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The Citadel in the News: Archive

January 2017

PUBLISH DATE STORIES
Tuesday
January 31, 2017
1. CofC president, Citadel provost issue statements regarding immigration order
President Glenn McConnell and Provost and Dean of The Citadel Connie Book, PhD., have issued statements on the immigration order issued by President Trump. President Donald Trump issued a ban on Saturday to ban more than 218 million people from the United States and to deny entry to all refugees worldwide. McConnell issued the following statement to the College of Charleston community Sunday: Dear Campus Community: On Friday, President Trump issued an executive order that bans foreign nationals from seven countries (Iraq, Iran, Syria, Libya, Somalia, Sudan and Yemen) for at least 90 days from entering the United States. In the coming days, the College will be closely monitoring how this order may affect our campus community as well as higher education in a broader sense. And we will try to keep you updated as new information becomes available. Connie Book, PhD., provost and dean of The Citadel, had this to say on Monday: ““We are highly committed to the 60 cadets and graduate college students attending The Citadel from other nations, and to our international study programs that take our students around the world to learn in other cultures. International education opportunities on and off campus are a powerful factor in the development of principled leaders.””
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV 5 (Charleston) - Online
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Tuesday
January 31, 2017
2. Cordes named to The Citadel President's List
Members of The Citadel South Carolina Corps of Cadets were recognized for earning a place on the President's List. The President's List is one of the most distinguished cadet awards presented by The Citadel. It indicates excellence in academics and military duties. The list is a combination of the Dean's List and the Commandant's Distinguished List and is composed of cadets who contribute the most to their companies while maintaining excellent military and academic records. John Cordes of Summerville was among 74 other cadets that were named to the President's List for the fall 2016 semester.
Published in: Journalscene.com - Online
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Tuesday
January 31, 2017
2.1 Breeden on Citadel president’s list
Joshua Breeden of Indian Land was one of 75 cadets named to the president’s list for the fall 2016 semester at The Citadel in Charleston. The list is a combination of the dean’s list and the commandant’s distinguished list and is composed of cadets who contribute the most to their companies, while maintaining excellent military and academic records.
Published in: CarolinaGatewayOnline.com - Online
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Tuesday
January 31, 2017
3. The Economic Nationalism of Donald Trump
Donald Trump has hardly taken his hand off the Bible upon which he took the presidential oath to preserve, protect and defend the U.S. Constitution, and he has already radically and rapidly begun to transform the direction of the American government. Taking up (at least metaphorically) Barack Obama’s pen, he has signed a series of executive orders. Several of them, I would suggest, demarcate the underlying premises and principles guiding much of his policy decision-making: political and economic nationalism. One of these executive orders declared that the United States was formally withdrawing from any intention of participating in the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), which had the stated purpose of reducing trade barriers among 12 countries, while specifying a variety of requirements for the members nations to fulfill as part of the agreement. Another executive order called for expediting the approval and construction of the Keystone and Dakota Access Pipelines, to enable the transportation of crude oil from Canada to refinery facilities closer to the Gulf coast. Still another one authorized the building of his promised “Wall” along the U.S.-Mexican border, along with additional personal to be hired for border security, and eliminating federal money to “sanctuary cities” protecting illegal immigrants. And most recently, there has been his executive order that places a temporary hold on refugees arriving in the United States from a series of seven countries declared to be security risks to the safety of the American citizenry. This latest executive order has set off an especial firestorm of controversy and opposition.
Published in: The Future of Freedom Foundation - Online
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Tuesday
January 31, 2017
3.1 Lecture At Hilton On Trump Administration
THE second annual Joan Thompson Memorial Freedom Lecture will be given by Richard Ebelling on February 21 at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel. #Dr Ebelling is the BB & T professor of ethics and free enterprise leadership at the Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina. His topic will be “The Zero-Sum World of Donald Trump”. #He will discuss what the new Trump administration could mean for America and the rest of the world. “Trump’s world view is a mixture of old and new ideas that may threaten the global trend toward freedom and prosperity,” is the theme of his talk. #Dr Ebeling, said the Nassau Institute, “was a favourite economist and lecturer of our founding president Joan Thompson, so it is fitting that he is the speaker for the Joan Thompson Memorial Freedom Lecture in her honour.” #Dr Ebeling’s talk will follow the Institute’s 7pm dinner.
Published in: The Tribune - Online
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Tuesday
January 31, 2017
Citadel football most-watched team in Southern Conference
Both in-person and on the web, The Citadel was the most-watched football team in the Southern Conference last season. For five games at Johnson Hagood Stadium in 2016, the 10-2 Bulldogs averaged 12,986 fans, tops in the SoCon and good for 17th in the nation among FCS schools. And on ESPN3, which streams SoCon games on the web, The Citadel attracted more viewers than any other SoCon program, the school said. The Citadel's official home attendance figures include the Oct. 6 game at North Greenville, which was moved due to Hurricane Matthew and drew a North Greenville-record 5,435 fans. With that game included, The Citadel averaged 11,727 fans for home games, still good for first in the SoCon and 20th in FCS. The Bulldogs' five games at Johnson Hagood ranged from a season-high of 15,015 against Samford to 10,336 for an FCS playoff game against Wofford. Mercer (11,237) and Western Carolina (10,465) were the only other SoCon teams to average better than 10,000 fans per game in 2016.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Monday
January 30, 2017
1. Most distinguished cadets named to fall 2016 President's List
The President's List is one of the most distinguished cadet awards presented by The Citadel. It indicates excellence in academics and military duties. The list is a combination of the Dean's List and the Commandant's Distinguished List and is composed of cadets who contribute the most to their companies while maintaining excellent military and academic records. Click the article to view the President's List.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Monday
January 30, 2017
2. Cadets taking top honors in the fall of 2016: Gold Stars
Gold Stars are awarded to cadets who have earned a grade point ratio of 3.7 or higher for the work accomplished in the fall semester of 2016. Click the link to view the members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets who received the honor.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Monday
January 30, 2017
3. Dean's List cadets and students announced for fall of 2016
Dean's List is a recognition given to cadets and students who are registered for 12 or more semester hours and whose grade point average is 3.20 or higher, with no grade of I (Incomplete) and no grade below C for work in a semester. In the case of cadets, the medal is worn on the cadet uniform during the following semester. Click the link to see the Dean's List recipients.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Monday
January 30, 2017
4. Joshua Dvorak of Cambridge recently marched in the 2017 Presidential Inaugural Parade
Joshua Dvorak of Cambridge recently marched in the 2017 Presidential Inaugural Parade as part of The Citadel Regimental Band and Pipes and Color Guard. The 2017 Presidential Inaugural Parade represents the seventh inaugural parade in which The Citadel Regimental Band and Pipes, Color Guard and/or Summerall Guard have been selected to participate. They jointly represented The Citadel together in the 1953 and 1985 inaugural parades. The Summerall Guard is a silent precision drill platoon that was formed at The Citadel 85 years ago. The platoon's purpose is to exemplify, through a series of movements based on the old close order drill, the exactness and thoroughness with which a cadet at The Citadel is trained. About 100 cadets make up The Citadel Regimental Band and Pipes, which is of two entities - the Regimental Band, formed in 1907, is made up of about 70 cadet musicians recruited from around the nation and the world, and The Pipe Band, which started in 1955, is composed of a drum major and about 30 pipers and drummers, and is highly competitive at Grades IV and V at Highland Games across the United States.
Published in: The Star Democrat
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Monday
January 30, 2017
5. McCabe takes over Susquehanna's Distribution Operations Team
Navy Supply Corps Lt. Cmdr. Matthew W. McCabe assumed command as DLA Distribution's Distribution Operations Team-Susquehanna commander in a Jan. 7 ceremony. McCabe took over command from Navy Cmdr. Greg Eaton Commanding Officer, who will next serve as commander of DLA-Logistic Assistance Team Philadelphia. A native of Bedford, Va., McCabe is a 1992 graduate of The Citadel in Charleston, S.C., with a Bachelor Degree in Business. He earned his Master of Business Administration in 2002 from Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Va. McCabe then affiliated with the Reserves and was commissioned as an ensign in the Supply Corps through the US Navy's Direct Commission Officer program in 2002. McCabe's assignments include: administration officer for Amphibious Construction Battalion TWO (PHIBCB-2); executive officer for Fleet and Industrial Supply Center Norfolk Detachment 207; supply officer (S4) for Naval Mobile Construction Battalion TWENTY-THREE (NMCB-23); operations officer for Commander, Naval Air Force U.S. Atlantic Fleet Supply; and assistant plans officer (N51) for Navy Supply Systems Command Global Logistics Support. His command tours have included officer-in-charge of Navy Supply Systems Command Fleet Logistics Center Pearl Harbor Detachment Alpha, and officer-in-charge of Navy Supply Systems Command Fleet Logistics Center Bahrain Detachment Bravo.
Published in: Defense Logistics Agency
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Monday
January 30, 2017
6. Charleston-area hires and promotions
Engineering - Chad Smith has joined Mount Pleasant-based SeamonWhiteside as an engineer-in-training. He has a bachelor's degree in civil engineering from The Citadel.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
January 30, 2017
7. Citadel baseball retools with transfers for Fred Jordan's 26th season
After watching his team struggle to a 17-42 record last season - the worst in his 25 seasons as The Citadel's baseball coach - Fred Jordan vowed to "retool" his program. Jordan wasn't kidding, as he brought in an unprecedented (for The Citadel) four transfer players for this season. That includes junior-college standout Jonathan Sabo, a two-time All-Lowcountry player of the year during his career at West Ashley High School. The Bulldogs' three graduate-student transfers are catcher Joe Sabatini from Baylor, right-handed pitcher Aaron Lesiak from Presbyterian and left-handed pitcher Marlin Morris, who's pitched at USC Sumter and College of Charleston. "I just felt like we needed more maturity in the back end of our bullpen," Jordan said Friday as practice opened at Riley Park. "And in reality, that's the new wave of recruiting. Everyone is doing it in all sports. I made the statement last year that we're going to change some things, and that's one of the things we changed. "I'm very excited about it. Guys who are 21 or 22 and have had success in college, they step into our clubhouse and demand respect, and that's what they've done." Sabatini, a grandson of former Air Force football coach Fisher DeBerry, batted .210 in 62 games over four seasons at Baylor, where he qualified six times for the Big 12 Commissioner's Honor Roll.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
January 30, 2017
8. For The Citadel, winning opens recruiting doors
Lineman Jon Barrett Lewis had long been verbally committed to Western Carolina when he attended the Catamounts' football game against The Citadel last October. The Bulldogs routed WCU, 37-14, that day and went on to go undefeated in the Southern Conference, winning a second straight league title. It's no coincidence that Lewis, a 6-2, 296-pounder from Lenoir, N.C., who was named to North Carolina's Shrine Bowl team, is now committed to The Citadel. "Definitely," Lewis said when asked if the Bulldogs' recent success played a role in his decision. "I had been committed to Western Carolina for a long time, so it took me a while to think about it. But when I thought about it, the opportunity at The Citadel overwhelmed the opportunity at Western Carolina." As Citadel coach Brent Thompson and his assistants zero in on National Signing Day on Wednesday, the Bulldogs' success over the last two seasons - records of 10-2 and 9-4, two FCS playoff berths, two SoCon titles and a win over South Carolina - seems to have boosted recruiting efforts. "I think it's made a huge difference for us," Thompson said from the recruiting road last week. "We find ourselves going up against more schools than we used to. We always try to get the best players we can, but I think this year we are trying to capitalize on what we've done and get a different caliber of player for us.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
January 30, 2017
9. Stratford's Rivers leads Mercer past The Citadel
Demetre Rivers had 23 points to lead Mercer to its 12th straight victory over The Citadel as the Bears pulled away in the second half for an 82-66 win on Saturday. Stephon Jelks had a season-best 14 rebounds while dishing out a career-high eight assists for Mercer (10-12, 4-5 Southern Conference). Rivers hit 7 of 10 from the floor. Ria'n Holland added 17 points and Jordan Strawberry hit 3 of 4 from distance to total 15 points for Mercer. The Citadel (9-14, 2-8) jumped out to an early lead but Mercer led 33-30 at the break. The Bulldogs' Quayson Williams drilled a 3 to tie at 41 with 15:31 left in the game. Ryan Johnson answered with a jumper and Holland nailed a trey as Mercer pulled away to lead 63-50 following a Strawberry 3-point jumper with 8:01 left. Ezekiel Balogun led The Citadel with 16 points.
Published in: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Friday
January 27, 2017
1. The accidental opera star: 'A lot of the purists, they don't believe my story'
Opera is often called the most irrational art form. Seen through that lens, bass singer Morris Robinson's unlikely career path makes wonderful sense. At a young age, from a family and culture that reveres singing, Robinson aspired to be a drummer instead. He ignored college music scholarships and conservatory programs for a free-ride to play football at a military college. Afterward, bypassing all thought of studying music at grad school, he worked for a Fortune 500 company in regional sales of data storage... To meet academic requirements, he traded band to go out for football but still needed to sing in the chorus. Though offered musical scholarships to universities, he lunged at a full football ride that came from the Citadel, the military college in South Carolina. He competed well enough against bigger players to be a three-time All American at the guard position, handing out and taking physical beatings. But he wasn't NFL-size big, and football came to an end. In college as a freshman he had sung to entertain older classmates, and he cofounded and directed the school gospel choir. His Citadel degree was in English and came with a work ethic and worldly ambitions, but still no ideas about a life in music. "I didn't see a viable opportunity, down where I was from, how music might work for me, a future," Robinson said.
Published in: Los Angeles Times
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Friday
January 27, 2017
2. Clayton's McIver took part in Trump's inaugural parade
In the first few hours of his presidency, Donald Trump stood and watched the parade in his honor, at one point saluting Clayton High School graduate Patrick McIver as he marched past. McIver marched in the president's inaugural parade as part of The Citadel's Summerall Guards, a 61-member drill team founded 85 years ago at the South Carolina military college. The Summerall Guards followed the Citadel's Pipe Band along the parade's two-mile route from the U.S. Capitol to the White House. Waiting for them at the end was the new president. "It was a great experience, something I don't think I'll ever get to do again," McIver said. "When we walked to the viewing area, everybody looks left and there's the president saluting, and I looked him in the eye. That was pretty awesome." McIver said the trip up Interstate 95 was his first to Washington, D.C., though he didn't much time for sightseeing. The group visited Arlington National Cemetery, and on the day of the inauguration, they walked the streets along the parade route. That walk offered McIver and the other cadets a glimpse into the range of emotions Americans felt about their new president. "We saw a mixture of people screaming for joy and a mixture of protests," McIver said. "There was kind of a smaller crowd along the route because of the riots and stuff forcing people to leave. Once we got to the view stand, it was nice to see the amount of people. And there were a lot of bright lights." The Summerall Guards carry rifles and typically perform a drill routine where that rifle moves from hand to hand and shoulder to shoulder. The inauguration called for a more subdued performance, McIver said, with the Guards instructed not to make any sudden movements with the rifles.
Published in: The News & Observer
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Friday
January 27, 2017
3. Local Cadet participates in Trump Presidential Inaugural Parade
Citadel Cadet Cory Nathan Taylor of Williamston was among cadets in the Citadel Summerall Guards participating in the Presidential Inauguration Parade held in Washington Jan. 20. The Summerall Guards are a silent precision drill platoon from The Citadel. According to The Citadel website, they demonstrate The Citadel ideals of honor, integrity, loyalty, leadership, self-discipline and patriotism. Consisting of 61 members, the Summerall Guards are first-class (senior) cadets who go through a rigorous physical training and initiation process and are chosen for their physical stamina and drill proficiency. Membership is considered a high honor at the military college. The platoon's purpose is to exemplify, through a unique series of movements based on the old German close order drill, the exactness and thoroughness with which a cadet is trained. The drill, which has never been written down, is performed to a silent count. Each year's Guards take responsibility for teaching the next year's unit the precise drill. Created in 1932, this unit has performed nationally at Disney World, the Cherry Blossom Festival in Washington, D.C., Mardi Gras in New Orleans and St. Patrick's Day in Savannah, Ga. The platoon is named for General Charles P. Summerall, former Chief of Staff of the U.S. Army and Citadel president from 1931 until 1953. This was their fifth appearance at a presidential inaugural parade. In 2005, the Summerall Guards made their fourth appearance at the George Bush presidential inaugural parade. The Guards also participated in the inaugurations of Ronald Reagan in 1985 and George H.W. Bush in 1989 and Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1953.
Published in: The Journal
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Friday
January 27, 2017
4. Former Milliken CEO hired by private equity firm
Former Milliken & Co. CEO Joseph Salley has landed at a New York-based private equity firm. Arsenal Capital Partners added Salley to its specialty industrials group as an operating partner. Arsenal Capital invests in middle market specialty industrials and health care companies. According to Terry Mullen, co-founder and partner with Arsenal, the company "specializes in building high-growth, technology-rich middle market companies." "Joe's addition augments our industrials domain and technical expertise and positions us to continue our long-term leadership in the industry," Mullen said, in a news release. Salley worked for Milliken & Co. for 20 years and served as the company's president and CEO since 2008. He earned a bachelor's degree in chemistry from The Citadel and a master's and Ph.D. in chemical engineering from Stanford University. "Joe is an exceptional CEO who brings the full spectrum of leadership and managerial capabilities and experiences to his operating partner role at Arsenal," said John Televantos, partner and co-head of Arsenal's specialty industrials group, in the release.
Published in: GSA Business Report
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Friday
January 27, 2017
5. The Citadel Concludes Road Trip Saturday
The Citadel men's basketball team concludes a three-game road swing on Saturday when they face Mercer in Macon, Georgia. The Bulldogs will be well rested heading into the contest following a week-long break from action, having last played on Jan. 21 at UNCG. The SoCon-leading Spartans earned the 81-72 win despite 26 points from Preston Parks. Zane Najdawi also had a strong outing, scoring 16 points and grabbing seven rebounds in the loss. Mercer is currently 9-12 this season with a 5-4 record on its home court. The Bears are seventh in the SoCon standings, one spot ahead of The Citadel, with wins over VMI, Samford and Western Carolina. Tip off for Saturday's game inside Hawkins Arena is set for 4:30 p.m. The game will be broadcast on ESPN3 with live stats available at CitadelSports.com.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Friday
January 27, 2017
6. The Citadel Takes Off to Face VMI
The Citadel's track and field teams head to Lexington, Virginia, for a dual against VMI on Saturday. Last weekend the Bulldogs' men's and women's track and field teams attended the Wake Forest Invitational to kick off the season. Freshman Jessy Page broke The Citadel's freshman record in the 20-lb. weight throw with an impressive toss of 47 feet, 2.25 inches to earn the all-time No. 4 spot. The men's squad had a noteworthy day in the 4x400-meter relay, which included Josiah Johnson, Devin Singleton, Stephan Kulick, and Samuel Santiago, by finishing second overall in 3 minutes, 26 seconds. Senior Malik Diggs also made his mark by earning the No. 2 spot in program history in the 60-meter hurdle event in with a third overall finish at 8.36. Senior Caillian Colquitt finished fifth in the 5k in 19:06 and sophomore Grace Jenkins finished eighth with a time of 19:43 for the women's team. Saturday's meet is scheduled to begin at 10 a.m. and live stats will be available at CitadelSports.com.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Friday
January 27, 2017
7. Bulldogs Host Ranked Foes This Weekend
The Citadel's rifle team hosts two matches this weekend, welcoming two top-20 foes to Charleston. The Bulldogs are set to host No. 4 Air Force, No. 20 North Georgia, VMI and Wofford on Saturday and will also compete against Air Force on Sunday. "We are excited about this weekend's competition," head coach William Smith said. "We have two top-20 teams coming to our place, plus going against VMI always brings out the competitive side of our team. I am looking for top scores from our team." The Citadel co-ed team won its third straight match last weekend by scoring 4,501 points to defeat Georgia Southern and Clemson. The Bulldogs have been led this season by sophomore Allison Auten, who won the air rifle with a season-best 584 points that is tied for the third-highest score in the SoCon this season, and junior Colton Poole, who won his third consecutive smallbore competition last weekend. Junior Morgan Long also registered a season-high score of 558 points while finishing second in smallbore last week. Senior Richie Parra claimed seventh in air rifle, and freshman Alexander McAlear posted top-10 finishes in both air rifle and smallbore.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Thursday
January 26, 2017
1. Three major events combine for one high-impact leadership learning weekend
Three of the most important events occurring each spring at The Citadel will come together to comprise one momentous weekend in 2017. The 10th Annual Principled Leadership Symposium, Corps Day, and Recognition Day for The Citadel Class of 2020 will all take place March 16 – 19. 10th Annual Principled Leadership Symposium: Resilience in a Changing World The South Carolina Corps of cadets, student delegates from the service academies, senior military and local colleges, faculty, staff, alumni and other special guests will gather to attend the symposium. It will take place Thurs., March 16 and Fri., March 17. The 2017 theme is “Resilience in a Changing World.” Corps Day Weekend: 174th birthday of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets Corps Day Weekend is the annual recognition of the beginning of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. It is normally held in conjunction with the Principled Leadership Symposium and is one of the most highly attended events at the college. It begins March 16 with a lunchtime birthday celebration during which the President of The Citadel, Lt. Gen. John W. Rosa will speak and a cake presentation will be held (not open to the public). Recognition Day events "Recognition Day marks the end of a freshman’s very challenging training period before officially being recognized as a cadet in the Corps. It is a pivotal and unforgettable moment in the college career of a cadet at The Citadel,” said South Carolina Corps of Cadets Regimental Commander Kevin MacDonald.
Published in: Citadel Newsroom - Online
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Thursday
January 26, 2017
2. WATCH LIVE NOW (Note: was live on Wed.): Meet the Next Space Station Crew
Today NASA will webcast the annual Day of Remembrance Ceremony at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, honoring the heroes who died in the Apollo 1 fire, the Columbia disaster and the Challenger disaster. You can watch the webcast in the window below, courtesy of NASA TV. NASA will honor members of the NASA family, including the crews of Apollo 1 and space shuttles Challenger and Columbia, who lost their lives while furthering the cause of exploration and discovery during the agency's annual Day of Remembrance on Tuesday, Jan. 31. On the Day of Remembrance, NASA Acting Administrator Robert Lightfoot, and other agency senior officials, will hold an observance and wreath-laying at Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia starting at 11 a.m. EST.
Published in: Space.com
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Thursday
January 26, 2017
3. MESSAGE FIVE - COURTESY OF NASA: GET TO KNOW COL. BRESNIK AND THE NEXT SPACE STATION CREW
Please scroll down to the bottom of the page to view the most recent message.
Published in: The Citadel Space Star Cadet Blog
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Thursday
January 26, 2017
4. AM790 - This Morning
The contract said to be worth more than a half a billion dollars weekend coming up for college air rifle at The Citadel in South Carolina there hosting the southeastern air rifle conference matt tcu however still ranked number one. Every time we Americans get a new president changes come to government properties. Most famously they redecorate some room in the white house but they also had to change up the stuff online like in White House.
Broadcast on: KNST-AM
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Thursday
January 26, 2017
5. Clemson receives $1.4 million to develop technology to eliminate traffic congest
Clemson University Clemson University received $1.4 million in startup financing from the U.S. Department of Transportation for the development of a new Center for Connected Multimodal Mobility that will practically make it possible to eliminate car accidents and travel busy roads without stopping for a traffic light, The Newsstand reports. Mashrur Ronnie Chowdhury, a civil engineering professor who is leading the new center, says it could happen in as little as 10 years. Chowdhury will work with researchers from Clemson, Benedict College, The Citadel, South Carolina State University, and the University of South Carolina TO find new ways to create wireless technology for all cars and traffic signals in order to make congestion on some of the busiest roads a thing of the past, wspa.com reports. He expects that all vehicles will soon be able to communicate wirelessly with each other, and with infrastructure and pedestrians. Each traffic signal will have a highly intelligent brain, a controller, that is controlling the light in real time based on existing and predicted vehicular and pedestrian demand, he told The Newsstand. In real time, signal timing at each intersection will be optimized and coordinated to improve corridor-wide traffic flow.
Published in: Equipment World
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Wednesday
January 25, 2017
1. Upcoming news from The Citadel - February
Black History Month: celebrating 50 years of African American cadets in the Corps - The Citadel is celebrating the 50th anniversary of African American cadets in the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. In 1966, Charles D. Foster became the first African American cadet to matriculate at the college and graduate in 1970 with a degree in business administration. In large part, because of the courage and tenacity of Foster and those who followed the path he paved, the college's culture evolved to become one where diversity is embraced and strategically supported. New feature for February on The Citadel's Celebrating Diversity Milestones - interactive timeline featuring the history of African Americans at The Citadel. Other events include: Annual Black History Month Bazaar and Quiz Bowl, The Zucker Family School of Education celebrates Black History Month with Authors in Schools Initiative, 50 Years of African American Experience at The Citadel - panels, Wreath Laying Ceremony and Citadel Parade in Honor of Charles D. Foster, Storm The Citadel and Charleston STEM Festival 2017, The Zucker Family School of Education's Wall of Fame Celebration, Citadel Graduate College to host spring open house, South Carolina Small Business Development Center and February feature from The Citadel Experts Guide.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Wednesday
January 25, 2017
2. Freitag to take over as Will County chief of staff
Will County board member Ragan Freitag, R-Wilmington said she will give up her elected seat to become the board's chief of staff March 1. Freitag will replace Bruce Friefeld, who served the county for 28 years before retiring at the end of December. Freitag, a practicing attorney, who was just re-elected to a two-year term in District 6, said she accepted the job on Monday, ending days of speculation after it was learned that County Board Speaker Jim Moustis, R-Frankfort Township, offered her the job. When Moustis made the offer in mid-December, she said she was "shocked." On Tuesday, she said she did not apply for the job, nor was it required to be posted. It was solely up to Moustis to fill. Freitag also squashed reports from her Democratic opponent Joe VanDuyne that she knew about the pending job offer before the November election. "I honestly did not know about it until after the election," said Freitag, a practicing attorney with the Joliet law firm of Kavanagh, Grumley and Gorbold. "I was still setting trial dates in December." She said she took time over the holidays to consider the new position, and its impact on her clients, constituents and family.
Published in: Chicago Tribune
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Wednesday
January 25, 2017
3. James Mill, David Ricardo and the Triumph of Free Trade
At a time when a president of the United States and some other countries around the world are turning away from the economics of free trade, it is, perhaps, worth remembering the gains from freedom of trade and to recall one of classical liberalism's great triumphs in the nineteenth century, especially in Great Britain: the repeal of trade protectionism and the advent of an era of free trade. During the Great Britain's long wars with France, between 1791 and 1815, both countries imposed trade barriers against the other and attempted to enforce naval blockades to prevent each from trading with other nations. In Britain a debate soon arose as to whether or not the British lost much from these respective trade barriers and blockades, since British farmers and manufacturers were more productive and cost-efficient than many of the countries with which they had previously traded. The response to this was given by a number of "political economists," especially James Mill (the father of John Stuart Mill) and David Ricardo. They explained what today is called the theory of comparative advantage. An individual or a nation may be significantly more cost-efficient and productive than its potential trading partners, but invariably it is likely to be comparatively most or more efficient at some things relative to others. That individual or nation will be far better off specializing in what they are most efficient and buy from their less efficient trading partners a variety of other goods so to free up their time, resources and labor to focus on what they are, in comparison, best at.
Published in: The Future of Freedom Foundation - Online
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Wednesday
January 25, 2017
4. Malthus Predicted Penury on the Eve of Plenty
Those of us fortunate enough to have been born in the so-called Western World (Europe and North America) rarely appreciate the historical uniqueness of our material and cultural well-being compared, not only to many around the globe today, but to westerners just a handful of generations ago. A mere 200 years ago, in 1820, the world population numbered only around 1.1 billion people. About 95 percent of that number lived in poverty, with 85 percent existing in "extreme poverty." By 2015, the world population had increased to over 7 billion, but less than 10 percent lived in poverty. Indeed, over the last quarter of a century, demographers calculate that every day there are 137,000 fewer people around the world living in extreme poverty. This escape from poverty originated in Western Europe in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries with the coming of the Industrial Revolution and the freeing of men and markets from the heavy-handed regulations and commercial restrictions of government. Especially since the mid-twentieth century, that liberation from poverty has been slowly but surely enveloping more of the people in the so-called "developing countries." Richard M. Ebeling is BB&T Distinguished Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina.
Published in: The Rational Argumentator
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Wednesday
January 25, 2017
5. I2i Population Health Appoints Chief Financial Officer to Support Growth and Strategic Planning
i2i Population Health, a national leader in population health management (PHM) technology, has named Cary McNamara as chief financial officer. "Cary's broad financial background is an excellent fit for i2i," says Justin Neece, president. "He's that rare individual who possesses both the strategic planning and day-to-day financial operations skills we need to take the company to the next level of growth." McNamara will oversee the company's strategic financial management efforts, as well as pricing, contracting, legal matters, compliance, business risk assessment, external reporting, audit, and tax. He joins i2i from EDO Interactive, a provider of card-linked offers, where he served as interim chief financial officer. He served in the same capacity at Agilum Healthcare Intelligence, a health technology company, prior to its sale to Sentry Data Systems in 2015. Prior to joining Agilum, Mr. McNamara was an associate at Court Square Capital, a $3 billion middle-market private equity firm, where he focused on the firm's healthcare portfolio. Before joining Court Square, he was at Goldman, Sachs & Co. where he worked in the firm's healthcare investment banking group. He is a graduate of The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, and recently received his Master of Accountancy from Belmont University.
Published in: KTEX-TV North Texas and multiple media outlets across the country
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Wednesday
January 25, 2017
6. Charleston-area hires and promotions
Real estate - Cameron Griffin has joined Caldwell Commercial as an associate broker. He has bachelor's degree from the University of South Carolina and a master's degree in business administration from The Citadel.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Wednesday
January 25, 2017
7a. Citadel football loses two more players
The Citadel has lost two more starting players from last year's Southern Conference championship football team, a school official confirmed Monday. Slotback Reggie Williams, the Bulldogs' leading returning rusher, and defensive end Travis Johnson are no longer enrolled in the military school. Privacy laws prevent the school from providing any further information, according to Derek Satterfield, assistant athletic director for athletic communications. "Our expectations at The Citadel are clear," coach Brent Thompson said in a statement. "We have high standards for everyone in our program and hold everyone accountable for their decisions. I am excited about our 2017 team and pleased with the many cadet-athletes in our program who represent The Citadel in a positive manner on and off the field." Williams, a rising senior from Palm Bay, Fla., started 11 games at slotback last season for the 10-2 Bulldogs, rushing for 694 yards and four touchdowns. He was the Bulldogs' No. 2 rusher behind senior fullback Tyler Renew, who ran for 1,096 yards and four TDs in his final college season.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Wednesday
January 25, 2017
7b. Williams becomes latest to transfer from The Citadel
The Citadel confirmed Monday A-Back Reggie Williams is transferring out of the Bulldogs football program. The junior becomes the latest to leave the team as Travis Johnson and Kevin Graham have also left. Bulldogs head coach Brent Thompson released the following statement regarding the offseason departures: "Our expectations at The Citadel are clear. We have high standards for everyone in our program and hold everyone accountable for their decisions. I am excited about our 2017 team and pleased with the many cadet-athletes in our program who represent The Citadel in a positive manner on and off the field." Williams was second on the team in rushing in 2016 with 694 yards and four touchdowns.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV 5 (Charleston) - Online
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Wednesday
January 25, 2017
8. Roane State to celebrate Nesbit's 25 years of coaching
Roane State Community College is celebrating 25 years with Men's Basketball Head Coach Randy Nesbit on Saturday, January 28, when the Roane State Raiders take on Dyersburg. The game is at 4 p.m., with a reception to follow. A 1980 graduate of The Citadel, Nesbit began his Roane State coaching career in the fall of 1992 after serving as assistant to Citadel's Head Coach Les Robinson. A three-year starting point guard on Robinson-coached basketball teams, Nesbit was a key member of The Citadel's 1979 team that won 20 games, a first for the college. Captain of the 1980 team, Nesbit was selected to the 1979 and 1980 All-Southern Conference second team and paced the 1978 team with a 54.0 field goal percentage and a 92.5 free throw percentage in 1980, which was the second-best in the National Collegiate Athletic Association, or NCAA. He tied a school mark with 13 assists in a 1979 game against Marshall, and established the school's season record of 120 dishes that season, holding the school's record for most career assists (324). Nesbit played only three years after having transferred from Gulf Coast Community College. He later served as an assistant to Robinson, and coached the Bulldogs from 1986-92, at which time he became Roane State's head basketball coach. He was inducted into the Citadel's Hall of Fame in 2011.
Published in: Oak Ridge Today - Online
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Wednesday
January 25, 2017
9. Colonel George P. Shamer II Obituary
colonel George P. Shamer II, USAF (Retired), 69, of Woodbridge, Virginia, passed away peacefully in his home on January, 18, 2017, after a long and courageous battle with Alzheimer's Disease. George was born in Bellflower, California on July 8, 1947, to Captain Preston Shamer and his wife, Elizabeth. He received his commission through ROTC at The Citadel, graduating with a bachelor of science in business administration, and he later earned a master of arts in psychology from the University of Northern Colorado. George had a long and distinguished career in the United States Air Force as a nuclear and missile operations officer with assignments throughout the United States culminating in retirement from the Pentagon. His many military decorations include: the Legion of Merit, the Meritorious Service Medal, the Air Force Commendation Medal, the Combat Readiness Medal, and the National Defense Medal. In his post-Air Force career, George was a senior analyst at Technology Research Corporation and a real estate agent with Long & Foster.
Published in: InsideNova.com
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Monday
January 23, 2017
1a. The Citadel Regimental Band and Pipes, Summerall Guard and Color Guard participate in Presidential Inaugural Parade
The 2017 Presidential Inaugural Parade represents the seventh time since 1953 that Citadel cadets have been selected to participate in this historic American tradition. The Citadel Regimental Band and Pipes, the Summerall Guards, and the college's color guard will participate in the parade on Jan. 20, 2017, in Washington, D.C., which directly follows the swearing in of President-elect Donald Trump.
Published in: WLTX-TV Columbia
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Monday
January 23, 2017
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Published in: WCBD-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
January 23, 2017
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Published in: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
January 23, 2017
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Published in: WIS-TV Columbia, SC
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Monday
January 23, 2017
2a. Citadel's Summerall Guard presents arms to President Trump
Sitting on a bus outside of the Pentagon, members of The Citadel's Summerall Guard talked about what they learned in school back in South Carolina to calm their nerves before presenting arms to the 45th President of the United States. 1st Sergeant Josh Scaife was held speechless trying to describe his emotions before leading the Citadel color guard and band in President Trump's inaugural parade Friday. "It's always an honor to just watch such an event such as this but to be able to perform here it... it just magnifies the event so much," he said. Under the pressure of the event's magnitude, Scaife said he will not be able to avoid thinking about the sacrifices of military and his future in the military. "It's both a moment of excitement and pride but also a moment that causes us to reflect on what we are really doing," he said. "About why we are really striving to fight for Americans, to defend Americans, because that's ultimately what it is about to serve others."
Published in: South Carolina Radio Network
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Monday
January 23, 2017
2b. Local Citadel cadet walks in inauguration parade
A local citadel cadet marched in today's inauguration parade in Washington D.C. Holden Usherwood is 20 years old was able to vote for the first time in the 2016 presidential election and marched down Pennsylvania Avenue with the Citadel Color Guard Friday afternoon in the parade. His mom, Penny Oates said she was so happy her son was able to experience the big event. "It is bucket list it's definitely a very historical event to be participating in," Oates said. She said she's always been proud of her son. "Holden was always a very strong willed child so we knew he would end up doing something pretty amazing one day," Oates said. The Citadel Color Guard found out in December that they may be going to D.C. for the inauguration and Oates said they have been excited ever since.
Published in: WRDW-TV Augusta, GA
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Monday
January 23, 2017
2c. Gaston County Citadel cadets participate in Inaugural Parade
Two cadets from the Gaston County area were part of The Citadel's Regimental Band and Pipes and Color Guard that participated in 2017 Presidential Inaugural Parade. They are: Christopher Owen, of Clover, S.C., and Jackson Crook, of Gastonia. This marked the seventh inaugural parade in which The Citadel Regimental Band and Pipes, Color Guard and/or Summerall Guard have been selected to participate.
Published in: Gaston Gazette
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Monday
January 23, 2017
2d. Locals take on weekend events in Washington D.C.
People around the Lowcountry are making their way back to South Carolina after the presidential inaugural weekend in Washington D.C. It was filled with celebratory events for President Donald Trump as well as marches in the streets. Locals were drawn to the same place for different reasons. President of the Citadel Republicans Society, Zachary Rutherford attended his first presidential inauguration. "It was combination of people both Republicans and Democrats a like. everyone was very respectful of both the former president and new president," he says it was interesting to see the behind-the-scenes work that goes into inauguration day. Former Chairperson of the Charleston County Republican Party, Cyndi Mosteller says the inaugural events were great moments in history. She brought with her a hat President Trump signed. "I think at the core heart of Donald Trump, and I think you saw this on inauguration day is absolute love for the people of this nation and the future of this nation," Mosteller said. The future of this nation is another reason why people came by the thousands for the Women's March on Washington. It's a movement that started in response to the presidential election. Local owner and director of Charleston Birth Place, Leslie Rathbun was there.
Published in: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
January 23, 2017
2e. Where did new President Trump's campaign spend money in SC?
The largest recipient of Donald Trump's campaign spending in South Carolina was a S.C. legislator now under indictment for misconduct in office. The Trump campaign spent $333,792 for strategic consulting provided by Geechee Communications, a company run by state Rep. Jim Merrill, Trump's S.C. campaign director. Last month, Merrill was indicted on 30 counts of misconduct and ethics violations as part of a long-running probe of corruption probe into the S.C. State House. The allegations against Merrill are not related to his work for Trump's campaign. Geechee's numbers were included in a two-year breakdown of spending by the Trump campaign with the Federal Elections Commission... Nancy Mace, the first woman to graduate from The Citadel and an unsuccessful candidate for the GOP nomination for the U.S. Senate in 2014, received $57,091 for field work on Trump's campaign.
Published in: The State
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Monday
January 23, 2017
3. Citadel professor earns 2017 Distinguished Book Award in U.S. History
Research conducted by Citadel history professor, Michael Livingston, Ph.D., is changing the way scholars view an infamous battle that occurred centuries ago. The findings are published in Livingston's latest book, The Battle of Crecy: A Casebook, which is the winner of the 2017 Distinguished Book Award in U.S. History by The Society for Military History. It was published by Liverpool Historical Casebooks. "Mike Livingston is one of the rare authors who has produced major books in several different genres of English literature," said Dean of The Citadel of School Humanities and Social Sciences, Bo Moore, Ph.D. "The Society of Military History's recognition of his work on the Battle of Crecy as the most distinguished book in military history during the past year, confirms the status Professor Livingston has earned as an American scholar of the first rank." The Battle of Crecy: A Casebook is the most extensive collection of documents ever assembled for the study of one of the most famous battles in history.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Monday
January 23, 2017
4. Evidence linking casino to crime, bankruptcy lacking
As casinos have sprouted up around the country, industry critics have raised questions about increased crime, gambling addiction and personal bankruptcy, but current research downplays such concerns. "There does not seem to be much good evidence that a casino increases crime, or other negative behaviors," said Michael Hicks, director of the Center for Business and Economic Research at Ball State University. "With the exception of drunk driving, recent studies have found a weaker link between casinos and both crime and bankruptcies, economists Douglas Walker of the College of Charleston and Russell Sobel of The Citadel wrote in the June 2016 journal Current Addiction Reports. According to Walker and Sobel, the social impacts of casinos are more difficult to measure than the economic impacts. "Taken at face value, estimates of both the benefits and costs of legalized casino gambling appear to be diminishing," they said. Sgt. Jason Collum, public information officer with the Evansville Police Department said increases in crime during the 20 years that city has hosted a casino have been due primarily to the city's growth. "I couldn't tell you that it is associated with the casino itself," said Collum, who worked at what was then Casino Aztar early in his career.
Published in: Tribune Star
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Monday
January 23, 2017
5. The U.S. Civil War - A Window Into the Apocalypse of World War One
On July 1, 1916, the British Army mounted one of the most ambitious offensives ever undertaken. It was an assault that quickly turned into one of the greatest disasters in military history. At exactly 7:30 a.m., some 100,000 men went "over the top" in a coordinated advance across a 15-mile front against German lines near the Somme River in France. Designed to relieve pressure on French forces then fighting at Verdun, the British attack had been carefully planned and was intended to drive a wedge through the enemy line, thus sending the German army tumbling back toward Berlin. H-hour was preceded by a colossal artillery bombardment that rained shells over German lines non-stop for more than a week. Undertaken to soften up enemy defenses, the cannonade saw more than a million shells fired from almost 25,000 heavy guns. Remarkably, the shelling had almost no effect. The Germans were dug in far deeper than the British anticipated and the artillery failed to destroy the miles of barbed wire that protected the entrenched defenders. The explosion of 17 massive underground mines and a "creeping barrage" laid down in front of the advancing British troops were both supposed to ensure success that fateful morning. Neither tactic proved effective. Jim Stempel is the author of seven books, including nonfiction, historical fiction, spirituality, and satire. His articles have appeared in numerous journals including North & South, HistoryNet, Concepts In Human Development, New Times, and Real Clear History. His novel, Windmill Point, has been selected as a finalist in the Chanticleer Literary Competition for best Civil War historical fiction. He is a graduate of The Citadel, Charleston, South Carolina, and lives with his wife and family Maryland.
Published in: Military History Now
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Monday
January 23, 2017
6. Time for a "Slow News" Movement
When citizens do not know that Obamacare and the Affordable Care Act are one in the same thing, and when they persist in the belief that Anthony Weiner had something to do with Hillary Clinton's emails, it is time to re-evaluate how we receive and process current events. Perhaps you have heard of Slow Food, an international grassroots movement that began in Italy in opposition to the detrimental effects of fast food on health and culinary traditions. The Slow Food movement advocates for a return to time-honored culinary practices and insists on the use of high-quality, locally sourced ingredients. Slow Food International characterizes its approach to food as being guided by three interconnected principles: the food that we produce and eat should be good, clean and fair. I believe it is time to call for a similar movement in how we produce and consume the news: it is time for a Slow News movement for information that is good, clean and fair...Alison Smith studied French and Political Science at Wake Forest University, and she earned her MA and PhD at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill in the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures. Alison is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Modern Languages at The Citadel and lives in Mount Pleasant, South Carolina. She is passionate about environmental and social justice issues, and she carries this passion into the classroom and her daily life.
Published in: Huffington Post
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Monday
January 23, 2017
7. Staying in shape early pays off now on college court for Laurel resident
Matt Frierson played soccer with the Laurel Boys and Girls Club as a boy, and all of that running has paid off in his current athletic pursuit. The Laurel resident is a sophomore shooting guard for the men's basketball team at The Citadel, whose style of play is unmatched by any Division I team in the country. In 21 games this season, the Bulldogs averaged 95.6 points per contest, which led the nation. Their up-tempo style of play, instituted by head coach Robert "Duggar" Baucom, in his second season with the military school in South Carolina, leaves many opponents gasping for air. The Citadel beat Johnson University of Florida 146-84 in November and posted a 144-94 victory over Toccoa Falls of Georgia in December. "It is a lot of fun to play," said Frierson, a graduate of Chapelgate Christian Academy in Marriottsville. "You get to shoot a lot of [three pointers]. You have to be in shape; coach puts us in a lot of drills during the off-season. Practices are usually short and intense. We go up and down for an hour and a half as fast as we can."
Published in: Baltimore Sun
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Monday
January 23, 2017
8. The Citadel extends winning streak to three
The Citadel's co-ed rifle team won its third straight match Saturday inside the Inouye Marksmanship Center. The Bulldogs continued their winning streak after more than two months between competitions, scoring 4,501 points to claim a narrow victory over second-place Georgia Southern's 4,493 points. The Citadel women's team scored 4,273 to claim third place and Clemson finished fourth with 4,248 points. Sophomore Allison Auten took top honors in air rifle with a season-best score of 584 points, and junior Colton Poole won his third consecutive smallbore competition after scoring 559 points. Poole also claimed fourth in air rifle with a season-best 577, and Auten registered another top-10 finish in smallbore with 543 points that ranked ninth. Junior Morgan Long made it a Bulldog sweep of the top-two places in smallbore by scoring a season-best 558 points. Senior Richie Parra finished seventh in air rifle with 571 points, and freshman Alexander McAlear recorded top-10 finishes on both disciplines with an eighth-place 545 in smallbore and a ninth-place 564 in air rifle.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Monday
January 23, 2017
9. UNC Greensboro beats The Citadel 81-72
Diante Baldwin scored 19 points and dished eight assists as UNC Greensboro posted its sixth-straight win, beating The Citadel 81-72 on Saturday. Demetrius Troy added 13 points for the Spartans (16-5, 7-1 Southern Conference). R.J. White had 12 points and seven rebounds and Marvin Smith had 10 points and nine rebounds. Jordy Kuiper led the team with 12 boards in addition to his eight points. The Spartans led 32-29 at the break but fell behind early in the second half to trail 44-38 with 16:11 to go. A Smith layup put them back on top, 61-59, with 8:17 left and a Baldwin 3-pointer followed by a White layup made it 67-61 with 7:08 remaining. The Citadel got as close as 76-72 with 1:44 to play but the Spartans pulled away again after that. Preston Parks scored 26 points to lead the Bulldogs (9-13, 2-7) who are on a four-game skid.
Published in: USA Today
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Friday
January 20, 2017
1. The Citadel Regimental Pipes & Band, Summerall Guards depart for 2017 Presidential Inauguration
The 2017 Presidential Inaugural Parade represents the seventh time since 1953 that Citadel cadets have been selected to participate in this historic American tradition. The Citadel Regimental Band and Pipes, the Summeral Guards, and the college's color guard will participate in the parade on Jan. 20, 2017, in Washington, D.C., which directly follows the swearing in of President-elect Donald Trump.
Published in: The Citadel's YouTube Channel
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Friday
January 20, 2017
2. Local Citadel cadets marching in Washington today
Aiken County's representatives today in Washington, D.C., will include at least two Citadel cadets from North Augusta: Jay Newman and Preston Wilson. The two graduates of North Augusta High School are in The Citadel Regimental Band and Pipes, which will perform in the inaugural parade, marking the transfer of power from one administration to another. Wilson, referring to today's massive gathering, wrote, "I'm honored to be performing in this event, and though it will be a challenging day with incredible pressure, it is a once-in-a-lifetime event that I can't thank God enough for giving me the opportunity to partake in." Newman, whose parents are Jim and Mary Jo Newman, is a "knob" (freshman) at the Charleston institution, with plans to major in criminal justice and move on to the Coast Guard. He plays the mellophone, which he described, via email, as a "marching French horn." He played trumpet in high school and was also a drum major for the Jacket Regiment, his high school's marching band.
Published in: Aiken Standard
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Friday
January 20, 2017
3. To the Archives! As Citadel cadets prepare for Trump's inaugural parade, here's a look back at the 6 others they've attended
After president-elect Donald Trump is sworn in as president of the United States, a parade will follow. So, too, will Citadel cadets. For the seventh time since 1953, Citadel cadets will participate in the presidential inaugural parade. The parade itself dates back to the nation's first inauguration. When George Washington took office, he journeyed from Mount Vernon to New York City (not the White House). Local militias joined him in a procession as he passed through towns along the way. Friday's parade from the Capitol to the White House will feature more than 8,000 people marching down Pennsylvania Avenue. Being selected to perform in the parade remains a rare honor today. The Presidential Inaugural Committee sorted through 200 applications from parade hopefuls, according to The Associated Press. As cadets prepare to make their seventh Inauguration Day appearance, we take a look back at past inaugural parades that featured Citadel cadets.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Friday
January 20, 2017
4. Business briefs
Doug Arseneau of Murrells Inlet has joined Horry County State Bank as senior vice president and residential mortgage lending manager. Arseneau will manage the bank's residential mortgage lending department, focusing on mortgage origination, refinancing, and overall customer service. He began his career at South Carolina National Bank as a retail banker before moving to mortgage lending in 1998. Since that time, he has held various mortgage positions at several banking institutions throughout the Myrtle Beach area. He is a graduate of The Citadel, where he earned a degree in business administration.
Published in: South Strand News
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Friday
January 20, 2017
5. Western Carolina out-paces The Citadel, 100-95
It was 37 years ago that Western Carolina's Ronnie Carr made the first 3-point shot in NCAA Division I history, at the Catamounts' old Reid Gym. Thursday night, The Citadel and Western Carolina staged a tribute of sorts, combining to make 24 of the long-range shots. When the air was finally cleared of basketballs, WCU emerged with a 100-95 victory over The Citadel at the Ramsey Center in Cullowhee, N.C. The Bulldogs made 15 of 38 from 3-point range, including 8 of 12 by freshman Preston Parks, who led The Citadel with 28 points. Western Carolina countered by going 9 of 16, including Elijah Pughsley's 6 of 9 for 28 points. It was a Pughsley dagger from 28 feet as the shot clock wound down that made the difference in the end, giving WCU a 96-92 lead with 39 seconds left. The Catamounts (6-13, 1-5) made 4 of 4 free throws from there to snap a five-game skid and ice their first victory in Southern Conference play. "It's very disappointing," said Citadel coach Duggar Baucom, whose team slid to 9-12 overall and 2-6 in the SoCon. “Their team comes in averaging 59 points, and we give up 100. There's got to be some personal responsibility there defensively." The Citadel forced only 11 turnovers by WCU and allowed the Catamounts to shoot 57.9 percent from the field and 56.3 percent from 3-point range. Haboubacar Mutombo scored 22 points and Devin Peterson added 20 for WCU.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Friday
January 20, 2017
6. The Citadel Travels for Doubleheader
The Citadel tennis team will travel to Columbia, South Carolina, to compete against the South Carolina Gamecocks on Friday. The Bulldogs will compete in their third doubleheader after dropping matches to Clemson and Georgia Southern last Saturday and North Carolina State on Monday. Freshman Jack Pyritz earned his first win against Clemson's Marshall Dagostine with a 6-0, 6-3 decision at the No. 6 position. Friday's match will be the season opener for the Gamecocks, whose team consists of four players in the Preseason ITA Rankings. The Citadel will take on South Carolina at the Carolina Tennis Center beginning at 2:30 p.m. The start time for Friday's second match will be determined at the conclusion of the first match. Live stats and a video stream for Friday's matches against South Carolina can be found at CitadelSports.com.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Friday
January 20, 2017
7. Bulldogs Return To Competition Saturday
The Citadel rifle team hosts Georgia Southern and Clemson on Saturday inside the Inouye Marksmanship Center. "This is our first match back after the long break," head coach William Smith said. "I hope we are able to pick up where we left off and continue shooting some competitive scores. Georgia Southern will be a tough match, and it's always nice to have Clemson compete with us." The Bulldogs return to action after more than two months away from competition due to the end of the fall semester and holiday break. The Citadel's co-ed team completed the fall portion of its schedule on a two-match winning streak, earning victories over Wofford on Nov. 5 and topping a field of Clemson and Georgia Military College on Nov. 12. The Citadel women's team has recorded a season-high score in all seven matches so far this season and finished second in the Nov. 12 match with 4,326 points. During the collegiate competition hiatus, two Bulldogs qualified to represent their respective home states at the Junior Olympics. Sophomore Allison Auten won both the smallbore and air rifle championships for South Carolina, and freshman Alexander McAlear qualified to represent North Carolina in smallbore.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Thursday
January 19, 2017
1. Citadel cadets from metro Atlanta excited to march in inaugural parade
The Citadel Regimental Band and Pipes and the Citadel Summerall Guards will be among the groups marching in Friday’s inaugural parade, including several cadets from the metro Atlanta area. “I’m honored to be a part of it,” said John Brunson, an Alpharetta High School graduate who’s now senior at The Citadel and a member of the Summerall Guard. It’ll be his first trip to Washington and he’s also looking forward to some site-seeing on Saturday. About 150 cadets, along with Col. Tim Smith, director of The Citadel Regimental Band and Pipes, and Col. Keith Brace, advisor to The Citadel Summerall Guards, are headed up by bus to Washington for the performance. It’s the seventh time The Citadel has been invited to participate in inaugural festivities, a tradition that began with President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s 1953 inauguration. The regimental band participated in President John F. Kennedy’s 1961 parade. The Summerall Guard participated in President George H. W. Bush’s 1989 inaugural parade and President George W. Bush’s 2005 inaugural parade. Bad weather forced the cancellation of President Ronald Reagan’s 1985 parade. Friday’s forecast isn’t the greatest – rain and highs in the 40s – but nothing like the 7-degree chill that forced event organizers to move Reagan’s second swearing-in to the Capitol Rotunda. We talked with three metro Atlanta cadets ahead of Friday’s event, and they’re excited to represent the hometowns as well as their school.
Published in: Atlanta Journal-Constitution - Online
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Thursday
January 19, 2017
2. Cadets from The Citadel headed to Inaugural Parade
(This story was picked up by a numerous TV stations locally and nationally as a result of a media opportunity). Cadets from The Citadel's Color Guard, Summerall Guard and Regimental Band & Pipes set to participate in the 2017 Inaugural Parade boarded buses to Washington, D.C. Thursday morning. The 150 cadets will be among thousands of parade participants following a newly-sworn-in president and vice president, Donald Trump and Mike Pence, from the Capitol to the White House Friday beginning at 3 p.m. The Citadel names each participating Cadet on their Facebook page. Among the cadets will be the public military college's first ever female drum major. Hunter Crawley leads the Regimental Band & Pipes. "It's amazing, for lack of better words. It's a dream that I've actually had," Crawley said. "It's nice to be here and make history like that."
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV 5 (Charleston)
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Thursday
January 19, 2017
2.1 Cadets Headed to Inauguration; Band, Summerall Guards Leave This Morning
The Citadel Regimental Band and Pipes and the Summerall Guards are participating in the 2017 Presidential Inaugural Parade. Approximately 150 cadets will head to Washington, D.C.
Broadcast on: WCBD-TV 2 (Charleston) - Online
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Thursday
January 19, 2017
Citadel makes seventh presidential inaugural parade appearance
Summerall Guards practicing for 2017 Presidential Inaugural Parade The 2017 Presidential Inaugural Parade represents the seventh time since 1953 that Citadel cadets have been selected to participate in this historic American tradition. The Citadel Regimental Band and Pipes, the Summeral Guards, and the college’s color guard will participate in the parade on Jan. 20, 2017, in Washington, D.C., which directly follows the swearing in of President-elect Donald Trump. “We are privileged to be representing The Citadel before the nation, and the world, as one of the many distinguished groups participating in the presidential inaugural parade. We don’t view this as political. To us, it represents another way to serve our nation,” said Cadet Devin Oliver, who is a Summerall Guard. Approximately 150 cadets comprise the troop representing the college. The seven invitations to to appear presidential inaugural parades occured in 1953, 1961, 1985, 1989, 2005, and 2017. “It is no small accomplishment to be selected to participate in a presidential inaugural parade out of hundreds and hundreds of applicants,” said Maj. Steve Smith, Citadel TAC officer and historian. “The Regimental Band and Summerall Guards jointly represented The Citadel in the 1953 and 1985 inaugural parades; unfortunately, inclement weather forced the cancellation of President Reagan’s 1985 parade, the only one known to have been canceled.” - See more at: http://www.citadel.edu/root/citadel-makes-seventh-presidential-inaugural-parade-appearance#sthash.ANkwKEeK.dpuf
Published in: Citadel Newsroom - Online
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Thursday
January 19, 2017
NASA Hosts News Conference, Interviews with Next Space Station Crew (article at end of page)
NASA astronaut Randy Bresnik, Paolo Nespoli of ESA (European Space Agency), and Sergey Ryazanskiy of the Russian space agency Roscosmos, who are scheduled to launch to the International Space Station in late spring, will participate in a news conference at 2 p.m. EST Wednesday, Jan. 25, at the agency’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. The news conference will air live on NASA Television and stream on the agency’s website. This will be Bresnik’s second trip to the space station, the second expedition for Ryazanskiy, and Nespoli’s third trip to the space station. They will be part of Expeditions 52 and 53. Media who wish to participate by telephone should call Johnson's newsroom at 281-483-5111 no later than 1:45 p.m. Those following the briefing on social media can ask questions using the hashtag #askNASA. After the news conference, interview opportunities are available with all crew members, in person or by phone. To request credentials to attend in person, or to reserve an interview opportunity, media must contact Johnson's newsroom by 5 p.m. Monday, Jan. 23. The deadline for international media accreditation has passed. During his upcoming mission aboard the orbiting laboratory, Bresnik and his crewmates will facilitate more than 250 research investigations and technology demonstrations not possible on Earth. Among the experiments is Cardiac Stem Cells which investigates how microgravity affects stem cells and the factors that govern stem cell activity, including physical and molecular changes. The Cosmic-Ray Energetics and Mass experiment is scheduled to arrive at the station during the crew’s stay and will measure the charges of cosmic rays ranging from hydrogen up through iron nuclei, over a broad energy range. Experiments such as these yield benefits for all of humanity, and will enable future long-duration human and robotic exploration into deep space, including the agency’s Journey to Mars. Originally from Santa Monica, California, Bresnik graduated from The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina, and was commissioned in the Marine Corps in May 1989. He was selected as an astronaut by NASA in May 2004 and flew aboard the space shuttle Atlantis to the International Space Station in 2009.
Published in: NASA Spaceflight - Online
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Wednesday
January 18, 2017
1. Citadel's New Nursing Department Made Possible By Swain Family
The Citadel's new Swain Department of Nursing is being established through the generosity of a gift from the Swain family, which has been a part of The Citadel family for decades. The seven-figure gift was initiated by brothers David C. Swain, Jr., Citadel Class of 1980, and his wife Mary, as well as Dr. Christopher C. Swain, Citadel Class of 1981, and his wife Debora. The Swain family's desire to help build a nursing program at The Citadel stems from both personal and professional interests. Together, the Swain brothers founded the Ob Hospitalist Group (OBHG) in Mauldin, South Carolina, in 2006 with a vision to elevate women's health care by providing quality medical care to expectant mothers. More than a decade later, OBHG is the single largest dedicated OB/GYN hospitalist provider, partnering with more than 450 board certified physicians nationwide. Dr. Chris Swain, a veteran OB/GYN doctor himself, founded the company as the result of his passion for women's health care and his strong commitment to seeing the industry elevated to provide improved safety and care. After graduating from The Citadel with a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology, he attended the University of South Alabama College of Medicine and completed his OB/GYN residency training at Bayfront Medical Center in St. Petersburgh, Florida. He currently serves as OBHG's Chief medical officer and resides on Isle of Palms, South Carolina, with Debbie and their two sons, one of whom is currently a sophomore in the South Carolina Corps of Cadets at The Citadel.
Published in: Island Eye News
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Wednesday
January 18, 2017
2. Meet the Beaufort County man leading the South Carolina Corps of Cadets
The almost 175-year-old military structure at The Citadel comprises much of what is essentially a leadership laboratory: the cadets manage the undergraduate student body called the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. Cadets can work to attain a variety of leadership opportunities during their four years in the Corps, with the highest position being that of regimental commander. It is a demanding job and a very visible role. Cadet Kevin MacDonald, who is from Hilton Head, South Carolina, holds that position for the 2016-17 academic year. MacDonald commands approximately 2,300 cadets. His main job is to train the cadets in The Citadel's four pillars: academics, military, physical effectiveness and moral/ethical. He was selected after a long and rigorous process, as all of the regimental commanders have been for more than a century. MacDonald is a Business Administration major who attends The Citadel on an Army scholarship and is expected to commission as an officer in the Army upon graduation. He is also a member of the elite Summerall Guards. The following interview with MacDonald (KM) was conducted by Regimental Public Affairs NCO Tristan Arrowood (TA).
Published in: TheDigitel.com
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Wednesday
January 18, 2017
3. How these Citadel cadets went from Dickies and Chuck Taylors to Trump's inauguration
Before the rifle is passed, both cadets have their hands on it, and the newest guard must wrest it from the veteran's grip. With a firm tug, the rifle comes free like meat off a tough rib. It's a ceremonial gesture, as is the one that follows: the outgoing guard makes a fist with the right hand - covered with a white glove that hides a class ring from The Citadel - and taps on the chest of the newest member of the Summerall Guards. Ring-tapping is a sign of approval at The Citadel, South Carolina's military college, founded in 1842 and located in Charleston. Tapping the breastplate of a fellow cadet conveys pride. After the new Summerall Guards - 61 of them every year - take their rifles on Corps Day, they perform publicly for the first time. They're rising seniors, soon to be called first-class cadets, and they're known for their silent precision drill. On Friday the guards will march in the inauguration parade of Donald Trump, the 45th president of the United States. Some 8,000 people in more than 40 organizations will participate in the parade, according to the Washington Post. It will be the fifth time the Summerall Guards have marched in one, according to The Citadel.
Published in: Myrtle Beach Online
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Wednesday
January 18, 2017
4. Ramsey Native Will March In Presidential Inaugural Parade
A Ramsey native will march in the 2017 Presidential Inaugural Parade Friday. Sophie-Leigh Baxter-Clark will march with The Citadel Regimental Band and Pipes. She is a Ramsey High School alumnus and was a member of the school's Big Blue marching band. Baxter-Clark is a senior and cadet major at The Citadel, majoring in history, with a minor in criminal justice, intelligence and homeland security. She also represented the school at the Edinburgh Military Tattoo in Scotland. Friday will be the seventh time the Citadel Regimental Band and Pipes will participate in a presidential inauguration. The band also performed at the inauguration of presidents John F. Kennedy, George H.W. Bush and George W. Bush. About 100 cadets perform in the band.
Published in: Ramsey Patch
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Wednesday
January 18, 2017
5. Citadel student from Warren marches at 2017 Presidential Inauguration
A Warren student currently attending the Citadel, Military College of South Carolina will be marching in the 2017 Presidential Inauguration Parade on Friday, Jan. 20 in Washington, D.C. Matthew Ransom, of Warren, is a part of the Citadel's Regimental Band and Pipes and Color Guard that was selected to perform. The 2017 Presidential Inaugural Parade represents the 7th inaugural parade in which The Citadel Regimental Band and Pipes, Color Guard and/or Summerall Guard have been selected to participate. They jointly represented The Citadel together in the 1953 and 1985 inaugural parades. Unfortunately, inclement weather forced the cancellation of President Reagan's 1985 parade. The regimental band was also a participant in President Kennedy's 1961 parade. The Summerall Guard participated in President George H. W. Bush's 1989 inaugural parade and President George W. Bush's 2005 inaugural parade. (1953; 1961; 1985; 1989; 2005; 2017) The Citadel Regimental Band and Pipes is the only U.S. military college band to ever be invited to the exclusive Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo, and has been selected to participate as the one American military band in the globally known event three times: 2015, 2010, and 1991.
Published in: Echoes-Sentinel
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Wednesday
January 18, 2017
6. Economic Ideas: David Ricardo on Wealth, Inflation, and Freedom
David Ricardo (1772-1823) was one of the most influential economic theorists of the first half of the nineteenth century. Born in London, England, his father's family were orthodox Jews originally from Portugal who had moved to England from Holland. His father was a highly successful stockbroker. David Ricardo learned the family business, and most likely would have inherited it from his father. But he fell in love with an English Quaker, converted from Judaism to Christianity, and at the age of 21 eloped without his family's knowledge. His father disowned him and his mother never spoke to him again. He, therefore, had to go out on his own and set up his own brokerage company. He soon showed himself to be an expert at all financial and brokerage dealings. Making a fortune, including dealing in British government securities during Britain's long war with Revolutionary and then Napoleonic France, Ricardo retired from business in his early 40s to an estate in the English countryside. Ricardo became interested in economics when he read Adam Smith's The Wealth of Nations during a holiday in 1799. He began to write on economic topics in 1809 with a series of articles and a monograph on the causes for inflation in Great Britain that gained him wide notoriety. The publication of The Principles of Political Economy and Taxation in 1817 soon established his permanent reputation as one of the leading economists in the world. Dr. Richard M. Ebeling is the recently appointed BB&T Distinguished Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel.
Published in: The Future of Freedom Foundation
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Wednesday
January 18, 2017
7. Citadel football recruiting nets trio of heavyweights
A second wave of verbal commitments followed The Citadel's latest official-visit weekend, bringing to at least 21 the number of players committed to the Bulldogs. The latest commitments include a pair of defensive backs from the Columbia area; a trio of 300-pound defensive linemen; and a couple of all-state players from Texas. Coach Brent Thompson cannot comment on individual recruits until the Feb. 1 signing day, and verbal commitments are non-binding. Among The Citadel's latest commitments are: Lane Botkin, a 6-0, 195-pound defensive back from A.C. Flora High in Columbia. The son of of former South Carolina assistant Kirk Botkin chose The Citadel from among Georgia Southern, Georgia State and Charleston Southern. Also a baseball standout, Botkin was a North-South All-Star and had 80 tackles last season. He also rushed for 621 yards and 13 touchdowns on offense. "I chose the Citadel because I feel like I have a good connection with all of the coaches and players from there," Botkin told The State. "It is a really close team and I enjoy being around them. It also helps that they are back-to-back SoCon champs. I have a good chance of going in and playing early, that was a big factor of why I chose them." Cole Brown, a 6-0, 190-pound defensive back from Blythewood High near Columbia. Brown is the brother of fellow Citadel commitment Micah Byrd-Brown, and was chosen for the Blue-Gray All-American Game. A trio of 300-pound defensive linemen that includes Jabauri Garner, a 6-3, 300-pounder from Florence (Ala.) High School who, according to scout.com, had offers from Army, Navy and Jackson State.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Friday
January 13, 2017
1a. Professor Joe Riley returns to the classroom at The Citadel
It was Charleston's coldest winter, so cold it killed the oleanders. The men and women who made their beds under bridges or in abandoned buildings appeared without warning at store fronts and church vestibules. An invisible problem was suddenly in plain view. So in the first of his four decades in office, Charleston's mayor joined forces with civic, business and religious leaders to form the city's first homeless shelter, now One80 Place. Joe Riley begins class by telling this story, inside a cavernous lecture hall on The Citadel campus Thursday afternoon, in part he said, because it explains why he was so eager to serve Charleston for so long. "It's because it gives so many opportunities to do important things to make things happen that maybe wouldn't have otherwise happened," he said. "You have the opportunity every day to help people." The city's longest-serving mayor now teaches his first course as a professor - a weekly class titled "Old South City, New South Revival: Political Leadership in Charleston, South Carolina" - this semester on "the city's transformation," as the syllabus says, "from a sleepy, coastal backwater into an international tourist destination, a major economic engine for the region, and a center for global trade." He returned to his alma mater a year ago this month as the college's first occupant of the Joseph P. Riley Jr. Endowed Chair of American Government and Public Policy.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Friday
January 13, 2017
1b. 'America's Mayor' begins career as professor on Charleston's history at The Citadel
It's been one year since America's longest-serving mayor retired from office, and now former Charleston Mayor Joe Riley is teaching his first full course at The Citadel. The class, titled "Old South City, New South Revival Political Leadership in Charleston, South Carolina," will focus on the way the Holy City turned from a small beach community into an internationally recognized tourist destination and hub of business and trade in the Southeast. The class started at 2:30 p.m. Thursday and featured an hour lecture from Riley followed by another hour of guest speakers and community members. It's how the rest of the semester will go. "Working with this generation of young people is thrilling and I never thought I would have the opportunity, and I'm sure I'll learn from them and hopefully I'll have something valuable for them to consider," Riley said. Much of the course will focus on his 40 years as mayor, covering a range of topics and issues Riley encountered in his political career. "There's lots of lessons here," said Riley. "It's going to lessons in civic leadership, lessons in understanding the needs and challenges of the city, lessons of human and race relations. Really, it's chocked full."
Broadcast on: WCIV-TV Charleston, SC
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Friday
January 13, 2017
2. Health care's perfect storm and the critical need for nurses
The phrase "perfect storm" is often used to describe a phenomenon resulting from an exceptionally rare combination of circumstances. Although the term is overused, I believe it accurately portrays the challenges facing the health care industry over the next 10 years. At the center of this metaphorical storm is America's aging population and the demand for registered nurses. The country has experienced nursing shortages before; however, the circumstances surrounding the looming shortage are fundamentally different. Experts agree that this shortage could result in a national crisis, and health care in the Lowcountry stands in the direct path of this approaching storm. According to Rebecca Grant in an article that appeared earlier this year in The Atlantic, the nursing profession will be influenced by four major factors over the next decade. The first factor, and primary driver of the gathering storm, is America's aging baby boomers. It has been estimated that the number of senior citizens (aged 65 or older) in the U.S. between 2010 and 2030 will increase 75 percent to 69 million. By 2050, that number is expected to grow to 88.5 million. As the population ages and experiences more health-related problems, the demand for nurses will increase. But that demand will primarily be driven by care for the chronically ill, which is ongoing care that becomes increasingly complex as illnesses and health problems become multi-layered. So, it may not only be diabetes that a patient is dealing with, but heart disease, renal failure, amputations, and a decrease in vision - all of which multiply the complexity of care.
Published in: Charleston Business Mag
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Friday
January 13, 2017
3. Citadel marching band to participate in Trump inauguration
The Citadel Regimental Band and Pipes and the Summerall Guards are participating in the 2017 Presidential Inaugural Parade. Approximately 150 cadets will head to Washington, D.C. On Friday, January 13, the group will hold a dress rehearsal from 4:15 - 5:30 p.m. The public is invited to attend. To attend, head over to Summerall Field and park in the general parking areas.
Published in: WCBD-TV Charleston, SC
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Friday
January 13, 2017
4. Native bagpiper to play in Inauguration Day parade
Mohawk Area High School graduate Derek Waddington will perform in the Presidential Inaugural Parade with The Citadel Military College of South Carolina's Regimental Band and Pipes and the Summerall Guards. Waddington, a sophomore cadet, is one of 35 bagpipers and drummers in the ensemble who will perform in the parade on Jan. 20. The Regimental Band was selected by the Presidential Inaugural Committee from 200 applications from parade hopefuls, according to the Associated Press. The Regimental Band has about 80 cadet musicians. Throughout its history, The Citadel has maintained a tradition of duty, pride and excellence as part of the cadet experience, and "America's Band" - The Citadel Regimental Band and Pipes has been a part of that tradition since 1909. As one of the 21 companies comprising the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, the Regimental Band and Pipes leads the way and sets the tempo that all other cadets follow. The Summerall Guards, a 61-member silent precision drill platoon, will perform a series of movements based on the old German close order drill, the exactness and thoroughness with which a cadet is trained.The drill, which has never been written down, is performed to a silent count. Each year's guards take responsibility for teaching the next year's unit the precise drill.
Published in: New Castle News
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Friday
January 13, 2017
5. Lowcountry Graduate Center adding health care management MBA
The Lowcountry Graduate Center is adding another degree program to its list of offerings. Classes for S.C. State University's health care management MBA are being taught at the center in North Charleston starting this year, according to a news release. Current students in the MBA program were able to enroll in the first class offered in the new concentration this semester, and new students will be able to enroll in the summer. Classes are held in the evenings and on weekends, as well as online. S.C. State University is now offering its health care management MBA at the Lowcountry Graduate Center. "The health care industry in the United States is experiencing dramatic growth and now represents the nation's largest private industry sector," graduate center director Nancy Muller said in the news release. "We are delighted to be able to support S.C. State University in serving the health care management talent needs in the Charleston area and welcome them as our newest academic partner." The Lowcountry Graduate Center offers graduate degrees and certificates through other institutions, including the College of Charleston, The Citadel, the Medical University of South Carolina, the University of South Carolina, Clemson University, Anderson University, and now S.C. State. The new MBA program with a health care management concentration teaches health care policy, law and ethics, organizational behavior, human resource management, quality assessment and the structure of the health care delivery system, the news release said.
Published in: Charleston Regional Business Journal
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Friday
January 13, 2017
6. Michael Livingston, The Gates of Hell, and Writing Secret Historical Fantasy
An award-winning writer and professor, Michael Livingston holds degrees in history, medieval studies, and English. He teaches at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina. He has also added a pair of fantasy novels to that impressive C.V.: last year's The Shards of Heaven and the just-released sequel, The Gates of Hell. We recently got a chance to talk to Michael about secret histories, name changes, and the challenges of writing the second novel in a series. For those readers not familiar with you, could you please introduce yourself? For those who don't know me, in my day-job I'm a professor of medieval matters at The Citadel, where among other things I do a lot of research on the military history of the Middle Ages. In my spare time, though, I write fiction. My first novel came out last year from Tor Books: The Shards of Heaven, a historical fantasy set against the war between the future Caesar Augustus and the famed lovers Mark Antony and Cleopatra. And now here we are with its sequel, The Gates of Hell-an amazing journey!
Published in: Barnes & Noble Sci-Fi Fantasy Blog
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Friday
January 13, 2017
7Epic Fantasy Meets Ancient Rome: An Interview with Michael Livingston, Author of "The Shards of Heaven" and "The Gates of Hell"
What happens when a historian brings his love of the fantasy genre to crafting a trilogy? In the case of Michael Livingston's adrenaline-pumping Shards novels, what you get resembles a cross between HBO's Rome and Game of Thrones. Set in the era of the Roman Empire, featuring such famous figures as Cleopatra and Augustus, Livingston's novels are cinematic in their immediacy, bringing historic characters and battle scenes to life. The addition of magical artifacts, known as the Shards, makes for an intriguing take on what determines the fate of empires. The Shards of Heaven and The Gates of Hell, the first two installments in the trilogy, are out now from Tor Books. I caught up with Michael to talk about the intertwining of magic and history, his unparalleled rendering of ancient Alexandria, his inspirations, and more... Michael Livingston's historical fantasy novel The Shards of Heaven was published by Tor Books in 2015; the sequel, The Gates of Hell, appeared in November 2016. An award-winning writer and professor, Livingston holds degrees in History, Medieval Studies, and English. He teaches at The Citadel, specializing in the Middle Ages and speculative literature.
Published in: HuffingtonPost.com
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Friday
January 13, 2017
8. Citadel's football commitments include two Shrine Bowl players
Early commitments for The Citadel's 2017 football recruiting class include two Shrine Bowl players and an offensive MVP of the North-South All-Star Game The Bulldogs have at least nine players committed thus far, according to announcements on social media and reports on recruiting websites. Citadel coach Brent Thompson has said he plans to sign about 20 players on Feb. 1. Coaches are not allowed to comment on individual recruits until signing day, and verbal commitments are non-binding. Here's a rundown on some of the players committed thus far: Jon Barrett Lewis is a 6-2, 296-pound lineman from Lenoir, N.C., who was named to the North Carolina Shrine Bowl team. He played both offense and defense for Hibriten High School, and was at one time committed to Western Carolina. Jalen Barr is a 5-11, 190-pound receiver and defensive back from Lake City High School. Barr was named offensive MVP for the South team in the North-South All-Star Game, catching five passes for 124 yards, including a 51-yard touchdown. Barr reportedly also had offers from Army, Presbyterian and Western Carolina. Ken'Darius Frederick is a 6-1, 173-pound defensive back from South Pointe High School in Rock Hill. Frederick was picked for the Shrine Bowl and helped South Pointe win a third straight state title last season. His commitment to The Citadel was reported by sportstalksc.com on Thursday. Willie Eubanks is a 6-2, 215-pound linebacker and running back from Laney High School in Augusta, Ga. Eubanks was selected to play in the Border Bowl all-star game.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
January 12, 2017
1. Former Charleston mayor Riley to lead first class at The Citadel
Former Charleston mayor Joe Riley and graduate of The Citadel Class of 1964 will lead his first class at the public military college Thursday afternoon. Riley took a position at his alma mater after serving as mayor of Charleston for 40 years. His class is called "Old South, New South Revival Political Leadership in Charleston, South Carolina." According to a statement from The Citadel, cadets are buzzing about having a nationally-renowned politician and alumnus on campus. “The Citadel is proud to have former Mayor Joe Riley return to his alma mater after four decades of leading the city of Charleston,” said Citadel President, Lt. Gen. John W. Rosa, USAF (Retired). “He epitomizes the leadership and service before self we seek to instill in our cadets.”
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV 5 - Online
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Thursday
January 12, 2017
1.1 Former Mayor Joe Riley to teach first class at The Citadel
Former Charleston Mayor Joseph P. Riley, Jr., is preparing to teach his first course at The Citadel. Old South City, New South Revival Political Leadership in Charleston, South Carolina, will dive into Charleston’s transformation from a sleepy coastal town into an international tourist destination, a major economic engine for the region and a center for global trade, according to the military college. Riley’s first class will be held from 2:30 – 5 p.m. on Thursday, January 12. Classes will be held on Tuesday afternoons at various locations on campus and throughout the city, including Riviera Theater, City Hall and Emanuel AME church. Each class session will include remarks by Riley, guest speakers, and a discussion with 15-20 cadets as well as members of the public who will be invited to attend classes based on their areas of interest, according to the course description
Broadcast on: WCBD-TV 2 (Charleston) - Online
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Thursday
January 12, 2017
2. Native bagpiper to play in Inauguration Day parade
Mohawk Area High School graduate Derek Waddington will perform in the Presidential Inaugural Parade with the Citadel Military College of South Carolina’s Regimental Band and Pipes and the Summerall Guards. Waddington, a sophomore cadet, is one of 35 bagpipers and drummers in the ensemble who will perform in the parade on Jan. 20. The Regimental Band was selected by the Presidential Inaugural Committee from 200 applications from parade hopefuls, according to the Associated Press. The Regimental Band has about 80 cadet musicians. Throughout its history, The Citadel has maintained a tradition of duty, pride and excellence as part of the cadet experience, and “America’s Band” — The Citadel Regimental Band and Pipes has been a part of that tradition since 1909. As one of the 21 companies comprising the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, the Regimental Band and Pipes leads the way and sets the tempo that all other cadets follow. The Summerall Guards, a 61-member silent precision drill platoon, will perform a series of movements based on the old German close order drill, the exactness and thoroughness with which a cadet is trained. The drill, which has never been written down, is performed to a silent count. Each year’s guards take responsibility for teaching the next year’s unit the precise drill.
Published in: New Castle News - Online
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Thursday
January 12, 2017
3. Video: The Citadel's Carl Jensen on Opportunities for Graduating Students in the Intelligence World
Carl talks about his role as Professor and Director of Intelligence and Security Studies at The Citadel. There are numerous opportunities in this area, not just in government but also in the private sector with significant growth.
Published in: Charleston CEO - Online
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Thursday
January 12, 2017
Chattanooga holds off Citadel, 83-73
With five senior starters at his disposal, Chattanooga coach Matt McCall has a veteran team well-equipped to handle the havoc that The Citadel basketball team hopes to cause in each game. The Mocs did just that Wednesday night, managing the Bulldogs' pressure and fast pace for an 83-73 victory at McKenzie Arena in Chattanooga, Tenn. Jonathan Burroughs-Cook scored 20 points to lead Chattanooga (13-4, 4-1), the defending champion and preseason favorite in the Southern Conference. Sophomore forward Zane Najdawi played through an ankle injury and led the Bulldogs (9-10, 2-4) with 15 points. Considering that The Citadel was without freshman standout Preston Parks for a third straight game and had lost by 40 on its last trip to Chattanooga, the result was not terribly frustrating for coach Duggar Baucom, who started three freshmen. “I'm unbelievably proud of them,” Baucom said. “The last time in this building, we got beat badly. Tonight, it was a 10-point game with six minutes to go, and then a questionable call ends up costing us three points.” The Bulldogs were within 68-58 when a scramble for the ball in front of the Chattanooga bench ended with the ball out of bounds, and the referee pointing the Mocs' way.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Wednesday
January 11, 2017
1. Statement on Dylann Roof sentence from Joseph P. Riley, The Citadel
"The unspeakable acts of this individual to some of the finest members of our community have been addressed by our civilization's system of justice. The judgment was equal to the horrific nature of the crimes. My hope is that this verdict gives some small measure of closure to the families of our beloved Emanuel nine," said Professor Joseph P. Riley, Jr., The Citadel, Mayor of Charleston, 1975-2016 Joseph P. Riley, Citadel Class of 1964, was the mayor of Charleston at the time of the Emanuel shooting and is widely credited with helping the city respond in a peaceful manner. Riley is the first occupant of the Joseph P. Riley, Jr. Endowed Chair of American and Public Policy at The Citadel. He assumed the seat in January 2016, upon his retirement from public office as the Mayor of Charleston, South Carolina, for 40 years. He begins teaching his first full course as Professor of American Government & Public Policy at The Citadel on Thurs., Jan. 12, 2017, one year from the date of his retirement from office.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Wednesday
January 11, 2017
2. The Citadel Board of Visitors to consider allowing beer sales at baseball games
As early as this spring, Citadel fans may be able to enjoy a cold one as they cheer on their beloved Bulldogs at Riley Park. With approval from the Board of Visitors, The Citadel would join dozens of universities across the country, including the College of Charleston, that sell alcohol at sporting events - a growing trend among athletic programs vying to boost revenue and game attendance. "I would probably say five years ago, you would be hard pressed to find (any college) that was selling alcohol at an athletic venue," said athletic director Jim Senter. "The trend is now moving back in the other direction." The college's proposal, presented to the Board of Visitors' operations and risk management committee on Tuesday, would allow RiverDogs concessions stands to sell beer to both the public and cadets alike at Citadel baseball games starting in the 2017 season - with a few caveats. Imbibers would be limited to beer - no wine, cocktails or hard liquor. And they only would be permitted to purchase three 12-ounce clear plastic cups per game, which concessions staff would track using tear-off tabs on their 21-and-over wristbands. Beer sales would stop at the end of the seventh inning. The Citadel would staff games with ushers, who would monitor the stands for any unruly, drunken behavior. The college would also carve out an alcohol-free "family friendly" section of the stands and offer free soda to wristband-identified designated drivers.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
January 11, 2017
Local Entrepreneurs Acquire Valpak of Greater Columbia in South Carolina
Valpak, a leader in local print and digital coupons, announced today that Valpak of Greater Columbia has been acquired by Daniel Bedenbaugh and Trey Bruner. The large South Carolina territory, which includes Lexington, Newberry and Richland counties, has served local businesses and residents since 1994. The entrepreneurs plan to mail their first Valpak Blue Envelope later this month to approximately 100,000 households in the Palmetto State with the potential to expand to 250,000 households per month. First-time franchisee Daniel Bedenbaugh is a ninth-generation Newberry County native. Prior to franchising with Valpak, Bedenbaugh graduated from The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, in Charleston with a degree in business administration. He has worked in the manufacturing industry, both in process improvement and sales management. "Leading up to this opportunity with Valpak, I discovered my passion for marketing and sales and had the ultimate goal to build my own business," said Bedenbaugh. "I was very attracted to Valpak's proven business model and reputation for being one of the leading direct marketing companies in the country. Valpak gives me the necessary tools to successfully own and build my own business, while allowing me to do something I am passionate about." Trey Bruner joins Bedenbaugh as his business partner. Bruner, who is also a first-time franchisee, owns the weekly community newspaper The Twin-City News and has strong ties in the local business advertising community. As a 14-year service member in the U.S. Army, Bruner continues to serve as a Captain in the South Carolina Army National Guard, in addition to being a financial advisor with Edward Jones.
Broadcast on: WWTV - Northern Michigan
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Wednesday
January 11, 2017
The Citadel Ranked In Top 10 In Both Final Polls
The Citadel football team has finished the 2016 season ranked in the top 10 of both major FCS polls, it was announced Monday. The Bulldogs are ranked 9th in the Coaches poll and 10th in the STATS poll. This is the team's highest final poll ranking since 1992 when the Bulldogs tied for 1st in the final regular season poll and is the third time The Citadel has finished inside the top 10, joining the 1988 squad's 9th-place position in the final regular season poll. The Citadel, which finished the 2015 season ranked 13th by STATS and 15th by the coaches, is ranked in the final poll in consecutive seasons for the first time since 1990-92 when the team was ranked 15th, tied for 20th and tied for 1st, respectively. The Citadel completed a 10-2 campaign in the first season under head coach Brent Thompson, who broke the program's 100-year-old record for wins by a first-year head coach. The Bulldogs earned their second straight Southern Conference championship and tied the record for most SoCon wins in a season by completing only the seventh 8-0 conference mark in SoCon history. The Citadel broke the program's single-season program record with six road wins, the most in FCS in 2016, and finished with the second-highest single-season wins total in school history. The Citadel was awarded the No. 6 seed in the FCS Playoffs, earning a national seed for the first time under the current 24-team format, and hosted a playoff game for the first time since 1992. The Bulldogs made their fifth postseason appearance and advanced to the playoffs in back-to-back seasons for the first time while Coach Thompson became the only first-year head coach to lead the Bulldogs to the postseason.
Published in: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Wednesday
January 11, 2017
Waccamaw football coach steps down
After seven seasons as head football coach at Waccamaw High School, Tyronne Davis has stepped down to spend more time watching his sons play the sport he loves. "I love it and love the kids, but I just thought it was my time," said Davis, who will continue to be an assistant principal at the school. "Now is the time that I really want to focus on being a parent." Tyler Davis, a Waccamaw High graduate, is a sophomore on The Citadel football team. Trey Davis is a sophomore on the Waccamaw football team. Waccamaw High Principal David Hammel called Davis and excellent football coach, mentor and role model. "I can't say enough good things about Coach Davis," Hammel said. "He has elevated our program." Davis was hired in 2010 and compiled a record of 24-51. In his seven seasons the Warriors made the postseason five times and won two playoff games. His best season was 2014, when the Warriors finished the regular season 5-5 and advanced to the second round of the Class AA playoffs. "I just felt that I wanted to do something different," Davis said. "I'm at a point now where I've done mostly what I wanted to do." Before making his decision to step down, Davis said he sought advice from former Waccamaw softball Coach Scott Streiffert and former Georgetown High basketball Alvin "Stitch" Walker, both of whom retired in 2016 after long coaching careers.
Published in: South Strand News
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Tuesday
January 10, 2017
Experts argue mental health played large role in Fort Lauderdale shooting
(This piece also appeared on more than 150 TV stations nationally). Esteban Santiago, the 26 year-old man suspected of opening fire in a baggage claim area at a Florida airport Friday, killing five people and wounding six, made his first appearance in federal court on Monday, where he faces multiple charges including murder, airport violence, and firearms offenses. If convicted, Santiago could face the death penalty. The suspect's questionable mental stability and recent history of a psychiatric crisis has brought renewed interest in laws that prevent a person who could be a danger to himself or others from owning or obtaining a firearm. The suspect took a one-way flight from his home in Anchorage, Alaska and caught a connecting flight before arriving at the Fort Lauderdale airport. Anchorage airport police confirmed that Santiago had only one checked bag, a hard-case which contained his gun, a 9mm semi-automatic pistol. TSA regulations allow passengers to check their unloaded firearms and up to 11 pounds of ammunition in a locked, hard-case bag. As of Saturday, the suspect's motive for the killing still wasn't clear. George Piro, the FBI's special agent in charge in Miami, told reporters that authorities "have not identified any triggers that would have caused this attack," adding that they have not ruled out terrorism as a motive for the shooting. Dr. Carl Jensen is a retired FBI special agent and director of the intelligence and security studies program at the Citadel Military College of South Carolina. He explained that during his time in the field it was "very common" for individuals with mental problems to reach out the FBI. "Very often, it involved people who heard voices, often times involving the CIA telling them to do something," he said. According to Jensen, the FBI office in Alaska followed the correct procedure by turning Santiago over to local authorities who then conducted his mental evaluation. "FBI agents are not psychologists, they cannot diagnose mental illness."
Broadcast on: WZTV (Nashville, TN) - online
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Tuesday
January 10, 2017
Local Entrepreneurs Acquire Valpak of Greater Columbia in South Carolina
Valpak, a leader in local print and digital coupons, announced today that Valpak of Greater Columbia has been acquired by Daniel Bedenbaugh and Trey Bruner. The large South Carolina territory, which includes Lexington, Newberry and Richland counties, has served local businesses and residents since 1994. The entrepreneurs plan to mail their first Valpak Blue Envelope later this month to approximately 100,000 households in the Palmetto State with the potential to expand to 250,000 households per month. First-time franchisee Daniel Bedenbaugh is a ninth-generation Newberry County native. Prior to franchising with Valpak, Bedenbaugh graduated from The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, in Charleston with a degree in business administration. He has worked in the manufacturing industry, both in process improvement and sales management. "Leading up to this opportunity with Valpak, I discovered my passion for marketing and sales and had the ultimate goal to build my own business," said Bedenbaugh. "I was very attracted to Valpak's proven business model and reputation for being one of the leading direct marketing companies in the country. Valpak gives me the necessary tools to successfully own and build my own business, while allowing me to do something I am passionate about."
Published in: Yahoo! Finance - online
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Monday
January 9, 2017
1a. Former Charleston Mayor Joe Riley to teach highly anticipated history course
On the one-year anniversary of the retirement of one of America's longest serving mayors, Joseph P. Riley, Jr., begins teaching his first full course at The Citadel. The highly anticipated class, Old South City, New South Revival Political Leadership in Charleston, South Carolina, will dive into Charleston's transformation from a sleepy coastal town into an international tourist destination, a major economic engine for the region and a center for global trade. The course will be Riley's first systematic and comprehensive public discussion of his years as mayor of Charleston—years in which the city was transformed from a stagnant, Southern community into a vibrant, international destination of choice. Renowned labor relations expert and history professor, Kerry Taylor, Ph.D., will also be presenting part of the course. Riley's first class will be held from 2:30 - 5 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 12 in Bond Hall room 295. The course will advance The Citadel's primary mission of developing principled leaders. Classes will be held on Tuesday afternoons at various locations on campus and throughout the city, including Riviera Theater, City Hall and Emanuel AME church. Each class session will include remarks by Riley, guest speakers, and a discussion with 15-20 cadets as well as members of the public who will be invited to attend classes based on their areas of interest.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Monday
January 9, 2017
1b. Palmetto Politics: The return of professor Joe Riley
One year after his retirement, former Charleston Mayor Joe Riley begins his new role Thursday as a professor at The Citadel. Riley, Charleston's mayor of 40 years and a 1964 Citadel grad, will teach a new history course called "Old South City, New South Revival: Political Leadership in Charleston, South Carolina." He'll be joined by Associate Professor Kerry Taylor, a labor historian who most recently made the news when police arrested him alongside workers protesting for a $15 minimum wage while on the Crosstown in December. "It will be his first, systematic and comprehensive public discussion of his years as mayor of Charleston - years in which the city was transformed from a stagnant, Southern community into a vibrant, international destination of choice," said Bo Moore, dean of The Citadel School of Humanities and Social Sciences. Post and Courier columnist Brian Hicks' "The Mayor: Joe Riley and the Rise of Charleston" is required reading for the course, as is Steve Estes' "Charleston in Black and White" and the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s Letter from a Birmingham Jail. Guest speakers during the course will include Police Chief Greg Mullen, Spoleto Festival USA General Director Nigel Redden and former S.C. Supreme Court Chief Justice Jean Toal.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
January 9, 2017
2. Get Fit Challenge - H.I.I.T. It
Meet Major David McGrath. An active duty marine for the past 23 years, he created the MUSC Boot Camp while studying Health Exercise & Sports Science at The Citadel. As a guy who wakes up at 4:30 a.m. to jog waist-deep through the ocean and lug ammo cans full of sand, he's a pretty good authority on high intensity. "HIIT is an exercise strategy that alternates short periods of intense activity with less-intense recovery periods," he explains. "It uses muscle confusion and cardiovascular endurance to ensure a full-body workout-think burpees, lunges, broad jumps, push-ups, and planks." The workouts are short in duration, build mental toughness, and benefit from collective motivation. "A positive mental attitude is critical to your success, and to that of your peers!" First Timers - Psyched to get started? Follow McGrath's orders: What to wear: Comfortable workout clothes, especially shoes that provide stability and support your running style. What to bring: A CamelBak or similar water system to maintain hydration, and a towel. You're gonna sweat! What to expect: Some programs use kettlebells, resistance bands, or medicine balls. These will be provided.
Published in: CharlestonMag.com
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Monday
January 9, 2017
3. USC's new grad program aimed at filling cybersecurity worker shortage
South Carolina is getting another degree program aimed at filling a shortage of trained cybersecurity workers in the state. The University of South Carolina won approval last week to start a master's program in information security from the state Commission on Higher Education. The program will be South Carolina's first postgraduate degree program focused specifically on cybersecurity. The Citadel offers a graduate certificate, and Coastal Carolina University has a program that touches on other areas. Charleston Southern, meantime, plans to start an undergraduate major this fall. Developing talent in-state has been a key concern as South Carolina's technology sector grows, especially around Charleston. But nationwide, labor shortages are especially pronounced in cybersecurity as new threats mount and more devices are connected to the internet. An industry trade group has estimated that there will be a worldwide shortage of 1.5 million security professionals by the end of the decade, and the Labor Department projects that between 2014 and 2024, employment in the field will grow by 15 percent. USC, for its part, says it expects to have a dozen or so students at a time in the program, which will use classes the university already offers.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
January 9, 2017
4. Citadel to spend $500,000 on temporary seats at Johnson Hagood Stadium
The Citadel will play at least two football seasons with temporary stands on the east side of Johnson Hagood Stadium as the school pursues a more permanent structure on that side of the stadium. Athletic director Jim Senter said last week that the east-side structure, built in 1948, will soon be razed. Temporary seating for between 2,000 and 3,000 fans will be installed, along with temporary concessions and restrooms, by Aug. 1 in time for the Sertoma Football Classic and the Bulldogs' 2017 season. Total cost for the demolition and temporary facilities could run to about $670,000, he said. That temporary configuration also will likely be in use for The Citadel's 2018 season, Senter said, as fundraising and design plans for a new east-side structure continue. "Having something permanent in place by the 2018 season is probably too ambitious, to be honest," Senter said. "We've got to figure out how much money we have to raise for the east-side, do a request for architectural services and pick somebody to design something for us. "Once we get an idea of the cost, we'll have to work with our donor base to figure out what kind of passion and ability there is to help us build something on the east side." In the meantime, Senter said, The Citadel is looking at spending about $170,000 for demolition and electrical modifications on the east side. Temporary facilities on that side will cost about $500,000, depending on how many seats are included. "The vision here is that we need a clean slate to start with on the east side," Senter said. "It's cost prohibitive to move forward with a structure that dates back to 1948. As we continue to move through the process, we'll look toward a more permanent solution, a design that works with that side of the stadium so we can have a permanent structure at a later date."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
January 9, 2017
5. Late steal, FTs and The Citadel holds off VMI 79-74 in SoCon
Frankie Johnson stole the ball with six seconds left and then the freshman made two free throws as The Citadel held off VMI 79-74 on Saturday. VMI's top scorer, QJ Peterson pulled the Keydets to 73-71 with just under three minutes remaining but missed two jump shots in the final minute and had just grabbed a defensive rebound when Johnson stripped the ball away with six seconds left. Peterson fouled, and Johnson made both free throws for a 79-74 lead and the Bulldogs held on as VMI missed two shots in the final two seconds. Johnson finished with nine points and was 3-for-4 at the foul line. Zane Najdawi led The Citadel (9-9, 2-3 Southern) with 25 points - his eighth game this season with 20 or better - and freshman Leandro Allende added a season-high 21. Peterson led the Keydets (3-11, 0-3) with 22 points and 12 boards, his second double-double.
Published in: USA Today
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Monday
January 9, 2017
6. Facing VMI 'no fun' for Citadel coach Duggar Baucom
Two years after leaving VMI, Citadel basketball coach Duggar Baucom doesn't find it any easier competing against the players he recruited to the Bulldogs' military school rival. "No, it's not fun for me," Baucom said of Saturday's 1 p.m. game against VMI at McAlister Field House. "But it's a necessary evil. We know those kids so well, having been a big part of their lives. I just hope our kids are ready to play." Baucom spent 10 years at VMI before coming to The Citadel in March of 2015. He posted a record of 151-159 at VMI, including a 144-139 mark in nine seasons of the "Loot and Shoot" system he drew up before the 2006-07 season. Baucom led VMI to 20-win seasons in 2008-09 and 2013-14, and to three Big South Conference title games. He also recruited much of the Keydets' current roster, including seniors QJ Peterson, Julian Eleby and Trey Chapman. Peterson, a 6-0 guard, is averaging 18.2 points, while the 6-3 Eleby is at 14.3 ppg. Chapman, a 6-6 forward, is at 9.7 points and 5.1 rebounds. "QJ is as good an individual player as there is in the league," Baucom said. "We'll have to do a good job on him, and on Julian. Their three best players are the seniors, so we'll have to do a good job on all of them." VMI replaced Baucom with Dan Earl, a former Navy assistant whose defense and shot selection emphasis is essentially the opposite of Baucom's fast-paced style.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
January 9, 2017
7. Bulldogs Begin SoCon Action at Appalachian State
The Citadel wrestling team will open its Southern Conference season against No. 21 Appalachian State on Sunday at 2 p.m. in Boone, North Carolina. The Bulldogs (1-1) and Mountaineers (7-2, 3-0 SoCon) both competed at the Southern Scuffle last week in Chattanooga, Tennessee. Appalachian State took 14th overall while the Bulldogs placed 23rd. Both teams were led by their 149-lb wrestlers. The Mountaineers' No. 20 Matt Zovistoski placed seventh individually and the Bulldog's Ty Buckiso (11-12) won his first two matches to advance to the quarterfinals. Buckiso and Zovistoski met in the consolation bracket, with the latter winning by a 3-1 decision in overtime. It was the second time the two wrestled this season, with Zovistoski winning another close match by a 7-6 decision on Nov. 6 at the Southeast Open. The two will likely meet for the third time this season on Sunday. While this is just the first SoCon dual for the Bulldogs, Appalachian State is already 3-0 in conference with wins over Davidson, Campbell and SIU-Edwardsville. The Bulldogs look to rebound off of their last dual, a loss to Northern Illinois in non-conference action. Following the dual at App State, The Citadel travels to Hampton Road, Virginia, for the Virginia Duals.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Monday
January 9, 2017
8. Ex-Citadel coach Mike Houston's formula working again at James Madison
Here's Citadel lineman Kyle Weaver on the Bulldogs' first spring practice under Mike Houston in 2014: "It seemed like there was no way we could keep this intensity the whole spring. We thought they were just sending a message that first practice. Then it was the same thing at the second practice, and the third. It kept going." Here's James Madison quarterback Bryan Schor on the Dukes' first fall camp under Mike Houston in 2016: "He kind of made a point of toughening us up. It's definitely something we worked on during the fall - we had a really challenging camp, with tough elements. He just pushed us really hard. And I think it's made us ready for this." Sound familiar? The same formula that Mike Houston used in turning around Citadel football in just two years - demanding tough, physical play from his players and a high standard for his program - now has James Madison on the brink of an FCS national championship. The 13-1 Dukes can claim their first FCS title since 2004 with a win over 12-3 Youngstown State in the championship game set for noon Saturday (ESPN2) in Frisco, Texas. A win in that game would complete a remarkable four-year run for Houston: An appearance in the Division II national title game at Lenoir-Rhyne in 2013; a Southern Conference title at The Citadel in 2015; and a Colonial Athletic Association title and FCS national championship in 2016.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Friday
January 6, 2017
1. Upcoming news from The Citadel - January
Upcoming news from The Citadel - January events include: cadets to participate in MLK Parade, Black History Intercollegiate Consortium MLK Program, The Citadel Regimental Band and Pipes along with the Summerall Guards to participate in Trump inauguration, Soldiers' Angels Mobile Pantry, The Powers in Us book release, Ostracism, Exclusion and Rejection book release and the January feature from The Citadel Experts Guide.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Friday
January 6, 2017
2. ETSU blows out short-handed Citadel, 115-71
Citadel coach Duggar Baucom didn't spend much time in the locker room after the Bulldogs' 115-71 loss to East Tennessee State on Thursday night at McAlister Field House. Seniors Tom Koopman and Warren Sledge did most of the paint-peeling after The Citadel's worst Southern Conference loss since 1995-96. "You shouldn't lose by 40 at home, everybody knows that," said Baucom, whose team was coming off perhaps the best win of his two Citadel seasons, a 104-103 overtime victory at Wofford. "And our seniors certainly know that, so I was glad they were vocal. We've got to get better before Saturday." ETSU (12-3, 2-0) starts two transfers from college basketball heavyweights Indiana and Wichita State, and was picked to finish second in the SoCon. The Bucs certainly lived up that billing, as senior T.J. Cromer and junior Devontavius Payne scored 19 points each. ETSU handled the Bulldogs' pressure and pace with veteran ease, limiting The Citadel (8-9, 1-3) to just 12 points off 12 turnovers. "We've been pressed a few times this year," said ETSU coach Steve Forbes, a former assistant to Gregg Marshall at Wichita State. "I thought we had pretty good preparation, and we've got some good ball-handlers. We didn't want to turn it over, that was our No. 1 goal, and we wanted to limit their offensive rebounds. We dominated the glass." The Citadel played without freshman standout Preston Parks, the Bulldogs' No. 2 scorer with 15.5 points per game. Parks, who is averaging 25 points in league play, sat out with illness, and is questionable for Saturday's game with VMI.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
January 5, 2017
1. Chapman High grad excited to lead Citadel band at Inaugural Parade
President-elect Donald Trump's Inaugural Parade is a chance for Hunter Crawley to show off her hard work before a national audience. Crawley, a Chapman High School graduate, is the first female Regimental Band drum major in the history of The Citadel. On Jan. 20, she will lead the The Citadel Regimental Band & Pipes and Summerall Guards, the only scheduled South Carolina representative at the inauguration parade, through the streets of Washington, D.C. "It's pretty huge," Crawley said Wednesday. "The Citadel has been part of some (inaugurations) before, but for me personally, it's a big honor and a really big stage." Crawley and her bandmates were ecstatic to learn they had been chosen to participate in the inauguration festivities, she said. "They were literally hollering out of their rooms with excitement," she said. Crawley was named drum major before the start of this academic year. The Regimental Band is composed of about 80 musicians. Another drum major leads The Citadel's Regimental Pipe Band, made up of about 40 pipers and drummers. Together, they lead the full band.
Published in: GoUpstate.com
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Thursday
January 5, 2017
2. Turn your Apple Watch into an armband with ActionSleeve
The Apple Watch's heart rate monitor is one of the most accurate options on the oximeter market - as long as you're not doing anything that involves wrist bending or heavy protective gear. Now, Twelve South may have just the armband strap to fix that problem. To understand why the Apple Watch doesn't like it when you bend your wrist, you have to get how the device's heart rate sensor (oximeter) works. Essentially, the Apple Watch measures your pulse by shining light on the blood vessels in your wrist and measuring how fast blood pumps through said vessels. When you bend your wrist or otherwise contract muscles in your arm, however, the watch may not get an accurate reading thanks to those vessels being constricted. Things like pushups, other weightlifting, and even roller derby can interfere with how the monitor reads your pulse - leading to inaccurate workouts. But rather than pick up a third party armband heart rate monitor to augment your Apple Watch, Twelve South has a different option for exercise aficionados: Move your watch to your bicep with its new ActionSleeve Armband strap. The strap comes with a protective silicone outer frame to protect your watch's casing and an adjustable neoprene strap to provide a snug fit on your arm - no matter your flexing prowess. It's also a great option for amputees and other athletes who don't always have access to their wrists - Twelve South worked with Cameron Massengale, an amputee athlete at The Citadel Military College of South Carolina, when developing the product.
Published in: iMore.com
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Thursday
January 5, 2017
3. Gregson pledges to strive for excellence as DA
Andy Gregson has been preparing most of his adult life to be a district attorney. He has worked under Garland Yates since 1994, many of those years as chief assistant district attorney for District 19B. When Yates announced last year that he wouldn't run for a 10th term, Gregson filed for the post and faced no opposition in winning the head job. But how Gregson, who was formally sworn in Wednesday, got to that point shows how prepared he is to be district attorney for Randolph and Montgomery counties. Air Force experience - A 1981 Randleman High School graduate, Gregson did his undergraduate work at The Citadel in Charleston, S.C., and earned his law degree from Campbell University. "I had taken a class in my junior year (at The Citadel) that had me intrigued with law," Gregson said recently. "I delayed Air Force entry to go to law school." As it happened, the Air Force needed JAGs, lawyers of the Judge Advocate General. Gregson said he "decided to be a trial lawyer. Campbell had a good program and I fell in love with it." Once in the Air Force, he was sent to Carswell Air Force Base in Fort Worth, Texas, a base that "had a lot of court martials. I did that for two years."
Published in: The Courier-Tribune
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Thursday
January 5, 2017
4. Former Rep. Thad Viers, serving federal prison sentence, being transferred to halfway house
Former Rep. Thad Viers, who currently is serving in federal prison for money laundering, is being transferred to a halfway house, prison officials said Wednesday. Viers, a Republican from Myrtle Beach, had been serving his sentence at a low-security federal prison in Petersburg, Virginia, and was being transferred on Wednesday. A prison spokesman said he could not say where the halfway house is located until Viers has reached the new location. In 2015, Viers pleaded guilty to money laundering for helping a construction company owner hide assets. Prison records indicate Viers is due to be released in June. The 38-year-old former lawmaker once was considered a rising star in South Carolina's Republican Party. A 1999 graduate of The Citadel, his bid for the newly formed 1st Congressional District seat in the U.S. House of Representatives in 2012 was derailed when he was arrested and charged with harassing and stalking a 28-year-old woman he once dated. The following year, Viers was charged with burglary and larceny in connection with the same 28-year-old woman. In 2014, Viers pleaded guilty to second-degree harassment in connection to those arrests and was sentenced to 60 days in jail, which he served on weekends. In July, the state Supreme Court revoked Viers' law license for three years, but the court made the suspension retroactive to 2012 to coincide with the harassment charges.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
January 5, 2017
5. Citadel basketball 'circus' does include defense, of a sort
After watching his team drop a 104-103 overtime decision to The Citadel on Monday, Wofford coach Mike Young offered brief remarks. "The circus came to town," he said, "and we didn't handle it very well." Bulldogs coach Duggar Baucom, who considers Young a friend, laughed about it Wednesday. "When I was young, the circus was the funnest thing around," Baucom said. "It's full of excitement and surprises. That might be a great way to describe what we do." In 11 years of coaching his brand of fast-paced basketball — variously described as "Duggarball" or "Loot and Shoot" — at VMI and now at The Citadel, Baucom has heard it all. "I've been called a mad scientist," said Baucom, whose Bulldogs (8-8, 1-2) face Southern Conference foe East Tennessee State (11-3, 1-0) Thursday night at McAlister Field House. "They say we don't play any defense. But points don't really matter to us, as long as we have one more than the other team." As conference play heats up around the nation, The Citadel leads all of Division I in scoring offense, averaging an even 100 points per game. The rest of the top five includes some of the sport's bluebloods - Kentucky, UCLA, Oklahoma State and West Virginia. Conversely, the Bulldogs also rank in the bottom five - second from last, in fact - in scoring defense, allowing 100.3 points per game. Only Savannah State (103.5) is worse among 347 teams in NCAA rankings. For Baucom, standard defensive measures, such as points per game or field-goal percentage defense, don't apply.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
January 4, 2017
1. Charleston couple leaves it all on the mat during judo competitions
They met in 1998 - two kids in the marching band at Gettysburg College in Pennsylvania who started to bond over late-night study sessions in a small section of the campus library. Then they fell in love. Robert Gouthro was a liberal arts guy, studying history. Lisa Capriotti was a science gal, earning her degree in chemistry. They fell for each other during their senior year at Gettysburg, started dating in 2001 and wed in 2009. "We really were kind of meant for each other," Capriotti gushed. "Like two peas in a pod." Most of the time, spousal terms are in order when the couple defines their relationship: he is Robert, Lisa's husband, and she is Lisa, Robert's wife. But the couple, who lives in Summerville, are also partners in kime no kata, a traditional form of judo with an emphasis on the self-defense applications of the sport. And when they travel around the world for judo competitions - finding themselves on the mat or in the gym - the tables turn... In the meantime, they teach free judo classes to military personnel and civilians at the Naval Weapons Station in Goose Creek, and Capriotti has also started a team at The Citadel, where she is an adjunct chemistry professor. Gouthro is hoping to start a club at Fort Dorchester Elementary, where he teaches English as a second language, some time next semester. Their mission is to grow the sport - hoping judo does for others what it's done for them.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Wednesday
January 4, 2017
2. The Past and Future of Socialism
December 24, 2016 marks the 25th anniversary of the formal end of the Soviet Union as a political entity on the map of the world. A quarter of a century ago, the curtain was lowered on the 75-year experiment in "building socialism" in the country where it all began following the Bolshevik Revolution in Russia, led by Vladimir Lenin in November 1917. Some historians have estimated that as many as 200 million people worldwide may have died as part of the 20th century dream of creating a collectivist "paradise on earth." The attempt to establish a comprehensive socialist system in many parts of the world over the last 100 years has been one of the cruelest and most brutal episodes in human history. Making a new "better world" was taken to mean the extermination, liquidation, and mass murder of all those who the socialist revolutionary leaders declared to be "class enemies," including the families and even the children of "enemies of the people." Richard M. Ebeling is BB&T Distinguished Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina. He was president of the Foundation for Economic Education (FEE) from 2003 to 2008.
Published in: Theology Geek NZ
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Wednesday
January 4, 2017
3. Bulldogs Finish Competition at Southern Scuffle
The Citadel wrestling team wrapped up its first tournament of 2017 at the Southern Scuffle on Monday. Ty Buckiso (11-12) was the lone Bulldog to advance to day two of the tournament, but fell in his first consolation match. Buckiso faced No. 7 seeded Matthew Zovistoski of SoCon rival Appalachian State in the consolation round. With the score tied 1-1 after three rounds, Zovistoski grabbed the deciding two points on a takedown 12 seconds into overtime. Buckiso went 2-2 at the tournament after winning his first two matches on Sunday. He defeated Penn State's Gary Dinmore by a 2-0 decision and followed it up with a win over Virginia's Sam Krivus by a 3-1 decision sudden victory. Buckiso picked up the match's lone takedown 24 seconds into overtime to move onto the quarterfinals. Buckiso then finished day one with a loss to No. 1 seeded Lavion Mayes of Missouri. Rian Burris also won two matches out of the 149-lb weight class for the Bulldogs. He wrestled unattached for The Citadel. Burris fell in his opening match by a 16-6 major decision to Lehigh's Cortlandt Schuyler. After receiving a win by forfeit, Burris defeated Oklahoma State's Jonce Blaylock by a 3-2 decision. He then fell to North Carolina's Troy Heilmann by a 15-5 major decision to end his tournament run.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Tuesday
January 3, 2017
1a. Citadel band and pipes, Summerall Guards to participate in Trump inauguration
The Citadel Regimental Band and Pipes and the Summerall Guards will participate in the parade that follows the inauguration of President-elect Donald Trump and running mate Mike Pence, the school said Wednesday. "The Citadel is greatly honored to have been selected to participate in the presidential inaugural parade," said Col. Tim Smith, Citadel director of music. "We'll be practicing as soon as cadets return from winter furlough and look forward to heading to Washington, D.C." The Presidential Inaugural Committee sorted through 200 applications from parade hopefuls, according to The Associated Press. The Regimental Band has about 80 cadet musicians. The Pipe Band includes some 35 to 40 bagpipers and drummers. "They are working on the music selections this week, selecting patriotic songs that can be played by the band and the pipes band together," said Kim Keelor-Parker, spokeswoman for The Citadel. The Summerall Guards is a 61-member silent precision drill platoon whose members include Cameron Massengale of Greenville. In 2014, he lost his dominant right right hand and wrist in a butcher shop accident. Despite the injury, he persevered to master the skills needed to join the elite group of seniors, The Citadel said.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
January 3, 2017
1b. Should Colleges March in Trump Inaugural?
At past presidential inaugurations, colleges and universities have boasted about being selected to march in the parade down Pennsylvania Avenue. Students and their institutions get a moment in front of the new president and airtime on national television. This has been true for inaugurations of recent Democratic and Republican presidents alike. The 2017 inauguration may be different. Marist College, in New York State; Olivet Nazarene University, in Illinois; and Talladega College, in Alabama, are all facing a barrage of online criticism from students and alumni for sending their bands to the parade. Several other colleges and universities will also be participating, but are not drawing criticism. Here are some of the tweets about Marist, the first two typical of the many criticizing the decision and the last one reflecting support for the college's stance... Other colleges marching are: The Citadel, Texas State University, the University of Tennessee at Knoxville and Virginia Military Institute. For VMI, this will be the 15th inauguration in which its Corps of Cadets will march.
Published in: InsideHigherEd.com
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Tuesday
January 3, 2017
2a. Charleston couple leaves it all on the mat during judo competitions
They met in 1998 - two kids in the marching band at Gettysburg College in Pennsylvania who started to bond over late-night study sessions in a small section of the campus library. Then they fell in love. Robert Gouthro was a liberal arts guy, studying history. Lisa Capriotti was a science gal, earning her degree in chemistry. They fell for each other during their senior year at Gettysburg, started dating in 2001 and wed in 2009. "We really were kind of meant for each other," Capriotti gushed. "Like two peas in a pod." Most of the time, spousal terms are in order when the couple defines their relationship: he is Robert, Lisa's husband, and she is Lisa, Robert's wife. But the couple, who lives in Summerville, are also partners in kime no kata, a traditional form of judo with an emphasis on the self-defense applications of the sport. And when they travel around the world for judo competitions - finding themselves on the mat or in the gym - the tables turn... In the meantime, they teach free judo classes to military personnel and civilians at the Naval Weapons Station in Goose Creek, and Capriotti has also started a team at The Citadel, where she is an adjunct chemistry professor. Gouthro is hoping to start a club at Fort Dorchester Elementary, where he teaches English as a second language, some time next semester. Their mission is to grow the sport - hoping judo does for others what it's done for them.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
January 3, 2017
2b. Citadel to help research ways to reduce traffic congestion
The Citadel, along with nine other universities in the Southeast, will develop ways to reduce traffic congestion using millions of dollars' worth of federal grants. The Southeastern Transportation Research, Innovation, Development and Education Center consortium grant will provide up to $14 million over the next five years to 10 universities, according to a news release. The Citadel is the only S.C. institution invited to participate. It was awarded two grants equaling about $1 million over five years by the U.S. Department of Transportation's University Transportation Center, the news release said. The other institutions involved are the University of North Carolina, N.C. State University, the University of Florida, Florida International University, Auburn University, Jackson State University, the University of Alabama at Birmingham, Georgia Tech and Tennessee Tech. "Our nation faces unprecedented challenges from population growth, a changing climate and increasing freight volumes," U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx said in the news release. "Universities are at the forefront of identifying solutions, researching critical emerging issues and ensuring improved access to opportunity for all Americans." The Citadel will also participate in a consortium of S.C. institutions that were selected for Center for Connected Multimodal Mobility grants. That federal grant will provide about $7.8 million over the next five years for transportation research, outreach and education, the news release said.
Published in: Charleston Regional Business Journal
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Tuesday
January 3, 2017
3a. Book pays tribute to general from American Revolution
A key leader of the American Revolution, including battles fought at Star Fort in Ninety Six, is the subject of a new book, "Nathanael Greene in South Carolina: Hero of the American Revolution," by author and historian Leigh M. Moring. The book tells the story of Greene and the liberation of the Lowcountry at the end of the American Revolution. According to information from the National Park Service about the Ninety Six National Historic Site, Greene was the Patriot commander at Ninety Six. A former Quaker from Rhode Island and the youngest brigadier general in the Patriot army, Greene assumed command of the Southern Department for the Patriots. Greene faced the British in several key battles in South Carolina in 1781. Ultimately, Greene was able to rid South Carolina of the British and free the important port city of Charleston. Moring, 26, said she had wanted to write about another South Carolina Revolutionary War hero, Francis Marion, but David Preston, a professor at The Citadel, suggested she consider Greene. "Once I started researching him and reading his papers, I was hooked," Moring wrote in an email. "Greene can be called the 'savior of the south.'"
Published in: Index-Journal
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Tuesday
January 3, 2017
3b. How to be a Light for Liberty in 2017
"It's the year," she said, "to get over the past, transform the present and really build the future. And if you can keep your wits about you, keep your focus, and not give into the endless distractions of the modern world, things will fall into place. As if by magic." The message, although somewhat nebulous to conceptualize, resonated. Broadly speaking, resolution-wise, we've committed to giving more, speaking more Truth to power, succumbing to fewer needless distractions, taking better care of our bag of meat and bones and, which will be a major focus in the coming months, building the future. This is the year, we believe, to find the appropriate "tribe" (in whatever form that may be) and build the future's foundation. The where, what and with whom may still be up in the air, but that is the resolution and intention: Find the tribe and build. (This journey, for us at least, will begin on the southern coast of Brazil as soon as next week. Stay tuned for that.) Most importantly, the overarching theme is to become a stronger and brighter and less apologetic light for truth, liberty, freedom and prosperity for all. Which brings us to the first feature of the new year from former FEE President Richard Ebeling. As our preliminary guide for this monumental task, we invite Mr. Ebeling to show us precisely how we can become a light for liberty in the new year - and, yes, for the new world.
Published in: LaissezFaire.org
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Tuesday
January 3, 2017
3c. The Soviet Union 25 Years On: 'A Story of Crushing Tyranny and Oceans of Blood'
December 24, 2016 marks the 25th anniversary of the formal end of the Soviet Union as a political entity on the map of the world. A quarter of a century ago, the curtain was lowered on the 75-year experiment in "building socialism" in the country where it all began following the Bolshevik Revolution in Russia, led by Vladimir Lenin in November 1917. Some historians have estimated that as many as 200 million people worldwide may have died as part of the 20th century dream of creating a collectivist "paradise on earth." The attempt to establish a comprehensive socialist system in many parts of the world over the last 100 years has been one of the cruelest and most brutal episodes in human history. Making a new "better world" was taken to mean the extermination, liquidation, and mass murder of all those who the socialist revolutionary leaders declared to be "class enemies," including the families and even the children of "enemies of the people." Richard M. Ebeling is BB&T Distinguished Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina. He was president of the Foundation for Economic Education (FEE) from 2003 to 2008.
Published in: Breitbart.com
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Tuesday
January 3, 2017
4a. Apollo Appoints Matt Green as Production Supervisor
Apollo Design Technology, Inc. announces the appointment of Matt Green as production supervisor. In this role, Green supervises production and ensures productivity and quality requirements of the finished products. "It's great to have Matt and his technical skills on the Apollo team. His service attitude and dedication are impressive and will help us to continue to grow.", says Joel Nichols, president of Apollo Design. Prior to joining Apollo Design, Green worked as a production supervisor at Zimmer Biomet, Inc. He served in the United States Air Force as an Airborne Intelligence Officer, was stationed overseas for four years and deployed several times in support of military operations in the middle east. Green holds a Bachelor's Degree in History from The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina. "I am extremely excited and humbled to join an innovative company like Apollo Design. I am looking forward to working alongside a highly capable and experienced team and relish the challenge in continuing to make Apollo a success," Green says.
Published in: Lighting and Sound America
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Tuesday
January 3, 2017
4b. Hires and promotions
Construction - Ed Cobb has joined Trident Construction as senior project manager. Previously, he worked in the Washington D.C., area for 35 years. He has a bachelor's degree in civil engineering from The Citadel and a master's degree in civil engineering from the University of Alaska.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
January 3, 2017
5. College News - The Citadel
Summerall Cup - The Summerall Cup is awarded annually to the cadet company at The Citadel with the best overall academic achievement. Companies are rated on average grade point ratio for the fall and spring semesters. India Company achieved an overall company grade point ratio of 3.2. Jacob Clements of Cameron, India Company, has been recognized for outstanding academic achievement during the 2015-16 school year. Papa Company awarded 2016 President's Cup - The Citadel's President's Cup is awarded annually to the cadet company that establishes the highest combined score in academic achievement, military performance, extracurricular participation and fourth-class retention. Octavia Wolfe of Orangeburg and Joseph Staley of Denmark, Papa Company, have been recognized for their contributions to the company's success during the 2015-16 school year.
Published in: The Times & Democrat
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Tuesday
January 3, 2017
6. Former Citadel basketball standout Derrick Henry now an MTV reality show star
Derrick Henry was at home one day last year, idly watching an episode of the MTV reality show "Are You The One?" "Would you ever do anything like that?" a friend asked. "Heck yeah," Henry answered. "How could you not want to do something like that!" A week later, as fate would have it, one of the show's casting producers contacted Henry with the very same question. The casting producer had spotted Henry on social media and thought the former Citadel basketball player fit the bill for the show: Young, good-looking people looking for love in a tropical setting. "It was totally random," Henry said. "They saw me on Instagram and Facebook, and it came out of nowhere." So instead of trying to find a job in professional basketball in Europe or elsewhere, Henry spent about two months in the Dominican Republic last fall taping 10 episodes of "Are You The One?" for its fifth season, which begins Jan. 11. Who knows? It might be the start of a different kind of pro career for Henry, who graduated from Winthrop University with a degree in business finance before transferring to The Citadel for his final season in 2015-16.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
January 3, 2017
7a. Citadel football 2016: Big drama, sudden end, bright future
A day after The Citadel's football season ended with a playoff loss to Wofford, coach Brent Thompson sat by himself in the stands at McAlister Field House. He stared into space as the Bulldogs' basketball team played in front of him, looking like a guy with a lot on his mind. He was. "You're thinking about all that's behind you and what's ahead of you," said Thompson, reflecting on his first season as a head coach. "And you think about what could have been. We had our opportunities. "But we had a great year, and I didn't want to see it end. It was so exciting around here, and when it ends all of the sudden like that, it's very difficult." There's plenty to contemplate in the Bulldogs' 2016 season: A 10-2 record, a second straight Southern Conference championship, a No. 6 seed and first-round bye in the FCS playoffs and all manner of postseason awards, including a SoCon coach of the year nod for Thompson. It was a season rivaled in school history only by the Bulldogs' 11-2 record, SoCon title and No. 1 national ranking in 1992, and continued the remarkable turnaround job begun by former coach Mike Houston and Thompson, his offensive coordinator, just three years ago. "We took great strides forward," Thompson said. "We accomplished many of our goals, and there are many goals still to be had. I think we gained a lot of confidence as a program."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
January 3, 2017
7b. The Citadel survives OT thriller against rival Wofford
Kaelon Harris scored 23 points and Frankie Johnson hit two crucial free throws in the final minute as The Citadel survived in overtime 104-103 against conference rival Wofford on Monday night. A Preston Parks 3 for the Bulldogs tied the game at 91 with 1:14 left and forced the overtime period. The Citadel kept the pressure on, scoring nine of the first 11 points for a 100-93 lead. Wofford responded however, trimming it to 102-100 on a Cameron Jackson layup with 34 seconds to play. But Johnson coolly drilled both free throws to give The Citadel (8-8, 1-2 Southern Conference) a two-possession lead which ultimately proved to be the difference. Parks finished with 19 points for The Citadel, which finished with 100-plus points for the eighth time this season. Eric Garcia led Wofford (6-9, 1-1) with 27 points, while Fletcher Magee added 18.
Broadcast on: WCIV-TV Charleston, SC
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Tuesday
January 3, 2017
8. West Lake hopes to make an impact in tennis
West Lake Country Club is known for its golf, but the tennis professionals are trying to make sure their sport gets some attention, too. A lot of work has been done recently at the tennis center. The hard courts have been resurfaced. The concrete steps on the stadium court have been pressure washed and are in the process of getting painted. Also, a basketball court has been added adjacent to the tennis courts, as well as pickleball courts. In addition, 60-foot court lines have been added for children 10 and under. "We're just trying to give a little more variety," West Lake director of tennis Raul Rodriguez said. "We're just trying to get as many people out to the center as possible." Rodriguez, along with assistant pro Tracy Zawacki, is helping to bring people to West Lake for tennis in another way as well. The club is organizing the inaugural Green Rackets Classic, which will be held two weeks after the Masters Tournament in April... "I want this to be the signature event and just change out the celebrities and pros each year and make it bigger and bigger," Rodriguez said. "As we raise more awareness and more sponsorship dollars, we can attract bigger names. I think the names we attracted for this year's event is pretty good." Rodriguez came a year and a half ago to West Lake. He grew up in Charleston and played tennis at The Citadel. He worked as a tennis pro in Charlotte, N.C., before moving to Augusta.
Published in: The Columbia County News Times
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