Skip navigation

Archives, by month and year
October, 2017
September, 2017
August, 2017
July, 2017
June, 2017
May, 2017
April, 2017
March, 2017
February, 2017
January, 2017
December, 2016
November, 2016
October, 2016
September, 2016
August, 2016
July, 2016
June, 2016
May, 2016
April, 2016
March, 2016
February, 2016
January, 2016
December, 2015
November, 2015
October, 2015
September, 2015
August, 2015
July, 2015
June, 2015
May, 2015
April, 2015
March, 2015
February, 2015
January, 2015
December, 2014
November, 2014
October, 2014
September, 2014
August, 2014
July, 2014
June, 2014
May, 2014
April, 2014
March, 2014
February, 2014
January, 2014
December, 2013
November, 2013
October, 2013
September, 2013
August, 2013
July, 2013
June, 2013
May, 2013
April, 2013
March, 2013
February, 2013
January, 2013
December, 2012
November, 2012
October, 2012
September, 2012
August, 2012
July, 2012
June, 2012
May, 2012
April, 2012
March, 2012
February, 2012
January, 2012
December, 2011
November, 2011
October, 2011
September, 2011
August, 2011
July, 2011
June, 2011
May, 2011
April, 2011
March, 2011
February, 2011
January, 2011
December, 2010
November, 2010
October, 2010
September, 2010
August, 2010
July, 2010
June, 2010
May, 2010
April, 2010
March, 2010
February, 2010
January, 2010
December, 2009
November, 2009
October, 2009
September, 2009
August, 2009
July, 2009
June, 2009
May, 2009
April, 2009
March, 2009
February, 2009
January, 2009
December, 2008
November, 2008
October, 2008
September, 2008
August, 2008
July, 2008
June, 2008
May, 2008
April, 2008
March, 2008
February, 2008
January, 2008
December, 2007
November, 2007
October, 2007
September, 2007
August, 2007
July, 2007
June, 2007
May, 2007
April, 2007
March, 2007
February, 2007
January, 2007
December, 2006
November, 2006
October, 2006
September, 2006
August, 2006
July, 2006
June, 2006
May, 2006
April, 2006
March, 2006
February, 2006
January, 2006
December, 2005
November, 2005
October, 2005
September, 2005
August, 2005
July, 2005
June, 2005
May, 2005
April, 2005
March, 2005
February, 2005
January, 2005
December, 2004
November, 2004
October, 2004
September, 2004
August, 2004
July, 2004
June, 2004
May, 2004
April, 2004
March, 2004
February, 2004
January, 2004
December, 2003
November, 2003
October, 2003
September, 2003
August, 2003
July, 2003
June, 2003
May, 2003
April, 2003
March, 2003
February, 2003
January, 2003

About Today's News Clips
"Today's News Clips" is published into your e-mail box on normal Citadel business days, and contains links to recent news about The Citadel, the state of South Carolina, and other topics of interest to professionals working at institutes of higher education.
To subscribe
If you are interested in subscribing to this e-mail list, please e-mail pat.lee@citadel.edu

The Citadel in the News: Archive

July 2016

PUBLISH DATE STORIES
Thursday
July 28, 2016
1. Intelligent vehicles and concrete canoes lead to real world success
Successfully developing innovative products under stressful deadlines for national competitions means Citadel engineering cadets and graduate college students have substantial, real-world experience as they head into the workforce or back to campus for the 2016-17 academic year. The summer competitions led to strong finishes, but more importantly, provided a year's worth of development, design and project management experiences that the students can now apply to their professional ventures. Meet PabloBOT - A team of five electrical engineering students from The Citadel Graduate College's evening undergraduate program competed against 35 teams from as far away as Egypt and India at the 2016 Intelligent Ground Vehicle Contest (IGVC). The four day event was held at Oakland University in Rochester, Michigan. JH (Candy) Colinco, Chris Martin, and Zachary Smith worked for months, along with their classmates Mathew Claeys and Richard Graf, and three evening undergraduate mechanical engineering students, to create the intelligent vehicle they named PabloBOT. They worked, and learned under the guidance of Jason Skinner, Ph.D., a professor in The Citadel Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. "The Intelligent Ground Vehicle Contest offers a real-world experience that in this case culminated after two semesters of designing and constructing a machine that incorporates cutting-edge electrical engineering innovations," said Skinner. The IGVC is "multidisciplinary, theory-based, hands-on, team implemented, outcome assessed, and based on product realization. It encompasses the very latest technologies impacting industrial development and taps subjects of high interest to students," according to the event website.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Thursday
July 28, 2016
2. Think tank identifies 5 states as top rivals
A conservative think tank from Omaha said July 13 that five states - Texas, Florida, Arizona, Colorado and Iowa - are Nebraska's top economic competitors. The Platte Institute for Economic Research said it will study those states' public policies to see if Nebraska could make changes to their policy to improve the unfavorable trends of people and their incomes leaving the state according to the institute. Sarah Curry, policy director for institute, said Nebraska can't duplicate Colorado's mountains or the warmer weather of Texas, Florida and Arizona, but factors like taxes, education, regulation and other policies may influence people when they look to relocate. Iowa, for example, has a similar climate and yet attracts Nebraskans, in part because of a lower tax rate on retirement benefits, she said. The institute's report, based on research from economist Russell Sobel of the Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina, cited U.S. Census figures, tax data and a study by the Heartland Institute, a Chicago-based conservative think tank.
Published in: News Channel Nebraska
(view article) (no cache available)

Thursday
July 28, 2016
3. Citadel picked second in SoCon football, highest since 1982
The last time The Citadel was picked to finish as high as second in the Southern Conference, Bulldogs football coach Brent Thompson was barely out of kindergarten. But that's where the defending Southern Conference co-champs were picked in SoCon preseason polls released Wednesday at the league's media day. Both coaches and media voted The Citadel to finish right behind consensus favorite Chattanooga, which shared the league title with the Bulldogs last season. That's the highest The Citadel has been predicted to finish since 1982, when Art Baker was the team’s coach. And it's a long way from the seventh-place finish projected for the Bulldogs a year ago. "It's great to get a little more respect, because our coaches deserve that and our players deserve that," said Thompson, who replaces Mike Houston, gone to James Madison after two seasons. "They earned that with their performance last season. "But with preseason polls, nobody has any idea what kind of football team they have right now. I've got a good idea of what we can do, but I certainly don't know what we are yet."
Published in: The Post and Courier
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Thursday
July 28, 2016
4. SoCon commissioner sees bright future for his league
Southern Conference commissioner John Iamarino stood in front of players, coaches and reporters and spoke about the state of the conference at the league's football media day on Wednesday. His message? Everything's just fine. After a down year in 2014, the Football Championship Subdivision league started to get back to the standard it had set prior to the defections of powers Appalachian State and Georgia Southern to the Football Bowl Subdivision, along with Elon leaving for the Colonial Athletic Association. "I think the league is back on the rise," new Citadel head coach Brent Thompson said. "We weren't down for very long. We're talking about recovering after two of the top teams leave, and they (Georgia Southern) go win the conference (Sun Belt) they go to. They do a great job of representing the Southern Conference at the next level. "I won't be surprised if we get three in the playoffs very soon." The SoCon almost had that last season. The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga and The Citadel shared the conference title and each won a playoff game. Western Carolina had as strong of a case for making the postseason as any team left out, with seven wins and losses only to the SoCon co-champions, as well as Southeastern Conference programs Tennessee and Texas A&M. In addition, The Citadel defeated SEC program South Carolina and Furman beat FBS member Central Florida.
Published in: Times Free Press
(view article) (no cache available)

Thursday
July 28, 2016
5. SoCon Notes: Citadel got sneak peek at new Chattanooga QB
Jacob Huesman is one of those college football players whose career seemed to last about eight years. That's because the Chattanooga quarterback packed so much into his four-year career - three Southern Conference championships and three offensive player of the year awards. Believe it or not, Huesman is finally done with college football, and is working out and hoping for a shot at pro ball. But The Citadel Bulldogs already have had a sneak peek at Huesman's heir apparent, Alejandro Bennifield, a 6-2, 220-pound junior. Bennifield, Citadel fans may recall, threw a touchdown pass on the first play of the game in the Mocs' 31-23 win a year ago, lining up at receiver to throw the second part of a double-pass that covered 75 yards. Bennifield will start at QB for the consensus favorite Mocs this season. "He's a lefty and probably played 100 snaps last year in a variety of ways," said Russ Huesman, the Mocs' coach and Jacob's father. "He's similar to Jacob in that he can run, and he's probably got a better arm than Jacob had. He might be able to make you miss better than Jacob could, but obviously he's not going to run the ball 200 times.
Published in: The Post and Courier
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Wednesday
July 27, 2016
1. What American Citizenship Makes Possible
Many years ago, after I had become a four-star general and then chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Times of London wrote an article observing that if my parents had sailed to England rather than New York, "the most they could have dreamed of for their son in the military was to become a sergeant in one of the lesser British regiments." Only in America could the son of two poor Jamaican immigrants become the first African-American, the youngest person and the first ROTC graduate from a public university to hold those positions, among many other firsts. My parents arrived—one at the Port of Philadelphia, the other at Ellis Island-in search of economic opportunity, but their goal was to become American citizens, because they knew what that made possible... I'm a public-education kid, from kindergarten through to Morris High School in the South Bronx and, finally, City College of New York. New York University made me an offer, but tuition there was $750 a year. Such a huge sum in 1954! I would never impose that on my parents, so it was CCNY, where back then tuition was free. I got a B.S. in geology and a commission as an Army second lieutenant, and that was that. And it all cost my parents nothing. Zero. After CCNY, I was lucky to be among the first group of officers commissioned just after the Army was desegregated. I competed against West Pointers, against grads from Harvard and VMI and The Citadel and other top schools. And to my surprise, I discovered I had gotten a pretty good education in the New York City public schools. Not only in geology and the military, but also in wider culture. I had learned a little about music, about Chaucer's "Canterbury Tales" and theater and things like that. I got a complete education, all through public schools, and it shapes me to this day.
Published in: The Wall Street Journal
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Wednesday
July 27, 2016
2. Five to be inducted into Charleston Baseball Hall of Fame
Former Charleston Mayor Joseph P. Riley, Jr., Charleston RiverDogs president emeritus Mike Veeck, broadcaster Ted Byrne and College of Charleston standouts Chris Campbell and Nick Chigges comprise the Charleston Baseball Hall of Fame's Class of 2016. Byrne, Campbell and Chigges were selected by fan voting; Riley and Veeck were chosen by the Charleston Baseball Hall of Fame Committee. The five, which represent the largest class in the 14-year history of the Charleston Baseball Hall of Fame, will be enshrined Aug. 25 prior to the RiverDogs' home game against the Columbia Fireflies, which begins at 7:05 p.m. Riley, who served as Charleston's mayor from 1975 to 2016, is a native of Charleston and a graduate of The Citadel and the University of South Carolina School of Law. Among his many projects as mayor was the completion of the $19 million baseball field that bears his name on the banks of the Ashley River.
Published in: The Post and Courier
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Wednesday
July 27, 2016
3. Pinecrest Quarterback Commits to The Citadel
Pinecrest Academy rising senior athlete, Ryan McCarthy, made a verbal commitment Monday, July 18 to The Citadel to play football. McCarthy, who is team captain for the Pinecrest Paladins and starts as quarterback and outside linebacker, will play quarterback for the Bulldogs in 2017. McCarthy also received a football scholarship offer from Elon University, and has been actively recruited by Georgia Southern University, Northern Illinois University, Minnesota State University, Ohio University, Samford University, Liberty University and Mercer University. During the 2016 football season and his junior year at Pinecrest, McCarthy was named All-State, Region Player of the Year, All-Region and All-County. "Ryan is a tremendous leader, student and Christian young man. He is a competitor in the classroom and on the field," commented Pinecrest Academy Head Football Coach Todd Winter. "We are proud of his accomplishments and looking forward to him leading our team in 2016."
Published in: North Fulton Herald
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Wednesday
July 27, 2016
4. State's football coaches gather for charitable cause
In about a month, Furman University's Bruce Fowler and Wofford College's Mike Ayers will begin another struggle for position in the Southern Conference. They will contend with South Carolina State's Buddy Pough and The Citadel's Brent Thompson for spots in the playoffs. Clemson's Dabo Swinney and South Carolina's Will Muschamp will open another quest for championships and bragging rights. However, on Tuesday night, the coaches suspended their rivalries and shared the same stage, because they all share the same stance on goodwill. Six of the state's Division I head coaches participated in South Carolina Coaches for Charity at the Hyatt Regency in Downtown Greenville. The annual event was initiated seven years ago by South Carolina native and former Air Force coach Fisher DeBerry. In addition to their respective schools, the coaches raised awareness and funds for their sponsored charities. The causes included Chris and Kelly's Hope which assists adolescents and young adults who struggle with substance abuse, addiction and depression, the Fellowship of Christian Athletes, the Brookland-Lakeview Empowerment Center and Dabo's All-In Team Foundation, which supports breast cancer research and educational enrichment programs.
Published in: Greenville Online
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Tuesday
July 26, 2016
1. The exclusive Cassique Golf Course on Kiawah Island will host the first annual Gavalas Kolanko Foundation golf tournament
The Gavalas Kolanko Foundation (GKF) will be expanding their fundraising efforts this fall with an inaugural golf tournament fundraiser. The GKF Golf Tournament, presented by MassMutual South Carolina, will be held on Tuesday, September 13, 2016 at the prestigious Cassique Golf Course on Kiawah Island. Cassique is not open to the public and is part of the private Kiawah Island Club, however, this will be one of the rare opportunities for non-members to play the course and enjoy the facilities... About The Gavalas Kolanko Foundation: Nicholas B. Gavalas and Dr. Ronald Kolanko established the Gavalas Kolanko Foundation (GKF) in 1999. The GKF assists students with physical disabilities with their secondary educational costs, and increases support and awareness of their needs in the Charleston community. Since its inception, the GKF has awarded 115 scholarships for more than $700,000 to Lowcountry students attending the College of Charleston, Charleston Southern University, The Citadel, Trident Technical College, the Medical University of the South (MUSC), and the Art Institute of Charleston. Proceeds from the golf tournament will directly fund future scholarships.
Published in: WorldGolf.com
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Tuesday
July 26, 2016
2. Last team in proving to be a tough out
All summer long, Will Abbott has been hamstrung by a request from The Citadel baseball coaching staff that their incoming freshman only pitch five innings per week for the Kershaw County American Legion baseball team. The restrictions were taken off when Post 17 played its way into the state tournament. Unchained for the first time since the completion of his Camden High career in May, the 6-foot-4 Abbott worked eight-plus innings of five-hit baseball in helping keep his team perfect through two state tourney games with a 9-4 win over defending American Legion World Series champion Chapin-Newberry on Sunday night at Riley Park. The five-run win came over a C-N squad which swept KC in three games less than two weeks earlier in the second round of the Lower State playoffs. It also came on the heels of Saturday morning's 11-6 victory over Rock Hill, the top seed from the Upper State. KC faced Florence Post 1 Monday night at Riley Park in a battle between the only unbeatens left in the eight-team field which will be pared in half four by today. The winner of the KC vs. Florence contest is scheduled to play tonight at 7 p.m. with the loser in the 3 p.m. elimination game. Post 17, which had to win two play-in games last Wednesday in Florence in order to get to Sumter, has been on a tear since dropping its best-of-five series with C-N. Having Abbott available, sans The Citadel-imposed limitations, added to that momentum.
Published in: Chronicle-Independent
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Tuesday
July 26, 2016
3. Watson, Swinney headline Coaches for Charity event
Clemson junior quarterback Deshaun Watson will be among the honorees Tuesday night at the 7th Annual South Carolina Coaches for Charity event at the Hyatt Regency in downtown Greenville. More than 300 guests will be in attendance for the event, which is hosted by Fisher DeBerry, a South Carolina native and Hall of Fame former football coach at the U.S. Air Force Academy. Through his Fisher DeBerry Foundation, monies are raised to assist children of single-parent families. "More than 40 percent of kids live in single-parent families," DeBerry said. "We believe so strongly in kids and camps, and this year we're sending over 700 kids across the country to summer camps." DeBerry conducts similar events in North Carolina and Colorado. The first six such fundraisers in South Carolina were each held in Columbia. In addition to Clemson coach Dabo Swinney, first-year South Carolina coach Will Muschamp will be on hand for Tuesday's event, as will Furman coach Bruce Fowler, Wofford's Mike Ayers, Buddy Pough of S.C. State and first-year Citadel coach Brent Thompson.
Published in: Greenville Online
(view article) (no cache available)

Monday
July 25, 2016
1. Social Hour: The Citadel burns South Carolina on Twitter
South Carolina's social media department may not recover from this dig by The Citadel. The Gamecocks were promoting the South Carolina takeover day on the SEC Network. The takeover days (each SEC school gets one), include a day full of programming centered towards a specific school. As you likely remember, The Citadel beat South Carolina in 2015. So here's The Citadel's response to South Carolina's tweet announcing the schedule for USC's day.
Published in: Yahoo Sports
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Monday
July 25, 2016
2. Thousands of high school coaches, administrators converge on North Charleston for SCACA clinic
More than 3,000 high school coaches and administrators from across the state are expected to gather in the Lowcountry over the next four days as the South Carolina Athletic Coaches Association all-sports clinic takes place at the Charleston Area Convention Center in North Charleston. The clinic begins on Sunday afternoon with Florida State football coach Jimbo Fisher scheduled to speak to high school football coaches. The clinic, which runs through Wednesday, will include lectures in all sports and also serves as a meeting point for each coaching association in various sports. Shell Dula, executive director of the SCACA, says the annual event serves as an official kickoff to the athletic year in South Carolina... The strength and conditioning staff of The Citadel will hold lectures and demonstrations throughout the week and The Citadel football staff will lecture on Tuesday and Wednesday. Wednesday also includes an appearance by USC head coach Will Muschamp. CSU men's basketball coach Barclay Radebaugh and assistant B.J. McKie will speak on Tuesday afternoon to the state's basketball coaches. College of Charleston volleyball coach Jason Kepner also will lecture on Tuesday.
Published in: The Post and Courier
(view article) (no cache available)

Monday
July 25, 2016
3. Providence Health introduces Providence Heart
Providence Health introduces Providence Heart, a new cardiology practice that includes the addition of four cardiologists ready to serve the residents of the Midlands. "We are pleased to have Providence Heart join Providence Health," says Market Chief Executive Officer Scott Campbell. "Providence Health is South Carolina's leader for cardiac care. The addition of these four well-regarded cardiologists further strengthens our ability to deliver needed cardiac services to our community." Providence Heart will include the following interventional cardiologists: Dr. Phillips received his medical degree from the University of South Carolina School of Medicine in Columbia, after receiving a bachelor of science in biology from The Citadel in Charleston. He completed a residency and internship in internal medicine at University of Virginia Health Sciences Center, where he completed fellowships in both cardiology (as the chief cardiology fellow) and interventional cardiology. Dr. Phillips is board certified in interventional cardiology, cardiovascular disease, and internal medicine. His professional affiliations include the American College of Cardiology, American Medical Association, Columbia Medical Society, ACP/ASIM. He has authored dozens of abstracts, manuscripts, and presentations, and serves on the USC School of Medicine Alumni Board.
Published in: Columbia Star
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Monday
July 25, 2016
4. Get to know Rotary's new president
Lesley Ogden, MD, MBA, FACEP, grew up in north Florida and developed a love for music (trained in classical piano and a myriad of instruments in band) and sports (lettered in swimming/diving in high school) and obtained a full academic scholarship to Troy State University where she graduated Summa Cum Laude with her Bachelor of Science in Marketing by age 20. She worked in educational computer sales in the Southeast U.S. in the early 1990s and eventually acquired a job at The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, managing their hardware/software and multimedia computer support. While working at The Citadel, she also obtained her Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree. After working in the IT field for approximately 10 years, the last of which was spent at Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, Antarctica, Ogden decided to change vocations and attended the University of Charleston in preparation for medical school, which she completed at the Medical University of South Carolina. In addition, she met her husband, William, in Antarctica and eventually they married on the same weekend as medical school graduation.
Published in: The News Guard
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Monday
July 25, 2016
5. York Co. teens attend Marine leadership academy
Two high school students from York County schools completed a week-long national youth leadership academy program with graduation ceremonies held Saturday. The two youths participated in the Marine Corps' 2016 Summer Leadership and Character Development Academy in Quantico, Va. The leadership and character development academy is intended to develop "citizens of quality and purpose" through ethical case studies, practical exercises, leadership classes and mentorship similar to the kind used to train Marine Corps officers. Two hundred students, representing 38 states, were selected for the program, which started July 17. Organizers described the participants as service-inclined, academically excellent, leadership-oriented and representing a variety of backgrounds and geographic locations. Colton Lohmeyer, a Fort Mill High School senior, and William "Danny" Warren, a York Comprehensive High senior - were among six South Carolina students who participated in the academy, along with seven from North Carolina. Although participation in the academic is not limited to students interested in military service, both 17-year-olds would like to attend the Citadel. "This week has been awesome, and the Marine Corps has gone above and beyond to run a great camp for high school student leaders," Warren said. :We have learned about leadership and ethical decision making, and have had a blast meeting new friends and pushing ourselves to the limit."
Published in: The Herald
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Monday
July 25, 2016
6. DeBerry charity aims to assist single-parent families
The idea of starting a charity to help single parents didn't suddenly come to Fisher DeBerry. It happened gradually with each recruiting trip he would make as head football coach at Air Force. "Each year," DeBerry said, "I found myself going into more and more and more single-parent homes." Home visits like that hit home. "I grew up in a single-parent family and respected so much the sacrifices that my mom made for me to have the opportunities I had," he said. "When her mother took us in, we had 15 cents. I know how much of a strain it is on mothers." DeBerry, the former Wofford player and assistant coach, began helping single parents with charity events in Colorado toward the end of his career at Air Force. He retired in 2006 with the highest winning percentage in program history and is now in the College Football Hall of Fame. The Fisher DeBerry Foundation expanded to include speaking engagements for coaches in Colorado, South Carolina and most recently North Carolina. South Carolina Coaches for Charity happens Tuesday at the Hyatt Regency in Greenville. There will be a silent auction at 6 p.m. and dinner during the program from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. Tickets are $200 and can be purchased at southcarolinacoaches.com, larger contributions coming with additional benefits. Mike Ayers from Wofford is one of the speakers, along with Dabo Swinney of Clemson, Will Muschamp of South Carolina, Buddy Pugh of South Carolina State, Bruce Fowler of Furman and Brent Thompson of The Citadel.
Published in: GoUpstate.com
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Monday
July 25, 2016
7. Kiawah caddy plays by the rules in his job
The first time he ever worked as a caddy, he was 12 years old and carried the bag of a guy known at a New Jersey golf course as "Big Red." The golfer wore red shoes, red clothes and owned a heavy red bag. Nate Ross, now 65, still remembers what he learned that day. Stay out of the way and speak when spoken to. Ross, a caddy at Kiawah's Ocean Course for the past 17 years, has a lot of stories to tell, though, and waiting to be asked might be the toughest part of his job. Ross came to Charleston as a basketball coach. He spent eight years at Appalachian State after a chance hiring by Bobby Cremins. Cremins, from New York, took a chance on Ross, a high school teacher from New Jersey. Maybe it was his accent. They might have been the only two people in Boone, North Carolina, who could understand what the other one was saying. Ross then spent seven more years as an assistant coach at The Citadel. After that, there were five long years attempting to own and manage a sandwich shop on King Street.
Published in: The Post and Courier
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Monday
July 25, 2016
8a. Citadel summer baseball roundup
The Citadel baseball team had eight cadet-athletes compete in collegiate summer leagues up and down the East Coast in preparation for the 2017 campaign. Rising junior left-handed pitcher JP Sears made three starts for the Columbia Blowfish out of the Coastal Plain League, earning a 2-0 record and a 2.37 ERA. The Sumter, S.C., native pitched a total of 19.0 innings, fanned 18 and held opposing batters to a .197 batting average. Rising sophomore Cole Buffington played in six games behind the plate for the Titans-Prospects out of the Sunbelt League in Georgia. The Kennesaw, Ga., native finished with a .333 average at the dish and tallied six hits, six RBI and four runs in 19 at-bats. Also a member of the Titans-Prospects is RHP Morgan Foulks. The Douglasville, Ga., native made two starts on the bump, tossing 12.2 innings and fanning nine. The sophomore went 1-0 with a 3.55 ERA. Sophomore right-handed pitcher Alex Bialakis has made seven starts so far for the Pompano Beach Clippers of the South Florida League in Florida. The Boca Raton, Fla., native has registered 32 strikeouts over 34 innings including fanning eight of the 19 batters he faced on July 11 against the Phipps Park Barracudas. Currently, Bialakis holds a 2-0 record with a 2.64 ERA.
Published in: Moultrie News
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Monday
July 25, 2016
8b. Braves looking to carry success into state tournament
During Mack Hite's five-year tenure as the coach of the Greenwood American Legion Post 20 baseball team, the Braves have been one of the most successful programs in the state. Five League 7 championships, more than 100 wins and four state tournament appearances decorate Post 20's resume in that span. That successful has yet to carry over into the state tournament, though. Greenwood has won just one game at the state tournament with three winless trips. Hite and the Braves hope to change that this year... Greenwood opens the tournament against a familiar opponent in Sumter Post 15. The two squared off in the first game last year, with Sumter pulling out a 4-2 win. Both squads are missing several key players from that game. The P-15s will be without the Watcher twins, Jacob and Phillip, who play at The Citadel, while Greenwood is missing six players who now play in college: Hamp Fallaw (Spartanburg Methodist), Gatlin Minick (Lander), Jonathan Wright and Brady Smith (USC Salkehatchie), Bryce Bearden (Southern Wesleyan) and Tucker Paul (Newberry). But, the Braves have made up for those losses throughout the year and feel confident that they will have a better state finish this year.
Published in: Index-Journal
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Monday
July 25, 2016
8c. Taylor's way with words led him to Northeast Tennessee
Country roads took West Virginia boy Tom Taylor to a home in Northeast Tennessee, eventually leading to a shortened flight that gave new birth through near death. And through it all, Taylor never lost his way with words. Born in Charleston, West Virginia, in 1958, Taylor went on to graduate from Marshall University - but not before working as a part-time disc jockey and calling ballgames on the radio for Boyd County High School in Catlettsburg, Kentucky... Taylor would fly again, the next time coming in 1990 when he was a broadcaster for The Citadel. The Bulldogs' baseball team reached the College World Series, and Taylor flew to Omaha, Nebraska. "Anytime you go through a crash, I think you have apprehension about flying," said Taylor. "It was in the back of my mind, but you've got to think positive." Taylor was with The Citadel for only one season. He decided to return to Northeast Tennessee, setting up a long run as a high school play-by-play guy for Science Hill, Dobyns-Bennett and Sullivan South high schools. These days, Taylor is charting a new course with the Tom Taylor Sports Show, an internet-based sports talk program.
Published in: Johnson City Press
(view article) (no cache available)

Thursday
July 21, 2016
Baseball great Chris Lemonis leads Citadel Athletic Hall of Fame class
Former Citadel baseball standout Chris Lemonis heads a list of six individuals who will be inducted into The Citadel's Athletic Hall of Fame this year. Also due for induction on Oct. 14 are football player Creig Tyler (Class of 1970), wrestler Jeff Hartsell (1956), track and field standout Gary Pinder (1966), supporter Bufort Blanton (1954) and John Carlisle (1964), president of The Citadel Football Association. The Class of 2016 will be honored at the Bulldogs' football game against Chattanooga on Oct. 15. Lemonis, now the head coach at Indiana, graduated in 1992 after helping the Bulldogs’ to the 1990 College World Series. He led the team in home runs three times and batted .367 as a senior. He was an assistant coach for 12 years at The Citadel before joining former Citadel teammate Dan McDonnell at Louisville, where Lemonis was named the top assistant coach in the nation in 2013.
Published in: The Post and Courier
(view article) (no cache available)

Wednesday
July 20, 2016
1. Training gap led to response delay to Citadel Beach House fire
The Citadel Beach House is under repair, after a fire in the early hours of May 8th destroyed it. The call for that fire did not come in to 911 until after the flames were already through the roof and Isle of Palms Fire Department could not handle it on their own. A woman yells, "4700 Palm Boulevard! It's a huge fire!" That's one of the calls that came into 911 that night from one of the people who was inside the Citadel Beach House. Because the fire was so involved, IOP asked for backup before they even arrived. Over the radio, you hear a firefighter say, "Go ahead and send the two units from Mt. Pleasant and Sullivan's Island to the Citadel Beach House please." But it took nine minutes from that request to even notify backup. Isle of Palms Fire Chief Ann Graham says, "I cannot predict how much more of the building would've been saved in that nine minutes, but I can say it delayed our interior attack, and it delayed a second hydrant, and it did delay additional equipment and manpower."
Broadcast on: WCBD-TV Charleston, SC
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Wednesday
July 20, 2016
2. Krause Center for Leadership and Ethics reaches civic engagement milestone
With a fresh start and new school year just around the corner, the South Carolina Corps of Cadets is gearing up to play a major role in the community. The Citadel's 2016 Leadership Day is October 19 and hundreds of cadets and students will spread out across the Lowcountry to volunteer and learn leadership by serving others. Earning over 19,000 hours in community service in one academic year, the Corps, under the direction of the Krause Center for Leadership and Ethics, surpassed their community service goal for the 2015-16 school year. While supporting over 100 different community partners, events and programs the Corps made a strong and positive impact on the local community. One cadet earned special recognition for his service learning and civic engagement. Cadet Cesar Reyes distinguished himself as the 2016 Newman Civic Fellows Award recipient. The Newman Civic Fellowship is a national award that honors inspiring college student leaders who have demonstrated an investment in finding solutions for challenges facing communities throughout the country.
Published in: Moultrie News
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Wednesday
July 20, 2016
3. Clinton And Trump Embody Plunder And Paternalism
Whether it is Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump who stands on the steps of the Capitol Building in Washington, D.C in January 2017 to take the oath of office as president of the United States, all public opinion polls suggest whomever emerges victorious will have among the highest unfavorable ratings for anyone beginning their time in the White House. Both Clinton And Trump represent a failure for American democracy. According to an Associated Press poll taken in early July 2016, fifty-seven percent view Clinton unfavorably and only 37 percent favorably. Sixty-three percent hold an unfavorable view of Trump, and only 31 percent are favorable. Of those planning to vote for either Clinton or Trump, only 26 percent, respectively, said they would be positively "excited" if their candidate wins. Plus, three quarters of prospective voters in the poll declared that they were making their decision based upon whom they wanted to vote against. If there was an option on the ballot box that enabled voters to choose "None of the Above", for president in this election year, it very will might be the case that that option would receive either a plurality or maybe even a majority. That may be why come November the Libertarian Party candidate, Gary Johnson, well likely receive the largest number of votes that the LP has every won in a presidential election. Not because a large number of voters either understand or agree with libertarian political philosophy or public policy views, but as a protest against the alternatives that are being offered to the American public by the Democratic and Republican Parties. Dr. Richard M. Ebeling is the BB & T Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina.
Published in: NassauInstitute.org
(view article) (no cache available)

Wednesday
July 20, 2016
4. Football: Pinecrest Academy's McCarthy commits to The Citadel
Pinecrest Academy quarterback Ryan McCarthy went to a football camp at The Citadel last Friday as a linebacker. He'd just about given up on getting recruited to play his favorite position in college. Who wants triple-option quarterbacks like him besides Georgia Tech, he figured? Well, The Citadel does, it turns out. The Bulldogs believed in McCarthy's athletic ability and decision-making acumen enough to offer him a scholarship, and the Paladins' rising senior verbally committed Monday. "It's a big weight lifted off my shoulders," McCarthy said. "I was a little stressed out about [the recruiting process] at first, but I knew with my coach, my friends and family that I'd be OK." McCarthy would join one of the top Division I Football Championship Subdivision programs in the country. The Citadel went 9-4 last year, won the Southern Conference championship and reached the FCS playoffs behind a triple-option offense that set a NCAA record for rushing yards in a season.
Published in: Forsyth County News
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Wednesday
July 20, 2016
5. Baseball commitments
Several local high school baseball players from the Rawlings Charleston Colts 17/18u summer team have recently announced their intentions to play college baseball. Gunnar Finneseth and Jeffery Brown, both of Bishop England High School, will be attending The Citadel, as will James Island's Hunter Barbee.
Published in: The Post and Courier
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Tuesday
July 19, 2016
1a. Krause Center for Leadership and Ethics reaches civic engagement milestone
With a fresh start and new school year just around the corner, the South Carolina Corps of Cadets is gearing up to play a major role in the community. The Citadel's 2016 Leadership Day is October 19, 2016 and hundreds of cadets and students will spread out across the Lowcountry to volunteer and learn leadership by serving others. Earning over 19,000 hours in community service in one academic year, the Corps, under the direction of the Krause Center for Leadership and Ethics, surpassed their community service goal for the 2015-16 school year. While supporting over 100 different community partners, events and programs the Corps made a strong and positive impact on the local community. One cadet earned special recognition for his service learning and civic engagement. Cadet Cesar Reyes distinguished himself as the 2016 Newman Civic Fellows Award recipient. The Newman Civic Fellowship is a national award that honors inspiring college student leaders who have demonstrated an investment in finding solutions for challenges facing communities throughout the country. "We are extremely proud of Cadet Cesar Reyes, who will be a junior this year. He captured our attention during his freshman year when he stepped in to serve as an impromptu Spanish translator for students from the Charleston County School District during an activity with Citadel Cadets, thereby ensuring a successful event," said Col. Tom Clark, director of the Krause Center for Leadership and Ethics. "Last year, Cesar was a key member in Victor Company where he served on the Company Community Engagement Council (CCEC)."
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Tuesday
July 19, 2016
1b. newman
newman
Published in: LowcountryBizSC.com
(view article) (no cache available)

Tuesday
July 19, 2016
2. Welcome to The Citadel's Experts Guide
The Citadel Experts Guide is a resource for journalists, researchers, K-12 teachers and community organizations looking for professors and staff who are leading influencers in their fields of interest. The full list of topics is on the left. Members of the media: to arrange an interview, please contact The Citadel Director of Media Relations at kkeelor@citadel.edu or (843) 953-2155, or our communications specialist, edevoe@citadel.edu or (843) 953-3722. You may also contact the industry expert directly, but please note that all media representatives are required to be escorted while on campus to ensure student privacy.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
(view article) (no cache available)

Tuesday
July 19, 2016
3. Making the Grade for July 19
Midlander Antonio Molina was named to the Dean's List for the spring semester at The Citadel. To be eligible, students must maintain a GPA of at least 3.2.
Published in: Midland Reporter-Telegram
(view article) (no cache available)

Monday
July 18, 2016
1. The Citadel Museum reopens after two-year hiatus
After a two-year hiatus, The Citadel Museum has finally reopened in Daniel Library with exhibits showcasing the military college's long and widespread history. The Citadel's origins date back to 1822 when Denmark Vesey, a free black man and founding member of Emanuel AME Church, plotted a massive slave revolt in Charleston. Before the insurrection could begin, Vesey and his co-conspirators were discovered and he, along with 34 others, were publicly hanged. That year, the S.C. Legislature voted to create a municipal guard and arsenal at Marion Square to fortify Charleston against future slave rebellions. In 1842, the Legislature established the South Carolina Military Academy with locations in Columbia and Charleston. The first class of 20 Citadel cadets reported to school at Marion Square in 1843. The newly reopened museum, which was closed in 2014 for renovations, charts the military college's path from its 1842 founding to the present. Exhibits include past cadet uniforms, the long-lost sword of Confederate Col. Charles Courtney Tew - returned to The Citadel in a ceremony last year - and other memorabilia, such as a $50 tuition receipt from 1858 and a few slabs of the original "hardtack" biscuit served in the mess hall in 1890.
Published in: The Post and Courier
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Monday
July 18, 2016
2a. Which troops are running 135 miles across Death Valley this week?
The Badwater 135 ultramarathon dubs itself the "world's toughest foot race," starting at 280 feet below sea level and climbing to 8,300 feet above it, with temperatures up to 120 degrees along the way. People all over the world apply to the race, and only 100 are selected by the race director and others who go through the applications. This year as in the past, several service members are hitting the trail. Military Times caught up with some of this year's military participants: Army Reserve Capt. William Lemieux-Charleston, South Carolina (currently studying at The Citadel) LeMieux, who would eagerly await the arrival of Runner's World magazine in the mail when he was deployed to Afghanistan, said he read several books that mentioned this race. Then two years ago, one of his friends asked LeMieux to be his crew chief for the race. "I knew this race was no joke." He likens the heat to a blow dryer on high that's turning you into beef jerky. WHY: "Most people will never know how far they can go because they never try," LeMieux said. "That's one of the reasons why I got into running... to find out if I can push the human element against nature." He said ultramarathons provide the time and solitude to really think about an issue or decision you're dealing with. "It's like a chest. I'll take [an issue out] and examine it and mull it over," he said. "Sometimes I decide to stop thinking about it forever, or I put it back in the chest." Beyond personal reasons for running, LeMieux is also raising money for the Warrior Surf Foundation, founded by surfers and combat vets. TRAINING: LeMieux prefers using other races to train instead of just running more than 20 miles on his own. "For a 135-mile race, you're certainly not going to go up to that," he said. "You rely on race-day adrenaline." In order to get used to the inevitable desert heat, LeMieux has been training himself to drive in the car without air-conditioning. Living in Charleston, South Carolina, provides a hot, muggy training area as well. Nutrition is a huge part of ultra training, he said, and he's going to rely on his race crew for when he should be drinking water or consuming calories. A homegrown crew usually follows each runner with water, food and a place to rest if needed. Since he'll be burning so many calories, he can afford to eat and drink some less-than-healthy snacks. "I like Mexican Coke, and I'm anticipating that I'm probably going to go through 12-24 of them," he said. He typically eats meat-free, but he's been known to have spicy chicken wings or a slice of pizza during the race as well - so not all carbs and sugar. "You've got to kind of watch what foods you eat," he said. "I had two ice cream cones [during a race] last weekend, and that was a mistake." GOAL: LeMieux said his future goal is to represent the United States at a world event. "It would be such an honor to wear USA across my chest," he said.
Published in: ArmyTimes.com
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Monday
July 18, 2016
2b. Confusion Hindered Fire Response
Restorations of Citadel Beach Club could be finished by fall's end following the Mother's Day fire that forced the gutting of the entire building. Meanwhile, Charleston County's Consolidated 9-1-1 Center has acknowledged that confusion on its end led to an 8- to 9-minute delay in dispatching Mount Pleasant Fire Department to assist Isle of Palms Fire Department that Sunday morning. "We're not looking for blame," said Isle of Palms Fire Chief Ann Graham, who asked the day after the May 8 fire for an explanation of what went wrong and finally got specifics from the 9-1-1 Center the first week in July. "We just don't want it to happen again." As far as the impact of dispatch delays on the fire's outcome, Graham said, "There is no way to know what the absolute difference would be, but it did cause a delayed response in making an interior attack." Originally constructed in the 1950s and rebuilt after Hurricane Hugo in 1989, Citadel Beach Club is an island landmark used by The Citadel's cadets, staff, faculty, alumni and donors. The state military college also books other events at the venue, which has a busy wedding calendar. The cause of the fire is still undetermined and likely to stay that way, Graham said. The Citadel said repair costs have not been determined yet either.
Published in: Island Eye News
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Monday
July 18, 2016
3. Retired Lt. Col. Jim Tucker inducted into Army Ranger Hall of Fame
Before you try to figure out who retired Army Ranger Lt. Col. Jim Tucker is, you need to understand a few things that he is not. He is not, by any stretch of the imagination, politically correct. He is not inclined to suffer fools gladly, nor to pay much attention to rank or protocol. There are many words that can describe Tucker: passionate, ornery, sentimental, loyal, profane, energetic, and far more literate and intelligent than he lets on. On Thursday, he added one more item to the list: Member of the Army Ranger Hall of Fame. Tucker was inducted into the elite group during a ceremony at Fort Benning, Georgia, home of the 75th Ranger Regiment and the Ranger Training Brigade. If you ask him, he will tell you he was honored for helping to form the U.S. Army Ranger Association more than 40 years ago. But according to the citation read at the ceremony, there is much more to the story. Born near Oxford, Mississippi in 1933, Tucker went on to graduate from The Citadel, an elite military school in Charleston, South Carolina, in 1956. Soon after, he made it through the grueling Army Ranger School, and was sent to Korea with the 7th Infantry Division. After Korea, Tucker became an instructor at Mountain Ranger Camp in Dahlonega, Georgia - the second phase of Ranger training. While there, he was awarded the prestigious Soldier's Medal after rescuing soldiers from a nighttime helicopter crash.
Published in: NWFDailyNews.com
(view article) (no cache available)

Monday
July 18, 2016
4. Citadel engineering professors garner awards
Three professors from the Citadel School of Engineering in South Carolina recently won awards for their exemplary work both as professors and in the engineering sector. Mary Katherine Watson, Ph.D., won the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) South Carolina section's 2016 Young Civil Engineer of the Year Award, given to the Palmetto State's most outstanding engineer under the age of 35. She was also honored with the 2016 ASCE ExCEEd New Faculty Teaching Award, given to exemplary faculty members with less than five years of full-time teaching experience. Dennis Fallon, Ph.D., won the ASCE South Carolina section's 2016 LeTellier Cup for outstanding lifetime contribution to civil engineering, as well as the George K. Wadlin Distinguished Service Award from the civil engineering division of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE). Simon Ghanat, Ph.D., was honored with the 2016 Gerald R. Seeley Award from the ASEE Civil Engineering Division for the best paper from a newer faculty member. "The Citadel School of Engineering team is very proud of these outstanding contributions by our colleagues," Col. Ronald W. Welch, USA (Retired), Ph.D., dean of The Citadel School of Engineering, said. "This kind of recognition underscores the excellence of our engineering programs and the leadership of our faculty."
Published in: Palmetto Business Daily
(view article) (no cache available)

Monday
July 18, 2016
5. Follow along Cadet Alexis Jusiniano's blog from the 2016 Republican National Convention
My name is Alexis Justiniano and this is my blog. I am a Political Science major with a concentration in International Politics and Military Affairs. In the fall I will be a college senior and one step closer to entering the political workforce. In two weeks, I will be in the great city of Cleveland, OH. Why? I will be there for this year's Republican National Convention. I was selected by my home institution of The Citadel to attend a seminar hosted by The Washington Center, along with 120 of my peers from colleges and universities around the country. This two week seminar will help reinforce student's perspectives and understanding of political conventions through the use of class time and fieldwork. A few months ago, I was anticipating a shocking and revolutionary open convention due to all the presidential candidates still in the running. However, the field has slowly been weeded out and Donald Trump emerged as the Republican Party Nominee for President. While I don't expect it to be as controversial as before, I believe it will be a great experience nonetheless. Stay tuned for further updates as we approach the 2016 RNC.
Published in: 2016 RNC Blog
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Monday
July 18, 2016
6. Heritage Event to focus on French and Indian War causes
The second annual French Creek Heritage Event on Saturday will focus on "1750 -- A Gathering Storm in the French Creek Valley" and the Washington/Gist expedition of 1753. The 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. event at the Cochranton Fairgrounds will include re-enactments, historical demonstrations, displays and local history talks. The French Creek Valley in 1750 was about to become a global battleground. The French, British and Indians claimed the territory, and would fight for it beginning six years later in the French and Indian War. In 1753, Colonial Virginia militia Major George Washington, guided by explorer Christopher Gist, led an expedition through the region to carry a message to the French at Fort LeBoeuf - that they were trespassing in British territory. The French and Indian War settled the claim in favor of the British. The 2016 Heritage Event will open with re-enactors paddling down French Creek and coming ashore to establish military encampments and foraging camps that will be open to visitors. Speakers' tent presentations will include the keynote address by Grove City native David Preston, professor of national security studies at The Citadel and author of award-winning books chronicling America's western frontier in the 18th century.
Published in: GoErie.com
(view article) (no cache available)

Monday
July 18, 2016
7. Meet the Mount Pleasant cop who blocked Tim Duncan's shot
Kirill Misyuchenko - the guys call him "Shorty" - doesn't talk about that game much. "Nothing to brag about, when you gave up 21 points and 12 rebounds," the good-natured Mount Pleasant police officer says now. But when NBA great Tim Duncan retired this week, after 19 seasons and five championships, Misyuchenko couldn't help but flash back to the time when he shared a court with the 15-time NBA All-Star. The date was Nov. 25, 1996, when Duncan's Wake Forest team - ranked No. 3 in the nation at the time - came to McAlister Field House to play The Citadel Bulldogs. A crowd of 5,127 fans turned out to see Duncan, who gave up swimming for basketball only after Hurricane Hugo destroyed the pool near his home on the U.S. Virgin Islands, and had ignored the riches of the NBA to return to Wake Forest for his senior season. Awaiting the 6-11 Duncan in the paint was Misyuchenko, the 7-0 Citadel center whose parents had immigrated from Russia to the U.S. in 1991. Misyuchenko had an inch on Duncan, but that's about all. "I wasn't really nervous," said Misyuchenko, who was known as "BRK" (Big Russian Kid) to his teammates. "I never got nervous for games like that. I wish we had prepared a little better than we did, and playing him one-on-one was probably our biggest mistake. He was just too fast for us, especially for me." The game - an 86-52 win for the Deacons, in which Duncan had 21 points and 12 rebounds - is a blur for Misyuchenko now.
Published in: The Post and Courier
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Monday
July 18, 2016
8. Floyd, Weaver To Participate In SoCon Media Day
The Citadel football program will be represented at Southern Conference Media Day by senior linebacker Tevin Floyd and senior offensive lineman Kyle Weaver, head coach Brent Thompson announced Thursday. Floyd, Weaver and Coach Thompson will join student-athletes and coaches from each Southern Conference school at the conference's annual media gathering at the Marriott in Spartanburg, South Carolina, on July 27. The event starts with a kickoff luncheon at noon before a media availability session from 1-3 p.m. In addition to the media opportunities, the all-conference preseason teams and preseason poll will be announced. Floyd has started 26 consecutive games, including every game in 2014 and 2015, and was named the Bulldogs' Defensive MVP and second-team All-Southern Conference last season. The Tallahassee, Florida, native recorded 91 tackles, including 8.5 for loss with 2.0 sacks, three interceptions, two interception return touchdowns, two forced fumbles, two pass breakups, one fumble recovery and one quarterback hurry. He tied for first in FCS in interception return touchdowns, ranked first in the SoCon and third in FCS with 132 interception return yards and was third in the conference in interceptions. He was the SoCon Defensive Player of the Month in November and was one of two in the conference to earn multiple SoCon Defensive Player of the Week honors.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
(view article) (no cache available)

Monday
July 18, 2016
9a. Antonio Brown proves everyone wrong all the way back to high school
It is hard to fault a college that misses on a high school prospect. The sheer volume of players makes scouting a tremendous challenge. And so it only makes sense that some really great players slip through the cracks. But that makes it no less impressive when a player rises through the ranks and finds NFL success. A perfect example of that is Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver Antonio Brown. Brown played wide receiver, quarterback, running back and kick returner at Miami Norland High School. But for all his stats, his lack of a designated position he didn't see much attention from teams. And Rivals had no stars as a wide receiver recruit. No stars. Let that sink in a minute. He had first planned to attend Florida State University, then Alcorn State out of high school, but academics sent him to North Carolina Tech Prep for a year. After that, Brown planned to attend West Virginia, but because of a late coaching change, ended up being a walk-on at Central Michigan. Just three short years later the Steelers took a shot on him as a sixth-round pick and the rest, as they say, is history. The Steelers haven't been shy about looking to smaller schools and less prominent players in the draft. In recent seasons the Steelers have looked to colleges like The Citadel, Central Michigan and South Carolina State in recent seasons as players they expect to start and play well.
Published in: Steelers Wire - USA Today
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Monday
July 18, 2016
9b. Marlins sign Cole Figueroa, designate Asher Wojciechowski
The Miami Marlins have made a pair of minor league moves, which includes signing infielder Cole Figueroa and designating for assignment RHP Asher Wojciechowski. The 29-year-old Figueroa has experienced a little bit of everything in his Major League career. After turning down the pros out of high school from Lincoln HS in Tallahassee, Florida, Figueroa signed on in 2008 with the San Diego Padres as a sixth round pick out of the University of Florida. Since then, he's been in the minor league system of the Padres, Rays, Yankees, Dodgers, and Pirates. He's hit well in 2016 as a member of both the Dodgers and Pirates Triple-A squads, with a slash line of .309/.350/.447. In 26 at-bats with the Pirates this year, he's collected only four hits. Wojciechowski is a former first-round pick of the Toronto Blue Jays in 2010 out of The Citadel. A native of Hardeeville, South Carolina, Wojciechowski made his Major League debut with the Houston Astros in 2015, making just five starts before being sent back through the minor league system. On May 24 of this year, he was claimed off waivers by the Marlins. In three starts with Triple-A New Orleans, the 27-year-old Wojciechowski was lit up, allowing 13 earned runs and three home runs in 7.1 innings of work.
Published in: TodaysKnuckleball.com
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Thursday
July 14, 2016
1. Should the U.S. open trade with Cuba?
I was in Cuba this year shortly after President Obama's visit. I saw American flags on cars, people wearing American flag t-shirts, and pro-Obama artwork in the markets. President Obama is a hero there. The sense of excitement is palpable. But is it the time right to open trade with Cuba? I don't know, but I continue to examine the issue. I know Cuba well, having traveled there many times since 1998. My area of teaching and research cover socialist and post-socialist economies. At The Citadel, I teach a course on the Cuban economy, and as part of that course I take my students to Havana over spring break. The U.S. currently has trade sanctions - the so-called embargo - on Cuba. The sanctions limit what can be imported to the U.S. from Cuba (basically nothing) and what can be exported to Cuba. Under the embargo, agricultural products and medicines can be exported to Cuba. In fact, in 2007, the U.S. was Cuba's top supplier of agricultural products, making the U.S. Cuba's fifth largest trade partner even though Cuba cannot ship item to the States. Cuba has since diversified its sources of food, so the U.S. is no longer needed as such a large trade partner. Written by Dr. William Trumbull, dean of The Citadel School of Business. Please email Emily DeVoe at edevoe@citadel.edu for the link to the entire article.
Published in: Charleston Business magazine
(photo included)

Thursday
July 14, 2016
2. Confederate flag supporters describe how their views changed
Like many other white southerners, Justin Hough used to consider the Confederate flag part of his regional heritage, not a symbol of hate. That changed when a white man who posed with the flag was charged with killing nine black churchgoers last year. Hough is one of thousands of people who felt compelled to share their feelings with South Carolina's governor after she called for removing the flag from its place of honor. "It's a tarnished, tattered image of the South," Hough told The Associated Press, and southerners who don't acknowledge this either don't understand the impact, or are "just lying about what it says to other people." The AP reached out to writers of these emails and letters after Gov. Nikki Haley's office released 10,000 pages of documents last week in response to requests for public records from last summer's flag debate. Hough now lives in North Carolina, where he expanded on the feelings he expressed last year, now that reactions to police killings threaten to provoke even more violence. In his letter, Hough said he was a graduate of The Citadel military academy who once loved "the Confederate flag, singing Dixie and defending our right to say the N-word." "I came to understand," he wrote, that "attaching southern pride to these relics of the past only served to solidify that the true beliefs of the south are the stereotypes of hatred, bigotry and racism."
Published in: Washington Post
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Thursday
July 14, 2016
3. Omaha think tank identifies five states as Nebraska's top economic rivals
A conservative think tank from Omaha said Wednesday that five states - Texas, Florida, Arizona, Colorado and Iowa - are Nebraska's top economic competitors. The Platte Institute for Economic Research said it would study those states' public policies to see whether there are changes Nebraska could make to improve what the institute said were unfavorable trends of people and their incomes leaving the state. Sarah Curry, policy director for institute, said Nebraska can't duplicate Colorado's mountains or the warmer weather of Texas, Florida and Arizona, but taxes, education, regulation and other policies also may be factors people consider when they relocate. Iowa, for example, has a similar climate and yet attracts people from Nebraska, at least in part because of lower taxes on retirement benefits, she said. The institute's report, based on research from economist Russell Sobel of the Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina, cited U.S. Census figures, tax data and a study by the Heartland Institute, a Chicago-based conservative think tank.
Published in: Omaha World-Herald
(view article) (no cache available)

Thursday
July 14, 2016
4. The Citadel's Crochet Nominated For AFCA Good Works Team
The Citadel senior linebacker Joe Crochet has been nominated for the AFCA Good Works Team, it was announced Wednesday. Crochet regularly participates in community service opportunities in the Charleston area with The South Carolina Corps of Cadets and The Citadel football team. He volunteers as a coach for a youth football camp at the Mount Pleasant Recreation Center, where he helps introduce children to football and teaches them proper techniques. He also volunteers for the annual Leadership Day, working in the community to assist others, and visits local schools to encourage students. This past spring, Crochet ran the Cooper River Bridge Run to raise money for the Ronald McDonald House in Charleston. He is also a counselor at Camp Rise Above, a two-day camp for children with illnesses and/or disabilities, and visits children in the hospital. Crochet, one of eight team leaders on The Citadel Player Council, graduated in three years with a bachelor's degree in business administration and is on track to graduate with his MBA when his athletic eligibility is completed. The Stone Mountain, Georgia, native was named a first-team CoSIDA Academic All-American in 2015, The Citadel's first since 1989, and is a member of the Southern Conference Fall All-Academic Team and the Southern Conference Academic Honor Roll.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
(view article) (no cache available)

Thursday
July 14, 2016
5. A year later, former Citadel coach Chuck Driesell has 'no regrets'
In Chuck Driesell's first season as The Citadel's basketball coach, the Bulldogs put together a nice little win streak, knocking off Southern Conference foes Samford, Appalachian State, Western Carolina and Davidson. "I should have gone to the AD right then asked for a lifetime contract," Driesell says now with a laugh, recalling that 2010-11 season. Alas, that four-game streak might have been the high point of Driesell's five-year tenure with the Bulldogs, which ended in March 2015 with a record of 42-113. Little more than a year later, the 53-year-old Driesell has found a home in high school coaching and says he has no regrets about his time at The Citadel. "I don't regret coming to The Citadel at all," says Driesell, who still owns a house in Mount Pleasant and is conducting a summer camp at Porter-Gaud this week. "I learned a lot about myself, that I work hard and am a good person and that I care about the players, regardless of how well they can play. I really thought that with a couple of more years, we might have turned the corner." Driesell's final season at The Citadel was his best, with an 11-19 overall record and 6-12 mark in SoCon play in 2014-15. But that was not enough to convince Citadel athletic director Jim Senter to renew his contract, and Senter hired former VMI coach Duggar Baucom to replace Driesell.
Published in: The Post and Courier
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Thursday
July 14, 2016
6. Former College of Charleston AD Jerry Baker returns as executive director of Cougar Club
erry Baker, who served as athletic director at the College of Charleston for 15 years, is returning to the school as the new executive director of the Cougar Club. "The College has made a fine selection in Jerry Baker as its next executive director of the Cougar Club," College of Charleston President Glenn F. McConnell said Wednesday. "As a former member and leader of the College's athletics department, Jerry worked tirelessly to enhance the student-athlete experience and game-day atmosphere at our institution. I am so pleased he is coming home to his alma mater. His passion, energy and leadership for student-athletes will serve the College well moving forward." As athletic director from 1991 to 2007, Baker helped lead the Cougars' transition from NAIA to NCAA Division I. He was also instrumental in improving Charleston's sports facilities, including the Cougars' $45 million basketball and volleyball facility and the renovations to the Patriots Point Athletics Complex. Baker is a 1974 graduate of the College of Charleston and was inducted into the CofC Athletics Hall of Fame in 2013. Baker stepped down as the College's athletics director in 2007 and later served as the executive director of The Citadel Brigadier Foundation for more than six years.
Published in: The Post and Courier
(view article) (no cache available)

Wednesday
July 13, 2016
1. Engineering faculty recognized for excellence by industry organizations
Faculty members from the recently expanded Citadel School of Engineering are enjoying recognition for their work as professors and industry education leaders. The following awards were received this summer from engineering industry associations and are as follows: Professor Mary Katherine Watson, Ph.D., Professor Dennis Fallon, Ph.D. and Professor Simon Ghanat, Ph.D.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
(view article) (no cache available)

Wednesday
July 13, 2016
2. Chattanooga man's class ring found 11 years after he lost it
For more than a decade, Rufus Marye was convinced a stretch of South Carolina beach was cursed. It was 2005 and he was working near the city of Charleston, flipping houses for a living. One of his favorite ways to unwind was to swim at the beach near Isle of Palms. He admits to hating the job, but it paid the bills. This was years before he moved back to Chattanooga to start the Van Man, Chattanooga Brew Choo and double-decker bus operations. On a sunny day, he decided to go for a swim to unwind a bit with his then-girlfriend. He happened to be wearing his brand-new class ring that his father had purchased for Marye when he graduated from The Citadel. It was 10K gold and inscribed with a personal motto that stuck with him during his formative years at McCallie School: "Man's chief end is to glorify God and enjoy him forever." He loved that ring-it represented years of hard work-and it was made even more special because it was a gift from his father. It was his prized possession at the time, and he wore it with pride everywhere he went.
Published in: Nooga.com
(view article) (no cache available)

Wednesday
July 13, 2016
3. How One Marine Went From The Corps To His Dream Job With A Top Fortune 500 Company
As one of the world's leading biotechnology companies, in 2016, Amgen was named one of Fortune magazine's World's Most Admired Companies, as well as one of Fast Company's 500 Most Innovative Companies. One way Amgen stays at the top is by hiring employees who share its core values, which serve as the compass on its mission to serve patients. These core values include being ethical, working in teams, and trusting and respecting each other. Among those who've found themselves gravitating to Amgen, in part, because of their shared values, are military veterans. Hirepurpose chatted with one such veteran to find out why he chose to work for Amgen, and how other veterans can follow in his footsteps... But getting to Amgen wasn't that easy. Before he found the company, he spent hours a day sitting at his computer, applying for jobs, looking for anything that matched his skills. And though he'd gone to college at The Citadel, he felt completely unprepared for his re-entry to the civilian world. "When you get out, there's not really a transition. There's no help getting acclimated to civilian life," Flanagan says. "It's a long process - it's tough and very lonesome. And coming from the military, you're so used to having a team around you and being able to accomplish anything, so it's a real adjustment."
Published in: Task & Purpose
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Wednesday
July 13, 2016
4. Names & Notes: Smith takes top honors at The Citadel
Members of The Citadel South Carolina Corps of Cadets earned top honors in the spring 2016 semester. Dean's list recognition is given to cadets registered for 12 or more semester hours and whose grade point average is 3.20 or higher with no grade below a C for the previous semester's work. Briggs Smith, of North Augusta, was recognized for outstanding academic achievement and earned dean's list recognition for the spring 2016 semester. Smith also was awarded Gold Stars by The Citadel for earning a grade point ratio of 3.70 or higher during the 2016 spring semester. The Citadel, founded in 1842, is a public, coeducational military college in Charleston that offers a classic military education for men and women seeking a college experience that is meaningful, academically strong and is focused on educating and developing principled leaders for a strong military and a global workforce.
Published in: North Augusta Star
(view article) (no cache available)

Wednesday
July 13, 2016
5. Olympic wrestlers, coach come together to lead camp at Riverside Military
Some of the most decorated wrestlers of all-time descended upon Gainesville to share their years of experience with the next generation of wrestlers on how to perform on and off the mat. This was the second consecutive year that the Champion Wrestling Camps were held at Riverside Military Academy, after over a decade at The Citadel in Charleston, with more than 100 middle and high school students from North Carolina, South Carolina, Florida, Alabama, Louisiana and Georgia. Olympic Gold Medalist Kendall Cross, two-time Olympic coach Rob Hermann and Wade Schalles, who is recognized by the Guinness Book of World Records for having the most wins and the most pins of anyone in the history of wrestling, joined former NCAA All-American and camp director Jeff Ragan to provide instruction for the four-day overnight camp that wraps up today. "We have one common goal," Ragan said. "We want to make kids better around the country." Other instructors included NCAA All-American Taylor Knapp, two-time All-American Peter Yates, NCAA finalist TJ Dudley, NCAA qualifier Sean Russell, three-time Southern Conference finalist Marshall Haas, two-time NCAA qualifier Clark Glass, NCAA qualifier Ryan Medved and undefeated Georgia high school wrestler Bazell "Poo Bear" Partridge.
Published in: GainesvilleTimes.com
(view article) (no cache available)

Wednesday
July 13, 2016
6. The Citadel Ticket Office Wins Charleston Award
The Citadel Athletic Ticket Office has been selected for the 2016 Charleston Award in the Ticket Sales category by the Charleston Award Program. During the 2015-16 athletic year, which included the football team winning a Southern Conference co-championship, the basketball team ranking second in the country in scoring and baseball head coach Fred Jordan's 800th career victory, attendance for those three sports was increased by more than 20,000 over the previous season. Baseball's average attendance of 958 per game led the SoCon by more than 300 fans per game, and football's total attendance of 64,070 was 19th in FCS. The Pearson Club Level at Johnson Hagood Stadium sold out for the first time, and the crowd of 14,925 for the Bulldogs' Homecoming game against VMI was the largest in Johnson Hagood Stadium since 2009. Each year, the Charleston Award Program identifies companies that have achieved exceptional marketing success in their local community and business category and enhance the positive image of small business through service to their customers and the community. The Charleston Award Program focuses on quality, not quantity, and winners are determined based on information gathered internally and data provided by third parties.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Tuesday
July 12, 2016
1. State says no to Wild Dunes beach erosion walls
Experimental removable seawalls have been ordered to be taken down in front of erosion-imperiled condos and houses in the Wild Dunes resort. Protecting the properties from severe beach erosion will be up to the messy piles of sandbags the walls were designed to replace. State regulators told the walls' design group Friday to dismantle the wave-dissipation device walls by July 28, the end date of the current study period for them. The decision comes after two environmental groups filed a notice of intent to sue over the devices' impact on nesting by endangered and threatened species of sea turtles, mostly the iconic loggerhead. The notice said the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control made the decision because of potential impact on the turtle nesting, and will continue to asses the concerns. The sandbags tend to lose sand, wash away and litter nearby beaches, despite patrols to clean them up after storm tides. They shored up the properties before the walls, creating a controversy with the litter, and have been placed again off and on as the walls have gone through permitting and re-permitting. The bags require emergency permits with time limits. So far, DHEC has received no requests, said Jennifer Read, chief communications officer.
Published in: The Post and Courier
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Tuesday
July 12, 2016
2. Self-Determination and Individual Choice Post Brexit
The recent vote within the United Kingdom to withdraw from the European Union has once again implicitly raised the issue of the right of self-determination through secession. In other words, do individuals have a right to determine under which political authority they shall live and be represented? This is, of course, an almost taboo subject in the United States because of its linkage with the Southern Confederacy and the attempted preservation of slavery in the 1860s. While defenders of Southern secession often argue that there were other issues besides slavery that motivated the Southern states to leave the Union following the election of Abraham Lincoln to the presidency in 1860, including tariffs and government spending, the fact is slavery was the most important catalyst for Southern secession. 1860s Southern Secession Vs. Self-Determination Today: Anyone who reads the proclamations of secession issued, for example, by South Carolina, Georgia, Mississippi, or Texas, soon finds that at the core of their decisions to withdraw from the Union was the desire to preserve slavery as the fundamental institution of their societies from perceived anti-slavery threats from the North. The proponents of Southern secession declared theirs to be a "democratic" choice reflecting the will of the people in these Southern states. But as the nineteenth century British political philosopher, John Stuart Mill, pointed out in 1863, "Secession, may be laudable, and so may any other kind of insurrection, but it may also be an enormous crime" when its purpose is the preservation of holding a portion of the population in perpetual bondage. If secession was meant to be an expression of the will of the people, Mill asked, "Have the slaves been consulted? Has their will been counted as any part in the estimate of collective volition? They are a part of the population . . . Remember, we consider them to be human beings, entitled to human rights." Dr. Richard M. Ebeling is the BB & T Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina.
Published in: NassauInstitute.org
(view article) (no cache available)

Tuesday
July 12, 2016
3. Students make dean's lists, recognized for hard work
The following members of The Citadel Corps of Cadets earned top honors in the spring 2016 semester. Dean's List recognition is given to cadets registered for 12 or more semester hours and whose grade point average is 3.2 or higher with no grade below a C for the previous semester's work. Among those on the Dean's List are Bryce Eaddy and Robert McClam of Lake City; Blayne Hayes of Scranton; Ethan McAllister of Pamplico; John Kellahan of Kingstree; and Dylan Moore of Olanta.
Published in: SCNow.com
(view article) (no cache available)

Monday
July 11, 2016
1a. Seventh Annual Citadel Lady Bulldogs Football 101
Ready. Set. Hike. Bring your game face on July 16 to the Seventh Annual Ladies Football 101 event, sponsored by The Citadel Football Association (CFA). Experience an evening of football education, fun, food, gifts and auctions. New this year is the Men's Huddle option, giving couples the opportunity to turn the event into a date night. The event will be held from 4:30 - 10 p.m. on Saturday, July 16, with proceeds benefiting the supplemental nutrition program for football players. View the article to see the curriculum and schedule for the Ladies Football 101 and the Men's Huddle.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Monday
July 11, 2016
1b. Citadel accepting scholarship applications for prospective STEM teachers
In order to meet the critical need for highly trained K - 12 teachers of science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines, The Citadel Graduate College is accepting applications for full, master's level scholarships. Applications will be accepted through July 25 for the college's Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarships, which are intended to support students and professionals who want to become STEM teachers. "Recent graduates or current college seniors with STEM majors from any college can apply. Additionally, working professionals who have STEM undergraduate degrees and want to change their careers to become teachers may apply," said Joel Gramling, grant supervisor, biology professor and curator of The Citadel Herbarium. "Also, STEM majors from the South Carolina Corps of Cadets who are sophomores through seniors can apply." All applicants must have a grade point average of 3.0 or higher. Undergraduates who are cadets, or who wish to transition to The Citadel to complete their undergraduate degrees in science or math with a teaching specialization, and then attend The Citadel Graduate College, may also apply. The students who are selected for the scholarships will receive full tuition (up to 36 credit hours) for a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) in math or biology. Recipients must sign a contract pledging to teach for one year per semester of support and will be provided with professional development opportunities including conferences and networking meetings, as well as the support of a mentor teacher. And, all of the Noyce Scholars will complete a student teaching internship at a local high school.
Published in: Moultrie News
(view article) (no cache available)

Monday
July 11, 2016
2a. A Year Later: the Confederate flag in South Carolina
It's been almost a year since the Confederate battle flag was lowered at the state house and handed over to the Confederate Relic Room for display, but the future of that flag and others like it is still unsettled. If you visit the SC Confederate Relic Room and Military Museum in Columbia and ask to see the Confederate flag, you'll find plenty. The museum tells the story of South Carolina's military history. But you won't find the flag removed from the state house grounds last summer. That flag is still in a box... "We always knew that this was a special case, it would take some time and that we wanted to get it right," Roberson said. "I'm not being naive about this, but hope we can, as much as possible, try to settle this issue." While the museum waits for direction, so does another state institution. The Confederate Naval Jack is still on display at The Citadel's Summerall Chapel, even though the school's Board of Visitors voted overwhelmingly to move it a year ago. The school's President, Lt. Gen. John Rosa formally asked lawmakers to amend the Heritage Act and allow the flag to be moved. This would require a similar act of legislation that brought down the statehouse flag last summer. The General Assembly didn't even consider legislation on the flag during the 2016 session. One immediate impact of the Confederate flag's removal from the state house was the end of the NAACP boycott and NCAA ban. The SEC women's basketball tournament is returning to the state for the first time since 2005. Greenville will host the event next March.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
(view article) (no cache available)

Monday
July 11, 2016
2b. Turtle-blocking seawalls coming down
A series of experimental seawalls that had blocked sea turtles from nesting on parts of the South Carolina coast must come down before the end of the month. The S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control ordered the walls' removal after learning about wildlife concerns from the S.C. Department of Natural Resources, according to a letter Friday from DHEC to a Citadel engineering professor involved in the experimental work. "We will continue to gather additional information to further assess these concerns," the agency's letter said. DHEC officials said engineers at The Citadel must remove the walls by July 28. The seawalls, known as wave dissipation devices, are located at Isle of Palms near Charleston and Harbor Island in Beaufort County. They were installed in front of buildings considered most vulnerable to damage from the ocean. They protect four different spots. DHEC took action after two environmental groups threatened to sue the agency because of the walls' impact on sea turtles during nesting season. Sea turtle volunteers have snapped photographs the past two summers showing turtle tracks leading to the base of wave dissipation devices. The S.C. Environmental Law Project praised DHEC's decision Friday. "These walls have resulted in numerous 'false crawls,' where the turtles crawl onto the beach but then turn around before laying their eggs once they encounter the walls," the law center said. The non-profit legal group is representing the Sierra Club and the S.C. Wildlife Federation.
Published in: The State
(view article) (no cache available)

Monday
July 11, 2016
3a. Bailey earns Citadel's Gold Star Certificate
Rose M. Bailey of Summerville was honored by The Citadel and The Citadel Graduate College with the Gold Star Certificate. The award, which began in Fall 2015 is given to evening undergraduate studies students who earn a 3.7 grade point average or higher in each semester for full-time class work at The Citadel.
Published in: The Summerville Journal Scene
(view article) (no cache available)

Monday
July 11, 2016
3b. The Citadel Dean's List
Members of The Citadel South Carolina Corps of Cadets earned top honors in the Spring 2016 semester. Dean's List recognition is given to cadets registered for 12 or more semester hours and whose grade point average is 3.2 or higher with no grade below a C for the previous semester's work. Cameron Lambert of Thomasville was recognized for outstanding academic achievement and earned Dean's List recognition for the Spring 2016 semester.
Published in: The Courier-Tribune
(view article) (no cache available)

Monday
July 11, 2016
4. Charleston Blazing Hawks set to open season in September
Two years after a fire burned his North Charleston home and destroyed all of his possessions, Clay Hampton has welcomed back a sense of normalcy into his life these days. The 74-year-old community activist is living in a new home, a renovated three-bedroom house presented to him by Metanoia Community Development and Jumpstart Prison Ministry. He's working in his vegetable and flower gardens again, hobbies he enjoyed for years before the fire ruined them both at his previous home...Hampton started three different youth teams and a semi-pro team, all in New York. He helped coach each of them for about nine years before he moved home to Charleston to be with his sick father. It was here where he started the Hawks. Thanks to a company in Texas, Hampton said he has been given 100-plus jerseys since the 2014 fire. The Citadel, Charleston Southern and a few of the Lowcountry high schools helped out with shoulder pads, and Hampton said a company in Florida is going to sell him used helmets for $75-100 each.
Published in: The Post and Courier
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Monday
July 11, 2016
5a. Tim Solms, US Federal and Managing Director Worldwide Government, Juniper Networks
Tim Solms is the Vice President, US Federal and Managing Director of Worldwide Government at Juniper Networks. In his role he manages the sales, engineering, and operations for the Federal Government's Defense, Intelligence, and Civilian businesses as well as the Federal Systems Integrators and partners. Additionally provides executive oversight and support for Juniper's Government business worldwide. Tim serves as the President of AFCEA's DC Chapter and Board of Directors and currently serves on several advisory boards in the technology space. Prior to Juniper, Tim was the General Manager for the Microsoft Department of Defense business where he had worldwide responsibility for all aspects of the business supporting the US Department of Defense. Previously Tim had executive management responsibility for the Defense and NATO businesses VMware and Dell where he managed multiple teams and was responsible for sales and solutions in the Intelligence & Homeland Security arena and the combined Federal OCONUS, DoD Healthcare, and Joint/Defense Agencies. Before joining Dell, Tim enjoyed a career in the United States Army as an attack aviator serving in command and staff positions in the United States and overseas. Tim graduated from The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina with a B.S. in Business Administration. Tim also enjoys sailing and flying and is a volunteer pilot for Angel Flight and Veteran's Airlift Command - an organization that flies wounded soldiers to and from home and other activities.
Published in: Federal News Radio
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Monday
July 11, 2016
5b. Hires and promotions
Sports - Alfonso Rogers has joined the Charleston RiverDogs as a sales representative. He has a bachelor's degree in sports management from The Citadel.
Published in: The Post and Courier
(view article) (no cache available)

Monday
July 11, 2016
5c. Les Robinson Named Interim A.D. At Lander
College basketball icon Les Robinson, who has been a head basketball coach and athletic director at three different Division I institutions, has agreed to serve as Lander University's interim athletic director, Lander President Richard Cosentino announced today. Robinson, who will lead Lander Athletics until a fulltime athletic director is hired to replace the retiring Jeff May, will begin his duties on July 18. "Coach Les Robinson is well known and well respected throughout the collegiate sports world, and Lander is fortunate to have someone of his considerable experience and expertise to guide us through this interim period," President Cosentino said. "With his background, he will be able to step into this role and quickly get up to speed, ensuring a continued strong program as we undertake a national search for a permanent athletic director." Robinson said he was "very impressed with Lander and the facilities," which he toured recently on a campus visit. "But I was more impressed with all the administrators and what a team they were." After a career that spanned nearly 50 years in college athletics, Robinson, who was good friends with Lander's legendary basketball coach and athletic director Finis Horne, ended his career as the athletic director at The Citadel in 2008. "The first thing I want to do is to meet the coaches and get to know them," added Robinson. "I want to hear where they are (with their team) and help them achieve their goals. The better you know (the coaches) and trust them, the more you can accomplish. I love sharing my knowledge." Upon completion of his playing days at N.C. State, where he graduated in 1965, he served as an assistant coach at his alma mater, Western Carolina University and The Citadel.
Published in: WSPA-TV Greenville, SC
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Monday
July 11, 2016
6a. Sapakoff: Next College of Charleston athletic director? 10 fresh ideas
The currently chilly College of Charleston sports scene needs revenue, fans and NCAA Tournament appearances. Those three assets are as intertwined in success as a basketball net before celebratory scissors separate it from a rim. A school founded in 1770 and older than the United States is looking for an athletic director, with Joe Hull due out in December. The next hire is critical. The College of Charleston, per a December update, has a $2.1 million deficit. The athletic department was $681,000 in the red for 2014, according to NCAA figures. There are too many empty seats at TD Arena. Andy Solomon, Development Officer for Athletics, The Citadel. Solomon, a Charleston native, is as plugged into sports business in South Carolina as anyone. He has juggled management, marketing and fundraising duties at The Citadel, and has been recognized nationally for his work. He helps the Charleston RiverDogs with public relations, serves as an NCAA postseason supervisor and has taught classes at The Citadel.
Published in: The Post and Courier
(view article) (no cache available)

Monday
July 11, 2016
6b. CCP&R to host Citadel Bulldog Youth Baseball and Softball Camp
The Colleton County Parks and Recreation Department will host a four-day baseball and softball day camp, led by the Citadel Bulldog coaching staff, on Monday, July 25-28 at Ace Basin Sports Complex from 9:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m. each day. The clinic is open to both baseball and softball players ages 6-17. Additional baseball and softball instruction will be provided by outstanding former and current college players. Pre-registration is suggested, but walk-ups are welcome. The purpose of the camp is to develop ballplayers to their fullest ability, while focusing on fundamentals. The campers will focus on defensive and hitting drills, bunting techniques, game situations and base-running. The campers will also participate in a home run contest. The cost of the four-day camp is $125. To register, visit the Colleton County Parks & Recreation Center. Registration includes payment, forms and proof of insurance. For more information, contact Jarrett Ritter jritter@colletoncounty.org or (843) 538-3031.
Published in: WalterboroLive.com
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Monday
July 11, 2016
7a. Class of 2017: Fort Dorchester defensive lineman Khalid Katz
Khalid Katz is among the top tacklers returning to the Fort Dorchester Football team for the 2016 season. In 2015, he was one of only three players on the Patriots' varsity team who had more than 100 tackles. Katz made 126 tackles as a junior including 10 for a loss. He had two sacks and forced a fumble. Before transferring to FD, as a sophomore at Summerville High School in 2014 Katz had 79 tackles including 44 unassisted and two for a loss. As an interior lineman the past two seasons he has been his team's third-leading tackler. As a freshman he played some for the Wave varsity team and some for the junior varsity... Katz is on track to play football in college. Programs that have shown an interest in him include the University of Minnesota, Army, The Citadel, Charleston Southern and Coastal Carolina. He moved to South Carolina from Florida and still has a lot of family in the southern part of that state so he says if he gets any offers from colleges there he will certainly consider them. Katz also throws shot put for the Patriot track and field team and is a member of the FDHS yearbook staff. When he isn't involved with school activities or studying he can typically be found hanging out with his younger brother.
Published in: The Summerville Journal Scene
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Monday
July 11, 2016
7b. Local tennis player signs with The Citadel
Three Way resident Jace Osborne is about to embark on the journey of fulfilling the dream of many high school athletes, which is playing NCAA Division I athletics. But the trip to the NCAA was a bit different for him compared to most athletes. Osborne signed this week to play tennis at The Citadel in South Carolina. "I'm really excited to play for a quality program like The Citadel and Coach [Chuck] Kriese," Osborne said. "He's the coach with the most wins in ACC history, and he's one of the best in the country." Kriese coached the tennis team at Clemson more than 30 years and led the Tigers to 10 ACC championships and was the national coach of the year four times. The Citadel is an NCAA Division I school in the Southern Conference with other schools like East Tennessee State and UT Chattanooga. Osborne didn't graduate from any high school in West Tennessee, however. After playing tennis for Trinity Christian Academy in his freshman and sophomore years, Osborne enrolled at Laurel Springs School, an accredited online high school program.
Published in: The Jackson Sun
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Thursday
July 7, 2016
1. Badwater: Army vet who served in Afghanistan returns to the desert
When Will LeMieux was serving as an Army field artillery officer in Afghanistan in 2011, he always looked forward to getting "Runner's World" magazine every month and "read everything in it." LeMieux - now 29, an Army reservist and a masters student in clinical counseling at The Citadel - was particularly drawn to stories about ultra marathon runners, such as Scott Jurek, Dean Karnazes and Pam Reed, and a crazy race called Badwater, a 135-mile run in California's Death Valley in mid-July. The ultra, considered among the toughest endurance races on the planet, starts 279 feet below sea level, in the Badwater Basin, and ends at the 8,360-foot Whitney Portal, the trailhead to Mount Whitney. The total vertical ascent is 14,600 feet. Temperatures are known to reach 120 degrees and authorities recently created restrictions to limit exposure to extreme heat. LeMieux worked his way from 5Ks to ultra marathons (distances beyond the marathon), which he determined was his niche, and in 2014, served as one of two crew members when a veteran friend Brandon Purdeu ran Badwater.
Published in: The Post and Courier
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Thursday
July 7, 2016
2. Four graduate from NJROTC Leadership Academy
Four future leaders from the McDowell NJROTC Unit Haley Clark, Morgan Dale, Alex Hendley and Lindsey Justice, recently graduated from the NJROTC Leadership Academy. The academy is a week-long demanding course where cadets learn leadership skills and are evaluated in a high-stress environment. The cadets spend the week at The Citadel in Charleston, S.C. starting each morning with intensive physical training followed by classroom instruction and then out into the field to practice what they have learned. Throughout the week, they are constantly observed and evaluated with not all cadets making it to the graduation ceremony. "The academy was difficult but worth the effort. We all came back stronger and better prepared for the upcoming year - and challenges later in life," said Cadet Justice. Of special note Cadets Hendley and Dale excelled to the extent that they will be returning to Leadership Academy next summer as one of the select group of cadets that assist the adult instructors in running the academy. This is noteworthy as only eight of the 175 cadets that attend the Academy are selected to return and assist the following year.
Published in: McDowellNews.com
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Thursday
July 7, 2016
3. SoCon Academic Honor Roll Features 130 Bulldogs
The Citadel was represented by 130 cadet-athletes on the 2015-16 Southern Conference Academic Honor Roll announced Tuesday. The Southern Conference Academic Honor Roll consists of student-athletes at member institutions who achieve at least a 3.0 grade-point average for the academic year while being a member of the final squad list during their sport's traditional season. Recipients must have been eligible to compete throughout the entire academic year. In addition, 26 Bulldogs earned the Commissioner's Medal for completing the academic year with a grade-point average of 3.8 or higher. Football led the way with 26 cadet-athletes recognized on the team. The top women's sport was soccer with 12 honorees, while 11 each from volleyball and women's track and field made the team. Men's track and field produced 22 honor roll members, and baseball had 14. Eleven Bulldogs earned a perfect 4.0 GPA for the 2015-16 academic year. Jonathan Dorogy, Nick Jeffreys and Myles Pierce gave the Southern Conference co-champion football team a department-high three cadet-athletes with a 4.0 GPA. Jennifer Burch and Amber Mills both produced perfect academic years for the women's rifle team, and the men's tennis team was represented on the 4.0 list by Joe Bove and Jackson Pride. Men's basketball graduate senior Derrick Henry, Rowan Brooks from soccer, wrestler Michael Nelems and Charles Braddock from the men's track and field team also had 4.0 grade-point averages in 2015-16.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
(view article) (no cache available)

Thursday
July 7, 2016
4. Battery Creek coach is back where he left his heart 14 years ago
Fred Hamilton wasted no time putting the furniture in his office back to the way he had it before. Now if he could just do something about the paint scheme. "I'm not really excited about the way it looks right now," Battery Creek's once-and-again football coach said Wednesday. "I think it's supposed to be gold, but it looks yellow. I want to paint it the same color as our uniforms - blue, white, gold." All in good time, presumably, though time is the one thing Hamilton has little of as he embarks on his second chapter as the Dolphins' coach, 14 years after the first came to a somewhat reluctant close. Hamilton, 57, officially returned to the job this week after the last of his paperwork formalities were completed. In reality, he'd already been laying the groundwork for a few weeks while orchestrating his move back from Colleton County High. Even so, the Dolphins went through spring drills without the typical breaking-in opportunity that comes with a new coach. Less than four weeks remain before fall camp begins. "I feel like I'm in a 100-meter sprint - and they popped the gun and told me I couldn't start for three or four seconds," said Hamilton, who also coached track at Battery Creek, along with stints at Fort Dorchester and Colleton County. "We're behind, no question about that. But I gladly accept that challenge. We're going to work like crazy to try to catch up." Battery Creek was Hamilton's first head-coaching job in 1999, taking the reins after an assistant's path that began at Porter-Gaud Academy to James Island and into the college ranks at The Citadel, Wofford, North Charleston, Charleston Southern and East Tennessee State.
Published in: The Island Packet
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Thursday
July 7, 2016
5. Q&A: Jack Castleberry
The Citadel head coach Duggar Baucom named Jack Castleberry the program's Director of Basketball Operations on Tuesday. Castleberry joins The Citadel with seven years of coaching experience at the collegiate level under his belt. He most recently served as an assistant coach for the women's basketball program at Siena College from 2012-14 before opting to transition to a financial planning career. Castleberry walked on to the Virginia Military Institute basketball team and eventually earned a scholarship under Coach Baucom. Upon graduation, he immediately landed an assistant coaching position at the University of Tennessee-Martin. Following a year there, he returned to VMI and worked under Coach Baucom from 2008-12, assisting in player development, recruiting and scheduling and serving as the team's academic coordinator.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
(view article) (no cache available)

Wednesday
July 6, 2016
1. The Citadel’s Boo gives birth to seven puppies July 4
The Citadel’s mascot, a three-year-old English bulldog named Boo , gave birth to seven puppies on Independence Day. Sadly, two of the female puppies died — one shortly after her birth and the other later that night. Otherwise, Boo is doing just fine. “She’s in a super good mood,” said Boo’s caretaker, Mike Groshon, The Citadel’s assistant athletic director for facilities and equipment. “She’s just plain big from all the milk she’s carrying. She looks like a cow. She’s huge!” West Ashley veterinarian John Bradford delivered Boo’s litter by Caesarean section Monday morning. The surviving puppies — two females and three males — each weigh no more than a pound.
Published in: The Post and Courier - online
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Wednesday
July 6, 2016
1.1 Citadel recruits K-12 STEM teacher candidates
To meet the critical need for highly trained K-12 teachers of science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines (STEM), The Citadel Graduate College is accepting applications for full, master’s-level scholarships. Applications will be accepted through July 25 for the college’s Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarships which are intended to support students and professionals who want to become STEM teachers. “Recent graduates or current college seniors with STEM majors from any college can apply. Additionally, working professionals who have STEM undergraduate degrees and want to change their careers to become teachers may apply,” said Joel Gramling, Ph.D., grant supervisor, biology professor and curator of The Citadel Herbarium. “Also, STEM majors from the South Carolina Corps of Cadets who are sophomores through seniors can apply.”All applicants must have a grade point average of 3.0 or higher. Undergraduates who are cadets, or who wish to transition to The Citadel to complete their undergraduate degrees in science or math with a teaching specialization, and then attend The Citadel Graduate College, may also apply.
Published in: Berkeley Independent - online
(view article) (no cache available)

Wednesday
July 6, 2016
Citadel recruits K-12 STEM teacher candidates
All applicants must have a grade point average of 3.0 or higher. Undergraduates who are cadets, or who wish to transition to The Citadel to complete their undergraduate degrees in science or math with a teaching specialization, and then attend The Citadel Graduate College, may also apply. The students who are selected for the scholarships will receive full tuition (up to 36 credit hours) for a Master of Arts in Teaching in math or biology. Recipients must sign a contract pledging to teach for one year per semester of support and will be provided with professional development opportunities including conferences and networking meetings, as well as the support of a mentor teacher. And all of the Noyce Scholars will complete a student teaching internship at a local high school. “One of the positive outcomes of being a Noyce Scholar is the value placed on community outreach. During our meetings, the Noyce Scholars discuss ways to bring our STEM expertise to schools in the greater Charleston area. We volunteer at STEM events and organize effective STEM outreach,” said Stephanie Eldridge, a Citadel Noyce Scholar who graduated in May. “I was also provided with the opportunity to attend the 2016 National Teaching Association Conference which also opened my eyes to opportunities that I might be able to bring to my future students.” Eldridge begins teaching biology and earth science at Ashley Ridge High School this fall.
Published in: Summerville Journal Scene - online
(view article) (no cache available)

Wednesday
July 6, 2016
The Citadel adds Castleberry to Basketball Staff
The Citadel head coach Duggar Baucom named Jack Castleberry the program’s Director of Basketball Operations, it was announced Tuesday. “I am extremely excited to add Jack back to our coaching family,” Coach Baucom said. “He brings a wealth of experience to his new position and great familiarity to our staff. Having played and coached in our system, he has a firsthand knowledge of what we are trying to accomplish on the court and can also closely relate with our players having graduated from a military school. Jack knows the rigors of an academic-military education and his tireless work ethic and excellent communication skills make him an integral part of our staff moving forward.” Castleberry joins The Citadel with seven years of coaching experience at the collegiate level under his belt. He most recently served as an assistant coach for the women’s basketball program at Siena College from 2012-14 before opting to transition to a financial planning career. Two years later, he’s itching to get back to the game he loves.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV 5 (Charleston) - online
(view article) (no cache available)

Tuesday
July 5, 2016
1. Citadel hopes to revitalize 'culture of water' with new boathouse project
Col. Benjamin Wham recalls seeing cadets sailing on the Ashley River when he studied at The Citadel in the 1980s. He remembers friends who rowed crew and the old boathouse, which seemed dated at the time. In the decades after he left, the channel that connects the campus to the river filled with silt, and time didn't do the boating center any favors. The college doesn't have a rowing club anymore, and its sailing team practices at a marina downtown. "When I was here when I was a kid, we were putting boats in the water, taking them out all the time. It was not an uncommon occurrence at the end of classes on a Wednesday to go rent a boat for $10 and take it out and go water skiing or just go enjoy yourself," said Wham, now the college's associate vice president for facilities and engineering. "Folks enjoyed it, and they had easy access to it." Now, The Citadel wants to return its cadets to a culture of being on the water, Wham said, so it's undertaking a project costing about $3.3 million to dredge the channel and build a new boathouse. The college finished clearing the channel last week, and it's beginning to move forward with plans for a new, two-story boathouse.
Published in: The Post and Courier
(view article) (no cache available)

Tuesday
July 5, 2016
2. What to expect when The Citadel's Boo is expecting
Boo barreled across the parking lot and into Dr. Bradford's office, her pink tongue, as thick and round as a slice of Canadian bacon, flapping with each of her labored breaths. Her prodigious belly and swollen nipples swung slightly a few inches above the floor. Grunting, Boo waddled on top of the scale: 62.2 pounds. "Oh my god, Boo!" her caretaker, Mike Groshon, cried. "You have gained a lot!” Boo X, The Citadel’s esteemed mascot, a paunchy English bulldog with a severe underbite, is pregnant. And miserable, too. She can't sleep. She's always hungry. She has diarrhea. Her Fourth of July due date can't come quickly enough. Veterinarian John Bradford poked his head into Boo's exam room and apologized for the smell. Two of his patients, also suffering from a bout of diarrhea, had made a mess moments earlier. "Just one of the hazards of having a place like this," Bradford said. "It's usually very nice smellin' in here." Bradford, a fast-talking vet in neon green gym shorts, is a self-described "bulldog expert" whose clients come to his West Ashley office from as far as Hilton Head, Columbia and Myrtle Beach, seeking his expertise. A former Citadel football player, Bradford has been treating the college's mascots since he graduated from vet school in 1982. Bradford even owned two of the animals back when The Citadel borrowed mascots for games. There was Colonel Ruff, a "terrible pet," otherwise known as "Killer," who preyed on cats and birds and (allegedly) poodles - until he met his tragic demise in 1990 before the start of football season. (Even Killer was no match for an alligator.) Bradford replaced Ruff with Patrick, whose heart gave out after six months on the job.
Published in: The Post and Courier
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Tuesday
July 5, 2016
3. Class Ring Returned to Owner Who Lost It on the Beach With Help of Social Media
One lucky Citadel grad, Tyson Cater, is getting his prestigious class ring back after losing it on the beach in Florida thanks to the kindness of a stranger and the power of social media. Tracey Lock, of Blackpool, England, was vacationing in Lake Wales, Florida, when she happened to stumble upon a large gold ring in the sand on Sunday. "I saw a glimmer of gold in the soil and investigated," Lock wrote to the Military College of South Carolina after discovering it was a Citadel ring from the inscription. "I am currently on vacation in Florida from the U.K.," she wrote in her initial email to the school. "I have found a college ring that has the name 'Tyson Lee Cater' inscribed on the inside. I wondered if you could help me contact Tyson and return the ring to its rightful owner? Many thanks if you can help." After unsuccessful attempts to reach Cater through his school email since he graduated on May 7, 2016, the Citadel turned to its Facebook page in hopes its tight-knit alumni could help track him down.
Published in: ABC News
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Tuesday
July 5, 2016
4. Citadel javelin thrower Capers Williamson advances to finals of U.S. Olympic Trials
Three track athletes with ties to the Lowcountry competed in the U.S. Olympic trials Saturday, and one is advancing to the finals of his event. Capers Williamson, a javelin thrower out of The Citadel, has another shot at making the Rio-bound U.S. Olympic team Monday, when the finals of his event wrap up in Eugene, Oregon. The javelin event started out with 24 throwers Saturday all vying for 12 spots in the Monday finals. Williamson placed 12th. The top three throwers from Monday's finale will be the three representatives to compete in Rio de Janeiro in August on the U.S.'s behalf. Also competing in the trials Saturday were long jumpers Braxton Drummond and Lavon Allen. Drummond is a rising senior at Charleston Southern, and Allen graduated from Charleston Southern in 2013 before enrolling in graduate school at South Carolina State. Like the javelin, the top 12 of 24 long jumpers advanced to the finals. Drummond placed 17th overall and Allen did not start.
Published in: The Post and Courier
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Tuesday
July 5, 2016
5. Citadel Class of 2008 North Charleston police officer shot, saved by vest
A North Charleston police officer was shot while responding to a call Monday afternoon, but a vest kept the bullet from causing serious injury. It happened just before 5 p.m. on Waltham Road, a neighborhood off Greenridge Road with neat brick houses, well-kept yards, trees blooming along the curb and teens outside shooting off July Fourth firecrackers. Deputy Chief David Cheatle identified the officer as Wayne Pavlischek. Cheatle said Pavlischek has been with the department for three years. "The officer was struck in the right side abdomen area - but thankfully the vest did its job and stopped the round," he said. Police released few details about what happened, including why officers were there or what led up to the shooting. Police tape kept observers from seeing the actual crime scene.
Published in: The Post and Courier
(view article) (no cache available)

Tuesday
July 5, 2016
6a. Letter: Citadel tuition
A June 24 article by Andy Shain titled "S.C. colleges raising tuition - again" listed The Citadel as the state's most expensive four-year public college. That is not accurate and could use some clarification, as could the amount listed as the college's tuition in the recent column, "Like college tuition, the sun also rises." The information provided to The Post and Courier earlier in the summer stated that Citadel cadets have very different financial requirements than those attending non-military colleges. The mandatory elements of the military education structure require all cadets to live on campus in the barracks. They must purchase military uniforms and take all of their meals in the cadet dining facility. Those costs are bundled into the one figure that includes tuition, presented by the college as its "all-in costs." Comparing The Citadel's all-in figure to the tuition figures used from the other state colleges is the same as comparing unrelated fruit. If dorm costs, meal cards and similar expenses students incur at the other colleges were added to their figures that were listed, the article and column would have been closer to comparing apples to apples.
Published in: The Post and Courier
(view article) (no cache available)

Tuesday
July 5, 2016
6b. Citadel campus is now tobacco-free
After months of education, preparation and counting down, The Citadel campus is now officially tobacco-free. The change comes after two years of planning and the creation of a new policy supporting the goal of providing a healthier learning and working environment. The new policy will enhance the campus culture of wellness. The policy extends to all locations owned and operated by The Citadel including Johnson Hagood Stadium and its surrounding parking lots, Joseph P. Riley, Jr. Park during Citadel events and The Citadel Beach Club. It applies to all students, faculty, staff, visitors, volunteers, contractors and vendors. The president of the college may permit limited exceptions to the policy and Citadel campus housing occupants are authorized to smoke on back porches, provided the porch is screened. The Citadel's Campus Alcohol and Drug Information Center (CADIC) is available for students and cadets who wish to stop the use of tobacco products. For employees, the college will provide tobacco cessation assistance through the Employee Assistance Program and the state health plan "Quit for Life" program.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
(view article) (no cache available)

Tuesday
July 5, 2016
7. Star Spangled Banners - America's Most Storied Wartime Flags: The Fort Sumter Flag
Unlike the Fort Niagara banner, the 33-star Union standard that flew above Fort Sumter at the outbreak of the American Civil War escaped capture. And that's no small feat when considering that The Citadel in Charleston Harbor fell to the rebel's in the conflict's opening days! The distinctive "diamond pattern" storm flag was waving on April 12, 1861 when Confederate guns opened fire on Sumter; it stayed up throughout the day-and-a-half-long bombardment. The outpost commander, Robert Anderson, hauled down the colours when he gave up the fort on April 14. Interestingly enough, the 55-year-old, one-time West Point instructor would have to surrender to a former student, Confederate brigadier P.G.T. Beauregard. Anderson was promptly returned to the North, with his flag in tow. Within a week, the standard was hanging from the statue of George Washington in Manhattan's Union Square before a gathering of 100,000 New Yorkers. It was supposedly the largest crowd ever assembled in the United States up to that point. [1] As part of a wartime patriotic fundraising campaign, the Sumter flag was repeatedly auctioned off to wealthy donors who all agreed to hand it back after purchasing it so it could be sold and resold again. It was returned to Sumter on April 14, 1865 - four years to the day that the fort fell to the South. It's now in the safe keeping of the United States' National Parks Service.
Published in: Military History Now
(view article) (no cache available)

Tuesday
July 5, 2016
8. Local student to attend The Citadel
Area Navy Junior ROTC cadets have earned $1,000 scholarships each from the Cmdr. Richard and Sherry Murray Scholarship Fund. Cadet Master Chief Savannah Green, from Clay High School, will attend Savannah State University in Savannah, Ga. Cadet Commander Charese Chandler, also from Clay High School, will be attending the Citadel in Charleston, S.C. Cadet Commander Vanessa Rodriguez, from Ridgeview High School, will attend the Navy Academy Preparatory School. All three plan to become Marine or Navy officers. "The scholarships are awarded to area cadets who have demonstrated determination, perseverance and a personal resolve to better themselves and their communities in the face of adversity," said retired Navy Lt. Cmdr. Robert D. Peterson.
Published in: The Florida Times-Union
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Tuesday
July 5, 2016
9a. Cadets attend leadership academy
Four Summerville High School Navy JROTC Cadets attended the Navy JROTC Area SIX Navy JROTC Leadership Academy held at The Citadel in Charleston the week of June 20. The Leadership Academy is designed to train 175 of the top Navy JROTC cadets in Area SIX, which includes the states of North and South Carolina. The cadets who attend are exposed to a litany of strenuous activities that challenge them both physically and mentally. All cadets who graduate from the Leadership Academy are expected to serve in leadership roles in their particular units for the upcoming academic year. Each of the four from Summerville will be serving as officers within the unit at the start of the school year.
Published in: The Summerville Journal Scene
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Tuesday
July 5, 2016
9b. Cadet graduates leadership academy
Cadet Ensign Michael Turgeon of the Colleton County High School Naval Junior ROTC Unit graduated from the NJROTC Area Six Leadership Academy on June 25 at the Citadel Military College, Charleston. The week-long course is designed to enhance the basic attitude, knowledge and skills required to practice the art of leadership. The academy promoted habits of orderliness and precision, challenged the cadets to push their physical and intellectual limits, and instilled personal honor, self-reliance and confidence. Coursework included physical fitness, military drill, sword manual, orienteering, personnel and room, field leadership, etiquette and manners. The next school year, Cadet Ensign Michael Turgeon will serve in the capacities of both platoon commander and orienteering team commander. Additionally, the NJROTC Unit will conduct its Summer Freshman Orientation Training beginning Tuesday July 19 from 10 a.m.-noon. The training will be held at Colleton County High School's NJROTC Complex, and all incoming freshman currently enrolled, or those considering enrollment in NJROTC, may attend. The training will be held each Tuesday and Thursday for two hours, ending Tuesday Aug. 2.
Published in: WalterboroLive.com
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Tuesday
July 5, 2016
9c. Arlington Eagle Scouts earn recognition
On June 11, Boy Scout Troop 306, held a ceremony to honor three Scouts: Liam Durant, Liam Lanigan and Trevor Brown, for attaining Boy Scouting's highest rank, the Eagle Scout Award. The ceremony was held at First Baptist Church in Arlington, which sponsors the Troop. Each of the honorees has been a member of Troop 306 for over six years, beginning in the sixth grade and going up until their 18th birthday. Along the way, each has participated in a number of wilderness high adventure trips, which include canoeing on Lake Chesuncook, and on the Penobscot river in Maine; climbing Katahdin in Baxter Sate Park, Maine, and Mount Washington in the White Mountains of New Hampshire... Durant has just completed his senior year at Arlington High School, and will attend Tufts University in the fall, where he will study engineering. Lanigan just completed his freshman year at the University of Michigan where he is studying economics and computer science. Brown just completed his freshman year at The Citadel in South Carolina where he is studying exercise science.
Published in: Wicked Local Arlington
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

© 2017 The Citadel, 171 Moultrie Street, Charleston, SC 29409 (843) 225-3294
Citadel Home | Library | Computing | Events Calendar | Contact Us
Citadel Departments | News | Subscribe to e-news | Giving to The Citadel | Log In