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The Citadel in the News: Archive

August 2016

PUBLISH DATE STORIES
Wednesday
August 31, 2016
1. After 1,000 practice reps, is Citadel QB Jordan Black ready for his debut?
A popular theory holds that 10,000 hours of practice are necessary to achieve mastery in any field. Such a practice schedule might violate NCAA rules, but Citadel coach Brent Thompson has done his best in preseason camp to prepare redshirt freshman quarterback Jordan Black for his college football debut. Thompson estimates that Black, who will make his first start on Thursday night in the 15th-ranked Bulldogs' season opener at Mercer, has put in almost 1,000 reps in preseason camp. The question is: Will that be enough for Black to be ready to lead the defending Southern Conference champion to victory in a TV game, on the road, against a SoCon foe? "He's probably close to 1,000 reps at this point," said Thompson, who also makes his debut as The Citadel's 25th head coach on Thursday. "So he's settled down at this point in that role. We'll probably have to settle him down his first couple of reps at Mercer, just like I will as head coach. But I think after the first couple of reps, he'll be just fine." Black, a 6-1, 200-pound lefty from Vidalia, Ga., is stepping in for junior Dominique Allen, who started all 13 games for the Bulldogs last year, leading the team to a 9-4 record and an FCS playoff victory. Allen is suspended for the season opener due to a violation of team rules, and he is also recovering from an injury to fingers on his throwing hand.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
August 31, 2016
2. Bulldogs Hit The Road For Bash In The 'Boro
The Citadel volleyball team will be on the road for the first time this season, traveling to Statesboro, Georgia, for the Bash in the 'Boro at Georgia Southern, beginning Thursday. The Bulldogs will play four matches, with two each on Thursday and Friday. They begin the tournament against Savannah State at 11 a.m., followed by Jacksonville State at 5 p.m. The Bulldogs continue play on Friday against Charleston Southern at 3 p.m. and finish the Bash in the 'Boro against host Georgia Southern at 7 p.m. The Citadel is 24-1 all-time against Savannah State, which includes a 24-match win streak. The teams matched up twice last season, with the Bulldogs winning 3-0 on Sept. 22 and 3-1 on Oct. 20. The Bulldogs have matched up once with Jacksonville State, falling 3-0 on Oct. 3, 1998. The Gamecocks finished 2015 with a 14-20 overall record. Friday will be the 25th meeting between The Citadel and Charleston Southern. In 2015, the teams split two matches. The Bulldogs won the first meeting 3-2 on Sept. 15, but fell 3-0 on Nov. 3. The Buccaneers were 10-23 in 2015. The Citadel last faced Georgia Southern in 2013, when the Eagles were a member of the Southern Conference, falling 3-0 on Nov. 5. The Eagles finished the 2015 campaign with a 10-19 record.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Wednesday
August 31, 2016
3. Press Conference: Mercer Week
The 15th-ranked Citadel football team hosted its first weekly press conference of the season Tuesday. Head coach Brent Thompson, redshirt freshman quarterback Jordan Black and senior linebacker Joe Crochet met with the media. Selected quotes are below. Head coach Brent Thompson - Opening Statement: "Afternoon, thank you guys for coming out. We are extremely excited here as we talk about Mercer, our opening game this year for the 2016 season. It's a much anticipated league game for us, they have done a great job and have improved every single year that they have been in the Southern Conference and they are at a point where they have 20 of 22 starters returning on both sides of the football. This is going to be a very experienced football team that we're seeing, they make very few mistakes and I think they are a very fundamental team. They are a team that's similar to us in that they like to run the football and they do a good job of it. They do a good job of stopping the run and that's the same premise we have on our team as well. It will be a very challenging game for us and what I have been telling our players all along is that the team that makes the least amount of mistakes, penalty wise and turnover wise, will have a chance to win this football game. If you look at them they turn it over very rarely, I think they were the best in the conference last year at the least penalties per game and so we are up against a challenge.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Wednesday
August 31, 2016
4. FOOTBALL: Q&A with Woodrow Wilson's Anthony Ramos
As part of our preseason look into South Jersey football, we want to know a little bit more about some of the region's players. Anthony Ramos, a senior linebacker, talked over a variety of things with reporter Josh Friedman... JF: You received a scholarship offer from The Citadel, a Division I program, after last year's performance. What was that like? AR: I was very excited and I just want more. I want to keep on going. I always dreamed of playing college football because I watch college football every day when it comes on, so when I got it, I never heard of the school till he said it, and I looked up some information and I really liked the school, but I want more. JF: You're a bit undersized as a linebacker at 5-foot-9, 183 pounds. Does that affect you? AR: It doesn't impact me. I just go out and play like I always do, I do what I got to do. JF: Are there any benefits to being that size? AR: I can get through the hole way faster than some bigger guys do.
Published in: Courier-Post
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Wednesday
August 31, 2016
5. Chris Mathisen Jr. Obituary
Norman (Chris) Alfred Mathisen, Jr., 78, of Lake Park and husband to Margie Thompson Mathisen of 56 years went to be with his Lord and Savior on August 27, 2016. He was born to the late Norman Alfred Mathisen Sr. and Geraldine Tomkinson Mathisen of Folly Beach S.C. on August 14, 1938. He is a graduate of the 1960 class of the Citadel in Charleston S.C. and the owner of The Mathisen Company since its inception in 1971. He developed the city of Lake Park as well as many other communities throughout Union and Mecklenburg County. Chris also served in several civic capacities including the Union Regional Medical Center Development Council, the CMC-Union Board of Trustees, the Union County Community Arts Council, the Union County Industrial Facilities and Pollution Control Financing Authority. Chris was in the United States Marine Corps Reserve from 1959 to 1961 and underwent basic training in the Platoon Leaders Class in Quantico, Virginia in 1959. He has been a member of Shiloh Baptist Church for over 30 years. He is survived by his wife Margie of the home, two daughters, Pamela Mathisen Schorr of Little River, S.C. and Teresa Jill Mathisen of Matthews, one grandson, Matthew Harley Schorr as well as one brother Charles Kristofer Mathisen and wife Mary of Summerville S.C. and his sister Christine Mathisen Schwacke and husband Edward of Charleston S.C.
Published in: The Enquirer Journal
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Tuesday
August 30, 2016
1. The Citadel, Charleston Southern agree to resume series in 2018
It was a one-sided rivalry until it went away the first time, and it's been fairly lopsided since it came back. It remains to be seen whether Charleston Southern or The Citadel will own a big edge on the field when they resume their now twice-interrupted series in 2018, but there's one aspect that will swing exclusively the Bulldogs' way: the location. Johnson Hagood Stadium will host all four meetings between Charleston's two Division I college football programs when a series that's currently in the first of a two-year hiatus kicks off again. And that's perhaps as interesting a detail as the agreement to play at all, which was announced Monday by The Citadel athletic director Jim Senter. "We are excited to renew this FCS matchup between our two schools," Senter said in a statement. "This game is a no-brainer and makes sense for two great colleges in the Lowcountry representing two outstanding FCS conferences. We have been working on dates and finalizing the terms for a while now, and we are excited to resume this series in Johnson Hagood Stadium beginning in 2018." The Citadel won four of the first five meetings in a series that began in 2002 and lasted until 2007, with a scheduled 2004 meeting canceled due to Hurricane Frances. The rivalry renewed in 2012 with another Bulldogs rout, but the Buccaneers have beaten The Citadel four times in the last three seasons - including a 14-6 win at home last December that was Charleston Southern's first FCS playoff victory.
Published in: FoxSports.com
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Tuesday
August 30, 2016
2. Citadel professor's research on Hemingway reveals different man than imagined
The author of the first major Ernest Hemingway biography in more than 20 years wants the world to know Hemingway as he believes he was. Citadel Professor James M. Hutchisson, Ph.D. wrote Ernest Hemingway, A New Life, which Penn State University Press published this year. Hutchisson is a professor of American literature at the college, and this is his thirteenth book. What compelled Hutchisson to write Ernest Hemingway, A New Life? "For starters, I thought that the existing major biographies of Hemingway were swaybacked by their insistence on seeing Hemingway through a single, very limited critical or ideological lens," he said. "I also felt that most biographers, whether they admitted it or not, didn't much like Hemingway. I think that over time many of his statements and public gestures were misinterpreted, and I wanted to give a fairer and more balanced portrait of the man. I see him more sympathetically, I think, than many other critics do." Hutchisson started Ernest Hemingway, A New Life in 2007, in the midst of his more than 25 year career as a professor at The Citadel. He says he published three other books during the time he was conducting research and writing about Hemmingway.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Tuesday
August 30, 2016
3. Citadel considers tearing down visitors' side at Johnson Hagood Stadium
The Citadel is considering tearing down the visitors' side at Johnson Hagood Stadium and expects to make a decision by the end of the week, athletic director Jim Senter said Monday. Flaking lead paint, a health hazard, was discovered on the east side of the 21,000-seat stadium over the summer, and fans were not allowed to sit on that side during the Sertoma Football Classic earlier this month. With the Bulldogs' home opener against Furman looming on Sept. 10, a decision on a way forward must be made soon, Senter said Monday after a meeting of the Board of Visitors' operations and risk management committee. The school also is considering a three-phase mitigation and repair project that would have the center section of the east-side stands ready for the Furman game, with more sections available later in the season. "We are looking at every option as to what is the wise and prudent thing to do," Senter said. "There's a lot of things to take into consideration there - the number of tickets we're selling, the revenue we're generating, the age and viability of the structure moving forward, the cost to repair it.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
August 30, 2016
4. John Locke Is Needed Now More than Ever
Personal and economic freedom are under attack in the United States and in many other parts of the world. This is seen most clearly in this year's contest for the White House. In all the rhetoric about America's political, social, and economic problems that is heard from the lips of the Democratic and Republican presidential candidates, there is one phrase that is hardly ever mentioned or considered important: the liberty of the individual. Neither Clinton nor Trump Place Any Value on Liberty - Hillary Clinton's mantra focuses on redistributive entitlements; racial, social and gender group privileges or burdens; and social engineering of human relationships based on superimposed collective identity politics. Deceptions, lies, and an arrogant self-righteous tone of feigned caring about others as she pursues personal power and wealth: these are the hallmarks of her disgraceful character. Amid Donald Trump's televised outbursts and often-disconnected streams of consciousness, he drones on about regaining a lost national collectivist greatness; nativist job entitlements against immigrants looking for a better future; and bullying businesses to operate their companies where Trump thinks they should be located. His coarse insults and threats are directed against anyone who falls into his disfavor, and are wrapped in a disregard for Constitutional constraints and a disrespect for civil liberties under the Bill of Rights. Richard M. Ebeling is BB&T Distinguished Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina. He was president of the Foundation for Economic Education (FEE) from 2003 to 2008.
Published in: Fee.org
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Tuesday
August 30, 2016
5. The Agenda: Record number of women in Citadel class
Twenty years after The Citadel eliminated its males-only admission policy, the 'Military College of the South' is welcoming a record-number of 68 incoming freshman cadets for the fall semester. Source: P&C
Published in: Charleston City Paper
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Tuesday
August 30, 2016
6. Wine and Food to kick off festival season with event at The Citadel
Charleston Wine + Food will officially launch its 2017 season with the release of full schedule and tickets Thursday, Sept. 15 at 8 a.m. To coincide with the release, the festival will host a locally inspired celebration, Grand Slam Jam, presented by Big Green Egg and supported by Charleston Magazine, at The Citadel's College Park Field. The event will feature an all-star lineup of local chefs, beverage pros, and live music from '80s and '90s cover band, The Spazmatics. Guests can expect vintage baseball vibes and elevated ballpark food and drink, all inspired by the venue that was once home to the Charleston Rainbows. The Rainbows served as Charleston's minor league baseball team from 1985 to 1993. Local culinary talent will include Kevin Johnson of The Grocery, Greg Garrison of Prohibition, Kevin Getzewich of Indaco, Jason Cote of Jasmine Porch at The Sanctuary, Daniel Doyle of Poogan's Smokehouse, Jared Rogers of Pawpaw, Anthony DiBernardo of Swig & Swine, Roland Feldman of Smoke BBQ, Emily Hahn of Parlor Deluxe & Warehouse, Tony Chu of AYA Cookhouse, Sean & Cillie Mendes of Roadside Seafood, Brandon Belk of Wich Cream?, Paul Yellin of Cane Rhum Bar & Caribbean Kitchen, Arielle Stratton of Pure Fluff Co, Kelly Chu of Cirsea Ice Cream.
Published in: Moultrie News
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Tuesday
August 30, 2016
7. Citadel Notes: True freshmen dot depth chart on offensive line
Freshman Drew McEntyre is slated to start at right guard for The Citadel in the Bulldogs' opener at Mercer on Thursday, and two other true freshmen are on the depth chart released Monday. McEntyre is a 6-3, 285-pounder from Calhoun, Ga. He started working with the first team in preseason camp when senior center Ryan Bednar was hampered by injury, forcing sophomore Tyler Davis to slide over from guard to center. The depth chart lists Bednar (6-1, 285) or Davis (6-1, 279) as the starter at center. Meanwhile, freshman Prince Howard-Whitaker is the backup to junior Isaiah Pinson and left tackle, and freshman Mark Weakland is No. 2 at left guard behind senior Kyle Weaver. On defense, junior Travis Johnson is set to start at the end position occupied by all-Southern Conference performer Mark Thomas last year. Sophomores Kevin Graham, Ken Allen and Jonathan King form a three-man rotation at tackle, where Mitchell Jeter was the SoCon defensive player of the year last year. Myles Pierce, a 6-0, 229-pound junior, is starting at the linebacker spot filled last year by top tackler James Riley.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
August 29, 2016
1. 20 years later, women continue to make history at The Citadel
Jennifer Pozzani grimaced as the barber wrapped her shoulder-length blonde hair into a ponytail and started cutting. Then she squeezed her eyes shut. The barber, a woman named Sarah Kilgore with two-toned hair and tattoos on her arms, sawed off Pozzani's ponytail and traced a humming clipper along her scalp. Jaw dropped, Pozzani stared at her reflection in the mirror on the opposite wall of The Citadel Barber Shop. "How does that look?" Kilgore asked, handing Pozzani a mirror. "Good," she said. "As good as it's gonna get." "Nine months will be over before you know it." For Pozzani, an 18-year-old from Rockland County in New York, her regulation haircut - no longer than three inches on all sides - is a rite of passage at The Citadel, an institution steeped in history and tradition that for decades excluded women from its ranks. How times have changed. In the past 20 years, the number of women in the Corps of Cadets has slowly but steadily grown. In 1999 - the year Nancy Mace, a self-described "tomboy" from Goose Creek, became the first female cadet to graduate from the historic military college - 30 women entered The Citadel's iron gates. For the fall 2016 semester, 68 female "knobs" reported to campus for Matriculation Day, the school's largest class of freshmen women ever. Today, women at The Citadel hold high-ranking leadership positions within the Corps. More than half of them participate in varsity sports. They enter The Citadel with higher grade-point averages than their males peers. They graduate at higher rates and are less likely to drop out, too. Research from the Multi-Institutional Survey of Leadership shows women graduate from The Citadel with increased resilience, confidence and leadership skills.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
August 29, 2016
2. SC Attorney General appoints chief deputy
South Carolina Attorney General Alan Wilson has appointed Robert Bolchoz as Chief Deputy Attorney General to replace John McIntosh, who is retiring. Bolchoz will take over the position Jan. 2, 2017. McIntosh has served as Chief Deputy since 1998 for three attorneys general and has been in the Attorney General's Office since 1995. McIntosh retires after an extensive 50-year legal career where he tried more than 300 criminal cases, including six death penalty trials. During his career, he worked as an Assistant Public Defender in Richland County and as Chief Deputy Solicitor in the 5th Circuit. From 1981 to 1994 he served as First Assistant in the U.S. Attorney's Office. "It has been my honor and privilege to work with one of the most experienced and respected prosecutors in the state. John's legal knowledge is second to none and to work with him and learn from him has been invaluable to me as Attorney General," Wilson said. Bolchoz brings more than 25 years of legal experience to the Attorney General's Office. This will be his second stint in the Office as he served as Chief Deputy Attorney General under former Attorney General Charlie Condon from 1995 to 1998. Prior to that, he served as an Assistant Solicitor and Deputy Solicitor in Charleston. Since 2010 he has been working in private practice in Columbia. "I have known Robert many years and have no doubt that he will be an excellent addition to our staff," said Wilson. "He not only has knowledge of this office and how it operates, but he also has extensive experience across the state in private practice and in the public sector. We look forward to having him as part of our team." Bolchoz is a 1986 graduate of The Citadel, and received a law degree from the University of South Carolina School of Law in 1989.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
August 29, 2016
3. Border States Electric promotes Sipe
Border States Electric has promoted James Sipe to strategy enablement director. Sipe earned a bachelor's degree in business administration at The Citadel in Charleston, S.C. He is a veteran of the National Guard and won multiple awards for service and leadership. Sipe joined BSE on Aug. 1, when it acquired Shealy Electrical Wholesalers, which Sipe joined in 2011. He has served as vice president of operations for Shealy Electrical Wholesalers since 2013.
Published in: Inforum.com
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Monday
August 29, 2016
4. Memos and distinctions
Scott D. Adams of Adams & Wilson Development has been named board chair of One80 Place, succeeding Paul Kohlheim. New board members are: Ernie Cochran of K&L Gates; Herbert Drayton of Vertical Holdings LLC; Geno Paluso of The Citadel; Colleen Troy of TouchPoint Communications; and Jerome Taylor of the City of Charleston Police Department. Dennis Fallon, a professor of engineering at The Citadel, has been named the recipient of the 2016 LeTellier Cup for his long-term contributions to the civil engineering profession from the American Society of Civil Engineers' South Carolina section. He also received the group's George K. Wadlin Distinguished Service Award.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
August 29, 2016
5. Hires and promotions: Architecture
Doug Snyder has joined LS3P & Associates Ltd. as chief financial officer. He is based in the Charleston office. Previously, he worked with the firm in a consulting role since November and was owner of The Snyder Firm PA. He is a certified public accountant. He has a bachelor's degree in accounting from The Citadel.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
August 29, 2016
6. Witness to the End of Soviet Power: Twenty-Five Years Ago
Twenty-five years ago, on August 22, 1991, I stood amid a vast cheering crowd of tens of thousands of people outside the Russian parliament building in Moscow, the capital of the Soviet Union. They were celebrating the failure by diehard Soviet leaders to undertake a political and military coup d'etat meant to maintain dictatorial communist rule in the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. The Soviet regime had ruled Russia and the other 14 component republics of the U.S.S.R. for nearly 75 years, since the Bolshevik Revolution in November 1917 led by Vladimir Lenin and his communist cadre of Marxist followers. During that almost three-quarters of a century, first under Lenin and especially Josef Stalin and then their successors, historians have estimated that upwards of 64 million people - innocent, unarmed men, women and children - died at the hands of the Soviet regime in the name of building the "bright, beautiful future" of socialism. Millions Dead - The forced collectivization of the land under Stalin in the early 1930s, alone, is calculated to have cost the lives of nine to twelve million Russian and Ukrainian peasants and their families who resisted the loss of their private farms and being forced into state collective farms that replaced them. Some were simply shot; others were tortured to death or sent to die as slave labor in the concentration and labor camps in Siberia or Soviet Central Asia known as the GULAG. Millions were slowly starved to death by a government-created famine designed to force submission to the central planning dictates of Stalin and his henchmen.
Published in: The Rational Argumentator
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Monday
August 29, 2016
7. For Citadel coach Brent Thompson, career crisis was big break
In January of 2010, Citadel football coach Brent Thompson had reached a crisis point. The coaching career he'd chosen over a life in the military, the coaching career to which he'd devoted the last 12 years, seemed like it might be at an end. After seven years as an assistant at Bucknell University in Lewisburg, Pa., a staff changeover left Thompson out of a job and growing desperate. "You start to think, 'What are you really qualified to do?'" Thompson says now. "I'd been in coaching a long time at that point, and reality starts to set in - there's not a lot else you are passionate about and really love to do, and now you are looking at having to change that. "After three or four weeks, you are still looking and the bills are coming in." That's when the fraternity that is college coaching went to work. Tommy Laurendine, who had been the offensive coordinator at Lenoir-Rhyne, was hired by Kevin Higgins, then head coach at The Citadel, to be the Bulldogs' offensive coordinator and to install the triple-option at the military school (a job Thompson applied for). That left Lenoir-Rhyne looking for a triple-option coach. A friend of Thompson's at Navy cold-called Lenoir-Rhyne coach Fred Goldsmith and put in a good word for Thompson. One interview later, Brent Thompson was hired as the Bears' offensive coordinator - on the same staff as Mike Houston. "So the best break of my career was when I took a pay cut of $20,000 and my wife took a $20,000 pay cut to go to Hickory, N.C.," Thompson said. "But looking back, it really was the best thing that could have happened."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
August 29, 2016
8. Citadel soccer earns second straight victory
The Citadel women's soccer team earned its first road win of the 2016 season with a 2-0 win over Alabama A&M. The Bulldogs (2-0) scored quickly in the lightning-shortened game as Mady Riegel tallied her first goal of the season thanks to a rebound off the keeper at the 18:31 mark to hand The Citadel a 1-0 lead. The score was the ninth of the junior's career. Katherine Arroyo padded the Bulldogs’ lead just eight minutes later, finding the back of the net unassisted for her second goal of the season. The Citadel outshot Alabama A&M (0-3) 9-5 in the contest and had three corner kicks. Emilie Valenciano led the Bulldogs with four shots in the game and two shots on goal. Freshman goalkeeper Logan Leask was only tested once in the contest, registering one save in the first half. "A trip like this has its own unique challenges and we had to maintain high standards to get the win," head coach Ciaran Traquair said. "They are physical and can catch you on the break if you aren't switched on. Credit to Alabama A&M for digging in given the circumstances with weather. Lightning delays are always tricky, especially when it starts back with a corner against. We scored two good goals and were pushing for more as the game wore on. I'm delighted with the first road win and the way in which the ladies handled the occasion. I'm excited to continue getting better as a group next week."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
August 29, 2016
9. Smith Leads Bulldogs In Tournament Finale
Outside hitter Moriah Smith set a program-record with 35 kills in a match, leading the Bulldogs to a 3-2 victory over Gardner-Webb in the finale of the Bulldog Battle on Saturday. "This was great start for us and a great weekend to finally test some of the things we have been working on," said head coach Craig Mosqueda. "We definitely have room to grow, but we saw a lot of good things from the team. I am really proud of the girls and their efforts this weekend." Smith hit .342 for the match and was dominant in the deciding fifth set with seven kills. Setter Logan Smith finished with 67 assists, the second most in a match in Bulldogs' history. The Citadel won its third straight first set to start the season, defeating Gardner-Webb 25-17 to open the match. In set two, the Bulldogs rallied from a 19-13 deficit to send the set to extra points. With the score tied at 26, the visiting Gardner-Webb Bulldogs took the next two points to even the match at one set apiece. In set three, the Bulldogs hit a match-high .395 from the floor to cruise to a 25-14 victory. Smith led the way with six kills and a .600 hitting percentage, followed by right-side hitter Megan Sowell with four kills.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Friday
August 26, 2016
1. Chester Bridge to be renamed for fallen soldier
A bridge in Chester will soon be renamed for a hometown hero who gave his life in the War on Terror. This past Wednesday, the Chesterfield Board of Supervisors voted to rename the West Hundred Road Bridge after Sgt. Aaron Wittman, a US Army soldier killed in the line of duty in 2013. Sgt. Aaron Xavier Wittman, a native of Chester, Virginia, was born on Nov. 6, 1984 and graduated from Lloyd C. Bird High School in 2003, where he was a wrestler and on the track team. He served in the South Carolina Army National Guard while a student at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina, deploying to Afghanistan with the 218th Brigade Combat Team in 2007. Sergeant Wittman enlisted in the United States Army in 2010 after completing his education at The Citadel. He deployed for his second combat tour in Afghanistan in 2012 with the 3rd Battalion, 69th Armor Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division. On Jan. 10, 2013 Sergeant Aaron Xavier Wittman died from wounds sustained while returning enemy fire to protect and save the lives of his combat team when his unit, which was on mounted patrol, came under small arms fire in Nangarhar Province, Afghanistan.
Published in: The Progress-Index
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Friday
August 26, 2016
2. David Fraser: A lifelong love of boats and yachts
The cover photo of Fraser Yachts' Winter 2012 magazine featured a teenage David Fraser at the helm of a boat, stoically looking ahead to what proved to be an influential career selling yachts. Fraser, 94, will tell anyone who lends him an ear his love for boating dates back to his days aboard the 185-foot schooner, Anna R. Heidritter, adorning the magazine cover. Inside the magazine are other photographs of a young Fraser interacting with the vessel that started a lifelong love affair. A slightly different story is told by his wife, who says Fraser's love for boats actually goes as far back as his childhood, when he swayed back and forth on a tree-hanging swing but imagined himself rolling along the waves of the ocean while aboard a boat. Whichever way Fraser's love for boating and yachting started the yacht broker's passion for the waterways - and placing as many people onto the water as possible to share in the joys of sailing - sustained itself for an entire lifetime. After graduating from the Citadel in South Carolina, serving in the U.S. Navy and working aboard a trading vessel Fraser hopped into a car and drove west - all the way to California. Once there he applied for a job at a yacht brokerage. He started selling boats in Wilmington before moving to Newport Beach to do the same.
Published in: TheLog.com
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Friday
August 26, 2016
3. Sapakoff: Ridiculous that NCAA, SEC, ACC still don't monitor concussions
Deep within a Clemson football helmet and a 21-year-old skull, things suddenly got fuzzy on Aug. 8. Jay Guillermo, the Tigers' 6-3, 325-pound senior center, suffered a concussion during a preseason practice. "I was dazed and confused," Guillermo said. Clemson trainer Danny Poole and a team doctor met with Guillermo three times a day for a week before he was allowed to commence slamming his head into defensive linemen again... S.C. concussion stats - Seven ACC or SEC schools are part of the NCAA/DOD concussion study (Georgia, Florida, Miami, North Carolina, Pittsburgh and Virginia Tech and Wake Forest). But the study apparently will not include concussion information obtained by The Post and Courier in a Freedom of Information Act survey of South Carolina, Clemson, The Citadel and Coastal Carolina football programs. Gamecock team doctors reported only three concussions in 2015, down from 10 in 2014. Thirteen of South Carolina's 21 concussions over the last three seasons came in games (see accompanying chart), while eight of Clemson's 14 concussions in 2015 came in practice. Clemson had eight concussions in practice in 2015, double the number of concussions the Tigers reported for all games and practices in 2014. Coastal Carolina had 19 concussions in both 2014 and 2015, while the Citadel had only seven each of those seasons. Even if schools are handling concussion protocol as safely and as reasonably possible, why wouldn't the NCAA and member conferences want thorough information, and answers to a few basic questions that would fit nicely into a data base?
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Friday
August 26, 2016
4. Bulldog Battle Schedule Changed
Due to travel difficulties, the schedule for the Bulldog Battle has been altered. Loyola will no longer be able to attend the tournament, dropping the Bulldog Battle from the originally scheduled eight matches to six. Morehead State, Robert Morris and Garder-Webb will still attend. The tournament will begin Friday at 1 p.m. with a match between The Citadel and Morehead State. There will be four matches on Friday and two matches on Saturday. All matches for the tournament will include live stats, while The Citadel's matches will also be streamed live on WatchESPN and the ESPN app. The full tournament schedule can be found below. Follow all the coverage of the Bulldog Battle on the tournament central homepage here.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Friday
August 26, 2016
5. Bulldogs First Road Match Set for Friday
The Citadel women's soccer team will hit the road for the first time this season as they travel to Alabama A&M for a non-conference matchup. "We have a tough challenge ahead of us this weekend," head coach Ciaran Traquair said. "There is always some doubt about how your squad handles the first away test of a new season. We are healthy, prepared and excited to try and build on our first win. I know we will need to show character at times and match their work rate." The Bulldogs come into Friday's game after defeating UNC Asheville 2-0 in the season opener on Aug. 21. Sophomores Emilie Valenciano and Katherine Arroyo tallied goals for The Citadel in the victory and Mady Riegel provided the lone assist on Arroyo's score. The Bulldogs finished with 12 shots, five shots on goal and nine corner kicks. Freshman goalkeeper Logan Leask was one of four Bulldogs to play all 90 minutes in the contest and posted a shutout in the first start of her collegiate career.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Thursday
August 25, 2016
1. Citadel Notes: Bulldogs' depth will be tested early
It's old news that The Citadel will play its season opener next week at Mercer with a new quarterback under center, and now it seems the Bulldogs' offensive line may have a new look, as well. With senior center Ryan Bednar banged up in preseason camp, sophomore Tyler Davis has moved from right guard to center and freshman Drew McEntyre is getting reps at right guard. Coach Brent Thompson said Wednesday that McEntyre, a 6-3, 285-pounder from Calhoun, Ga., could start against Mercer next Thursday. "He'll probably start at right guard for us," Thompson said. "He's been practicing there for about two weeks and has done a good job with it. We haven't set the two-deep yet, but we like what he's done and he's gotten so much better." Thompson said that Bednar, who started all 13 games at center last year, should be ready to play against Mercer.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
August 25, 2016
2. Building a successful program not easy in college-rich Charleston, S.C.
The method of scheduling football games for Charleston Southern University over the years includes keeping an eye on FBS powers Clemson and the University of South Carolina. It's not so much who those two are playing, but when. The Buccaneers do everything they can to keep from going head-to-head with the Tigers and Gamecocks. "We want people to go to both," said CSU athletic director Hank Small. "We've only been playing football since 1990. We're the new guy so we're building in everything we do."... In Charleston, S.C., it's a battle for people to notice that level. The Citadel military college, for instance, was established in 1842. The College of Charleston, which doesn't play football, dates back to 1770. "They've been here a long time, we've been in town just over 50 years," Small said. "The good thing is the area is just exploding with people that don't have those old ties so the fact we're a local school means more to them than a tie with Clemson, Citadel or South Carolina."
Published in: The Dickinson Press
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Wednesday
August 24, 2016
1. The Citadel's Bastin Hall approved
By a slim margin, the State Fiscal Accountability Authority approved a $31.8 million expansion of Coastal Carolina University's football stadium over the objection of Gov. Nikki Haley. Tuesday's contentious 3-2 vote cleared the way for the university to go forward even after the state Commission on Higher Education repeatedly rejected the costly expansion of Brooks Stadium, citing the potential increases to student fees. Legislators earlier this year circumvented the commission's decision by adding two budget items related to the expansion. It was done to legally secure funding through the authority. Those budget provisos survived Haley's veto pen in June and her criticism Tuesday that the body was setting a bad precedent. Borrowing plans for other universities also were approved Tuesday, including $17.5 million in bonds for construction of The Citadel's Bastin Hall, its new business school. Those plans and others already had received the commission’s approval.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
August 24, 2016
2. The Citadel's Renew Included On Player of the Year Watch List
The Citadel football B-Back Tyler Renew is on the College Football Performance Awards (CFPA) FCS National Player of the Year Trophy Watch List, it was announced Tuesday. Renew has earned numerous preseason accolades this summer. The senior was also named a preseason All-American by STATS and Athlon Sports as well as a preseason All-Southern Conference selection by the conference's coaches. Renew was a first-team STATS All-American in 2015 after he appeared in all 13 games with nine starts and compiled 839 yards and five touchdowns on 162 carries. He ranked seventh in the Southern Conference in rushing yards, and his 5.18 yards-per-carry average was eighth. The Columbia, South Carolina, native had his best game in his hometown, rushing for a career-high 174 yards and a career-high two touchdowns in the Bulldogs' 23-22 win at South Carolina to earn SoCon Offensive Player of the Week honors. His rushing total was the highest allowed by the Gamecocks at home since Darren McFadden rushed for 219 yards in 2006 and was higher than five teams' rushing totals against South Carolina in 2015. The next week, Renew was one of a school-record four 100-yard rushers in The Citadel's 41-38 win at Coastal Carolina, the first road playoff win in school history, gaining 129 yards with one touchdown on a career-high 28 carries.
Published in: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Wednesday
August 24, 2016
3. Revisiting college football of the 1970s (and early 1980s) with 21st-century statistics
One great thing about college football is its long and often well-documented history. There are a lot of stories, and a lot of ways to tell those stories - including using statistics to drive the narrative. I've enjoyed reading Bill Connelly's series of posts at SBNation that look back at college football over the past 40+ years, including his ranking of teams based on their estimated S&P ratings in each given season (dating back to 1970). I know a fair bit about the history of the sport, but I've learned more than a few new things perusing these articles. If you want to get up to speed on what major college football was like in the latter part of the 20th century, you could do a lot worse than to read these yearly summaries. That includes The Citadel's history in I-A. Because the Southern Conference did not move to I-AA until 1982, The Citadel is included in the ratings from 1970 (the earliest year Connelly has written about so far) until 1981. So are the other SoCon teams of that era, along with the Ivy League squads and several other schools that are currently members of what is now known as the FCS. There is also a smattering of schools that no longer play football (Cal State-Los Angeles, Wichita State, and Tampa, just to name three of them).
Published in: The Sports Arsenal
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Tuesday
August 23, 2016
1. Telling tales about Pat Conroy: The author's friends reminisce
Pat Conroy, Wolfian writer of sweeping Southern novels, is gone, but his legend grows. Conroy died of pancreatic cancer March 4 at his home in Beaufort, S.C., a town that reached its apotheosis in Conroy's prose. Beaufort is returning the favor. Friends and family have established a yearly Pat Conroy Literary Festival in that lowcountry Eden, and are working to create the Pat Conroy Literary Center on Beaufort's historic waterfront. Atlanta is also celebrating Conroy, starting with the keynote address at the AJC Decatur Book Festival, Sept. 2-4. Speaking will be novelist Rick Bragg, Conroy's widow and fellow novelist Cassandra King, Conroy's daughter Melissa Conroy, poet and novelist Ron Rash and journalist Bronwen Dickey. Pat graduated from Beaufort and attended the South Carolina military college The Citadel, an experience he both criticizes and praises in his novel "The Lords of Discipline."
Published in: MyAJC.com
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Tuesday
August 23, 2016
2. Charleston, S.C. Midshipman competes for 2016 Ship-Handler of the Year
Midshipman 1st Class Robert Decort, 22 and an incoming senior at The Military College of South Carolina, The Citadel Naval Reserve Officers Corps (NROTC) unit, checks out a gyro compass on a Full Mission Bridge Virtual Reality simulator at the Surface Warfare Officers School. More than 10 midshipmen from NROTC units across the country competed to be named the 2016 NROTC Ship-handler of the Year.
Published in: Moultrie News
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Tuesday
August 23, 2016
3. Murdaugh activated on Citadel roster
Brian Murdaugh, 2016 Colleton Prep graduate and former War Hawk football standout, has been activated on the Citadel Football roster. Derek Satterfield, The Citadel's assistant athletic director/athletic communications, confirmed last Wednesday morning that Murdaugh, a walk-on, was on the roster and practicing with the team during preseason practices. Murdaugh joins Lee Riley, another Colleton Prep graduate, on the Citadel Bulldog football team. Riley, a sophomore long snapper, appeared in eight games last season as a redshirt freshman. According to The Citadel team roster available online, Riley helped his team rank first in the Southern Conference and sixth in the FCS punt return defense, while ranking fourth in the SoCon in net punting. Brian is the son of Valerie and Steve Murdaugh of Walterboro. Lee is the son of Cindy and Leroy Riley, also of Walterboro.
Published in: WalterboroLive.com
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Monday
August 22, 2016
1a. The Citadel sets up September events
Upcoming News from The Citadel - September 2016 events include: South Carolina Business Development Center "Get Your Business Online" workshop, Citadel Republican Socitey's 9/11: Never Forget Commemoration, Friends of the Daniel Library Lecture: Citadel Professor Jim Hutchisson's new book, Ernest Hemingway: A New Life, Soldiers' Angels Mobile Pantry, First Lady of The Citadel and Alzheimer's Walk team, Daddy's Darlings, hoping to be one of the top fundraisers again in 2016, Travels to Cuba: an evening with Dean Bill Trumbull, The Zucker Family School of Education presents "Authors in Schools" initiative to kick off the new school year and Storm The Citadel 2017 registration is now open.
Published in: Palmetto Business Daily
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Monday
August 22, 2016
1b. Upcoming News
Upcoming News from The Citadel - September 2016.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Monday
August 22, 2016
2. Free Market Money: On The Separation of Banking and State
Money is the most important commodity in an economic system Indeed, money "makes the world go 'round." This is because money is the general medium of exchange. We sell our products and services for money, and then use it to buy the products and services of others. Money also permits us to comparison shop. Since all goods are traded for money, every item in the market has its own money price. Consumers and producers are easily able to evaluate the relative money costs of consumer goods as well as the resources with which these goods are manufactured. This allows an efficient and economical use of the resources and commodities in society. Money also enables an efficient transfer of resources between savers and investors. People who wish to save their money are able to loan it to those who wish to spend it This process has been the basis upon which entrepreneurs and businessmen have been able to invest in the plant equipment and new and improved machinery that has given us our high standard of living. Finally, money tends to keep people honest. If I want to buy what others have for sale, I must have money to do so. But, ultimately, the only way I can acquire money in a free-market economy is if I have earned it by producing something for which other people are willing to pay me. Thus, my ability to obtain what others have produced is dependent upon first having produced something which others wish to buy from me. In a free-market society, each man serves his fellow men as the means to achieve his own personal ends. Dr. Richard M. Ebeling is the BB & T Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina.
Published in: NassauInstitute.org
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Monday
August 22, 2016
3. Bahamas should rethink cozy relationship with the Yuan
The Chinese government is clearly pushing for countries such as the Bahamas to link their currency with the Yuan. The Chinese government's purpose, its fairly clear, is to attempt to offer their currency as a counter-weight to the U.S. dollar as a global reserve currency and international medium of exchange. In addition, they desire to tie a network of countries closer to their economy and economic system for financial and trading and political purposes. It is certainly true that the value of the U.S. dollar and changes in it are highly politicized in the sense that the foreign exchange rate of the U.S. dollar vis-a-vie other currencies is dependent upon the monetary and interest rate decisions of the Federal Reserve, the U.S. central bank. Countries linking their own currency to the international value of the dollar, therefore, have their currency's value partly dependent on Federal Reserve policy. Historically, many some countries in Latin America who have followed this course have been saved from the experience of severe inflation that has plagued some nations in the Western Hemisphere. Dr. Richard M. Ebeling is the BB & T Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina.
Published in: NassauInstitute.org
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Monday
August 22, 2016
4. New pastor at Grace Community Fellowship
Ordination ceremonies were held on July 10 to install Pastor Iain Boyd as the new pastor at Grace Community Fellowship. Boyd and his family recently moved from Myrtle Beach, S.C., to Helena to accept the new position. Boyd, 34, was senior pastor at Trinity Church in Myrtle Beach. Boyd was called to Grace Community Fellowship earlier this spring. His move to Helena is accompanied by his wife Shelly, and three children Josiah, Hannah, and Isaac. Shelly is originally from Butte, where her father pastored at St. John's Episcopal Church, so the transition from Myrtle Beach to Helena was a very welcome and exciting move for the family. After being raised in North Carolina, Boyd graduated from The Citadel, a military college in South Carolina, receiving a bachelor's degree in history in 2003. His Pastoral education came from Nashotah House Theological Seminary in Nashotah, Wis., where he graduated with a Master of Divinity degree in 2006. Grace Community Fellowship is located on Park Avenue across from the Mediterranean Grill and Park Avenue Bakery. Starting in the fall, Sunday School will be from 9-9:45 a.m. and worship services will begin at 10.
Published in: Independent Record
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Monday
August 22, 2016
5. Astatula church marks 130th anniversary
Schoolteacher Charles P. Summerall was a new arrival in the small enclave of Astatula on the shores of Little Lake Harris when he decided he needed another title - church pastor. At just 19, the Florida native started Sunday worship services in the one-room schoolhouse he taught in throughout the week. The year was 1886, and except for a few years during World War II, Astatula Baptist Church has held services ever since, according to church records. At 10:45 a.m. Sunday, the church will celebrate its 130th anniversary with a groundbreaking ceremony on a much-needed and long-awaited new worship center and family life center. U.S Rep. Dan Webster, R-Clermont, and Sheriff Gary Borders are expected to attend... Summerall, who left Astatula after a couple of years to enroll in the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, served in World War I, became chief of staff of the Army and, later, president of The Citadel. But for members of Astatula Baptist, his most important work was founding the church. "We're just very excited about the future," Workman said.
Published in: Orlando Sentinel
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Monday
August 22, 2016
6. Anderson University's Master of Criminal Justice to be offered at the Lowcountry Graduate Center
Law enforcement professionals are responsible for making decisions every day that can have life-or-death ramifications for themselves and others. The Master of Criminal Justice program offered through Anderson University's Command College of South Carolina provides these individuals with the tools and training they need to make those crucial decisions with confidence. This executive degree program will be available at the Lowcountry Graduate Center in North Charleston with classes starting in January 2017, upon receiving approval from the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges. "Anderson University's program provides not only knowledge of policy and liability issues but also the role of the commercial and social media in the shaping of public opinion. Instruction places special emphasis on the administration of justice in today's culturally diverse American society, with community cohesiveness, safety, and wellness foremost in mind. We welcome this fine Upstate institution to our repertoire of offerings for advancing careers throughout the Lowcountry," said Dr. Nancy Muller, director of the Lowcountry Graduate Center... The Lowcountry Graduate Center was created in 2001 as a consortium of the College of Charleston, The Citadel and the Medical University of South Carolina. These founding institutions, along with the University of South Carolina, Clemson University, South Carolina State University and Anderson University, now offer a variety of graduate degrees and certificates at the Lowcountry Graduate Center. Conveniently located in North Charleston, the mission of the Lowcountry Graduate Center is to increase access to advanced education by professionals in the workforce, support the region's employers, and boost economic development in the Lowcountry.
Published in: Moultrie News
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Monday
August 22, 2016
7. Senter announced as executive committee member of FCS-ADA
The members of the Division I Football Championship Subdivision Athletics Directors Association (FCS ADA) have selected Mark Wilson, director of athletics at Tennessee Tech University, to serve as president during 2016-17. "It is my honor and privilege to serve the Football Championship Subdivision Athletics Directors Association," said Wilson. "We will continue to engage the membership in the dialogue of the ever-changing landscape of intercollegiate athletics while highlighting the accomplishments of FCS student-athletes, coaches and programs." The FCS ADA elected the following athletics directors to serve alongside Wilson as officers during the upcoming year Thorr Bjorn, University of Rhode Island, 1st Vice President; Bruce McCutcheon, Lafayette College, 2nd Vice President; and Bill Smith, Bryant University, 3rd Vice President. The Association also announced the following additions to its Executive Committee: Walt Hameline, director of athletics at Wagner College; Kent Haslam, director of athletics at University of Montana; Jason Henderson, director of athletics at Lamar University; Tim Leonard, director of athletics at Towson University; Tom Michael, director of athletics at Eastern Illinois University; Peter Pilling, director of intercollegiate athletics and physical education at Columbia University; and Jim Senter, director of athletics at The Citadel.
Published in: Herald-Citizen
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Monday
August 22, 2016
8. Col. Brett H. Weaver, 64, spent 28 years as U.S. Army tanker
U.S. Army Col. Brett H. Weaver (Ret.) of Chapin passed away peacefully Thursday, Aug. 18, with his wife of 40 years by his side. He was 64. He was a beloved son, brother, husband, father, grandfather and uncle. Born July 27, 1952, in Sulphur Springs, Texas, Brett was commissioned into the Armor Corps upon graduating from the Citadel in 1974 and spent nearly 28 years proudly serving his county as a "TANKER." After retiring from military service in 2001, Brett and his family settled in Chapin. Brett continued to work as a contractor to the U.S. Army and became an active member of Gideon's International. Brett served as a deacon at Chapin Baptist Church where he taught a men's small group class and served on the Visitation Committee. Above all, Brett was most proud of his family. He married the former Susan Raines in 1976 and had three children. He is survived his wife, Susan; daughters Aubrey Wood and her husband, Todd, of Falls Church, Va., and Ally Rivers and her husband, Parker, of Chapin; son, Chad Weaver and his wife, Anna, of Chapin; four grandchildren: Ava Kate, Thomas, Charlotte and Caroline; his parents Col. (Ret.) Gene and Dorothy Weaver; and his brother, Col. (Ret.) Kurt Weaver and his wife, Debbi, and their family. A visitation will take place from 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 23, at Caughman Harmon Funeral Home's Chapin Chapel. The funeral service will begin at 2 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 24, at Chapin Baptist Church. Burial will take place at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Va.
Published in: ColaDaily.com
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Friday
August 19, 2016
1. State doling out nearly $5.8M - $1.3M in Lowcountry - to local agencies for body cameras
Much needed state money to pay for police body cameras will start coming in as soon as next month. In the Lowcountry, 24 law enforcement agencies have been approved for funds. A recently passed law requires officers to wear then, but the cameras and systems to store the video are not cheap. The state's Department of Public Safety says 168 agencies have applied for the funding and been given approval. In all, it will cost the state close to $5.8 million to outfit In the Lowcountry alone, 24 agencies will get nearly $1.3 million. The Ninth Circuit Solicitor's Office is getting the highest individual payout at $137,500. Campus police departments for the College of Charleston, The Citadel, and the Medical University of South Carolina are also getting funding. - Citadel Public Safety $ 9,600.00
Published in: WCIV-TV Charleston, SC
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Friday
August 19, 2016
2. The story of slave revolts, beyond 'The Birth of a Nation'
When Nate Parker's "The Birth of a Nation" broke out and set a purchase price record at the Sundance Film Festival in January, one of the things it promised was an uncompromising look at one of the most fraught incidents in American history: Nat Turner's 1831 slave rebellion, which lasted three days and prompted widespread restrictions on slaves' already-limited opportunities for education and assembly. Now, the renewed attention to a 1999 rape charge against Parker and his collaborator Jean Celestin seems to threaten a movie that told a story Hollywood has avoided until now. But the story of American slaves' resistance shouldn't rely solely on a single movie, novel or even a single rebellion. When I visited South Carolina last December to cover Charleston's efforts to build a museum at the site of the wharf where a huge number of enslaved people arrived in the United States, I was struck by the ways Charleston has worked to incorporate the story of another slave revolt into its official history and public spaces... In 2014, the city unveiled a monument to Vesey in Hampton Park, near The Citadel in downtown Charleston. Unlike John C. Calhoun, whose statue was vandalized so frequently that it had to be placed out of reach on a vaguely ludicrous-looking pillar, the Vesey statue is accessible and dignified. The statue was a particular point of pride for Riley when I interviewed him in December. "Isn't it impressive? I mean, it's really, really wonderful," Riley said, speaking about the statue and portrait as part of his efforts to reclaim Vesey's image from those who portrayed him as a "brutal would-be killer of white people," and to affirm that Vesey's main goal was to free slaves who were still being held in bondage.
Published in: Washington Post
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Friday
August 19, 2016
3. The Citadel Finalizes 2016-17 Basketball Schedule
The Citadel basketball team has finalized its 2016-17 schedule, head coach Duggar Baucom announced Thursday. The slate features 17 games inside McAlister Field House, including the Holy City Hoops Classic, and road trips to opponents from the Big 12, Pac-12 and ACC. "We are looking forward to our challenging schedule," Coach Baucom said. "Playing teams from the Big 12, Pac-12 and ACC will be an exciting experience for our team. The Holy City Hoops Classic we are hosting will be a great opportunity for our fans to see six college basketball games in three days. The College of Charleston, Presbyterian and USC Upstate will be three tough in-state tests for our young team. I hope our demanding non-conference schedule will help prepare our guys for the battles in the Southern Conference." The Bulldogs play their first four games in Charleston with an exhibition game at home against North Greenville on Nov. 4 followed by the season opener at College of Charleston on Nov. 11 and home games on Nov. 13 and Nov. 15. The first road trip of the season takes The Citadel to Stetson on Nov. 18 before playing at Iowa State on Nov. 20 and at Arizona State on Nov. 23. The Bulldogs defeated Stetson 94-93 last season in Charleston, and the all-time series with the Hatters is tied 9-9. This season marks the first meeting in program history with Iowa State and Arizona State, and the game against the Sun Devils will be the Bulldogs' first in the state of Arizona.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Friday
August 19, 2016
4. Citadel scrimmage cut short by lightning
Exactly two weeks out from its season opener at Mercer, The Citadel football team had its second scrimmage of preseason camp cut short Thursday night by nearby lightning. The Bulldogs were able to scrimmage for only about 50 minutes before they were forced to leave the field at Johnson Hagood Stadium, which was frustrating for coach Brent Thompson. "It is, because it's our last opportunity and we planned this for two weeks out," Thompson said. "I thought we got some good work in as far as the mechanics of pre-game, getting on and off the field. "We got about what we wanted out of our ones, but I wanted to get a little more from the twos and threes. With the weather the way it was, that was about all we could get done." Most of the big plays on offense were turned in by the second team. Freshman quarterback Brandon Rainey made a nice deep throw on the run, hitting receiver DeAndre Schoultz down the sideline for a 40-yard gain. Rainey also found slotback Jonathan Dorogy on a 68-yard catch-and-run for a TD, also against the second-team defense.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
August 18, 2016
1. Welcoming The Citadel Class of 2020
The Class of 2020, largest recorded freshman class in the history of The Citadel reported to campus on Saturday, August 13, 2016. Most of the members of the class of 2020 were born in 1998, have never known a world without Google, and are considered to be members of Generation Y. They were born the same year the first section of the International Space Station was launched, the search engine Google was founded, and the iMac was unveiled. View the article to see the Class of 2020 by the numbers.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Thursday
August 18, 2016
2. Michalaka featured in U.S. DOT's Fast Forward program
The U.S. Department of Transportation selected Professor of Civil Engineering, Dimitra Michalaka, Ph.D., to promote careers in transportation for students and educators in junior high, high school, and community college through the Transportation Research Board's initiative, Fast Forward. Fast Forward inspires students to consider careers in transportation by publishing video interviews and stories with leaders in the industry talking about their own career path and experiences and why a career in the industry is a great choice for young people to consider.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Thursday
August 18, 2016
3. Witness to the End of Soviet Power: Twenty-Five Years Ago
Twenty-five years ago, on August 22, 1991, I stood amid a vast cheering crowd of tens of thousands of people outside the Russian parliament building in Moscow, the capital of the Soviet Union. They were celebrating the failure by diehard Soviet leaders to undertake a political and military coup d'etat meant to maintain dictatorial communist rule in the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. The Soviet regime had ruled Russia and the other 14 component republics of the U.S.S.R. for nearly 75 years, since the Bolshevik Revolution in November 1917 led by Vladimir Lenin and his communist cadre of Marxist followers. During that almost three-quarters of a century, first under Lenin and especially Josef Stalin and then their successors, historians have estimated that upwards of 64 million people - innocent, unarmed men, women and children – died at the hands of the Soviet regime in the name of building the "bright, beautiful future" of socialism. Millions Dead - The forced collectivization of the land under Stalin in the early 1930s, alone, is calculated to have cost the lives of nine to twelve million Russian and Ukrainian peasants and their families who resisted the loss of their private farms and being forced into state collective farms that replaced them. Dr. Richard M. Ebeling is the BB & T Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina, He was formerly professor of Economics at Northwood University.
Published in: NassauInstitute.org
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Thursday
August 18, 2016
4. U.S. military members join online learning at The Citadel
Men and women serving in the U.S. military can now participate in online master's and undergraduate degree curriculums, and certificate programs from The Citadel Graduate College, which recently expanded its online learning center. The programs are designed for non-cadets. They are perfect for busy military service members, their spouses, and others who want to further their own education. "As a naval officer, I am faced with increasingly complex operational, ethical and leadership challenges," Lt. Cmdr. Eric Chitwood, U.S. Navy Reserves Defense Logistics Agency, said. "It was imperative I obtain the best possible leadership education in order to successfully meet those challenges. When I began my research to find the right academic institution, I wanted flexibility, due to my military lifestyle, and I wanted an institution with a reputation for excellence that was instantly recognizable amongst leaders from all organizations." Chitwood is one of many examples of someone who serves in the military while also holding a second job. He is a finance consultant for the worldwide pharmaceutical company, Eli Lilly and Company. Now he can study his Master of Science in Leadership online, giving flexibility for his busy work and family schedule.
Published in: Palmetto Business Daily
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Thursday
August 18, 2016
5. Williams Elementary School announces citizenship winners
The Citadel's Core Values were an important part to Mr. Arland D. Williams' life. At Williams Elementary School, they use those core values as a basis for the Williams Elementary School citizenship award and program. This past school year, all of the fifth grade students had participated in school projects and had community guest speakers sharing information regarding citizenship. In the past, they had students write an essay about their citizenship experiences, however this year friends of Mr. Williams and other honored guests were asked to meet with 10-12 students that have exhibited high levels of student citizenship at Williams Elementary. They concluded their citizenship activities in May by honoring all fifth grade students at the Award's Assembly in which Cayden Knierim, of Mrs. Livingston's class, and Laney Faller, of Ms. Clark's class, received an additional honor as citizenship winners.
Published in: Journal Gazette & Times-Courier
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Thursday
August 18, 2016
6. Highlighting achievements, Aug. 18, 2016
Angelica McNerny and Nickolas Maddalena, both of Las Vegas, made the spring 2016 dean's list at The Citadel South Carolina Corps of Cadets.
Published in: Las Vegas Review-Journal
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Thursday
August 18, 2016
7. Dilday named captain of The Citadel women's soccer team
Former Green Wave standout Tinslee Dilday has been named a captain for The Citadel women's soccer team. Head coach Ciaran Traquair, on Aug. 9, announced Dilday, Ilana Green and Montana Hinson as captains for the 2016 season. Dilday saw action in 19 games last season, tallied five shots and two shots on goal. The junior from Summerville logged 1,248 minutes of playing time over the course of the season. She has played in 37 games during her career.
Published in: The Summerville Journal Scene
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Thursday
August 18, 2016
8a. Citadel looks to sustain success with new head coach
Two weeks. That's how long new Citadel football coach Brent Thompson allowed the Bulldogs to wear their Southern Conference championship rings from 2015. "You can enjoy those when your career is over," said Thompson, who replaces Mike Houston as the Bulldogs' head coach. "That's when you think about those games and those moments from that season." There were plenty of special games and moments during the Bulldogs' 9-4 season, including an FCS playoff victory at Coastal Carolina and a 23-22 upset of South Carolina at Williams-Brice Stadium. But with the rings put away, it's time to put 2015 away, as well. "We've got to talk about the things that enabled us to get to that point," Thompson said. "But it's not 2015 anymore. Coach Houston is not here, and those seniors are gone. The dynamics are completely different, and that 2015 team cannot win any games in 2016."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
August 18, 2016
8b. Citadel QB Jordan Black: New starting role 'nothing I can’t handle'
When Jordan Black was pondering his choice of college football programs - some wanted him to play receiver, some wanted him as a safety and some at quarterback - Uncle Mel came through with some solid advice. "I was trying to decide where I wanted to play, and what position I wanted to play," says Black, a redshirt freshman at The Citadel. "And he definitely played a role in that and helped me make my decision." Black’s Uncle Mel is NFL Hall of Famer Mel Blount, the former Pittsburgh Steelers defensive back from Vidalia, Ga., the same small town where Black grew up. Blount, who played on the great Steelers teams of the late 1970s, is a brother of Black's grandfather. "When we were kids, he'd come down every two or three months," Black said of Blount. "His kids were the same age as me, and he'd just hang out. Sometimes he'd take us up to the Hall of Fame inductions, and that was cool."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
August 18, 2016
9. Veteran Porter-Gaud team led by 19 seniors
They've been the heart and soul of Porter-Gaud's football team since they were sophomores two years ago, and now the wait is over. The 19 seniors are ready to deliver the school what should be its most promising season in their four years there. "Usually to be good, you have to have seniors in SCISA and we actually had what looked like a senior team with last year's juniors," Porter-Gaud athletic director Larry Salley said. "We of course graduated some key pieces, but this is a group we've been waiting to be seniors for some time." Three Division I prospects highlight the Cyclones' veteran-laden team: Quarterback Oliver Michaud and wide receivers Dante Smith and Eric Johnson. Michaud has some Ivy League interest, while Smith is looking into playing at The Citadel, Wofford, Furman or Florida A&M. Johnson has a few Southern Conference teams interested as well, including Furman and Mercer.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
August 17, 2016
1. The Citadel Class of 2020 Oath Ceremony
Members of the Class of 2020 take part in The Citadel Oath Ceremony, becoming cadet recruits in the South Carolina Corps of Cadets.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Wednesday
August 17, 2016
2. U.S. military members among those now learning online from The Citadel
Members of the U.S. Military living around the country or on installations overseas are among those registering for The Citadel Graduate College's newly expanded online masters degrees and certificates, and undergraduate degrees. The non-cadet programs are ideal for busy professionals and military service members and their spouses wanting to continue their education. "As a naval officer, I am faced with increasingly complex operational, ethical and leadership challenges," said Lt. Cmdr. Eric Chitwood, U.S. Navy Reserves Defense Logistics Agency. "It was imperative I obtain the best possible leadership education in order to successfully meet those challenges. When I began my research to find the right academic institution, I wanted flexibility, due to my military lifestyle, and I wanted an institution with a reputation for excellence that was instantly recognizable amongst leaders from all organizations." In addition to serving as a naval commander, Chitwood works as a finance consultant for Eli Lilly and Company, a global pharmaceutical company. He, his wife Stephanie, and their four children live in Indianapolis, Indiana. "There are similar online programs available at other well-known universities, but after considering The Citadel's strong support of veterans, high academic standards, the famous alumni network and their 175-year history of producing world-class leaders, I realized that there was only one choice," Chitwood said.
Published in: Moultrie News
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Wednesday
August 17, 2016
3. GuideStone announces results of internal reviews, restructuring
GuideStone's theme for 2015 was the "Year of Efficiency," whereby GuideStone sought out new efficiencies in people, processes and policies. Scores of efficiencies were identified and implemented throughout the organization, including streamlining employee training and onboarding, renegotiating energy contracts and bulk mailing services, and lowered medical group sizes to help assist more churches. Coming out of that effort GuideStone has announced a realignment of certain job responsibilities and the promotion of three new executive officers from within the ranks of the organization... Nelson was elected Chief Strategic Investment Officer. He joined GuideStone in 2013 and previously served as GuideStone's Executive Director of Investments Sales. Prior to GuideStone, Nelson spent eight years with Golden Capital Management, an investment management affiliate of Wells Fargo. He has also served at Charles Schwab and First Union/Wachovia Bank throughout his 25-year tenure in the financial services industry. Nelson holds a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, and is a member of the Investment Management Consulting Association. He has earned the Certified Investment Management Analyst designation.
Published in: BaptistMessage.com
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Wednesday
August 17, 2016
4. 2016 Southern Conference Preview
The Citadel had one of the best, and most surprising seasons in program history last year. Count star linebacker Tevin Floyd among those who say it's time to move on. "It definitely was a great time, it definitely was something great to build off of," the all-Southern Conference preseason selection said. "But you've got to kind of put it to rest with the new season coming up. You have to take things from what you did great last year and bring it on board this year. With all great things that you do, there's always room for improvement, and that's been our main goal this offseason." The offseason has been both different and similar to last year, when The Citadel improved from 5-7 to 9-4, earned a share of its first conference title, secured its first FCS playoff berth since 1992, achieved its second-highest single-season win total and upset SEC member South Carolina. All of that led to coach Mike Houston earning the head coaching position at James Madison. But The Citadel kept continuity within its program by elevating Brent Thompson from offensive coordinator to the top spot. "It's a tough act to follow right now," Thompson said. "But we believe that the plan that we've had in place, the plan that we do have in place moving forward, our players are starting to believe in what we're doing. Really it's all about execution at this point." It's a deep season in the SoCon title race, with the other defending co-champion, Chattanooga, favored to win a fourth straight title. The Citadel won't sneak up on anybody this time, putting a lot of pressure on the Bulldogs to stay on such a high level.
Published in: FoxSports.com
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Wednesday
August 17, 2016
5. Bulldogs End Preseason With 3-0 Win
The Citadel women's soccer team scored 56 seconds into Tuesday's game and never looked back, defeating USC Beaufort 3-0 in the last exhibition game of 2016. "The game was a great way to wrap up our preseason with a win, three goals and a shutout," head coach Ciaran Traquair said. "We were a little sluggish in our performance and lacked in our ability in the final third of the field. We are still early in the season and the girls are working hard to get up to full speed. It was great to get a victory and I'm pleased we are going into Sunday with some confidence." Junior Tinslee Dilday's second goal of the preseason came less than one minute into the contest after she collected the rebound from Samara Nche's blocked shot and easily found the back of the net to give the Bulldogs a 1-0 lead. Dilday continued her dominant play with an assist 30 minutes later, finding Katherine Arroyo open in the box for the Bulldogs' second goal of the game. The score remained 2-0 heading into halftime. The Bulldogs continued to pour it on in the second half with Arroyo notching her second goal of the contest thanks to an assist from Emilie Valenciano. Arroyo again received the pass in the box and beat the keeper to give The Citadel a 3-0 lead in the 84th minute.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Tuesday
August 16, 2016
1a. U.S. military members among those now learning online from The Citadel
Members of the U.S. Military living around the country or on installations overseas are among those registering for The Citadel Graduate College's newly expanded online masters degrees and certificates, and undergraduate degrees. The non-cadet programs are ideal for busy professionals and military service members and their spouses wanting to continue their education. "As a naval officer, I am faced with increasingly complex operational, ethical and leadership challenges," said Lt. Cmdr. Eric Chitwood, U.S. Navy Reserves Defense Logistics Agency. "It was imperative I obtain the best possible leadership education in order to successfully meet those challenges. When I began my research to find the right academic institution, I wanted flexibility, due to my military lifestyle, and I wanted an institution with a reputation for excellence that was instantly recognizable amongst leaders from all organizations." In addition to serving as a naval commander, Chitwood works as a finance consultant for Eli Lilly and Company, a global pharmaceutical company. He, his wife Stephanie, and their four children live in Indianapolis, Indiana. "There are similar online programs available at other well-known universities, but after considering The Citadel's strong support of veterans, high academic standards, the famous alumni network and their 175-year history of producing world-class leaders, I realized that there was only one choice," Chitwood said.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Tuesday
August 16, 2016
1b. online learning
online learning
Published in: TheDigitel.com
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Tuesday
August 16, 2016
2. Civil Air Patrol teaches youth about aviation, leadership
Jonathan Pruett knew five years ago he wanted to join the military. Being homeschooled didn't give him the option to join ROTC, so instead he got involved with the Civil Air Patrol. "I found out about Civil Air Patrol through a friend I went to church with who had been in it for about three years," Pruett said. "I attended three meetings, and then I was ready to join." After climbing through the ranks, the 19-year-old is now a Cadet 1st lieutenant in the Spartanburg Composite Squadron. He has proudly served as cadet commander of the squadron on and off for three years. "Civil Air Patrol is a dynamic organization, and it's very diverse," Pruett said. "Everybody can get something out of it."... Maj. Jeff Parcell has volunteered with the Civil Air Patrol for 13 years, both in Spartanburg and at the state level. After his older son joined the Spartanburg Composite Squadron in 2004, Parcell, a graduate of The Citadel, was searching for a way to give back to the community in a military-style environment. "(My son) joined as a cadet, and after a short period of time, they found a place for me to serve as well," he said. Parcell serves as the squadron's commander and said he has seen several young men and women succeed in the Civil Air Patrol over the years.
Published in: GoUpstate.com
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Tuesday
August 16, 2016
3. Representative Alonzo Ransier of South Carolina
On this date, South Carolina Representative Alonzo Ransier, a Reconstruction Era African American, died at the age of 48. Elected to a seat previously held by Congressman Robert DeLarge, Ransier represented the black majority district of Charleston for one term in the 43rd Congress (1873–1875). Upon Ransier's arrival in Congress, an observer on the House Floor (who already admired the South Carolinian for his open support for women's suffrage) noted that he looked like "a man of great courage and sagacity... Mr. Ransier's political career has been a varied and powerful one, and his strong, tough, active brain makes him an effective and worthy worker in the House." Ransier who rose rapidly through the ranks in the South Carolina Republican Party was stymied as a legislator in the House. He introduced measures to erect a public building in Beaufort, South Carolina, and to restore the war-damaged west wing of the Citadel Academy in Charleston. Ransier also requested $100,000 to improve Charleston Harbor. None of these bills, however, passed. Disillusioned with the Republican Party's lack of support for freedmen, Ransier broke from the party and lost his re-election bid. He never again ran for national office.
Published in: History, Art & Archives - US House of Representatives
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Monday
August 15, 2016
1. Largest Citadel freshmen class
With about 850 expected, the largest freshman class in Citadel history reported to campus on Matriculation Day 2016 on Saturday.
Published in: The Post and Courier - online
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Monday
August 15, 2016
1. Welcome to the Class of 2020!
820 incoming knobs arrived on campus this morning to officially begin their cadet careers. Check out a few quick scenes from Matriculation Day 2016.
Published in: You Tube - online
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Monday
August 15, 2016
2. The Citadel hits milestone with largest group of freshmen women in history
The Citadel will hit a major milestone Saturday as cadets move back on campus. This year the military school has its largest group of women entering the freshman class. As of Monday, 78 women were enrolled for the 2016-2017 year. That’s a 25% increase from last year. As for the entire freshman class size, that also increased 23% from the prior year. Friday the school barber shop was filled with families as their daughters took that first major step attending the school – the haircut. "I was trying to wait until the last minute, maybe not have to cut it, but I'm donating it so it's fine,” said knob Analisa Samusson. Samusson had roughly 12 inches of hair cut off as part of the uniform at the college. She wasn't the only woman though who took on a different look. Dozens of other women started a day early preparing for their first year of military school by getting their haircuts, picking up uniforms, and buying textbooks.
Broadcast on: A few samplings -- WCSC TV-5 (Charleston); Also seen on other CBS stations including: WIS-TV Columbia, WECT – Wilmington, NC, KMOV-TV St. Louis, NBC12 Richmond, Virginia, WTOL-TV Toledo, KCTV – Kansas City - online
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Monday
August 15, 2016
4. U.S. military members among those now learning online from The Citadel
(Appearing on more than 200 media outlet websites across the US) Members of the U.S. military living around the country or on installations overseas are among those registering for The Citadel Graduate College’s newly online masters' degrees and certificates, and undergraduate degrees. The non-cadet programs are ideal for busy professionals and military service members and their spouses wanting to continue their education. "As a naval officer, I am faced with increasingly complex operational, ethical and leadership challenges,” said Lt. Cmdr. Eric Chitwood, U.S. Navy Reserves Defense Logistics Agency. “It was imperative that I obtain the best possible leadership education to successfully meet those challenges. When I began my research to find the right academic institution, I wanted flexibility, due to my military lifestyle, and I wanted an institution with a reputation for excellence that was instantly recognizable among leaders from all organizations.” In addition to serving as a Naval commander, Chitwood works as a finance consultant for Eli Lilly and Company, a global pharmaceutical company. He, his wife Stephanie, and their four children live in Indianapolis, Indiana. “There are similar online programs available at other well-known universities, but after considering The Citadel’s strong support of veterans, high academic standards, the famous alumni network and their 175-year history
Published in: A few samplings -- WKL TV-7 (Tyler, TX), WBTV Charlotte, KITV Honolulu, KPHO Phoenix - online
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Monday
August 15, 2016
5. Professor Russell Sobel assists with Seabrook Island economic impact study
They say records are made to be broken. Town clerk, Faye Allbritton hinted at a short Seabrook Island Town Council agenda for July, and it would prove prophetic. The meeting began on time and ended in 35 minutes, besting the previous record by two minutes. Mayor Ciancio reported revenues for the month came up $8,000 short of expectations. He attributed the shortfall to an unexpected dip in class 8 business licenses. However, SITC is still above revenue projections by more than $140,000 for the year. Mitigating the projections, SITC spent $10,000 less than expected in June and has $113,000 less than expected for the year. Councilmember John Gregg said the Seabrook Island Club met on July 21 to go over the 2017 strategic plan. The goal at this early stage is to develop an objective statement for the plan being considered. When the plan achieves more structure, it will be distributed for review. Gregg also said The Seabrook Island Property Owners group has reviewed the flooding preparedness booklet recently embraced by SITC. The document has been reviewed by the governing entities on Seabrook, some members of the public and the county. Changes have been made to dovetail with recommendations which fell out of Charleston County’s review and their changes have been incorporated. Further action items will be forthcoming.
Published in: Citadel Newsroom via Island Packet - onlline
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Monday
August 15, 2016
Citadel aim: Get new QB Jordan Black ready for opener
In a little more than two weeks, The Citadel will ask redshirt freshman quarterback Jordan Black to lead the Bulldogs to victory in his first college game. It will be on the road, on Thursday night TV, in a Southern Conference game against an up-and-coming Mercer team that lost its last two games to The Citadel by a combined four po“I think he is extremely close,” Thompson said Sunday at The Citadel’s media day. “I’ve seen him do some things that it is very difficult for a redshirt freshman do, and that is take control of an offense and march the ball down the field against a very good defense (in Saturday’s scrimmage). “If the defense makes a mistake in fitting the quarterback, he can take it to the house, which is something that’s pretty dynamic for us. As long as we can take control of the ball, he’ll be fine. We’ve got plenty of good playmakers around him and a pretty good offensive line around him.”ints.Coach Brent Thompson, is Jordan Black going to be ready?Black, a 6-1, 185-pound lefty from Vidalia, Ga., has been pushed into the spotlight by a one-game suspension and injury to junior Dominique Allen, who started all 13 games of last year’s 9-4 SoCon championship season. Allen was suspended for the season opener for an unspecified violation of team rules, and he also injured a finger on his throwing hand during an unrelated incident, sidelining him for preseason camp. The hope is that Allen can return for the second game, Sept. 10 against Furman.
Published in: The Post and Courier - online
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Friday
August 12, 2016
1. Seabrook Island Town Council Report: July 2016
They say records are made to be broken. Town clerk, Faye Allbritton hinted at a short Seabrook Island Town Council agenda for July, and it would prove prophetic. The meeting began on time and ended in 35 minutes, besting the previous record by two minutes. Mayor Ciancio reported revenues for the month came up $8,000 short of expectations. He attributed the shortfall to an unexpected dip in class 8 business licenses. However, SITC is still above revenue projections by more than $140,000 for the year. Mitigating the projections, SITC spent $10,000 less than expected in June and has spent $113,000 less than expected for the year... The mayor reported he, with help and support from Kiawah, contacted Russell Sobel to do an economic impact study. Sobel is a professor of economics with the school of business at The Citadel. The mayor met with Professor Sobel to set the parameters of the study. The study will begin in September and will take not one but two semesters to complete because the scope of the study demands additional time. Sobel asked for $500 reimbursement of expenses (which passed unanimously). The study will examine the spending patterns of Seabrook/Kiawah residents in Charleston and on Johns Island, how many jobs are created as well as volunteer hours and taxes contributed to both regions. The study will also examine the spending habits of people visiting Seabrook/Kiawah both on Johns Island and in the city.
Published in: The Island Connection
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Friday
August 12, 2016
2. Renew, Ward Jr. rushing Bulldogs to SoCon crown
The Citadel Bulldogs had a breakout season in 2015. After back-to-back five win years, The Citadel ended the 2015 campaign with a record of 9-4, including a win over the University of South Carolina and a first round playoff win over Coastal Carolina. Former Ben Lippen star Tyler Renew played a key role in the Bulldogs’ resurgence. The senior running back carried the ball 162 times for 839 yards and five touchdowns. For the first four games, Citadel coaches moved Renew from B-back to A-back. After a 2-2 start, he moved back to B-back and scored his first touchdown of the season in a 39- 12 win over Wofford. The Bulldogs would win four more games before falling to Chattanooga 31- 23. With a 7-3 record and a playoff birth hanging in the balance, they made the trip up I-26 to face the University of South Carolina. For Renew, and fellow Columbia native Lorenzo Ward Jr., the trip to their hometown held a special meaning for each. Renew worked at Williams-Brice Stadium as a youth. For Ward Jr., his father, Lorenzo Ward, was the co-defensive coordinator for South Carolina. "I was excited," Ward Jr. said, "I always told my dad growing up, 'I'm going to play against you, and I'm going to beat you.' He said, 'Good luck with that.' After I committed to The Citadel, I found out we would be playing them my freshman year." The Gamecocks were struggling through a tough season. Renew, along with his teammates, were out to make a statement.
Published in: Columbia Star
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Friday
August 12, 2016
3. First Baptist, Wando, Coastal win on Sertoma's opening night
First Baptist head coach Johnny Waters agreed to open the regular season a week early, 400 miles away from home but only under one condition - that his Hurricanes could still play in Sertoma two days before. "There was no way we were going to miss Sertoma," Waters said. "It's special to us, to our school, to our town. We really enjoy being able to come play in front of everybody and our kids were excited to be a part of all of this." High school football doesn't begin in the Lowcountry without the Sertoma Football Classic. Thursday, for the 46th year, Sertoma once again reignited in the high school season with its pageantry, spirit and tradition under the sunset of downtown Charleston. "We're happy to be a part of Sertoma and everything it stands for," Wando head coach Jimmy Noonan said. "If it means helping fill the stands and bringing the crowd out for a good cause, we're all for it." First Baptist and Wando were among the victors Thursday night as 14 teams in all squared off in the preseason jamboree at The Citadel's Johnson Hagood Stadium. Twelve more - including Coastal, Academic Magnet, Oceanside and Bishop England - will take the field for Friday's second night.
Published in: Moultrie News
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Thursday
August 11, 2016
1. Woodstown grad earns Doctorate at Jefferson University
Samuel Adam Oliver, a 2009 graduate of Woodstown High School, graduated from The Citadel in South Carolina in 2013. The Citadel provides academic instruction, character development, military training, and physical fitness and prepares cadets to assume leadership roles in whatever path they choose following commencement. For the fifth consecutive year, The Citadel has been recognized by U.S. News & World Report in its 2016 Best Colleges rankings. Oliver was a member of the 2013 "Summerall Guards" a silent precision drill platoon at The Citadel. He graduated with a Magna Cum Laude and received a Bachelor's Degree in Health Exercise and Sports Science. Following The Citadel, Oliver went onto Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia and graduated on June 1 with a Doctorate in Physical Therapy. He is the son of Mike and Cindy Oliver from Alloway.
Published in: NJ.com
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Thursday
August 11, 2016
2. UT System's Greenberg to present 2016 Lecture in October
Highly respected for his expertise, compassion, and creative approaches to patient care, Dr. William Laurence "Larry" Thornton, Professor of Psychiatry, has been selected to receive the 2016 Patricia and William L. Watson, Jr., M.D. Award for Excellence in Clinical Medicine. The Award will be presented to Dr. Thornton this fall, in conjunction with the Watson Lecture, to be delivered by Dr. Raymond S. Greenberg, Executive Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs for the UT System. Dr. Greenberg will discuss "A New Paradigm in Chronic Disease Management."... Before coming to the UT System, Dr. Greenberg served for 13 years as President of the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) - the state's preeminent, research-intensive academic health institution. Prior to that, he served for five years as Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost of MUSC, which is composed of six colleges and multiple hospital facilities. He earned his medical degree from Duke University, a master's of public health degree from Harvard University, and a doctorate in epidemiology from the University of North Carolina. Dr. Greenberg holds honorary degrees from the College of Charleston, Simpson College and The Citadel. He also held leadership positions at Emory University, including Chair of the medical school's department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Deputy Director of the Winship Cancer Center and Founding Dean of the Rollins School of Public Health.
Published in: UTSouthwestern.edu
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Thursday
August 11, 2016
3. U.S. Army Second Lieutenant Shalik T. Brown
Shalik T. Brown has been commissioned as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army after successfully completing the Army Reserve Officers' Training Corps program and graduating with a bachelor's degree from The Citadel, Charleston, S.C. The new officer will be branched to a specific corps in the Army to serve on active duty or in the Army National Guard or Army Reserve. The lieutenant will attend an officer basic course relating to his or her particular military occupational specialty/job. Afterward, the officer will complete advanced training by attending basic officer leadership courses for career progression purposes. The ROTC curriculum prepares students with the tools, training and experiences to help cadets succeed as effective leaders in any competitive environment. Army officers serve as leaders, counselors, strategists and motivators, who lead other soldiers in all situations occurring in ever-changing environments. As trained problem-solvers, key influencers and planners, they are driven to achieve success with their team on every mission. Brown is the son of Sharon and Milton Brown of Florence, S.C., and grandson of Anne Smythe of Peekskill, N.Y., James Pinnix of Ossining, N.Y., and Sadie Curtis of Darlington, S.C.
Published in: HVPress.net
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Thursday
August 11, 2016
4. The Citadel Hosts Meet The Bulldogs August 14
The Citadel will host its annual Coke Zero Meet The Bulldogs on Sunday, Aug. 14 at the Holliday Alumni Center located at 69 Hagood Avenue across the street from Johnson Hagood Stadium. The event begins at 1 p.m. and will feature an opportunity for fans to meet and get autographs from cadet-athletes and coaches from The Citadel's football, volleyball and cheer programs. The two-hour event also gives fans an opportunity to interact with the Bulldogs' mascot, Spike. Photo opportunities, face painting by Susan Fedor and KIDet Club sign-ups will also be available. In addition, The Citadel soccer team will be hosting its first exhibition match of the season at noon against Winthrop at WLI Field. The volleyball team opens the season at home against Loyola on Aug. 26 at 1 p.m. in McAllister Field House as part of the Bulldog Battle. Football plays its first game on the road at Mercer on Sept. 1 before hosting Furman on Sept. 10 for the home opener in Johnson Hagood Stadium. To purchase tickets, call The Citadel Athletic Ticket Office at 843-953-DOGS (3647) or visit CitadelSports.com/tickets. For more information on The Citadel athletics, follow @CitadelSports or visit CitadelSports.com.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Thursday
August 11, 2016
5. Dilday, Green and Hinson Named Captains
Head coach Ciaran Traquair selected Tinslee Dilday, Ilana Green and Montana Hinson as captains for the 2016 season, it was announced Tuesday. This will be the second consecutive year for Dilday and Green as captains. Dilday saw action in 19 games last season, tallied five shots and two shots on goal. The junior from Summerville, South Carolina, logged 1,248 minutes of playing time over the course of the season and has played in 37 games during her career. Green started all 20 games last season, ranking third on the team with 1,693 minutes played. The Raleigh, North Carolina, native registered 17 shots and 11 shots on goal during the 2015 season and heads into her senior season having played in 53 games during her career at The Citadel. Hinson played in every game last season and started 13 to run her total up to 45 career starts. Hinson also recorded three shots and now has 17 in her career at The Citadel. The senior from Hendersonville, Tennessee, native ranked fourth on the team with 1,477 minutes played. The Citadel opens the 2016 season on Sunday with an exhibition game against Winthrop. Kickoff is set for noon and admission to W.L.I. Field is free. For more information on The Citadel soccer, follow @CitadelWSoccer or visit CitadelSports.com.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Thursday
August 11, 2016
6. Mic'd Up: Coach Traquair
The Citadel soccer head coach Ciaran Traquair wore a microphone to give fans an inside look at one of his recent practices. The Bulldogs open the 2016 season on Sunday with an exhibition game against Winthrop. Kickoff is set for noon and admission to W.L.I. Field is free. For more information on The Citadel soccer, follow @CitadelWSoccer or visit CitadelSports.com.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Wednesday
August 10, 2016
1a. Citadel's First Lady Encourages Year-Round Protection from Melanoma
Cadets and students are returning to The Citadel's iconic campus in Charleston where the sun shines bright and the temperatures stay warm long past the official end of summer on calendars. The Citadel's First Lady, Donna Rosa, wants to remind the college's community that skin cancer prevention steps are needed all year long. Rosa, the wife of Citadel President Lt. Gen. John W. Rosa, USAF (ret.), and life-long lover of the sun had a very close call after being diagnosed with melanoma several years ago. "I am somewhat of a walking miracle. I was diagnosed 20 years ago; it has come back several times since and has required numerous surgeries as well as chemotherapy. We're not talking about a little cosmetic problem here - melanoma starts on the skin but can move rapidly through the body's lymphatic system causing tumors in multiple places," says Donna. "I have had tumors in my hip, in my lung and at one point was told I would have only nine months to live. That was in 2001 and I am still here. Many others with melanoma are not." Donna who is involved with numerous philanthropic efforts including the American Cancer Society's Relay for Life and the annual Walk to End Alzheimer's holds her breath every year when her body is scanned until she gets the results. She still loves being outdoors.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Wednesday
August 10, 2016
1b. melanoma
melanoma
Published in: TheDigitel.com
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Wednesday
August 10, 2016
2. Citadel: Cybersecurity Summer Training Camp
Watch the video to learn more about The Citadel's GenCyber cybersecurity summer training camp.
Published in: YouTube.com - TheCitadelExperience
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Wednesday
August 10, 2016
3. Letter: Revealing avoidance of service
The third option, open only to the privileged, was to avoid service - a doctor's note was very effective. Even though there seem to have been no ill effects from Donald Trump's heel spur, it did keep him from serving. Ted Gup, who like Trump used a doctor's note to avoid service, recently wrote, "For many of us who avoided the draft, the ensuing years brought with them not merely a measure of guilt, but also a deeper appreciation for the sacrifices of those who did serve." That sentiment is obviously not carried by Mr. Trump. The Khan family endured some withering comments from Mr. Trump after their appearance at the Democratic convention. Perhaps he should visit the Khan room in the ROTC department at the University of Virginia. He would learn that the Khans are the "mom and pop" of that program, and the former commander of the program described Mr. Khan as "the most patriotic person I've ever met." I am grateful that there are still institutions such as the University of Virginia (and The Citadel) that offer ROTC. I conclude with another quote from Andrew Bacevich: "Avoiding service out of self-interest deserves contempt."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
August 10, 2016
4. Fort Mill history: Do you remember?
1976 - Jerry Morris Darnow of Fort Mill was among the cadets who comprised the training cadre at The Citadel.
Published in: Fort Mill Times
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Wednesday
August 10, 2016
5. Sertoma kicks off prep football and prizes to boot
For more than 40 years, students, families and fans have come together for The Sertoma Football Classic, the official kickoff to high school football in the tri-county area, but this year, there's a new twist. Sponsors are offering more than $4,000 in combined prize money to local participating high schools through brand new Sertoma Football Classic spirit contests (The Hendrick Social Media Award and the Hendrick Spirit Contest Award) and the annual cheerleader football toss. In the social media contest, students to get points for each Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and SnapChat post showing their school spirit and appreciation to title sponsor Hendrick Automotive Charleston/North Charleston... Another change this year deals with seating for the event. According to Sertoma officials, The Citadel announced the visitor stands (East-side stands) at Johnson Hagood Stadium will not be available for use during the Sertoma Football Classic due to "unforeseen circumstances." According to Citadel officials, the east-side stands need repairs due to deterioration of some of the paint that is old and lead-based. "To ensure the safety of our visitors, the stands will be unavailable for Sertoma," a statement read. "A sealer will be applied section-by-section to secure older layers of paint, and we anticipate having seats available on the east side for our home opener against Furman on September 10." Seating during Sertoma will be available on the renovated home side (West side). "Each year the Classic is different, if it wasn't, it wouldn't be any fun. So even though the visitor's side is closing for this year's Classic, it doesn't mean the games will be any less interesting or competitive," a statement from Sertoma President Susan Spearman said. "We thank The Citadel for all of their support and hope to see you at the Sertoma Classic this Thursday and Friday."
Published in: WCIV-TV Charleston, SC
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Wednesday
August 10, 2016
6. Editorial: Friday Night Lights shine bright in Aiken County area
South Carolina has a proud tradition of football statewide, and Aiken County and its surrounding communities are no exception. It's hard to believe, but football season is creeping up fast, with high school football kicking off this Friday with the annual Aiken County football jamboree. This year's jamboree will be held at Aiken High School with gates opening at 5:45 p.m. The first game gets underway at 6:30 p.m., with area teams scrimmaging in 20-minute contests well into the evening. Some high school teams will take to the gridiron in regulation play a week later, with most opening non-region play on Aug. 19... Coastal Carolina University (remember how the CCU baseball team recently won the College World Series?) begins the two-year ascension from FCS to FBS. Charleston Southern, led by Strom Thurmond grad Darius Hammond, is coming off yet another great season following a deep postseason run in the FCS playoffs. The Buccaneers are ranked 6th in the FCS preseason coaches poll. The Citadel is ranked 15th in the same poll, while S.C. State received 49 votes. Furman and Presbyterian have proud traditions as well. As for the NFL, all eyes will be on the Carolina Panthers who after a stellar 2015 season fell to the Denver Broncos in Super Bowl 50.
Published in: Aiken Standard
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Tuesday
August 9, 2016
1. Zavier Nathaniel Carver promoted to Petty Officer 2nd Class
Zavier Nathaniel Carver was meritoriously advanced and authorized to assume the title uniform of a Petty Officer 2nd Class. Carver is an information systems technician. "Petty Officer Carver consistently performed his demanding duties in an exemplary and highly professional manner," the promotion read. "As electronic plots operator, he provided sound recommendations and forceful back up to the contact manager in dynamic, shallow water, high contact density environment. Distinguishing himself among his peers, he was the driving force in the training and development of Topeka's LAN Technicians of watch directly contributing to the watch teams' ability to maintain atmospheres through Topeka's first mission vital to national security in over three years. Petty Officer Carver's managerial ability, personal initiative and unswerving devotion to duty reflected credit upon himself and were in keeping the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Carver is a 2011 graduate of Person County High School in Roxboro, North Carolina. After graduation he attended The Citadel, Military College of South Carolina in 2013, he enlisted in the U.S. Navy and is currently stationed in Guam aboard the Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarine USS Topeka. He is the son of Sonia Barnett-Carver of Timberlake, North Carolina, and Bobby W. Carver of Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania. He is the grandson of G.C. and Susan Carver of Timberlake, North Carolina, and Jack and Dixie Barnett of Halifax.
Published in: The Gazette-Virginian
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Tuesday
August 9, 2016
2. GPTS Welcomes New Trustees and Staffers
C. Frederic Marcinak III - Mr. Marcinak is an attorney practicing in the Transportation Industry Group at the law firm of Smith Moore Leatherwood in Greenville. S.C. In this capacity, he represents transportation companies, including carriers and intermediaries, regionally and nationally, on commercial litigation matters. He received a B.A. in history from The Citadel Military College of South Carolina, LL.M. in international criminal law from the University of Sussex, and J.D. from the University of South Carolina School of Law. He is a ruling elder and clerk of Session at Woodruff Road Presbyterian Church (PCA) in Simpsonville, S.C. A native of the Upstate region of South Carolina, Mr. Marcinak enjoys outdoor activities in the mountains of North and South Carolina. He and his wife and two children enjoy serving the community through their church and other local organizations.
Published in: GPTS.edu
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Tuesday
August 9, 2016
3. Michael Jordan, Bugs Bunny battle aliens in Mount Pleasant
The Town of Mount Pleasant continues its Music & Movies in the Park series presented by Y102.5 by taking you back to the 80s and 90s with music by local throwback band Weird Science and the hilarious adventure comedy Space Jam at Memorial Waterfront Park on Friday, Aug. 12. Bring your blankets and chairs, enjoy a sunset picnic in the park, then sit back and enjoy an evening of free entertainment with the Ravenel Bridge and Charleston Harbor as a backdrop. The Chopped & Topped food truck will serve up dinner starting at 6:30 when the music begins. Plus, T&T Kettle Korn, BKeD pretzels, Charleston Festival Foods, Holy City Homemade Italian Ice and Hometown Catering will have plenty of snacks and frozen treats available. College of Charleston's Clyde the Cougar and The Citadel's Spike the Bulldog will be entertaining the crowd during the music and tossing balls in inflatable basketball games (if you've seen Clyde dance before, you know he's got quite a few moves!) "This is going to be one of our best throwback weeks ever," said Special Events Manager Nicole Harvey. "In addition to enjoying great music and a classic movie, we're counting on our guests to cheer on Clyde and Spike enough to talk them into a good old fashioned hoops challenge."
Published in: Moultrie News
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Tuesday
August 9, 2016
4. Wilson High School hosts Cadet Leadership Course graduation
Wilson High School held a Graduation and Promotion Ceremony for its Cadet Leadership Course (CLC) graduates on Friday. The cadets completed the program at The Citadel in Charleston. The goal of the program is to challenge all cadets to achieve their best as individuals and as members of a team. Wilson High School's Lt. Col. Johnny Guest, USAF (Ret.), said, "Successful completion of the CLC results in the cadets returning to their units stronger in mind and spirit, and ready to accept the challenges and rewards of leadership." Lt. Col. Guest also outlined the purpose of the learning experiences: 1.To prepare Air Force JROTC cadets for leadership roles in their units; 2.To prepare Air Force JROTC cadets for service and leadership roles in their schools and communities and better prepare them for life after high school; and 3.To instill in cadets the JROTC values of citizenship, service to the United States, personal responsibility, and a sense of accomplishment. The Florence students are among a total of 340 cadets, from 16 AFJROTC Units in the South Eastern Region, one of the two Coast Guard Units in the Nation, and from the National Cadet Corps of the Republic of Singapore. Florence Cadet graduates are Joel Baslot, Abigayle Stone, Justice Long, (West Florence), Austin Davis, Jamison Faulk-Jordan, Justin Hedges, Shykeria King, and Dawson Muckelroy.
Published in: WBTW-TV Myrtle Beach, SC
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Tuesday
August 9, 2016
5. Charleston Southern in FCS preseason top 10; Citadel at No. 15
Charleston Southern is ranked No. 7 and The Citadel No. 15 in the FCS STATS preseason football media poll released Monday. CSU, 10-3 and the Big South champion a year ago, opens the season at preseason No. 1 North Dakota State on Aug. 27. The Citadel, 9-4 and Southern Conference co-champion in 2015, opens its season Sept. 1 at Mercer. SoCon co-champion Chattanooga is ranked No. 6 in the preseason poll, with Coastal Carolina at No. 16. Coastal is transitioning from the Big South for the FBS Sun Belt and is ineligible for the Big South title this season.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
August 8, 2016
1. Citadel sailors return to the Ashley
The discipline and elegance of a rowing crew gliding smoothly through unruly waves will soon return to the Ashley River along The Citadel's waterfront. Staff at the military college are understandably excited about reviving water sports at The Citadel. Water access is a natural amenity for a college built along a scenic river offering a broad scope for those recreational and competitive activities. The canal connecting the Citadel Boating Center to the Ashley has been recently cleared of silt that had built up over years and made access to the open water difficult, at best. Rehabilitation of the boating center will begin this fall and include replacing a century-old boathouse that has sadly outlived its usefulness. While sailing is still available to cadets a few times a year, thanks to collaboration with other sailing communities at a downtown marina, the sport hasn't been competitive since the late 1980s. Better access to the Ashley River will surely help reinvigorate interest.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
August 8, 2016
2. Is Tax Free Weekend worth the hassle?
It's time to enter that sea of supplies. School is less than two weeks away and the Tax Free Weekend shopping rush starts today! It's like Black Friday for kids going back to school, but will you really save money if you brave the crowds? Father of 3 says savings not significant for him One father of three said it's not for him! For Tian Griffieth and his three kids it's not just about what you come home with, it's about what you save... Nick Michael is starting his first year of college. His choice of schools - The Citadel - brings with it another list of must-haves. "Nick has got a big list for The Citadel coming up, and so the only way he can get all that stuff is pretty much to save on tax-free weekend and everybody's running really good sales," said Michael's father. And when dad says save, he means half. "He's looking at spending about $1,200 so that's gonna be big money," he said. Tanger is also offering an extra 25 percent off coupon in-store off one item. Shoppers can pick that up at the service center.
Broadcast on: WCIV-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
August 8, 2016
3. Chicora grads say new school represents dreams come true for their children
A little over one week before the first day of school, experts trained the teachers of the new Chicora School of Communication on how to use the latest technology in the classroom. Principal Shavonna Coakley has had a summer filled with emotion and anticipation for the start of the 2016-17 school year. Tears of joy came to her eyes as she talked about the opportunities available to today's Chicora students that were not available when she graduated from the school years ago... We talked to yet another graduate of Chicora. Shelton Robinson Sr. says he came from "humble beginnings," went to The Citadel and is now a computer engineer and business owner. He attributed a portion of his success to the people who helped raise him. Now, he wants to pay it back by launching a mentor-ship program to help in ways outside of the classroom.
Broadcast on: WCBD-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
August 8, 2016
4. 3 file to seek open seats on Pickens County School Board
Two former educators - both named Betty - and a Pickens-area dad have filed to seek the three open seats on the Pickens County School Board in November. Betty Bagley, a retired superintendent of Anderson District 5, has filed for the Clemson-area District 1 seat that had been held by Herb Cooper until his death on Tuesday. Bagley, who retired from District 5 in 2013, now works for the State Department of Education as a personalized learning consultant and is an adjunct professor at Anderson University. She grew up in Norris and graduated from Liberty High School. She is a Ph.D. candidate in educational leadership at Clemson University, and she holds a bachelor's degree from Southern Wesleyan University, a master's of education from Clemson University and two education-related degrees from The Citadel. She was appointed to serve on the Performance, Accountability and Standards for Schools (PASS) Commission by Gov. David Beasley in 1997 and the First Steps Readiness Board by Gov. Jim Hodges in 1999.
Published in: GreenvilleOnline.com
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Monday
August 8, 2016
5. Military Rec: Old School Smoker is for settling scores and raising money
Corey Goodwin is betting there are friends who need to hash out a few things. He thinks the boxing ring is the perfect place to do it during the Old School Smoker: Buddy Bout Night later this month. "It's really all about the fun and bragging rights," Goodwin said. "I can see a soldier saying, 'Come on, sergeant. I'll fight you.'" The Old School Smoker is Aug. 19 at Sports USA. Buddies who want to engage in a friendly fight will be doing so for a good cause. Proceeds from the event will benefit the Children of the Fallen Project, a local charity that provides mentors and social activities for children who have lost a parent or guardian serving in the military. Goodwin - a former boxer who competed at The Citadel, during his Air Force career and as a professional fighter - went to a recent county government meeting looking to find support for developing the pro boxing scene in Fayetteville. "While I was there, I met a woman who introduced me to Children of the Fallen," Goodwin said. "That's one aspect of military life that I think we look over, the children of soldiers who have died in combat." Goodwin said learning of the charity made him switch his initial focus from boosting pro boxing to getting soldiers involved in an event for Children of the Fallen.
Published in: FayObserver.com
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Monday
August 8, 2016
6. Change in coach doesn't change The Citadel's plan
An important step in The Citadel's effort to build upon one of the program's most electrifying seasons occurred in mid-January. The college's administration responded to coach Mike Houston's departure after just two seasons by promoting offensive coordinator Brent Thompson on Jan. 19 to lead the program. Though it's Thompson's first time as a head coach, the continuity his hiring meant for the systems already in place offers the opportunity for the team's momentum to continue. "It actually helped the program's progress instead of going backwards," Thompson said. "So we're thinking it's a year three instead of a year one or year zero." From January through the spring, only two assistant coaches left, further locking in the plan. "We walked into The Citadel from Lenoir-Rhyne two years ago with a plan, and whether Coach Houston is here or not, we're going to continue that plan," Thompson said. "We felt the plan was a good plan to start. We've been able to improve upon it." The plan needed only two years to succeed. The Bulldogs ran to a 9-4 season, including 6-1 in the Southern Conference. The Citadel closed out the regular season by knocking off the University of South Carolina 23-22. The Bulldogs earned a spot in the FCS playoffs, defeating Coastal Carolina before falling to Charleston Southern.
Published in: GreenvilleOnline.com
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Monday
August 8, 2016
7. The Citadel kicks off practice
2015 was an unforgettable year for football fans of The Citadel. Nine wins, including a victory over South Carolina, a co-conference championship, and trip to the playoffs. Take it all in, remember the good times and then forget about them. That's the message being sent to the Bulldogs by first year head coach, Brent Thompson, who served as the team's offensive coordinator in 2015. "We still have a lot to prove out there," said Thompson. "We're not a team that's going to be physically superior to anybody so we have to go out there and work hard to stay on top."
Published in: WCBD-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
August 8, 2016
8. The Citadel's Delaney Named To Player of the Year Watch List
The Citadel junior defensive back Dee Delaney is included on the STATS Defensive Player of the Year Watch List released Friday. The watch list includes 22 athletes from across the country, only four defensive backs and just two from the Southern Conference. Delaney has already been selected as a Preseason All-American by STATS and Athlon Sports and is a first-team Preseason All-Southern Conference selection by the conference's coaches. In 2015, Delaney was named a Walter Camp All-American, first-team STATS All-American and a second-team All-American by the Associated Press and College Sports Madness. The Beaufort, South Carolina, native also earned the College Football Performance Awards Elite Defensive Back Award and was a first-team All-Southern Conference selection. Delaney started all 13 games at cornerback and registered 46 tackles, including 1.0 for loss, five interceptions, eight pass breakups, two forced fumbles, one fumble recovery and one blocked kick. His interception total led the SoCon, tied for eighth in FCS and tied for sixth on The Citadel's single-season list. His 13 passes defended also tied for sixth on the program's single-season list. He led the Southern Conference in total passes defended and in passes defended in conference play with nine. Delaney has seven interceptions in his career and is tied for ninth on The Citadel's all-time list.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
August 8, 2016
9. Sertoma Classic signals start of new season
The 46th edition of the Sertoma Classic will once again ring the bell for the start of the 2016 high school football season in the Lowcountry. The annual event is at Citadel's Johnson Hagood Stadium Aug 11-12. Gates open each day at 4:30 p.m. and the first matchup is slated for 5:30 p.m. The Classic has never gotten old to Goose Creek High School football coach Chris Candor. He played in it decades ago and has coached in the Classic for three different high school teams. "Sertoma has been a tradition since I was a kid and it's a special time for all the schools in the area," said Candor, in his second season as the GCHS coach. "Teams get their game uniforms on for the first time and get to run out under the lights in a big stadium. It's an outstanding night for kids to be seen in a college stadium as a Goose Creek Gator or whatever school they're with. It does good with the charitable donations and it helps somebody else besides yourself."
Published in: The Gazette
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Thursday
August 4, 2016
1. Recent grads in the news
Take a look at where some of the Class of 2016 have landed in our Good to Go section.
Published in: Citadel Newsroom - Citadel Website
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Thursday
August 4, 2016
2. USAMU Soldiers win National Trophy Pistol Team Match for tenth year
Soldiers assigned to the U.S. Army Marksmanship Unit (USAMU) won the Civilian Marksmanship Program (CMP) National Trophy Pistol Team Match and Gold Cup Trophy for the 10th time in a row during the National Trophy Pistol Matches July 11-17, 2016. Sgt. 1st Class Adam Sokolowski, USAMU team chief and competitor who was second overall in the National Rifle Association (NRA) National Pistol Championship and NRA High (Military) Service Champion, said the National Trophy Pistol Matches, which have been conducted since 1903, are the World Series for pistol shooting. “The National Matches are the largest championship we shoot in,” Sokolowski said. “We train all year and compete in state, regional and interstate matches in preparation for the National Matches.” Members of the winning team included Pfc. Christopher Hudock, Sgt. 1st Class Lawrence Cleveland, Sgt. Ryan Franks, Staff Sgt. Greg Markowski, Sgt. 1st Class James Henderson and Team Captain Sokolowski. Hudock, the newest member of the USAMU Service Pistol Team, won the CMP National Trophy Individual Pistol Match General Custer Trophy in his debut with the Army. Hudock has shot in the National Pistol Matches since 2003 when he was a junior marksman, but he said winning this award was like nothing else he has experienced. “It was surreal and amazing,” he said. “I have been training the entire year for it.” Additionally, the CMP honored Hudock by asking him to co-present distinguished shooting badges to this year’s distinguished shooters, including two of his teammates—Sgt. 1st class Lawrence Cleveland and Sgt. Ryan Franks.. Hudock, who attended The Citadel in South Carolina and shot on the military college’s shooting team, had planned on becoming an Army officer, but his plans changed. He enlisted in the Army and joined USAMU in 2015. “I always thought of myself as a career Soldier, and there’s no place better than USAMU where you shoot with the best in the world,” he said.
Published in: DVIDS - Online
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Thursday
August 4, 2016
5 questions for The Citadel: Can Bulldogs sustain success?
The Citadel begins practice for the 2016 football season Thursday with a new head coach and two new coordinators, and a bit of bad news. Starting quarterback Dominique Allen has been suspended for the Sept. 1 season opener at Mercer, the school announced Wednesday. Allen, a 6-1, 214-pound junior, also has a broken finger on his throwing hand that will keep him out of action for about four weeks, coach Brent Thompson said.That moves redshirt freshman Jordan Black to the top of the depth chart at quarterback, and moves the QB position up on the list of questiNew head coach Brent Thompson and new defensive coordinator Blake Harrell were on the staff that led the Bulldogs to a 9-4 record, a share of the Southern Conference championship, an FCS playoff victory and an upset of SEC foe South Carolina a season ago. Offensive coordinator Lou Conte rejoins the staff after a year away. With 15 starters back from the 2015 squad, the beginning of the Brent Thompson era — he’s the 25th coach in school history — does not feel like starting over.ons facing the Bulldogs as preseason camp begins.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Thursday
August 4, 2016
Citadel starting quarterback suspended for season opener
The Citadel starting quarterback Dominique Allen has been suspended for the Bulldogs’ Sept. 1 season opener at Mercer, football coach Brent Thompson said Wednesday. Allen, who started every game of last year’s 9-4 Southern Conference championship season, was suspended for an unspecified violation of team rules. Allen also has suffered an injury -- unrelated to his suspension -- that will keep him out of action for about four weeks, the school said. The Bulldogs open preseason practice on Thursday. “We have high expectations for all members of our team and there are consequences when those expectations are not met,” Thompson said in a statement. “I am disappointed in Dominique’s choices and the impact they are having on our team, but he has taken responsibility for his actions and we will move forward.” “Earlier this week, in a separate and unrelated occurrence, Dominique injured a finger on his throwing hand and will not be available to practice as we open camp tomorrow.” Thompson said. “He is expected to miss approximately four weeks but will be evaluated on a week-to-week basis.” With Allen out, redshirt freshman Jordan Black is likely to start against Mercer.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Thursday
August 4, 2016
Four cardiologists join Providence Health
Providence Health introduces Providence Heart, a new cardiology practice that includes the addition of four cardiologists ready to serve the residents of the Midlands. Providence Heart and will include the following interventional cardiologists: •Daniel Pinckney Bouknight, MD, FACC •Christopher J. Huffman, MD, FACC •J. William (Bill) Phillips, III, MD, FACC •Rodney G. Rhinehart, MD, FACC “We are pleased to have Providence Heart join Providence Health,” says Market Chief Executive Officer Scott Campbell. “Providence Health is South Carolina’s leader for cardiac care. The addition of these four well-regarded cardiologists further strengthens our ability to deliver needed cardiac services to our community.” 1.William (Bill) Phillips, III, MD, FACC Dr. Phillips received his medical degree from the University of South Carolina School of Medicine here in Columbia, SC, after receiving a Bachelor of Science in Biology from The Citadel in Charleston. He completed a residency and internship in internal medicine at University of Virginia Health Sciences Center, where he completed fellowships in both cardiology (as the Chief Cardiology Fellow) and interventional cardiology. Dr. Phillips is board certified in interventional cardiology, cardiovascular disease, and internal medicine. His professional affiliations include the American College of Cardiology, American Medical Association, Columbia Medical Society, ACP/ASIM. He has authored dozens of abstracts, manuscripts and presentations, and serves on the USC School of Medicine Alumni Board.
Published in: thenortheastnews.com - Online
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Thursday
August 4, 2016
JMU is breaking in another new coach, but Mike Houston says transition has been smooth
For the third time in four seasons, James Madison has a different football coach. The seniors who came in with Mickey Matthews and played two years for Everett Withers will finish their careers under Mike Houston. Houston coached a prolific offense last season at The Citadel, but in no way was it similar to JMU’s. The Bulldogs’ set was the triple option, and 88 percent of their plays were runs. The Citadel was second nationally in rushing at 345 yards per game. But, like Madison’s spread, it worked. From 5-7 in Houston’s first season, The Citadel went 9-4 last fall and won its first Southern Conference championship since 1992. Aside from advancing a round in the playoffs, the Bulldogs’ highlight was beating South Carolina 23-22 in Columbia. But as for bringing that triple option from Charleston, S.C., to Harrisonburg, that won’t happen. “The Citadel was a different institution than James Madison is, and it really felt like that offense fit the kind of players we could recruit there,” Houston said. “And we ran the triple option at a very high level.
Published in: Daily Press - Online
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Thursday
August 4, 2016
Redskins’ young defensive backs are relishing opportunity to pick the brains of veterans
On Monday, Redskins Coach Jay Gruden named off some of the defensive backs that had been gaining his attention. Sure, Josh Norman, Bashaud Breeland, Quinton Dunbar and the like were named. But then followed a name that isn’t so A-List. “[Jeremy] Harris has done some good things,” Gruden said. If that name doesn’t ring any bells, that’s all right. His three-year NFL career has been tumultuous to say the least. His rookie campaign with the Jaguars in 2013 was spent on the injured reserve with a back injury. He played sparingly on special teams the following season over six games and recorded five tackles. In 2015, Harris suited up for four different teams. He landed on the Redskins’ practice squad in Week 13, after stints with the Jaguars, Chiefs and Jets, and he was elevated to the roster after four weeks. Of the 16 defensive backs listed on the roster, eight of them are newcomers to the team. Of those eight, five of them are rookies. And they share the same sentiment as Harris. Mariel Cooper, a rookie cornerback out of The Citadel, came to Washington as an undrafted free agent. He said he’s picking the brains of all the veteran defensive backs. “It is pretty awesome,” Cooper said of sharing the field with veteran defensive backs. “It’s a lot of vets back there in the group. I wouldn’t want to be any place else, other than here in Washington. Back there with [DeAngelo Hall], [Will Blackmon], [Josh Norman], [Bashaud Breeland], just collectively, it’s a solid group and me being a young guy coming in, I’m just being a sponge and soaking in everything.”
Published in: Washington Post - Online
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Wednesday
August 3, 2016
1. At The Citadel, cadets are growing out of the box
The Citadel last week installed its first container farm on the far side of a soccer field; the school hopes to add another container each year so eventually all of the produce consumed on campus will come from its boxed-up farms.For now, the aim is to supply the mess hall’s salad bars. “Everyone is excited for us to shape the health and fitness of the school,” says Nick Mosko, who this spring graduated with a business degree. When staff sergeant Ben Cohen last year embarked on the container farm project, he recruited cadets studying business, chemistry and engineering. Nine cadets will be responsible for maintaining the farm, which is set up so 1,296 seedlings can be planted in temperature-controlled vertical towers.
Published in: The Post and Courier - online
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Wednesday
August 3, 2016
2. Commission increases Patriots Point director’s salary, maintains Citadel president’s
The state Agency Head Salary Commission approved a 14 percent raise for Patriots Point Development Authority Director Mac Burdette while maintaining Citadel President Lt. Gen. John Rosa’s salary Tuesday. Patriots Point Development Authority Board Chairman Ray Chandler told the commission in a letter that Burdette deserved the bump to $122,000 since he is “grossly underpaid” for the accomplishments over the past 51/2 years. “(Our agency) revenues are up 30 percent, provides education to over 20,000 South Carolina students annually, hosts 300 events annually (and) has become the second most popular camping venue in America,” Chandler wrote. A flourishing foundation, partnerships with local municipalities and groups and a forthcoming, $300 million mixed-use development were among other accomplishments listed by Chandler.
Published in: The Post and Courier - online
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Wednesday
August 3, 2016
3. Cigarette butts on the beach is the No. 1 litter problem, officials say
A pilot project here aims to raise public awareness of the coast’s biggest litter problem: cigarette butts. The state received $5,000 for the “Cigarette Litter Reduction Pilot Study: Folly Beach” from the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.In addition to being unsightly, cigarette butt litter poses a hazard to marine life because it contains plastics and toxic metals that leach into the environment. Shrimp and fish can ingest the microscopic pieces of plastic which pose an unknown risk to human health, according to researchers at The Citadel. Lead and nickel are among metals found to leach from smoked cigarettes within 24 hours, officials said. “In a laboratory study, a concentration of one cigarette butt in one liter of water killed half of all fish exposed within 96 hours,” according to OCRM. In addition, plastic debris along the coast can lead to choking or blockage of the gut in marine life such as sea turtles, officials said.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Wednesday
August 3, 2016
4. Two South Carolina State players named to STATS FCS All-America teams
Two South Carolina state football players were named to the STATS FCS All-America teams on Monday. Redshirt senior offensive lineman Javarius Leamon (6-foot-7, 310 pounds, Woodruff, S.C.) was named to the second-team offense. Meanwhile, redshirt junior linebacker Darius Leonard (6-foot-3, 200 pounds, Lake View, S.C.) was named to the third-team offense. Senior fullback Tyler Renew of The Citadel made the first-team offense, while Charleston Southern junior offensive lineman Erik Austell joined him. Junior defensive back Dee Delaney of The Citadel made first-team defense. Other in-state notables making the list include Coastal Carolina senior tailback De'Angelo Henderson on the second-team offense joining Leamon, as is Wofford senior offensive lineman Anton Wahrby. Charleston Southern junior defensive lineman Anthony Ellis is on the second-team defense, as is Furman senior defensive back Trey Robinson. Charleston Southern has two senior players on the second-team special teams list, including long snapper Joseph Smith and all-purpose back Darius Hammond.
Published in: The Times and Democrat - Online
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Wednesday
August 3, 2016
Citadel’s Will LeMieux finishes 135-mile Badwater endurance race through Death Valley in 42 hours
Citadel graduate student and Army veteran Will LeMieux finished one of the most grueling endurance races in the world, the Styr Labs Badwater 135 ultra through California’s Death Valley, on Wednesday in 42 hours, 13 minutes and 3 seconds. LeMieux started the 135-mile run at 11 p.m. Monday (Pacific Standard Time) and finished at 5:13 p.m. PST on Wednesday. According to results posted online, LeMieux was 62nd out of 97 total finishers in the run that started in the Badwater Basin of Death Valley and finished at the 8,360-foot Whitney Portal, the trail head to Mount Whitney. LeMieux, who served a tour in Afghanistan in 2011, said the severe desert conditions struck him immediately upon his arrival at Furnace Creek to pick up his race packet. “We got out of the car and it just hits you. I wouldn’t describe it as a breeze, but hot air moving very rapidly … When you get on the ground, it gets real, especially when you know there’s no turning back,” he said.
Published in: The Post and Courier - online
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Tuesday
August 2, 2016
1. Upcoming News from The Citadel - Back to School
Upcoming News from The Citadel - Back to School edition includes: Matriculation Day, Oath Ceremony, first fall dress parade, Gold Stars and President's List parade and The Citadel Experts Guide.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Tuesday
August 2, 2016
2. New in Translation: August 2016
The Family Interrupted by Eloy UrrozThe Family Interrupted - ranslated from Spanish to English by Ezra Fitz - Published on: August 26, 2016 When the poet Luis Cernuda flees Spain in February of 1938, he has no idea that he will never again set foot on his native land. In exile in England, his former lover finds him a disheartening job that only intensifies his feelings of bitterness and despair: caring for 3,800 refugee children who have also fled to England after the city of Bilbao fell to Franco's army. Seventy years later, a young Mexican filmmaker living in New York receives a mysterious email that throws his life into complete disarray and forever links him to the famous Spanish poet. The Family Interrupted (the title of Cernuda's only play, which had gone missing for fifty years until Octavio Paz found it in a shoe box in his mother's house) is, as Jorge Volpi once said, "A beautiful example of two decanting narratives constructed with the precision and accuracy of a watchmaker. From the opening lines, the characters' destiny seems-almost-preordained." - Dalkey Archive Eloy Urroz is the author of The Obstacles, Friction, and The Novelist's Wife, forthcoming from Dalkey Archive Press, along with several other volumes of poetry and literary criticism. He was one of the authors of the "Crack Manifesto," a statement by five Mexican writers dedicated to breaking with the pervading Latin American literary tradition. Born in New York in 1967, Urroz is currently a professor at The Citadel in South Carolina, where he teaches 20th century Latin American Literature, 20th century Spanish Poetry, and Creative Writing.
Published in: Literary Translators
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Tuesday
August 2, 2016
3. Citadel, Charleston Southern players named to FCS All-America squad
High expectations for the football teams at Charleston Southern and The Citadel are accompanied by preseason accolades for the Buccaneers and Bulldogs. Four CSU and two Citadel players were named to the STATS FCS Preseason All-America team announced Monday. Both Citadel players - fullback Tyler Renew and cornerback Dee Delaney - were first-team picks. Charleston Southern had one first-team pick in offensive tackle Erik Austell, while three Bucs - defensive end Anthony Ellis, running back Darius Hammond and long-snapper Joseph Smith - were named to the second team. Austell, a senior, is a three-year starter at left tackle and was a second-team All-American last season despite missing four games with an injury. From The Citadel, Renew is a senior who was named first-team All-America last season after rushing for 839 yards and five touchdowns on 162 carries, averaging 5.18 yards per carry. His season included a career-high 174 yards and two TDs in a 23-22 upset at South Carolina.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
August 2, 2016
4. Two Pinecrest stars named to GHSF Daily's preseason all-state team
Pinecrest Academy received preseason recognition for two of its star football players on Monday. Rising seniors Ryan McCarthy and Garrison Winter were named to the Georgia High School Football Daily's preseason all-state team for Class A-Private. McCarthy's selection as a linebacker might be surprising considering what he accomplished as a quarterback in his junior year. An FCN all-county first-team selection last season, he rushed for 1,284 yards on 168 carries and scored 22 touchdowns as the team's centerpiece in a flexbone attack. He was recruited heavily as a linebacker but committed to The Citadel as a quarterback on July 19. Defensively, McCarthy amassed 77 tackles a year ago-just four for a loss-but added two sacks, seven pass breakups and returned two of his four interceptions for touchdowns. Winter, the son of Pinecrest head coach Todd Winter, led a powerful offensive line as a junior. The team carried 522 times for 3,237 yards (6.2 yards per carry) and 39 total touchdowns. Winter, named to the FCN's all-county second-team, graded out at 88-percent with 114 pancake blocks-the most in the county.
Published in: Forsyth County News
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Monday
August 1, 2016
1. Wildlife choking on plastics
It had been a good morning sea trout fishing. Charter Capt. Harry Demosthenes had piloted the Drum Runner customers spot to spot making catches on the North Edisto River. Then he spotted the hulk up on the bank. "Wow," he said "That's a big dead sea turtle." The leatherback turned out to be huge, more than 900 pounds. A tag on her flipper indicated she had come all the way from Trinidad. She had propeller scars across the left side of her leathery shell, but she otherwise was healthy, by all forensics measures - except for the blob of plastic blocking her intestines, that apparently killed her. Nearly 1 billion tons of plastic are manufactured around the world each year. Virtually indestructible, they get discarded as litter or wash into waterways often enough that a recent Citadel study estimated more than 7 tons are breaking down to squiggles called microplastics in the tide and waves of Charleston Harbor at any given time. That kills marine life. In the water the plastics resemble jellyfish and then smaller organisms that fish feed on. The larger pieces cut off digestion; the microplastics are toxic. No one knows yet what the impacts will be on the food chain and human life.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
August 1, 2016
2. Old photos reveal much about who we were, and are
Madeleine Keller Shuler recently celebrated her 92nd birthday. Until two months ago, she was living unassisted and driving her '91 Caprice Classic with barely 50,000 miles on the odometer. She moved into Sandpiper Village recently because she was tired of cooking her own meals and figured it was time to park the vintage Chevy. She's still proud that she never had an accident and never got a ticket in more than 70 years of driving. These new surroundings at this retirement village still allow for some of her favorite pieces of furniture. There's also just enough room outside for flowers, but no more worries about yard work or upkeep. She'd like you to know, though, that just a couple years ago she laid sod at the old homestead... In 1947, her husband was a veteran-student at The Citadel. Because he had experience with a B-24 aerial photography unit in World War II, he was asked to take some pictures for the military school. Karl loved photography. He further adored taking pictures of his lovely wife. When asked to provide a cover photo for the school's literary magazine, The Shako, Karl asked Madeleine to go with him to Folly Beach. The original idea was for Madeleine, while wearing a two-piece bathing suit, to run to a specific spot where an 'X' was drawn in the sand. Though looking beautiful in her beach attire, she missed her mark. Later, after the photo was developed, her smiling visage was clearly off-center. Karl was not overly concerned. He was so in love with his wife and with the photo, he developed a little dark room magic and created identical twins.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
August 1, 2016
3. Harbor Island erosion-control system to remain - for now
Experimental erosion-control devices will remain up on Harbor Island and Isle of Palms while property owners challenge an order for their removal. Environmental groups had threatened legal action, saying the so-called wave dissipation system affects turtle-nesting activity. A state environmental agency had ordered the wave dissipation system removed by Thursday, citing the end of a study period and concerns the structure was inhibiting threated sea turtles. Attorneys representing property owners on Harbor Island and Isle of Palms filed several separate requests for final review with the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control this month. The action puts a hold on DHEC's order July 8 to remove the system... In her request for review provided by DHEC on Thursday, Shahid said the Law Project didn't prove turtles had tried to nest in front of the device and that false crawls are common along the coast. Property owners asked that the system remain in place until the results of the study are analyzed for the wall's effectiveness. The owners paid to install the experimental system last year. The structure was created by Deron Nettles and is being studied by engineers at The Citadel.
Published in: The Island Packet
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Monday
August 1, 2016
4. Aiken artist plays varied music with son
When he was younger, Aiken musician Eric "Bogie" DeBeaugrine would sit and watch his dad play bluegrass songs on the mandolin. "To this day, I believe it's the most beautiful sounding instrument on earth," DeBeaugrine said. After he learned the mandolin, DeBeaugrine went on to study the guitar, piano and drums. "I've always enjoyed entertaining people through comedy and music," DeBeaugrine said. "The ultimate reward is to see people moved to the point of tears or laughter by my performances. Money can't buy that." "I like to describe my repertoire as a little bit of everything and a whole lotta nothin'," he said, laughing. In addition to performing, DeBeaugrine has written several songs. He wrote one of his more meaningful pieces, "Only When You're In Love," out of an unrequited love for a girl. He was a student at The Citadel in Charleston at the time. "I was driving down East Bay Street in downtown Charleston and turned right onto Broad Street. I saw the steeple of St. Michael's (Episcopal Church) and heard its bell tower playing a hymn," the songwriter recalled. "That's when the words started flowing, then the melody and chord progression. As melodramatic as that sounds, I remember it like it was yesterday." The singer-guitarist would like to one day produce a CD of originals.
Published in: Aiken Standard
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Monday
August 1, 2016
5. Paul Leroy: Patriot, math scholar, coach and family man
Coach Paul Leroy is best known in Thomson as the coach that led the Thomson Bulldogs to their first ever state championship in 1967, but his passion for coaching has led him to be successful in many other places. Leroy was born in Camp Hill, Alabama, as the 12th of 13 children. Although Leroy didn’t play football until his senior year of high school, he enrolled in Marion Military Institute in 1953, receiving a letter in football. He then received scholarship offers from The Citadel, VMI and Suwanee, but the football coach at Troy State approached Leroy, giving him a walk on offer in the summer of 1955. While at Troy, Leroy majored in mathematics, and he married his high school sweetheart, Mary Louise Baker, his senior year at Troy, graduating in 1957. As fate would have it, Leroy said he was walking down a hallway at Troy when the principal of Hayneville High School in Hayneville, Alabama approached him. The principal, a Troy alumni, knew of Leroy and his talents in both teaching and coaching. The principal was searching for a math teacher and head football coach at his high school and asked Leroy if he would be interested in the job. Leroy accepted the position.
Published in: The McDuffie Progress
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Monday
August 1, 2016
6. Haley gets too much credit for flag removal
Of recent, Gov. Haley was inundated with praise for removing the Confederate flag from the Statehouse grounds. African-Americans along with liberals and progressives can appreciate the move as it was a start to neo-racial healing within the state. But such a move was initially not of her own volition. It was a reaction, perhaps inevitable, to the forgiving nature of the families who lost loved ones in the Emanuel slayings, the killing of a state senator, the behavior of Charleston's African-American community, which eschewed violent direct action, and the sensitive handling of the slayings by a former mayor and present chief of police... Even during the aftermath, if Gov. Haley were innately concerned about the flag why has she not made a call for the removal of the symbol at The Citadel? Is not the flag there just as defiantly unjust as it was at the Statehouse? Is not the flag at The Citadel in greater proximity to the Emanuel AME Church than the flag at the Statehouse? Where is her courage, political indignation, and leadership now? One can commend Gov. Haley, however, for listening and adhering to the suggestions and admonitions, and persuading her fellow Republicans to join suit in the flag's removal. Her leadership was belated but without the Republican party's vote, the flag would not have been removed; and acclaim should be given to her for that measure.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
August 1, 2016
7. Former Ben Lippen RB Named Preseason All-SoCon
Tyler Renew is poised for a big senior season with the Citadel Bulldogs and Wednesday saw the former Ben Lippen Falcon receive a preseason honor. Renew has been named to the Southern Conference Preseason All-Conference Second Team. Renew was The Citadel's second leading rusher in 2015 with 839 yards. He also scored five touchdowns as one of the lead backs in the Bulldogs' triple-option attack. The Citadel was picked to finish second in the league behind Chattanooga according to the preseason poll released Wednesday during the Southern Conference Media Day in Spartanburg. The Bulldogs received one first place vote to Chattanooga's seven. Sanford, which also received a first place vote, was picked to finish third. Western Carolina, Mercer, Wofford, Furman, VMI and ETSU round out the poll.
Broadcast on: WLTX-TV Columbia, SC
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Monday
August 1, 2016
8. MUSC physical therapy students host 5th Annual Wheelchair Basketball Tournament at The Citadel
For the past five years, physical therapy students at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) host a wheelchair basketball tournament called Shots with a Spin. On Saturday, people with disabilities and without participated in games on The Citadel's campus. Samuel Wakefield is on the Spartanburg Pistons Wheelchair Basketball Team. He's a Gulf War Veteran. "I gave them 17 years and a leg that was enough for me," Wakefield said. This is his second year participating in the tournament with his team. "We have two double amputees, we have three spinal chords and we have three single amputees," Wakefield said. He lost his leg in an automobile accident at Fort Stewart, after coming back from war. "When I lost the leg, I didn't want to be seen," he said. Now it's a different story. He encourages others to get back up again. Today he was part of the Shots with a Spin Wheelchair basketball tournament.
Published in: WFXG-TV Augusta, GA
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