

Published in: American Institute for Economic Research - Online
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Wednesday
October 3, 2018
4Economist to speak at UNCP Thursday

Russell Sobel, a professor of Economics and Entrepreneurship at The Citadel, will speak at The University of North Carolina at Pembroke on Thursday. Sobel’s lecture, titled “Creative Destruction, Entrepreneurship and Discovery,” will begin at 3:45 p.m. at the University Center Annex. The lecture is open to the public. There will be a reception afterward.

Published in: The Robesonian - Online
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Wednesday
October 3, 2018
5'A broken man': Wimmer speaks through court documents

The juxtaposition of Lee Wimmer’s confessed fraud and the man whom his family and friends say is a loving father, devoted Christian and active community leader came as a shock to those who know him best, newly released court documents show.

The fourth male in his family to graduate from The Citadel, Wimmer’s father was a respected dentist and Army veteran who served in Vietnam. Wimmer’s mother, Joyce, is an instructor at Piedmont Technical College.

Published in: Index-Journal - Online
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Wednesday
October 3, 2018
6College Sports Journal FCS Top 25 after Week 5 – October 2, 2018

Towson easily beat The Citadel last week on the arm and legs of Tom Flacco. Flacco had 253 yards passing and two touch downs. He did just as much damage on the ground, with 185 yards and two touchdowns on just 15 carries.

Published in: The College Sports Journal - Online
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Tuesday
October 2, 2018
1Comfort Bears No Fruit

At the age of 14, Donnell Boucher was passionate about football, but when he realized that he was only going to be an average player, he revised his playbook and became passionate about what he knew he could do well.

Published in: The Citadel Today - Online
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Tuesday
October 2, 2018
2US spies see new threats from global rivals, say it could be Cold War 2.0

As the intelligence community shifts its primary focus from counterterrorism to threats from Russia and China, some leaders voice a sense of deja vu and even eagerness at the challenge.

Published in: Stars and Stripes - Online
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Tuesday
October 2, 2018
3The hidden value of a technical college degree, from associate degree to MBA

Technical and community college degrees are often the best or only available entry point into education for a large number of people either directly out of high school or later in life. Whether it is an Associate of Arts (AA), Associates of Science (AS) or an Associates of Applied Science (AAS) these degrees can be extremely valuable and cost effective.

Published in: The Citadel Today - Online
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Tuesday
October 2, 2018
4aCollege News - Oct. 2, 2018

Craig Carter of Lugoff, was among the 61 cadets named to the Citadel’s South Carolina Corps of Cadets President’s List for the 2018 spring semester. Also, the Citadel awarded gold stars to Carter, William Cole of Elgin, Frederick Galloway of Lugoff, Trace Guy of Rembert, Kody McCutcheon of Bishopville, and Blake Serpas of Lugoff.

Published in: Chronicle Independent - Online
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Tuesday
October 2, 2018
4Bulldogs Athletics taking part in NCAA, MOIC, SAAC diversity and inclusion social media campaign

The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), in partnership with the Minority Opportunities and Interests Committee (MOIC) and the national Student-Athlete Advisory Committee (SAAC) is rolling out the 2018 MOIC and SAAC Diversity and Inclusion Social Media Campaign Monday, Oct. 1 – Friday, Oct. 5.

Published in: Citadel Sports - Online
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Tuesday
October 2, 2018
5Citadel golf set to begin 2018 campaign

The Citadel Bulldogs will open their fall season tournament competing in the Sand Shark Invitational at the Oldfield Golf Club. The Bulldogs will compete in a five-team field beginning on Monday, followed by a final round on Tuesday.

Published in: Citadel Sports - Online
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Monday
October 1, 2018
1The Citadel Foundation Receives Second CASE Educational Fundraising Award

The Citadel Foundation now holds a 2018 Educational Fundraising Award in overall performance from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education. This is the second consecutive year TCF has received this award, an honor given to superior fundraising programs at educational institutions across the country.

Published in: Charleston CEO - Online
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Monday
October 1, 2018
2US intelligence agencies see new threats from global rivals, and say it may be Cold War 2.0

As the intelligence community shifts its primary focus from counterterrorism to threats from Russia and China, some leaders voice a sense of deja vu and even eagerness at the challenge. “It has been a sort of reawakening of times of old, I will say,” said Deputy Director Justin Poole of the National Geospacial-Intelligence Agency, one of the 17 agencies and offices that make up the U.S. intelligence community. “It’s a little more cold warrior-y.”

The remarks touched on themes hit a day earlier by Trump’s director of national intelligence, Dan Coats, in a speech at The Citadel in South Carolina, in which he flayed China for meddling in the U.S. heartland.

Published in: American Military News - Online
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Monday
October 1, 2018
3Bob Inglis, a Republican believer in climate change, is out to convert his party

Eight years ago, Bob Inglis ran for a seventh term in the U.S. House of Representatives and didn’t even make it out of the Republican primary. He lost by nearly 3 to 1. His estrangement from South Carolina voters ran deep, friends-gone-missing and allies-turned-enemies deep.

The chief reason Inglis was rejected by his constituents? He not only believed climate change was real but, as a solution, he proposed a tax on carbon. In a deeply conservative corner of one of the most conservative states in America, Republicans did not welcome those views.

Published in: NBC News - Online
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Monday
October 1, 2018
4Earls attending The Citadel

Jonathan Earls of Union matriculated as part of the Citadel Class of 2022. Of the incoming class of 837 new cadet recruits and students, 80 are Hispanic and 87 are women.

Published in: The Union Times - Online
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Monday
October 1, 2018
5Military Salute

The Citadel officially welcomed the Class of 2022. Among the 837 new cadet recruits were Jonathan Lineweaver of Kennesaw; Matthew Collins, Zavier Gebrayel and Jacob Pereira, all of Marietta; and Shiloh Smiles of Smyrna.

Published in: Marietta Daily Journal - Online
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Monday
October 1, 2018
6The Citadel makes Tom Flacco look elite in a 44-27 loss at Towson

Towson quarterback Tom Flacco plays his home games in Johnny Unitas Stadium. On Saturday against The Citadel, the Tigers’ senior quarterback did a fair impression of the NFL Hall of Famer.

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Monday
October 1, 2018
7Bulldogs Defeat VMI 4-3 Behind Furious Second Half Attack

For the first time since the 2016 season, The Citadel women's soccer team has won a Southern Conference game. The Bulldogs defeated rival VMI, 4-3, at Washington Light Infantry Field Sunday afternoon, marking the first win over the Keydets since 2014 and the first win at home in the series since 2004.

Published in: Citadel Sports - Online
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