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About Today's News Clips
"Today's News Clips" is published into your e-mail box on normal Citadel business days, and contains links to recent news about The Citadel, the state of South Carolina, and other topics of interest to professionals working at institutes of higher education.
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The Citadel in the News: Archive

June 2016

PUBLISH DATE STORIES
Thursday
June 30, 2016
1. Citadel grad located, missing ring found in Florida to be returned
A Citadel graduation ring separated from its owner will soon be reunited. After a day of hunting on social media, The Citadel was able to find Tyson Lee Cater, who apparently lost his 2016 class ring in Florida sometime in the last couple months. According to a post on The Citadel's Facebook page, a vacationer in Cocoa Beach, Florida from the United Kingdom reached out to the university because she found Cater's ring. The university worked with the woman to track down Cater and return the ring.
Broadcast on: WCIV-TV Charleston, SC
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Thursday
June 30, 2016
2. The Citadel's Capers Williamson to compete in Olympic Trials
The Citadel's Capers Williamson will compete for a spot on the U.S. Olympic track and field team in the javelin this weekend at the Olympic Trials in Eugene, Oregon. Williamson, a two-time Southern Conference champion, will begin competition at the Trials' opening round of the javelin at 3:45 p.m. ET Saturday. Williamson's SoCon-record throw of 239 feet, four inches (72.95 meters) earlier this year qualified him for the Olympic Trials as one of the top 24 among eligible Americans who had declared for the Trials. Cyrus Hostetler leads the javelin field with a throw of 83.83 meters (about 275 feet). "This is one of those once-in-a-lifetime moments and we are so excited for him to be able to have this experience," said The Citadel head track and field coach Jody Huddleston. "Eugene is a very special place in the world of track and field, not only getting to experience that but then also to get to throw in the Olympic Trials on top of it is a very special way to end your Citadel track and field career. The coaches, his teammates and The Citadel want to wish him all the best." Williamson, ranked No. 23 in the Trials field, must finish in the top 12 in Saturday's first round to reach the finals, set for 7:25 p.m. on Monday. The top three finishers will compete for the U.S. in the Olympic Games.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
June 30, 2016
3. School of Humanities and Social Sciences faculty publications
Department of Criminal Justice - Professor Roy Fenoff authored a book chapter titled, "Food fraud detection technologies," which was published in The Routledge International Handbook of Technology, Crime and Justice. Fenoff also had a journal article accepted for publications called "Evaluating the effectiveness of an evidence-based cognitive restructuring approach: 1-year results from Project ASPECT." It will appear in the International Journal of Cognitive Therapy. Department of History - Professor Keith Knapp heads the Early Medieval China Group, which initiated a global project involving more than 60 scholars from around the world, resulting in the publication of Early Medieval Chinese Texts: A Bibliographical Guide, in 2016. It was published by The Institute for East Asian Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. Knapp served as the editor along with three other professors. This work introduces all of the primary sources that are available for the study of early medieval China (AD 100-600). Additionally, Knapp co-edited Early Medieval Chinese Texts: A Bibliographical Guide, published in the spring by the institute. Department of Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures - Professor Juan Bahk has published a critical book review for a poetic anthology entitled, Los Exodos, Los Exilios, written by Peruvian-Spanish poet and professor of Salamanca University, Alfredo Perez Alendart. Bahk's review was published in the book Alencart, Poeta De Todas Parties: Ensayos y Notas. He joined The Citadel in 1991. He has published three critical books, as well as numerous articles that appeared in publications around the world.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Thursday
June 30, 2016
4. Workout honors fallen soldier who was Richland County deputy
Ryan Rawl's mother Diane is happy that Richland County deputies are living up to their promise to remember her late son's sacrifice. "They've kept their word about that," she said. "It means a lot." Their dedication will be on display again Monday at the annual Warrior Challenge named for the deputy killed in 2012 while on military duty in Afghanistan. Those taking part in the event on the 4th of July will join deputies in exercises on the State House grounds in downtown Columbia. Proceeds benefit scholarships in memory of Ryan Rawl. His mother, other family members and friends with be there either to participate or cheer on those taking part. "I love seeing everyone again," she said. Lott's promised that her family will part of his team's circle. "He's kept up with us," Diane Rawl said. In particular, Lott "always lets us know he's thinking of us that day" on June 20, the anniversary of her son's death, she said. Ryan Rawl was a deputy for seven years who worked on patrol and as a school resource officer. Lott kept a letter sent by Rawl asking for the sheriff's approval for a 10-week leave of absence for South Carolina National Guard basic training. "I feel it is my duty to serve my country," The Citadel graduate's request said. "I would greatly appreciate you honoring my request." "OK," Lott wrote at the bottom in reply. "Proud of you for joining."
Published in: The State
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Thursday
June 30, 2016
5. Area students named to Citadel dean's list
The following members of The Citadel South Carolina Corps of Cadets were named to the dean's list for the spring 2016 semester: William Caughman, of Salley; Samuel Douglas, of Aiken; Thomas Griffith, of Aiken; William Hartzog, of Williston; James Strickland, of Aiken; Dane Anderson, of North Augusta; Corey Williams, of North Augusta; Matthew Loveland, of Aiken; DeAndre Schoultz, of Aiken; and Sarah Zorn, of Warrenville.
Published in: Aiken Standard
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Thursday
June 30, 2016
6. The Lohmann Brothers
If you were to ask Greenville, Ohio, residents to name the most famous and accomplished individuals to ever call our town home, you would most likely be given the names of sharpshooter Annie Oakley, journalist Lowell Thomas, and perhaps naval airship captain Zachary Lansdowne. A modern sports fan might even list retired NFL player Matt Light. Few Greenville residents would realize they were ignoring a group of brothers who were among the most respected in their field during their prime. Few Greenville residents have ever heard of the Lohmann brothers and their finely crafted telescopes... William Tyler Olcott, another popular twentieth century astronomer, purchased a 5" Lohmann equatorial refractor, which he installed in an observatory on the roof of his house. The Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina, purchased a 7" Lohmann refractor in 1913. Parsons College in Fairfield, Iowa, used a 9″ refractor telescope from Lohmann Brothers for decades before eventually selling it to the Insights Museum in El Paso, Texas, who them transferred it to HUT observatory in El Paso when the museum was torn down. Taylor University in Upland, Indiana, had a 10 1/4" reflector telescope from the Lohmanns. In 2010, a private owner in Battle Creek, Michigan, reported to Antique Telescopes he was restoring a 4" Lohmann refractor, but no further information is available. Ad in Antique Telescope SocietyThe Dayton Astronomical Society purchased a 6" refractor from the brothers for $2,000 in 1910 (almost $50,000 in today's dollars), which was housed at the Dayton Museum of Natural History (now Boonshoft Museum of Discovery). John Graham of the Miami Valley Astronomical Society confirms the scope is in storage under the Apollo Observatory at Boonshoft, and states he once helped partially restore the antique, though the process was never completed.
Published in: Fourth & Sycamore
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Wednesday
June 29, 2016
1. Full scholarships for master's degree level prospective teachers available
In order to meet the critical need for highly-trained K-12 teachers of science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines (STEM), The Citadel Graduate College (CGC) is accepting applications for full, master's level scholarships. Applications will be accepted through July 25, 2016, for the college's Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarships which are intended to support students and professionals who want to become STEM teachers. "Recent graduates or current college seniors with STEM majors from any college can apply. Additionally working professionals who have STEM undergraduate degrees and want to change their careers to become teachers may apply," said Joel Gramling, Ph.D., grant supervisor, biology professor and curator of The Citadel Herbarium. "Also, STEM majors from the South Carolina Corps of Cadets who are sophomores through seniors can apply." All applicants must have a grade point average of 3.0 or higher. Undergraduates who are cadets, or who wish to transition to The Citadel to complete their undergraduate degrees in science or math with a teaching specialization, and then attend The Citadel Graduate College, may also apply. The students who are selected for the scholarships will receive full tuition (up to 36 credit hours) for a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) in math or biology. Recipients must sign a contract pledging to teach for one year per semester of support and will be provided with professional development opportunities including conferences and networking meetings, as well as the support of a mentor teacher. And, all of the Noyce Scholars will complete a student teaching internship at a local high school.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Wednesday
June 29, 2016
2. Citadel celebrates 20 years of admitting women
Even in the summer, The Citadel is always changing. "Close to 20 years ago I started here at The Citadel," said Nancy Mace, the first woman to graduate from the school. Mace was also among the first four cadets admitted to the school in 1996. "I've got a lot of fond memories," she said. "It was about learning who I am, the value of hard work." While a court battle and board of visitors opened The Citadel's doors for Mace and other female cadets, it was her hard work that pushed her ahead. "When you are the first in any experience, there are going to be challenges," she said. She's reminded of those challenges as she walks through campus. "When my father dropped me off at school, his final words to me were, Nancy, don't go home if you want to quit, just put on your shoes and start walking and he dropped me off on campus that first day." The school's first female provost and dean, Connie Book, says more change is coming. "This fall we're going to bring in our largest class ever of women. Literally jumping 36% in our incoming class of women," Book said. 4937-the citadel really works hard at its commitment to have women in the core. We do that through our admissions process, as well as the support we provide women when they're here.
Broadcast on: WCIV-TV Charleston, SC
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Wednesday
June 29, 2016
3. Public invited to participate in creation of The Citadel's hazard mitigation plan
Happening today: The Citadel is looking for your input during a public meeting at the school. It's an effort to keep their campus up and running post disaster. This is an effort made possible through a grant from FEMA. The Citadel will host its first public meeting tonight to discuss what they call their multi-hazard mitigation plan. It's a way they can identify hazards they have that could hinder a quick response and clean up after a disaster. They want the public to provide input to identify those hazards and to address them. Since this is being done with money from FEMA once the college has their plan in place they can go to the federal agency for funds in the event of a disaster. "Having a plan in place is absolutely critical. With a plan in place we can sit there and get the right resources lined up against it and hopefully mitigate the damage," said Col Ben Wham, vice president for facilities and engineering at the school. Please email Emily DeVoe at edevoe@citadel.edu to request the video clip.
Broadcast on: WCIV-TV Charleston, SC

Wednesday
June 29, 2016
4. Like college tuition, the sun also rises
Welcome to Personal Finance 101, class. Today we'll examine the cost of living for South Carolina college graduates. Pay attention or you'll have to learn this the hard way in four years. Let's say each of you will land jobs straight out of college making $35,000. That's higher than the state average, but some will earn more - mostly those who go on to get advanced degrees... Rolling downhill - That $25 per class-hour is probably about right because, yes, South Carolina colleges and universities have raised tuition again. They do it so regularly now it barely qualifies as news. This year it's 3 percent, for the most part. For in-state tuition, the College of Charleston and USC have topped $11,000 a year, and Clemson is more than $14,000. The Citadel is creeping up near $28,000. If you maintain a B average, you're eligible for lottery help. But tuition is higher now with lottery scholarships than it was before that manna came from Columbia. So the cost of college would be fine if wages had doubled in the past 14 years. Instead, wages are stagnant and - surprise - student debt is going up. As usual, South Carolina is among the top 10 states for that problem.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
June 29, 2016
5. Still time to vote in today's runoff elections
Just a friendly reminder, polls close at 7 p.m. Tuesday evening, so there's still time to cast your vote in this year's runoff elections. The ballot for Charleston area voters consists solely of Republican candidates vying for seats in the Statehouse. In state Senate District 41, Roy Maybank and Sandy Senn are competing for a spot as the GOP candidate. Senn is a West Ashley lawyer. As part of her platform, Senn has promised to defend 2nd Amendment rights and encourage more conservation easements to preserve undeveloped land. Maybank, also a West Ashley resident, is a graduate of The Citadel and currently runs Maybank Law Firm. Following this year's primary election, Maybank received endorsements from James Island Mayor Bill Woolsey and former Senate candidate Culver Kidd. This is the first attempt at political office by both candidates, who are running for the seat left vacant by Sen. Paul Thurmond. The choice for the Republican candidate for Senate District 34 comes down to Reese Boyd and Stephen Goldfinch. Goldfinch, a member of the state House of Representatives, is a proponent for small government who sponsored a bill prohibiting federal restrictions on firearms. Runoff opponent Boyd bills himself as a pro-life, pro-2nd Amendment candidate, who has earned an endorsement from Gov. Nikki Haley.
Published in: Charleston City Paper
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Tuesday
June 28, 2016
1. Citadel voted to admit women 20 years ago June 28
Twenty years ago on June 28, the Board of Visitors at The Citadel, a public military college steeped in tradition and history, unanimously voted to begin admitting female cadets, ending 154 years of male-only admittance. Although women represent only 7 percent of enrollment in the Corps of Cadets today, their ranks have slowly but steadily grown. In the fall of 1996, The Citadel's first class of four women joined the Corps of Cadets. Next fall, The Citadel expects to enroll 83 first-year female "knobs," its largest class of women ever - up from 53 last year. "You can really see the impact - the positive impact - of women at The Citadel every day in my work," said Connie Book, who joined The Citadel last year as its first female provost and dean. "They are full members of the Corps of Cadets. They hold leadership roles and positions within the Corps of Cadets. They're going on to stellar careers within the military and in civilian life and graduate school." In August 1995, Shannon Faulkner became the first female cadet to enroll at The Citadel following a two-year legal battle against the college over its male-only admissions policy. She had been admitted in 1993 after deleting references to her gender on her application, but then was denied from starting classes and joining the Corps once officials discovered her gender. Her case reached the U.S. Supreme Court. After the lengthy legal battle, she was admitted to the Corps under a federal court order. She dropped out in less than a week, citing exhaustion from stress and psychological abuse.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
June 28, 2016
2. Open for business: new cadet coin laundry facility
Cadets asked for it and The Citadel has delivered. The Citadel Coin Laundry is now officially open for business 24 hours a day, seven days a week for cadets. Located behind Murray Barracks, The Citadel Coin Laundry will provide the campus with access to 12 energy efficient washers and 12 energy efficient dryers. The updated laundry facility comes after a $565,000 renovation and is complete with video surveillance in order to provide students with a secure means of cleaning laundry. Cadet laundry services are included in tuition and laundry bags can be dropped off at Laundry Services, but now cadets have the option to get that fresh, out-of-the-dryer feel and smell. The renovated facility will be the answer to cadet requests for needing a quick and simple laundry solution. The coin laundry facility will accept two methods of payment - coins and the OneCard. Students will have the ability to load funds onto their OneCard for full access to the facility's machines. The machines will also eventually have the capacity to receive credit cards. Each wash costs $2.25 and the cost for drying is $0.25 for every 6 minutes. For more information please contact the Director of Laundry and Dry Cleaning, Chris Floyd at (843) 953-5087 or chris.floyd@citadel.edu.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Tuesday
June 28, 2016
3. The Citadel raises tuition, fees for 2016-17 academic year
The Citadel's Board of Visitors has approved the college's budget, which includes the combined tuition and fees rate for the 2016-17 academic year. The Citadel's all-in costs for in-state cadets will increase 2.9 percent for upperclassmen ($648 per year) and 3.0 percent for freshmen ($808 per year). Out-of-state freshmen and upperclassmen will see an increase of 3.1 percent compared to last year, representing an annual increase of $1,310 for upperclassmen and $1,470 for freshmen. "To help families of cadets prepare, The Citadel provides the information below for all-in costs. All members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets must live on campus due to the military culture, therefore the all-in costs include room and board, uniforms, laundry, dry cleaning, infirmary use, books, and other mandatory expenses not required by most colleges and universities, as well as general tuition," said Col. Joseph Garcia, The Citadel's vice president for finance and business. "Fees for freshmen are higher due to the uniform purchases that year." The all-in costs do not include other fees as determined by the college, such as specific targeted fees or lab fees which vary according to the academic major or schedule of each cadet.
Broadcast on: WCBD-TV Charleston, SC
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Tuesday
June 28, 2016
4. British Say "No" to EU Power and Plunder
The political and financial establishments of Europe and the United States were taken by almost total surprise and sent into apparent shock when 52 percent of the voters in the United Kingdom chose for their country to leave the European Union (EU). But it is not the end of the world as we know it, and can be a positive sign and example of opposition to unrepresentative and centralized bureaucratic control over people's lives. As the June 23, 2016 vote neared on the referendum as to whether or not the United Kingdom would retain its membership in the 28-nation European Union, public opinion polls suggested that the voting result would be very close but with an edge toward remaining within the EU. The financial and foreign exchange markets all were positive, and the political elites in both London and Brussels, the European Union headquarters, appeared to be taking a sigh of relief that the existing order of things would not be threatened by a major participating nation opting out. Hysteria and bedlam are the only words to describe the initial reaction when the votes were being counted, with the clear outcome that a majority of the voters had, in fact, said, "No," to staying under the rule of the Brussels bureaucracies. What is the European Union, and how and why has it brought about such a reaction from not only the people of the British Isles, but sizeable numbers of people in other member countries from one end of the European continent to the other? Dr. Richard M. Ebeling is the BB & T Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina, He was formerly professor of Economics at Northwood University.
Published in: NassauInstitute.org
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Tuesday
June 28, 2016
5. Letter: Citadel flag
R.L. Schreadley's commentary "Honor valor of North and South" defends the displaying of the Confederate flag in The Citadel chapel. His statement that "It is certainly true that Confederate flags have been hijacked by a small rabble of evil men" confuses me. History documents the trafficking of young Africans for enslavement. The trafficking business had a booming hub in the Charleston area where Fort Sumter was fired on by an army (not a small rabble) that would fight under Confederate flags (not hijacked) to perpetuate the legal trafficking of kidnapped people. Long after the Civil War ended, and with it the slave trade, Confederate battle flags were once again being unfurled throughout the South to fly above statehouses, places where elected officials discuss law. The flags that once flew above an Army that fought in defense of legal kidnap and enslavement were then raised as proud ensigns of resistance to civil rights for Americans of African descent, the descendants of those enslaved without rights. This effrontery was, once again, not committed by a "small rabble of evil men."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
June 28, 2016
6. Walters Nominated to Replace Paxton as Assistant Marine Corps Commandant
Defense Secretary Ash Carter has announced that Marine Lt. Gen. Glenn Walters has been nominated to serve as the next assistant commandant of the Marine Corps. If confirmed by the Senate, Walters will replace Gen. John Paxton Jr. as the Marine Corps' second-highest ranking officer and 33rd assistant commandant. A Cobra pilot by trade, Walters currently serves as the deputy commandant for Marine Corps Programs and Resources. Walters, who has been tapped to receive a fourth star, has served with a host of helicopter and test squadrons. He was the first commanding officer of Marine Operational and Evaluation Squadron 22 and has served as the assistant deputy commandant for Marine Corps Aviation. Walters led 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing (Forward) in Afghanistan. He was commissioned in the Marine Corps in 1979 after graduating from The Citadel in South Carolina. He attended flight training in Pensacola, Florida. Walters was designated a naval aviator in March 1981 and was assigned to Marine Aircraft Group 39, where he trained to fly the AH-1T Cobra helicopter. He was then transferred to Marine Attack Helicopter Squadron 169 where he served as the flight line officer.
Published in: MilitaryConnection.com
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Tuesday
June 28, 2016
7. Citadel students honored
The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, honored the following students with Gold Stars for outstanding academic achievement during the spring semester of the 2015-2016 academic year. Gold Stars are awarded to students that achieve a 3.7 grade point average or higher. Students that achieve Gold Star recognition are also placed on The Citadel's Dean's List. Local students are Ellison Smith of Conway, Augustus Smith of Conway, George Graham of Conway, William Mills of Conway, and Lloyd Powers of Loris. The following members of The Citadel South Carolina Corps of Cadets earned top honors in the spring 2016 semester. Dean's List recognition is given to cadets registered for 12 or more semester hours and whose grade point average is 3.2 or higher with no grade below a C for the previous semester’s work. Local students are Ellison Smith of Conway, Augustus Smith of Conway, George Graham of Conway, William Mills of Conway, Lloyd Powers of Loris, Caleb Stalvey of Loris, Coleman Floyd of Conway, and Kurt Harris of Conway.
Published in: MyHorryNews.com
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Tuesday
June 28, 2016
8. Student Spotlight : Rafael Gonzalez
Rafael Gonzalez graduated from Coral Gables High in the top one percent of his class. Now he is preparing for his next big thing - college. Gonzalez will attend The Citadel Military College of South Carolina. "I wanted to do something military for a while," he said. "I'm going to go in wanting the military experience, get it and see if it's for me." He is taking mechanical engineering so if he doesn't enter the military, he'll seek an engineering job. Gonzalez earned a full scholarship to The Citadel. He applied for West Point but was waitlisted because of a paperwork glitch. At The Citadel, Gonzalez can take ROTC from any of the military branches. While at Gables, Gonzalez created a community service project to tutor middle school students in computer science. "We helped them in HTML coding," he said. "To see if they have an interest in computer science. The point was more to teach them beginner ideas in computer science. It's pretty important to teach them young. Computer science is going to be fundamental to everyone."
Published in: Miami's Community Newspapers
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Tuesday
June 28, 2016
9. 2016 Spring Academic All-SoCon team announced
The Citadel's cadet-athletes earned a total of 22 placements on the Spring 2016 Academic All-Southern Conference Team it was announced Monday. To be a part of the academic all-conference team, cadet-athletes must have at least a 3.3 cumulative grade-point average at the completion of the spring semester and must have participated in a minimum of 50 percent of their team's contests. Additionally, the cadet-athletes must have successfully completed at least three semesters at their institutions, making true freshmen and first-year transfers ineligible for the team. Two-sport athlete Mady Riegel is one of three Bulldogs to have earned the honor in both the fall and spring seasons. Riegel is joined by track and field members Jessica DeWitte and Jamie Cunningham, who competed for the cross country team in the fall. Tennis senior Jackson Pride is one of 16 members on the team to finish with a 4.00 GPA. For more information on The Citadel athletics, follow @CitadelSports or visit CitadelSports.com.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Monday
June 27, 2016
1a. Palmetto dove image spreads around city after one year
When he heard the news of nine people killed at Emanuel AME church, Gil Shuler was shocked. He wanted, needed, to do something. As a graphic artist, there was only one thing he could do. "I can't give you a lot of money, I can't work on your car, I can't build your house," he said. "But I can do that. The art." Shuler, a graphic design artist based in Mount Pleasant, is the mind behind the image of doves flying from the Palmetto tree that is often associated with the Emanuel AME tragedy. From the day after the tragedy to one year later, the image has spread all over the city... The Citadel used the same phrase and Shuler's image to create a mural last year in College Park. "The College Park wall has been crying out for a mural for years," Tiffany Silverman, fine arts director at The Citadel, said. "Hundreds of feet of cracked cinder block were, in my eyes, the perfect canvas for something significant for our community." The Citadel had rejected two proposals for murals on the wall until the Emanuel AME tragedy. One of the victims was a Citadel Graduate College alumnus. The James Island Lowe's, Holy City Doves and the Color Chemists provided all of the art materials for free, and Silverman and her team were able to get the project underway quickly. Not only did cadets and art students help out, but so did Charleston community members, who were allowed to paint their own doves on the wall in solidarity with those affected by the tragedy. There are just over 1,700 doves on the wall today. Silverman said she hopes that every time someone passes the mural they remember the past and pledge to make Charleston a better place. "It's more than just paint on a wall - it's a visual symbol of how people from all walks of life can unite over a shared vision," she said. "It has been one of the most meaningful collaborations of my life."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
June 27, 2016
1b. The Citadel is seeking applicants for teaching scholarship
The Citadel is seeking applicants for a prestigious, fully funded teaching scholarship open to college graduates or professionals in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics. The Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship program has 10 available slots, according to Citadel spokeswoman Kim Keelor. Funded by the National Science Foundation, the available scholarships are open to anyone with an undergraduate degree in a "STEM" major with a grade point average of 3.0 or higher. The scholarship pays for up to 36 credit hours in The Citadel's Master of Arts in Teaching program, or about two years' worth of in-state tuition. Selected recipients must commit to teaching science or math for two years in local high-need school districts, including Berkeley, Charleston, Colleton, Dorchester 4 or Hampton 1, after completing their master's degree. Applications for the coming fall are due July 25. Visit www.citadel.edu for more information on how to apply.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
June 27, 2016
1c. As the National Organization for Women turns 50, feminists reflect on progress, unfinished business
Two years after she was hired as a cub reporter for a local TV news station, Jennet Robinson Alterman asked for a raise. It was 1975. She had been hired at the same time as two men, both fresh out of college with liberal arts degrees just like her. But despite having the same job, they made twice as much she did. When she approached her boss about a pay bump, he said something Alterman would never forget... After moving to Charleston in 1985, she founded Skirt! magazine, originally as a newsletter where she tried to combine "feminism with lighter stuff," like articles about fashion and style. Skirt! covered issues like reproductive rights and abortion. The magazine backed Shannon Faulkner, the first female cadet to enter The Citadel in 1995 under the escort of U.S. marshals, a heated controversy that ended with Faulkner's departure from the military college. "It wasn't a popular stance to take at all," Hardin said. "I got a little bit of hate mail. I think someone threw an egg on my car at work." Nowadays, identifying as feminist also feels like an unpopular stance, Hardin said. In a way, she's right: According to a recent national survey by the Washington Post and Kaiser Family Foundation, six in 10 women and only one-third of men in the U.S. depict themselves as feminists, which are higher figures than in some polls a few years earlier. Four in 10 respondents in the new poll, however, viewed the feminist movement as "angry," and a similar portion said it unfairly blames men for women’s challenges.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
June 27, 2016
1d. How a college drug ring hid in plain sight
It was one of Charleston's bigger drug busts: A network of present and former College of Charleston students and other 20-somethings accused of funneling hundreds of thousands of dollars of cocaine, pills and other narcotics into downtown's white-hot party scene. But the bust only hinted at a problem that's been hiding in plain sight for years: A drug- and booze-fueled culture around the college that generates enormous profits for young drug dealers even as it increases risks of addiction and violence. A Post and Courier examination of police and court documents, along with interviews with people knowledgeable about the drug ring, reveal an eye-opening portrait of audacity and excess... Inside 47 Ashley Ave., officers discovered cocaine in a false bottom of an Arizona Tea can in a bedroom refrigerator. They retrieved $7,500 in Xanax pills and $7,000 worth of marijuana in small bags, one labeled "Jolly Rancher." They found several Citadel cadet uniforms, and through one of the apartment's windows, they could see Moultrie Playground. After the search, police arrested Samantha Hincks, 26, on marijuana, cocaine and other narcotics distribution charges. Hincks attended The Citadel but did not graduate. Also arrested was her boyfriend, Jake Poeschek, 21, who also attended but did not graduate from The Citadel, school officials said. It was an unusual launch to a narcotics investigation, Mullen said. Most begin after police arrest small-time street dealers or drug users. Detectives then use such arrests as leverage to go after higher-level distributors. But this one started with what Mullen described as mid-level dealers.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
June 27, 2016
2a. Local students receive Gold Stars at The Citadel
The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, honored the following students with Gold Stars for outstanding academic achievement during the spring semester of the 2015-2016 academic year. Gold Stars are awarded to students who achieve a 3.7 grade point average or higher. Students who achieve Gold Star recognition are also placed on The Citadel's Dean's List: Anjelika Brown of Summerville; Justin Brownlee of Saint George; Kai Clark of Summerville; Bryce Hoopes of North Charleston; Thomas Rogers of Saint George; Alex Bear of Summerville; James Blocker of Summerville; Allen Boyd of Summerville; Dallin Cook of North Charleston; John Cordes of Summerville; Tinslee Dilday of Summerville; Brian Lapchak of North Charleston; Dylan Lilly of Dorchester.
Published in: The Summerville Journal Scene
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Monday
June 27, 2016
2b. Conrad Geis of Streetsboro takes top honors at The Citadel in spring 2016: Dean's List
Members of The Citadel South Carolina Corps of Cadets earned top honors in the spring 2016 semester. Dean's List recognition is given to cadets registered for 12 or more semester hours and whose grade point average is 3.2 or higher with no grade below a C for the previous semester's work. Conrad Geis of Streetsboro has been awarded Dean's List recognition.
Published in: Record-Courier
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Monday
June 27, 2016
2c. College report graduations, honors lists
Members of The Citadel South Carolina Corps of Cadets earned top honors in the spring 2016 semester. Dominique Allen of Richmond Hill was recognized for academic achievement and earned dean's list recognition. Dean's list cadets registered for 12 or more semester hours whose GPAs are 3.2 or higher with no grade below a C for the previous semester's work.
Published in: Bryan County News
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Monday
June 27, 2016
2d. Hillsborough: College students dean's list grades
Michael Subach of Hillsborough was awarded Gold Stars by The Citadel in Charleston, S.C., for earning a grade-point ratio of 3.7 or higher during the spring semester. Students who achieve Gold Star recognition are also placed on The Citadel's dean's list. He is a May graduate of the military academy.
Published in: CentralJersey.com
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Monday
June 27, 2016
2e. Local students named to Citadel's Gold Stars and Dean's List
Two named Gold Star cadets - Two Colleton County students have received Gold Stars for outstanding academic achievement during the spring semester at The Citadel in Charleston. They are Joshua Hamilton of Cottageville and Jackson Riley of Walterboro. Four named to Citadel's dean's list - Four Colleton County students have been named to the dean's list for the spring semester at The Citadel in Charleston: Joshua Hamilton of Cottageville, Jackson Riley of Walterboro, David Mitchell of Yemassee and Steven Murdaugh of Walterboro. The list requires a 3.2 or higher grade point average for 12 or more semester hours with no grade below a C.
Published in: WlaterboroLive.com
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Monday
June 27, 2016
2f. Names in the News
Matthew Hamma of Haymarket was honored with a Gold Star by The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina for outstanding academic achievement during the spring semester. Daniel Yu of Gainesville was honored with a Gold Star by The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina for outstanding academic achievement during the spring semester. Matthew Hamma of Haymarket and a member of The Citadel South Carolina Corps of Cadets was named to The Citadel's Dean List for the 2016 spring semester. Daniel Yu of Gainesville and a member of The Citadel South Carolina Corps of Cadets was named to The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina's Dean List for the 2016 spring semester. Traceel Andrews of Montclair and a member of The Citadel South Carolina Corps of Cadets was named to The Citadel's Dean List for the spring semester. Brandon Hickey of Triangle and a member of The Citadel South Carolina Corps of Cadets was named to The Citadel's Dean List for the spring semester. Jeremy McCathern of Dumfries and a member of The Citadel South Carolina Corps of Cadets was named to The Citadel's Dean List for the spring semester.
Published in: PrinceWilliamTimes.com
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Monday
June 27, 2016
2g. College and University News - June 24 - alumna honors, Recognition Day and Who's Who
Alumna - Umeko Noel Favor, the daughter of Mrs. Mary Ann Favor and Cleophis Favor, recently earned her master's degree in Social Work from Clark Atlanta University. Favor is a 2008 Camden High School graduate and attended Charleston Southern University where she earned a bachelor's degree in Social Science in 2012. In 2012 and 2013, Favor served the AmeriCorps VISTA program at The Citadel in Charleston. Favor plans to serve the behavioral/mental health community in Atlanta. Recognition Day - Men and women who entered The Citadel as freshmen last fall were officially sworn in as members of the S.C. Corps of Cadets in early April during Recognition Day 2016. The celebration marked the end of what many consider the toughest first year college military training in the country. Each year, hundreds of people line the streets to cheer for the freshmen as they march, dressed in their brilliant white uniforms, to attend "The Oath Renewal on The Citadel Green." The oath marks their transition to officially becoming members of the Corps. The green at Marion Square was the original parade ground for the college, when it was founded in 1842 in the structure that is now the Embassy Suites. The march follows three weeks of Transition to Recognition Training during which the knobs take classes examining student ethics and leadership skills and the honor code. They also undergo inspections and drills training. Among the 588 freshmen cadets officially sworn into the S.c. Corps of Cadets were Michael Conde of Elgin, Matthew Gallahorn of Camden, Holland Johnson of Camden, Andrew Laulusa of Elgin, Temon Reed of Camden, Blake Serpas of Lugoff and William Watkins of Camden. Who's Who - Ashley Williams of Camden was recently chosen by Citadel faculty members for the 2016 list of Who's Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges. Who’s Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges is one of the most highly regarded and long-standing honors programs in the nation. Nominations are based on strength of character, academic achievement, military achievement, leadership, campus activities and participation and excellence in athletics at the varsity, intramural or club sport level. Williams was recognized during the annual Awards Convocation on May 5.
Published in: Chronicle-Independent.com
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Monday
June 27, 2016
3. North Charleston City Gallery to Exhibit Works by Marlene O'Bryant-Seabrook and Nora Phillips
Parallel Thoughts/Single Minded: The Art Quilts of Marlene O'Bryant Seabrook with Prose by EOB3 - This retrospective exhibition showcases selected quilts by nationally and internationally exhibited fiber artist, Dr. Marlene O'Bryant-Seabrook. More than a dozen quilts featuring a variety of subjects, along with other small fiber works, will be displayed. A number of the quilts will be accompanied by prose written by the artist's son and published author, Evans O'Bryant, III (EOB3). The works were not created in collaboration, their parallel thoughts were a discovery. Dr. Marlene O'Bryant-Seabrook, a third generation educator, holds a BS from South Carolina State College, MAT from The Citadel, and Ph.D. from the University of South Carolina. She was a classroom teacher, central staff administrator, and, in 1975, became the first African American and one of only two women on The Citadel's permanent faculty. O'Bryant-Seabrook has no familial quilters, but took an eight week quilting class in the 1980s and began exhibiting her quilts nationally in 1992. She approaches quilting from the dual focus of an educator and an artist, often slipping "lessons" into her quilts: love of God, family, children; pride in heritage; respect for accomplishments, etc. She has lectured throughout the country and her work has appeared in numerous publications and exhibited both nationally and internationally. She was one of 44 nationally recognized fiber artists invited to create a quilt honoring President Obama for an Inaugural exhibition at the Washington Historic Society.
Published in: The Chronicle
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Monday
June 27, 2016
4a. Bob Olson named interim athletic director for Charleston County School District
Former St. Andrews and West Ashley high school principal Bob Olson has been named interim athletic director for Charleston County School District. Olson replaces Dave Spurlock, who announced his retirement earlier this year. Olson currently serves as a director in the Department of Operational Planning, and will continue serving in that capacity, in addition to overseeing all district athletics, health, and physical education, a CCSD statement said. Olson began his career as an educator in 1977 as a physical education teacher at Wallace Middle School in Charleston. The following year, Olson went on to serve as a teacher and coach at Middleton High School for four years before becoming assistant principal at East Cooper School and St. John's High School. In 1990, Olson became principal of St. Andrew's High and eventually West Ashley High after St. Andrew's and Middleton High merged in 1997. Since 2006, Olson has served in a variety of administrative positions at CCSD including director of secondary school support, director of school choice and staff allocations, and director of accreditation. In addition to his role as interim director of athletics, Olson will continue his duties in operational planning, coordinating student transfers, serving as charter school liaison, assisting in rezoning of school attendance zones and a variety of other projects. "Throughout his tenure at CCSD, Bob has demonstrated a tremendous ability to serve in a variety of educational roles and take on new and exciting responsibilities as needed," said CCSD Superintendent Gerrita Postlewait. Olson holds a Bachelor of Science from the University of Illinois, a M.Ed. in School Administration from The Citadel, and an Ed.S. in School Superintendency from The Citadel. Olson was named the 1995 South Carolina Principal of the Year, 2006 South Carolina Administrator of the Year, and served as the Region 8-AAAA coordinator for the S.C. High School League.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
June 27, 2016
4b. Engineering: Chris Cloyde, Crafton Tull
Crafton Tull is proud to welcome new Sr. Engineering Manager, Chris Cloyde, P.E. A graduate of The Citadel, Military College of South Carolina, with a B.S. in Civil Engineering, Cloyde is a member of the Oklahoma Society of Professional Engineers and American Society of Civil Engineering. He currently resides in Bixby with his wife and son, and attends First United Methodist Church of Tulsa. Cloyde is looking forward to contributing to the Tulsa area's growing infrastructure.
Published in: Tulsa World
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Monday
June 27, 2016
5a. TCHS cadets complete leadership camp at The Citadel
Treasure Coast High School Air Force Junior ROTC cadets returned from a week-long Cadet Leadership Course (CLC) at The Citadel Military College of South Carolina on June 18. TCHS was able to send 21 cadets this year to participate in CLC with more than 10 other high schools and cadets from the National Cadet Corps of Singapore. First year cadets (basics) learned how to form a coherent group through team building (leadership lab), orienteering, drill, marksmanship, team sports, physical fitness and the Marine Corps obstacle course. Second and third year cadets capitalized on their previous training by practicing organizational, management and leadership skills by running functional areas such as mission support, standardization and evaluation and mentoring basic cadets as flight leaders. TCHS cadets performed admirably and took home five top awards, including Overall Outstanding Basic Cadet and Top Female in Drill. There were also five honor graduates and four academic honors winners among the 15 basics that attended. All participating cadets will use their experience gained at CLC to mentor and lead the TCHS AFJROTC unit's cadets in the coming school year. Congratulations, cadets.
Published in: TCPalm.com
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Monday
June 27, 2016
5b. Central Grads Heading To 126 Colleges, Universities This Fall
Graduating high school is no small feat. For hundreds of West Morris Central High School graduates, it's now time to continue their educational careers at the collegiate level. On Wednesday 313 students flipped their tassels and went from Central seniors to alumni, prepared for one last summer before beginning their college careers. Students from West Morris Central will be attending 126 colleges and universities across the country. See which schools they chose: The Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina.
Published in: Long Valley Patch
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Monday
June 27, 2016
6. Bishop England's Logan Leask among five to sign with Citadel soccer
The Citadel has signed five women's soccer players, including goalkeeper Logan Leask from Bishop England High School. Leask was an all-state and All-Lowcountry player at Bishop England, helping her squad to a state championship last season. "Logan is a local product and we are delighted that she chose The Citadel," said Bulldogs coach Ciaran Traquair. "She has a very tough mentality and trains at the highest level every day. Logan will compete for the No. 1 spot and has the determination to battle for it day in and day out. She is the ultimate team player and we are confident she will have a major impact on this squad." Other players signed include midfielder Kaylee Franklin of Blythewood HS; defender Kaeleigh Guth of Washington, N.J.; forward Samara Nche of Cambridge, United Kingdom; and forward Ammber Valverde of San Antonio, Texas.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
June 27, 2016
7. Youngstarz basketball camp returns
Looking to keep the kids busy this summer? Basketball camp is one way to do so. Nansemond River High School boys basketball coach Ed Young will conduct his 12th annual Youngstarz Camp July 5-8. The camp, which is among the longest running in the area, will run each day from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. for rising third- through eighth-grade boys and girls. Organizers plan to accept kids until the first day of camp but will limit it to 60-65 participants. "We spend a lot of time on drill sessions and basketball instruction," Young said. "We do a break-down of not only full-court games, but how to play full-court basketball in terms of offense and defense, five-on-five." "It's catered to a beginner to an intermediate type of player. We actually have our players running the skill stations, because I feel they identify with the kids better than bringing in a bunch of older coaches. We also do a classroom session with an emphasis on how to be a better student and better person." In addition, campers will get an opportunity to play 1-on-1 and 3-on-3 games and to participate in hot-shot and free-throw competitions. Young's assistants will be in and out throughout the week, along with a handful of current and past players, which has included in recent years the likes of former standouts such as Dontrell Brite (Mount Olive), Shannon Evans (Arizona State), Nick Wright (Old Dominion), Andre Jones (Winthrop), Devon Oakley (Hampton) and others. "What's been funny is - take a kid like Ashton Moore, who came to our camp as a youngster, ended up playing in our program, got a Division I scholarship to The Citadel, and now he's playing professional basketball," Young said.
Published in: Suffolk News Herald
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Monday
June 27, 2016
8. James (Jim) Arthur Larkin Obituary
James (Jim) Arthur Larkin, born June 27, 1928, died Feb. 20, 2016, after a long battle with Alzheimer's disease. Jim was born in 1928 in Suffern, N.Y., to his parents Caroline Aldom and Arthur Larkin and attended high school at the Citadel in South Carolina before getting his Masters degree at the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor) where he met his wife, Jeanne Holden (predeceased in 1997). Jim taught music and art history at University of Charleston (West Virginia), South Carolina State University and as an adjunct professor at the Citadel (South Carolina). He is survived by his only daughter, Diane Larkin, son-in-law Kenneth Smith, his beloved granddaughter, Isabella Ciara Smith, and his two nieces, Meredith Mylod-Meindl and Irene Mylod-Raine. He is predeceased by his younger sister, Sandra Larkin (Mylod). Jim taught music and art history at the University of Charleston (West Virginia), South Carolina State University, retiring after Hurricane Hugo, and then after retirement, teaching as an adjunct professor at The Citadel. He moved to Fort Lauderdale, Fla., in 2003 to spend more time with his daughter, Diane, son-in-law, Kenneth, and ultimately is only granddaughter, Isabella. He will be remembered always by all of his family and friends as a loving and caring father, brother, uncle, and grandfather. Graveside burial of ashes will be at 1 p.m. Saturday, June 25, 2016, at St. Paul's Cemetery. Monsignor Richard Pricco will officiate. Donations may be made to alz.org.
Published in: The McDonough County Voice
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Thursday
June 23, 2016
1. Citadel athletics facilities plan projected to cost $33 million
A master plan for Citadel athletics facilities approved by the Board of Visitors calls for more than $33 million in improvements and new buildings. The BOV voted in April to include the athletics facilities master plan in the existing campus master plan. The athletics facilities plan includes a new $28.9 million, 95,000-square foot building that would house Citadel athletics, as well as upgrades to McAlister Field House and the Bulldogs' track and football practice facility. Citadel athletic director Jim Senter said Wednesday that the plan represents the athletic department "getting its ducks in a row" for when the time is right to begin a fund-raising campaign. "The college has a facilities master plan, and they asked us what we wanted to do," Senter said. "So we needed to do a study to find out what we have in comparison to our peers." The Citadel contracted with a private firm to study venues and facilities at "peer institutions" such as Mercer, Furman, Western Carolina and VMI, all members of the Southern Conference along with The Citadel. The study found that The Citadel has a "programmatic facility shortfall" of about 52,000 square feet, including the areas of academic enhancement, sports medicine, coaches' offices, administration and practice facilities.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
June 23, 2016
2. Learning the ins and outs of national education policy making
A group of educators from The Citadel's Zucker Family School of Education is more knowledgeable about the U.S. educational policy making process after a recent trip to Washington, D.C. Two members of The Citadel Class of 2016, James McManus (Bachelor of Science in Social Studies Education) and Jennifer Clark Bucciarelli (Masters of Arts in Teaching, Mathematics Education), were part of a larger South Carolina delegation participating in a "Day on the Hill," sponsored by the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (AACTE). The two students, who are also teachers, learned about educational policy from Washington experts and participated in visits to the offices of South Carolina's members of Congress. AACTE holds the event annually to assist teacher education faculty and students who wish to become involved in educational policy creation. The Dean of the Zucker Family School of Education, Larry G. Daniel, and Citadel Professor Stephenie Hewett also attended the D.C. event. "AACTE's Day on the Hill is a premier event within the profession of teacher education. It builds camaraderie among teacher educators, education students, and individuals involved in the making and interpretation of educational policy," said Daniel, who has attended the last 12 years. "I am pleased we can help our faculty and students in education learn about the importance of their involvement in the democratic process."
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Thursday
June 23, 2016
3. Zucker Family School of Education: Getting engaged in national education policy making
A group of educators from The Citadel's Zucker Family School of Education is more knowledgeable about the U.S. educational policy making process after a recent trip to Washington, D.C. Two members of The Citadel Class of 2016, James McManus (Bachelor of Science in Social Studies Education) and Jennifer Clark Bucciarelli (Masters of Arts in Teaching, Mathematics Education), were part of a larger South Carolina delegation participating in a "Day on the Hill," sponsored by the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (AACTE). The two students, who are also teachers, learned about educational policy from Washington experts and participated in visits to the offices of South Carolina's members of Congress. AACTE holds the event annually to assist teacher education faculty and students who wish to become involved in educational policy creation. The Dean of the Zucker Family School of Education, Larry G. Daniel, and Citadel Professor Stephenie Hewett also attended the D.C. event. "AACTE's a 'Day on the Hill' is a premier event within the profession of teacher education. It builds camaraderie among teacher educators, education students, and individuals involved in the making and interpretation of educational policy,” said Daniel, who has attended the last 12 years. "I am pleased we can help our faculty and students in education learn about the importance of their involvement in the democratic process."
Published in: TheDigitel.com
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Thursday
June 23, 2016
4. Cadets from Nicholasville take honors at The Citadel
Nicholasville natives in The Citadel South Carolina Corps of Cadets earned academic honors during the spring semester. Evan Grant and William Mossbarger, both of Nicholasville, were on the dean’s list for the 2016 spring semester. Dean's list recognition is given to cadets registered for 12 or more semester hours and whose grade point average is 3.2 or higher with no grade below a C for the previous semester's work. Grant was also awarded Gold Stars by The Citadel for earning a grade point ratio of 3.7 or higher during the 2016 spring semester. The Citadel, founded in 1842, is a public, coeducational military college in Charleston, South Carolina.
Published in: JessamineJournal.com
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Thursday
June 23, 2016
5. Meet The Coach: Maurice Drayton
College professors always stress the importance of internships. Maurice Drayton can attest to that for life in the NFL, too. Drayton comes to the Colts from the college ranks. He will team up with Tom McMahon to assist with the special teams. In 2013, Drayton was an intern with McMahon. So when former Colts Assistant Special Teams Coach Brant Boyer took a head coordinating position with the Jets, McMahon knew who to ring. Get to know Assistant Special Teams Coach Maurice Drayton: Describe your journey to Indianapolis "I was most recently the defensive coordinator/assistant head coach at The Citadel, in my second stint. Before that, I actually interned (with the Colts) in 2013. That's where I really got accustomed to the building and how Tom McMahon does things. They had to run me out (laughs). I would have stayed the whole time had they let me. In 2012, I was at Southern Mississippi with coach Ellis Johnson, who actually gave me my first full-time job in the profession. I also did an intern in Canada in 2013, in the Canadian Football League. Before Southern Miss, I was an assistant head coach/wide receivers and special teams coordinator at Coastal Carolina. That was really cool. Before that, I was at South Carolina State where I had defensive backs/special teams coordinator under a guy named Buddy Pough. Prior to that I was in Europe as a defensive coordinator in the European Football League. I was in high school for two seasons. I was a part time football coach, other time I spent as an administrator. I was in charge of three B's-buses, books and butts. We actually still had corporal punishment at the high school I was at-Goose Creek High School in South Carolina. Before that was my first stint at The Citadel, where I spent the longest amount of time. I coached in a myriad of roles, on offense, defense, special teams, etc. In between, I had stops in the Arena Football League. I've been exposed to this same game on a lot of different levels. It's been good for my maturation process."
Published in: Colts.com
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Thursday
June 23, 2016
6. UNC Football: Early opponent preview The Citadel
This Week: The Citadel - The Citadel Bulldogs are the 11th game for the Heels this year. They play in the Southern Conference and will be UNC's second FCS team this year. Only one win against an FCS team counts toward bowl eligibility, so a win here doesn't help a lot, but a loss would do a lot more damage, not only to the season but the recruiting trail as well. So what do we need to know about the Citadel Bulldogs? Head Coach: Brent Thompson. Career Record 0-0 (first season). The Citadel is his first Head Coaching job. He was named head coach when former head coach, Mike Houston, left the Citadel for James Madison. Best Graduate: Running back Stump Mitchell. Mitchell had 11,988 all-purpose yards and 42 touchdowns in nine seasons with the St Louis and Phoenix Cardinals. He is also 14-42-1 in five plus seasons as a head coach at Mercer and Southern. Second Best Graduate: Wide receiver Andre Roberts. Roberts has 229 receptions for 2,711 yards and 13 touchdowns in six NFL seasons. He also has 1783 return yards and a touchdown. Roberts currently is a member of the Detroit Lions, his third NFL franchise.
Published in: KeepingitHeel.com
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Wednesday
June 22, 2016
1. Weinstein to take over as interim dean at The Citadel
Beginning July 1, The Citadel School of Science and Mathematics will be under the leadership of new interim dean John Weinstein, Ph.D. Weinstein, who has been The Citadel's biology department head for five years, was appointed by Connie Book, the college's provost and dean. Weinstein came to The Citadel's Department of Biology in 2000; he was promoted to department head in 2011. In his new capacity, Weinstein will head The Citadel's biology, chemistry, health, exercise and sport science, mathematics and computer science and physics departments. Weinstein holds a bachelor of arts degree in biology from Rutgers University and a master's degree in biology from East Carolina University. He went on to earn a Ph.D. in biological sciences from the University of South Carolina. He completed his postdoctoral research at the Miami University Department of Zoology, and has taught at Western Michigan University and Texas A&M University-Commerce. Weinstein succeeds Lok C. Lew Yan Voon, Ph.D., who became The Citadel's dean in 2012. He is leaving The Citadel for the University of West Georgia, where he will serve as dean of the College of Science and Mathematics.
Published in: Palmetto Business Daily
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Wednesday
June 22, 2016
2. The Citadel raises tuition, fees for 2016-17 academic year
The Citadel is increasing its tuition and fees for the 2016-17 academic year, which begins in August. Cadets at the military college pay an all-in cost, which includes tuition, room and board, uniforms, laundry, dry cleaning, infirmary use, books and other mandatory expenses. Fees for freshmen are higher because of uniform purchases. In-state freshman cadets will pay $27,838 per year, a 3% increase from last year, while upperclassmen will pay $22,928 per year, a 2.9% increase, a news release from the college said. Out-of-state freshman cadets will pay $48,916 and upperclassmen will pay $44,006, both of which are 3.1% increasing from last year, the release said. Students in evening undergraduate, graduate and online programs at The Citadel will also see a price hike. In-state graduate students will pay $569 per credit hour on campus, while out-of-state graduate students will pay $957 per credit hour. Those are both 3.25% increases since last year, the release said. Evening undergraduate credit hours are increasing 3.25% to $456 per hour for in-state students and $847 per hour for out-of-state students. Undergraduate courses taken online will cost $500 per credit hour, and graduate-level courses takes online will cost $695, the release said.
Published in: Charleston Regional Business Journal
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Wednesday
June 22, 2016
3. New agent in charge of Kingsville Border Patrol Station
The Kingsville Border Patrol Station has a new agent in charge. In a news release, the agency announced that Duke Canchola will be the new Patrol Agent in Charge. Canchola has been with the Border Parol since 1997. He previously served in several other positions, including Acting Assistant Chief Patrol Agent and Patrol Agent in Charge the of Laredo Sector Special Operations Detachment. Canchola is a Carroll High School alumnus who attended the Marine Military Academy in Harlingen. Canchola earned a bachelor's degree from The Military College of South Carolina and graduated from the marine Corps Officer Candidates School in Qunatico, Virginia.
Published in: Caller Times
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Wednesday
June 22, 2016
4. Bestselling local author Brad Taylor to hold open book release party
After serving in the Army infantry and special forces for over 21 years and working his way up to the rank of lieutenant colonel, local author Brad Taylor possesses very specialized knowledge about the inner workings of the military. Among the inside knowledge gained from many operations overseas is an invaluable understanding of "how our counter-terrorist apparatus works." That knowledge is handy for the time he spends time working as a security consultant and appearances on FOX, CNN, and MSNBC to share his expertise, and it also has given him the capability to write intimately about different levels of the military in his realistic fiction Pike Logan series. Going from a career in the military to being an author may seem like an unlikely transition, but to Taylor it made perfect sense. He has always been a "voracious reader" and said that writing a book is "something I always wanted to do, it was kind of a bucket list thing." But Taylor had little idea of the success that would follow. What brought Taylor to Charleston in 2007 was an assignment to work as an assistant professor of military science at The Citadel. While working there, Taylor found himself with more time on his hands than he previously had in his special forces job, which he used to write his first novel, "One Rough Man." It is centered around the character of Pike Logan, an operative in a unit so classified that Congress is oblivious to its existence.
Published in: Moultrie News
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Wednesday
June 22, 2016
5. 2016 FCS storylines - Part I
There will be many intriguing storylines that surprise people throughout the 2016 FCS season. This time last year, quarterback Case Cookus was just joining Northern Arizona, so few knew about him. All he did was win the starting job away from two seniors and go on to set the FCS record for touchdown passes by a freshman. Southern Utah, The Citadel, Penn? Yeah, nobody saw conference titles coming from them... There is no shortage of FCS powers who hope to beat FBS programs - North Dakota State (Iowa), Northern Iowa (Iowa State), Jacksonville State (LSU), Eastern Washington (Washington State), Chattanooga (Alabama), Richmond (Virginia) - but the upsets come in all shapes and sizes. Last year, there were nine FCS wins, starting with Fordham over Army West Point on opening weekend and extending to the final weekend of the FCS regular season with The Citadel surprising South Carolina... New coaches energize FCS programs: Success on the FCS level can mean a head coach might be moving on to a bigger job. Six playoff teams (Fordham, James Madison, McNeese State, Southern Utah, The Citadel and Western Illinois) and Celebration Bowl participant Alcorn State lost head coaches - five of whom went to FBS programs. Overall, 19 FCS programs have named new coaches since the end of the 2015 regular season.
Published in: Yahoo Sports
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Tuesday
June 21, 2016
1. Education briefs: Citadel, Ashland, Youngstown, Springfield, Harding
The following Berkeley County students have made the Dean's List at The Citadel. Dean's List recognition is given to cadets and students registered for 12 or more semester hours and whose grade point average is 3.2 or higher with no grade below a C for the previous semester's work. Evening undergraduates: Rose Bailey of Moncks Corner, Jonathan Clark of Bonneau; Veterans: Warren Snipes of Hanahan, David Weir of Goose Creek, Kevin Willner of Goose Creek, Nicholas Contestabile of Goose Creek, Joseph Cook of Goose Creek, Ronald Crabtree of Goose Creek, Tres Litten of Goose Creek, Benjamin McCall of Goose Creek, Zachary Smith of Hanahan, Earl Fitts of Goose Creek; Active duty: Marcus Padilla of Goose Creek, Joseph Page of Goose Creek, Cody Pearson of Goose Creek, Michael Sickles of Goose Creek, Randall Clark of Goose Creek, Scott Sam of Goose Creek; Cadets: Charles Cox of Daniel Island, Lee Davis of Moncks Corner, Christopher Jacobik of Goose Creek, Chandler Sambets of Hanahan, Arnetta Smith of Goose Creek, Andrew Hensley of Goose Creek, Jacob Barker of Hanahan, Stephen Churchill of Hanahan, Richard Cook of Goose Creek, Joshua Fiddie of Pinopolis, Cagney Irving of Huger, Mark Neitzel of Goose Creek, Bethany Reeves of Goose Creek, Colton Rolader of Moncks Corner, Cole Smith of Goose Creek, William Tye of Moncks Corner, Za'Von Whitaker of Saint Stephen; The Citadel honored the following Berkeley County students with Gold Stars for outstanding academic achievement during the spring semester of the 2015-2016 academic year. Gold Stars are awarded to students that achieve a 3.7 grade point average or higher. Students that achieve Gold Star recognition are also placed on The Citadel's Dean's List - Lee Davis of Moncks Corner, Christopher Jacobik of Goose Creek, Chandler Sambets of Hanahan, and Arnetta Smith of Goose Creek.
Published in: The Gazette
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Tuesday
June 21, 2016
2. Students earn honors, scholarships
Charles Lawson Turner, a 2014 graduate of Benedictine Military School, was awarded the 4th set of Gold Stars for spring semester 2016 at The Citadel in Charleston. Citadel Cadets must maintain at 3.7 or higher GPA to be awarded Gold Stars.
Published in: SavannahNow.com
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Tuesday
June 21, 2016
3. Twenty nine students receive scholarships from Building Industry Charitable Foundation
Over the past fifteen years, the Building Industry Charitable Foundation has awarded $449,500 in scholarships to children of Association members and other students who meet criteria set for the program. This month, the Building Industry Charitable Foundation will award an additional $45,000 to students. The scholarship program is funded by annual events, including the BIA Golf Classic and through private contributions to the Foundation. Congratulations to our 2016 Scholarship Recipients: Ryan Sheard, The Citadel
Published in: Midlands Biz
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Tuesday
June 21, 2016
4. Citadel approves budget for 2016-17 academic year
The Citadel's Board of Visitors has approved the college's budget, which includes the combined tuition and fees rate for the 2016-17 academic year. The Citadel's all-in costs for in-state cadets will increase 2.9 percent for upperclassmen ($648 per year) and 3.0 percent for freshmen ($808 per year). Out-of-state freshmen and upperclassmen will see an increase of 3.1 percent compared to last year, representing an annual increase of $1,310 for upperclassmen and $1,470 for freshmen. "To help families of cadets prepare, The Citadel provides the information below for all-in costs. All members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets must live on campus due to the military culture, therefore the all-in costs include room and board, uniforms, laundry, dry cleaning, infirmary use, books, and other mandatory expenses not required by most colleges and universities, as well as general tuition," said Col. Joseph Garcia, The Citadel's vice president for finance and business. "Fees for freshmen are higher due to the uniform purchases that year." The all-in costs do not include other fees as determined by the college, such as specific targeted fees or lab fees which vary according to the academic major or schedule of each cadet.
Published in: Moultrie News
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Monday
June 20, 2016
1. Weinstein named interim dean of the School of Science and Mathematics
The Citadel School of Science and Mathematics will have an interim dean beginning July 1. John Weinstein, Ph.D., was appointed to the position this week by The Citadel Provost and Dean of the College, Dr. Connie Book. Weinstein has served as the head of The Citadel Department of Biology for five years. Weinstein's current research interests are in the area of environmental toxicology. He has expertise in natural and anthropogenic stressor interactions, food web transfer of chemical contaminants, and risk assessment. He has investigated the impacts of hydrocarbon pollution on a variety of salt marsh animals and has assessed chemical contamination of storm water retention ponds. Most recently, the research he is directing with cadets is focused on the sources, fate, and effects of microplastic pollution in Lowcountry estuaries. He will replace internationally-known, solid-state physicist and researcher, Lok C. Lew Yan Voon, Ph.D., who came to the college as dean of the school in 2012. "Dr. Lok Lew Yan Voon's successes as dean were many, including advancing the school's contributions to the college's long range LEAD Plan 2018 through the expansion of undergraduate research, as well as shepherding the initial efforts to establish a nursing program at The Citadel," said Book.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Monday
June 20, 2016
2. The Citadel Board of Visitors raises tuition and fees for 2016-2017
The Citadel's Board of Visitors has approved a tuition and fees increase of roughly 3 percent for both in-state and out-of-state cadets for the coming academic year. Annual "all in" costs, which include room and board, uniforms, books and other expenses, will rise to $27,838 for in-state freshmen and $22,928 for in-state upperclassman. Out-of-state freshmen will pay $48,916, while out-of-state upperclassmen will pay $44,006. The Board of Visitors also raised fees by 3.25 percent for all students in The Citadel's evening undergraduate, graduate and online programs. Evening undergraduate courses will cost in-state students $456 per credit hour and out-of-state students $847 per credit hour. In-state and out-of-state students taking graduate-level courses will pay $569 and $957 per credit hour, respectively. Online programs will cost $500 per credit hour for undergraduate classes and $695 per credit hour for graduate-level classes.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
June 20, 2016
3a. Charleston Strong: A rallying cry in a time of mourning
Words never did justice to the violence of last year's attack on Emanuel AME Church. Words failed observers nationwide as the family members of the victims stood in court and told the shooter, "I forgive you." But somehow a simple phrase seemed to capture the families' and the city's response, from profound acts of grace to a massive display of racial unity as thousands held hands across the Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge: "Charleston Strong."... Months after the bridge event, a large mural went up on Rutledge Avenue near Hampton Park that boasts the phrase "CHARLESTON STRONG." It's decorated with doves painted by dozens of community members and leaders, a nod to an image created after the shooting by graphic designer Gil Shuler that showed nine doves in the shape of a palmetto tree. Tiffany Silverman, director of the fine arts department at The Citadel, organized the project, which she says still reflects the sentiment of that time. "No single person could have created this memorial, which gives me great hope that Charleston Strong will continue to mean much more than a hashtag," she said. "What a fitting metaphor to take a wall that didn't look like much and reveal its strength by transforming it into a landmark through the power of community."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
June 20, 2016
3b. While the Confederate flag has been furled, debate over it still fluttering
Next month, a group plans to return to the Statehouse grounds here and use a portable pole to raise a Confederate flag similar to the one furled a year ago in the wake of the Emanuel AME Church shooting. James Bessenger, founder of the S.C. Secessionist Party, estimates that a few hundred people will attend, and he hopes their presence sends a signal to state leaders... In Clemson, some have pushed to remove the name of white supremacist and former governor "Pitchfork" Ben Tillman from that university's most iconic building, one whose name was changed from Old Main to Tillman Hall in the 1940s. In Greenwood, others are attempting to remove segregationist language from a memorial honoring fallen World War I and II soldiers. And in Charleston, Citadel officials and others would like to remove the Confederate Naval Jack from Summerall Chapel, but their hands are tied until the Legislature gives its OK. In order to change any of the above building names or monuments on public property, two-thirds of the state House and Senate must approve. The Legislature isn't the only forum for these debates, however. The Heritage Act also is subject to an ongoing court fight. "We're dealing with an ironic situation where the Heritage Act was passed in order to protect the flag that is, of course, no longer on the Statehouse grounds," Circuit Judge Frank Addy Jr. said in March.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
June 20, 2016
4a. Clarendon students named to Citadel Dean's List
Manning native Drew Edwards and Alcolu native Lewis Warr were named to The Citadel's Spring Dean's List, which recognizes cadets with a 3.2 or higher GPA who are registered for 12 or more semester hours. The Citadel, founded in 1842, is a public, coeducational military college in Charleston, S.C., that offers a classic military education for men and women seeking a college experience that is meaningful, academically strong and is focused on educating and developing principled leaders for a strong military and a global workforce.
Published in: ManningLive.com
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Monday
June 20, 2016
4b. Atwater earns Dean's List recognition at The Citadel
Graham Atwater, of Yuma, was recognized for outstanding academic achievement and earned dean's list recognition for the spring 2016 semester at The Citadel in Charleston, S.C. To make the dean's list, students must be registered for 12 or more semester hours and whose grade-point average is 3.2 or higher with no grade below a C for the previous semester's work.
Published in: Yuma Sun
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Monday
June 20, 2016
4c. Achievements: Area students honored
Marlan Campbell, of Stark City, was awarded Gold Stars by The Citadel, Charleston, South Carolina, for earning a grade point ratio of 3.7 or higher during the 2016 spring semester. Campbell also earned The Citadel's dean's list recognition for the spring 2016 semester. Dean's list recognition is given to cadets whose grade-point average is 3.2 or higher.
Published in: The Joplin Globe
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Monday
June 20, 2016
4d. Cortlandt Manor Student Takes Top Honors on Dean's List
Members of The Citadel South Carolina Corps of Cadets earned top honors in the spring 2016 semester. Dean's List recognition is given to cadets registered for 12 or more semester hours and whose grade point average is 3.2 or higher with no grade below a C for the previous semester's work. Michelle Schoenfeld of Cortlandt Manor, NY (10567), was recognized for outstanding academic achievement and earned Dean's List recognition for the spring 2016 semester. The Citadel, founded in 1842, is a public, coeducational military college in Charleston, S.C., that offers a classic military education for men and women seeking a college experience that is meaningful, academically strong and is focused on educating and developing principled leaders for a strong military and a global workforce.
Published in: Patch.com
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Monday
June 20, 2016
4e. Dean's list, June 19, 2016
The Citadel Madyson Riegel, Schuylkill Haven, a member of The Citadel South Carolina Corps of Cadets, was awarded Gold Stars by The Citadel, Charleston, South Carolina, for earning a grade point ratio of 3.7 or higher during the spring semester. Students who achieve Gold Star recognition are also placed on dean's list.
Published in: Republican Herald
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Monday
June 20, 2016
4f. School notebook: The Citadel Dean's List
McDonough's Stephen Cleary was named among members of The Citadel South Carolina Corps of Cadets earning recognition on the institution's spring 2016 semester Dean's List. Cadets registered for 12 or more semester hours and whose GPA is 3.2 or higher with no grade below a C for the previous semester's work receive the distinction.
Published in: Henry Herald
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Monday
June 20, 2016
4g. The Citadel honors area cadets
Cadets from the Union County have been honored for academic achievement by The Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina, with either a Gold Star and/or being named to the Dean's List. Gold Star - The Citadel honored the following students with Gold Stars for outstanding academic achievement during the spring semester of the 2015-2016 academic year: Daniel Boulware of Whitmire; Jacob Robbins of Union; Corey Gill of Pauline - Gold Stars are awarded to students that achieve a 3.7 grade point average or higher. Students that achieve Gold Star recognition are also placed on The Citadel's Dean's List. Dean's List - The following members of The Citadel South Carolina Corps of Cadets earned top honors in the spring 2016 semester and were named to the Dean's List - Daniel Boulware of Whitmire; Jacob Robbins of Union; Corey Gill of Pauline; Jacob Patterson of Jonesville; Avery Hyatt of Pauline. Dean's List recognition is given to cadets registered for 12 or more semester hours and whose grade point average is 3.2 or higher with no grade below a C for the previous semester's work. The Citadel, founded in 1842, is a public, coeducational military college in Charleston, S.C., that offers a classic military education for men and women seeking a college experience that is meaningful, academically strong and is focused on educating and developing principled leaders for a strong military and a global workforce.
Published in: The Union Times
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Monday
June 20, 2016
4h. Warr receives Citadel degree
Alcolu native Lewis Warr graduated May 7 from The Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina, receiving a bachelor of science degree in business administration. Members of The Citadel Class of 2016 were recognized for excellence in leadership, service and academics. The South Carolina Corps of Cadets celebrated the graduation of over 550 cadets, 11 active duty students and 27 veteran students from 32 states. Of those cadets, 151 were commissioned as officers. Top areas of study for the class included business administration, engineering, political science and criminal justice.
Published in: ManningLive.com
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Monday
June 20, 2016
5. Colleton Citadel Club presents three $1,500 scholarships
The Colleton County Citadel Club presented $1,500 scholarships to 2016 graduates Cole Cummings, Isaac Sauls and Brian Murdaugh to attend The Citadel this fall. The presentations were made by Citadel Club President Scott Hilderbrand and Vice President Luke Guess at an event held June 11 at Flowers Farm near Walterboro. A graduate of Colleton Prep, Cummings is the son of Todd and Angie Cummings. He plans to major in biology and attend medical school. Sauls, a graduate of Colleton County High School, is the son of Marion and Teresa Sauls and Donna Crosby. He plans to study business and attend law school. Also a CPA graduate, Murdaugh is the son of Steve and Valerie Murdaugh. He plans to study criminal justice and attend law school.
Published in: WalterboroLive.com
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Monday
June 20, 2016
6. St. Luke's names Jim Bross as CEO
St. Luke's Hospital has named James B. (Jim) Bross as its new CEO, with Bross assuming his new position July 18. Bross follows Ken Shull who announced in March that he would retire after 43 years in healthcare. Shull led St. Luke's Hospital for nearly seven years. "We are pleased to welcome someone with the experience and knowledge in health care delivery that Jim Bross has to our hospital," said Clark Benson, chair of the St. Luke's Hospital Board of Trustees. "Jim's achievements and career experiences, as well as his personal demeanor, will serve St. Luke's well and help move us forward despite the challenges small and large hospitals face in today's environment... Bross is a 1991 graduate of The Citadel with a Master of Business Administration and a 1984 graduate of Southern Wesleyan University (Central Wesleyan College) in Central. He and his wife, Angie, an elementary school teacher, are moving to Polk County within the month. With parents living nearby in Upstate South Carolina, they are also happy to be closer to their daughter, Anna, who will begin a teaching career this fall in nearby Pickens, S.C. Bross recognizes that, "Along with the rest of the St. Luke's family and community, I join in great respect and admiration for the body of work done by your retiring CEO. I have big shoes to fill following Ken, pardon the pun, but I'm thrilled for this opportunity and look forward to working closely with our board and all caregivers, including our medical staff, our hospital staff and our volunteers.
Published in: BlueRidgeNow.cpm
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Monday
June 20, 2016
7. The Time, the Place, the Date and the Hour that the Confederacy Died
Jim Stempel is the author of seven books, including military nonfiction, historical fiction, spirituality, and satire. His articles have appeared in numerous journals including North & South, Concepts In Human Development, and the New Times. He is a graduate of The Citadel, Charleston, South Carolina, and lives with his wife and family in Western Maryland. His latest book is the novel, Windmill Point. Today it seems a maxim of American history that the South could never have won the American Civil War. Indeed, the facts supporting this conclusion appear overwhelming. The sizeable advantage the North enjoyed in terms of population, manufacturing, railroad infrastructure, telegraph lines, food production, naval and merchant fleets, as examples, dwarfed, by and large, their Southern counterparts. These factors have all been laboriously catalogued, were all true, and no doubt tilted the odds of victory significantly in favor of the North. But probabilities alone do not always win wars. Wars are at times won on the field of battle, indeed won when the odds for victory appear decidedly improbable. If this were not true today names like Marathon, Rorke's Drift, Stirling Bridge, Trenton, and Gaugamela would have no resonance whatsoever, except, perhaps, as reminders of the brutal truth of impotence in the face of overwhelming force. But that is hardly the case. Instead, these names remind us that there were times - yes, perhaps only few and far between, but times nevertheless - when the odds were turned violently on their heads, and a triumph snatched away from some presumptive victor's grasp. Were there such moments for the Southern Confederacy during the Civil War? I believe the answer to that question is a qualified yes, and in Windmill Point, recently released by Penmore Press, I have presented through historical fiction what I believe to be one of those rare and tantalizing moments.
Published in: History News Network
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Monday
June 20, 2016
8. Policy Positions: Free Trade vs. Political Ignorance
The current political campaign for the U.S. presidency has brought out the worst in both the personalities and the policy positions among many of those running for that high political office, and this has been especially the case with international trade and the global economy. Listening to the presumptive Republican and Democratic candidates for the White House, the average voter would think that international trade and investment is a zero sum game in which there is a "winner" and a "loser." Their economic policy assumption is that other countries are gaining at the international trade game at the expense of the United States. The fact is America is economically interconnected and interdependent with the rest of the world. About 20 percent of the American work force is employed in foreign trade and investment related jobs, and represents more than 25 percent of the U.S. Gross Domestic Product. Dr. Richard M. Ebeling is the BB & T Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina, He was formerly professor of Economics at Northwood University.
Published in: NassauInstitute.org
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Monday
June 20, 2016
9. Five Black River runners commit to colleges
The Black River track & field team has been a stealth force in the state the past few years. But the River Rats have become a force at the regional level, and the results are leading to a bright future - both for the school and the athletes now heading to college to run. Five River Rats have committed to run collegiately next year - three at the NCAA Division I level. Daniela Sanchez-Martinez committed to run at The Citadel, an NCAA Division I program, to run cross country and track. She has run the 5,000 meters in 20:08 and the 3,200 meters in 11:59.45. "Dani will go into The Citadel and likely run varsity as a freshman," Jones said. "Daniela has desired a military association, which makes The Citadel a great choice for her."
Published in: Holland Sentinel
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Thursday
June 16, 2016
1. Citadel historian making history of his own with Braddock's Defeat
New evidence uncovered by one of The Citadel's history professors about what is described as one of North America's most consequential battles, is helping David Preston earn his own place in history. Preston, the college's Westvaco Professor of National Security Studies, teaches cadets, many of whom are military officer candidates, about U.S. military history and early American history. His second book, Braddock's Defeat: The Battle of the Monongahela and the Road to Revolution, published by Oxford University Press in July of 2015, has earned six awards in the first year as well as dozens of positive reviews. "The Citadel should be justly proud to have such a gifted scholar among its faculty," said reviewer Ben Moise in The Post and Courier. The prestigious of Guggenheim-Lerhman Prize is an international competition, first established in 2013. The Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation website describes the objective of the prize as follows: The intent of the $50,000 prize, which is jointly administered by the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation and the New-York Historical Society, is to draw public attention to military history not only as an important staple of education in the areas of international relations, diplomacy, and conflict studies, but also as a subject in which any educated citizen should be interested. The study of steps to war, the conduct of military campaigns, and diplomatic responses to war can play an essential role in the quest for a more peaceable future. Preston was named the winner during a ceremony March 21, 2016, at the New York Historical Society in New York City.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Thursday
June 16, 2016
2. Citadel approves budget for 2016-17 academic year
The Citadel's Board of Visitors has approved the college's budget, which includes the combined tuition and fees rate for the 2016-17 academic year. The Citadel's all-in costs for in-state cadets will increase 2.9 percent for upperclassmen ($648 per year) and 3.0 percent for freshmen ($808 per year). Out-of-state freshmen and upperclassmen will see an increase of 3.1 percent compared to last year, representing an annual increase of $1,310 for upperclassmen and $1,470 for freshmen. "To help families of cadets prepare, The Citadel provides the information below for all-in costs. All members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets must live on campus due to the military culture, therefore the all-in costs include room and board, uniforms, laundry, dry cleaning, infirmary use, books, and other mandatory expenses not required by most colleges and universities, as well as general tuition," said Col. Joseph Garcia, The Citadel's vice president for finance and business. "Fees for freshmen are higher due to the uniform purchases that year." The all-in costs do not include other fees as determined by the college, such as specific targeted fees or lab fees which vary according to the academic major or schedule of each cadet.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Thursday
June 16, 2016
3a. Clay cadets make Dean's List at The Citadel
Two Clay student cadets earned top honors in the spring 2016 semester at The Citadel. Dean's List recognition is given to cadets registered for 12 or more semester hours and whose grade point average is 3.2 or higher with no grade below a C for the previous semester's work. Andrew Aiken of Fleming Island and Rachel Keefer of Orange Park earned Dean's List honors. Meanwhile, Aiken was also awarded Gold Stars by The Citadel for earning a grade point ratio of 3.7 or higher during the 2016 spring semester. Students that achieve Gold Star recognition are also placed on The Citadel's Dean's List. The Citadel, founded in 1842, is a public, coeducational military college in Charleston, S.C., that offers a classic military education for men and women seeking a college experience that is meaningful, academically strong and is focused on educating and developing principled leaders for a strong military and a global workforce.
Published in: Clay Today
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Thursday
June 16, 2016
3b. Dean's lists from June 15, 2016
Colton Price, Mercer, was recognized for outstanding academic achievement and earned dean's list recognition for the spring 2016 semester at The Citadel South Carolina Corps of Cadets.
Published in: The Herald
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Thursday
June 16, 2016
3c. Education notes: Dean's list announcements and other honors
The following members of The Citadel South Carolina Corps of Cadets earned dean's list recognition: Antonio Cuccaro and Christopher Vanacore, of Ringoes; Rocco Consiglio and Matthew Consiglio, of Nazareth; Kevin Thieme, of Bethlehem; and Joseph Scerbo, of Flemington.
Published in: LehighValleyLive.com
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Thursday
June 16, 2016
4. Teacher continues fight to allow the deaf in the military
Dave Alexander went through Reserve Officers' Training Corps in college, flew Black Hawk helicopters in the military, taught ROTC and went into the Reserves. Alexander went to graduate school for audiology and started working at the Maryland School for the Deaf in November. There, he met Keith Nolan, who wants to be in the military but can't because he's deaf. "At first, I was like, 'Really? I don't know if that can work,'" Alexander said. "I think once people stop and think about it and recognize the talents everybody can contribute, I think we can get over that. I'm fortunate enough to work with Keith and fortunate enough to see his talent, his work and his skills."... Two years ago, Nolan and Ethan Lusted, the first deaf graduate of The Citadel, a military college in South Carolina, ran from the Maryland School for the Deaf to Washington to garner support for the legislation. They met with about 300 supporters after the run to march from the Capitol to the White House. Nolan signed that there is a range of supporting roles the deaf could fill. The recent focus on cybersecurity, primarily requiring computer skills, opens up more positions. The 11-page feasibility report states that each service member must be able to deploy at any time, regardless of military occupational specialty. Some people have not deployed in the last 10 years, but there are no non-deployable occupations.
Published in: The Frederick News-Post
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Thursday
June 16, 2016
5. United States Attorney Bill Nettles leaving position for private practice in Columbia
United States Attorney for the District of South Carolina Bill Nettles will leave office effective Wednesday. His final official act as United State Attorney will be at 4 p.m. Wednesday at the Hollings Courthouse in Charleston, where he will address the drug court program that he and Federal Judge Bruce Hendricks started. Nettles will now open a private law practice focusing on "white collar" defense, criminal defense, cases under the federal Whistleblower/False Claims Act, personal injury and general civil litigation. His office will be located in Columbia at 2008 Lincoln Street. "I am extremely proud of the progress that our district made over the past six years," Nettles said. "The office is staffed and positioned to continue to build on a national reputation for innovation and efficiency in serving the citizens of South Carolina."... The district earned national acclaim for its work. Former Attorney General Eric Holder traveled to South Carolina in 2014 to observe the district's programs, as did Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates and US Attorneys from throughout the country. Stories by The Wall Street Journal, NBC's "Dateline" and the Huffington Post featured the office's innovative and groundbreaking work. Nettles is a graduate of The Citadel and earned his law degree at The Widener University School of Law in Harrisburg, PA.
Published in: WACH-TV Columbia, SC
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Thursday
June 16, 2016
6. Charleston city leaders dedicate Higgins Pier in West Ashley
Charleston Mayor John Tecklenburg and members of City Council dedicated Higgins Pier in West Ashley on Wednesday and unveiled a new plaque honoring Leonard A. Higgins, Sr. The pier is located at the end of the West Ashley Bikeway on the Ashley River. The plaque bears the following inscription: "Higgins graduated from Burke High School and Allen University. He later went to Atlanta University where he received his master's degree in biology. Higgins served in the Army and earned another degree from The Citadel and certification from the College of Charleston. He spent the majority of his adult life as a community leader and an educator. Among his many accomplishments, Higgins was as a high school biology teacher, football coach and principal of St. John's High School as well as president of the Maryville/Ashleyville Neighborhood Association. Known for his extensive community involvement, Higgins was instrumental in helping bring this pier to fruition." Project construction started in May 2014 and the pier was completed and opened in 2015. The project consisted of the construction of a timber fishing pier with a covered pier head, a 20 feet by 20 feet floating dock and gangway. The pier walkway is approximately 425 feet long. BluTide Marine Construction was the contractor of the project. Tidewater Environmental Services, Collins Engineering and Johnson, Mirmiran & Thompson (JMT) consulted on the project.
Broadcast on: WCBD-TV Charleston, SC
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Thursday
June 16, 2016
7. Fleming continues family tradition of pole vault success
For Reagan Fleming, it is a matter a family pride. The rising senior from Wren High School comes from a family known for its success in track and field. Fleming added her name to that legacy this past spring sports season when she won the Class AAA girls' pole vault. "My dad was a hurdler at The Citadel, and he has always been there to push us to try new things," Fleming said. "Both of my sisters pole vaulted and my brother (Max) vaults at The Citadel, too." Since the seventh grade, Fleming has been on the Hurricanes track team, but this year sharpened her focus on the sport. "I got serious about it. I was just working hard at it," she said. With the refocused dedication though came sacrifice, namely a twice a week trip to Columbia for extra training at the Rusty Shealy Pole Vault Camp, affiliated with Shealy Athletics. Shealy has trained 91 South Carolina state champions, 11 national champions, and three members of Team USA since 1998. "I spend two hours with him training. He knows what he is talking about," Fleming said. "I go with a great friend of mine, Blake Oldfield. We make a good time out of it."
Published in: Independent Mail
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Thursday
June 16, 2016
8. Club level sold out for second straight year
The Citadel has sold out the Pearson Club Level of Johnson Hagood Stadium for the 2016 season, it was announced Wednesday. The Pearson Club Level will be at capacity for the second consecutive season after selling out for the first time in the history of the west tower in 2015. "This milestone represents the exciting energy that currently surrounds The Citadel football program," Athletic Director Jim Senter said. "Last season's historic accomplishments have fueled a resurgence in ticket sales and interest by alumni, donors and fans in the Lowcountry. Expectations are high and our fans are looking to see how we can improve on last year's Southern Conference championship season under the new leadership of first-year head coach Brent Thompson." A limited number of season tickets are still available, and fans who purchase at least two season tickets will receive a commemorative 2015 Southern Conference champions ring. For more information or to purchase tickets, visit CitadelSports.com/tickets or call The Citadel Athletic Ticket Office at 843-953-DOGS (3647).
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Wednesday
June 15, 2016
1. New Jersey Democrat unsuccessful in forcing debate to remove Confederate flag from The Citadel
The U.S. Senate on Tuesday passed its 2017 National Defense Authorization Act without language to compel The Citadel to take down the Confederate flag hanging in Summerall Chapel. U.S. Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., was championing the cause after U.S. Rep. Jim Clyburn, D-S.C., and other Democrats were unsuccessful in securing the amendment's adoption as part of the House NDAA bill. Both amendments would have barred Reserve Officers' Training Corps funding from any military academy that flies the Confederate battle flag. The Citadel is currently the only institution that fits that description. Unlike in the House, where Clyburn explored multiple procedural avenues to get his amendment debated on the chamber floor, Senate rules make it more difficult for a lawmaker to force an up or down vote on his or her provision. Booker could have put up a fight, but he would have been blamed for stalling debate on the entire NDAA bill. He also knew he faced an uphill battle: The White House has spoken out in opposition to the amendment as a free speech issue, and neither South Carolina Republican senator was prepared to support it. GOP critics argued The Citadel's Board of Visitors had already voted to take down the flag but has so far been prevented from doing so thanks to a state law that bars it, and besides, they said, this was an issue best left to South Carolina, not Congress.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
June 15, 2016
2. Letter: Stop blaming the flag
I am not originally from this beautiful state; however, I feel as though it has become my home. The people here have been welcoming. Like every Charlestonian, I was shocked by the horrific slayings of nine beautiful souls last June at Emanuel AME. I am, however, also saddened by the controversy it has stirred up all across the South over the Confederate flag. It was not the flag that killed those nine souls, but a deranged individual who should not have had a gun. Because the alleged shooter was photographed with a Confederate flag, all of a sudden it was as if the flag pulled the trigger. Had he posed with the nation's flag, would we have been so quick to remove it from the Statehouse grounds and other places where we have removed the Confederate flag? Why remove statues and rename buildings related to the Confederacy? Some are trying to remove the Confederate Navy Jack from The Citadel chapel, where it is a symbol of honor to those cadets who gave their lives to fight in the Civil War. Will we remove Confederate generals from history books? It was a deranged individual who killed a preacher, a wife, a mother and a grandmother, a sister, a brother and a grandson. Let's not forget these wonderful people. Let us use this as a learning experience for our future generations and not try to change history.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
June 15, 2016
3. Fort Myers students earn Gold Stars and Dean's List recognition at The Citadel
David Whitenack of Fort Myers, was awarded Gold Stars by The Citadel for earning a grade point ratio of 3.7 or higher during the 2016 spring semester. Students that achieve Gold Star recognition are also placed on The Citadel's Dean's List. The following members of The Citadel South Carolina Corps of Cadets earned top honors in the spring 2016 semester. Dean's List recognition is given to cadets registered for 12 or more semester hours and whose grade point average is 3.2 or higher with no grade below a C for the previous semester's work. All from Fort Myers: David Whitenack; Cody Vallette; and Kylie Flynn. The Citadel, founded in 1842, is a public, coeducational military college in Charleston, S.C., that offers a classic military education for men and women seeking a college experience that is meaningful, academically strong and is focused on educating and developing principled leaders for a strong military and a global workforce.
Published in: News-Press.com
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Wednesday
June 15, 2016
4. What American Soldiers Are Saying About Donald Trump
Reality TV host and New York real estate mogul Donald Trump holds up a replica flintlock rifle awarded him by cadets at the Citadel Military College in Charleston, South Carolina. (Photo by Richard Ellis/Getty Images) A steady diet of criticism from retired generals and CIA chiefs hasn't cost Donald Trump his support in the military. Poll after poll shows the presumptive Republican presidential nominee is backed by the majority of rank and file service members-a divide that seems to reflect the gap between elite opinion and popular dissatisfaction that has propelled the real estate scion's insurgent campaign. "The first rule about military voting patterns is that they generally mirror the electorate, and that's especially true of junior officers and most enlisted personnel who are only in the service for a few years," Phil Carter, senior fellow at the Center for a New American Security, tells VICE. An Iraq veteran, Carter served in the Obama administration after leaving the service and now supports Hillary Clinton for president. For his part, he's skeptical of the recent polls showing Trump with a massive following. "I'm sure Trump has pockets of strong support in the military like he has pockets everywhere," he says. "I have yet to hear from a single person, military or not, who supports [Trump] on national security grounds."
Published in: Vice.com
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Wednesday
June 15, 2016
5. These Students Are Winning the Most Private Scholarships
College is expensive. And, college is getting more expensive each year. The rising costs of tuition, room & board, and textbooks has made it difficult for the average American family to afford a college degree. Before you apply for a student loan, you should look for scholarships and grants to help cover your cost of attendance. Scholarships are a great way to finance your education. Unlike student loans, scholarships do not need to be paid back. And, according to College Board, there is $122 billion in scholarship funding awarded to students each year. At LendEDU, we've created over 100 guides to help students find private scholarships. Private scholarships are a great supplement to grants and merit based scholarships awarded by colleges and universities. In most cases, private scholarships are awarded by organizations, companies, and individuals looking to give back. Applying for private scholarships could be a full-time job. But if you put in the work, your time spent could be extremely rewarding. The LendEDU team thought it would be interesting to find out which students were receiving the most private scholarship funding. Using data licensed from Peterson's, we calculated the average amount of non-need based private scholarship funding per student at 1,000 colleges and universities. #14 - The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina
Published in: LendEdu.com
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Wednesday
June 15, 2016
6. Lejeune High School graduates 83 Devil Pups
The Lejeune High School Class of 2016 is small in size but big in achievement. Class Vice President Caitlyn Campbell said the class stands out because of its commitment and perseverance as students. As the graduates picked up their diplomas during a Tuesday commencement program, they moved on to college and the next phase of their education having been awarded the largest amount of scholarships and awards in the school's history... He quickly named each: Class salutatorian Carissa Baldwin will attend the University of Notre Dame on a Naval ROTC scholarship; Alanna Baker will attend The Citadel on a Naval ROTC scholarship-Marine Corps option; Ryan Bestul, will attend the University of New Mexico on a Naval ROTC Minority-Serving Institution scholarship; Drake Bodine accepted an appointment to the Naval Academy; Jeffrey Burds will attend the University of Texas on a Navy ROTC scholarship; and Benjamin Mason will attend Boston University on a Navy ROTC scholarship-Marine Corps option.
Published in: JDNews.com
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Tuesday
June 14, 2016
1. Former FBI agent weighs in on Mateen surveillance
On Monday FBI director James Comey spoke about their investigation into Omar Mateen, which began back in 2013 after coworkers reported hearing him speak of becoming a martyr. After 10 months they suspended their surveillance saying that there was not enough evidence to keep the case open. After hearing that Mateen was previously on the FBI's watch list, many here in Charleston expressed their frustration, saying that the bureau should have done more to prevent the shooter from carrying out his plan. News 2 spoke with Dr. Carl Jensen the director of intelligence studies at The Citadel and former FBI agent about how these investigations typically go. He says that after a person is suspected of terrorist activity the FBI may interview them, monitor their movements, and speak with relatives. He says that they look for any evidence that would suggest intent to commit a crime, but if evidence is not enough to warrant an arrest they must close the case. He also says that preventing terrorism proves to be a difficult challenge. "It's like trying to find a needle in a very very very large haystack," he said. "If you are a true lone wolf and not signaling your intentions and activities, it is very very difficult."
Broadcast on: WCBD-TV Charleston, SC
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Tuesday
June 14, 2016
2. The Citadel receives recognition from National Security Agency
The National Security Agency (NSA) and Department of Homeland Security (DHS) recently honored South Carolina's The Citadel as a National Center of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense Education (CAE-CDE). The award was presented June 8 at the the eighth annual National Cyber Summit in Huntsville, Alabama. The Citadel is the second South Carolina college to earn the CAE-CDE designation. "Cybersecurity has a tremendous impact on our daily lives," Shankar Banik, associate professor at The Citadel's School of Science and Mathematics and program director for cybersecurity, said. "The Center of Academic Excellence designation will highlight The Citadel's role in securing the nation's cyberspace information systems and producing some of the country's top cybersecurity professionals." This designation will allow The Citadel to apply for scholarship funds, as well as funding for curricular and faculty development, from the NSA and DHS. "The endless opportunities and challenges of cybersecurity are what first attracted me to the minor," Senior Cadet Anthony Zovich, president of The Citadel Cybersecurity Club, said. "The skills I've learned have already proven to be valuable in my internship with the Department of Homeland Security."
Published in: Palmetto Business Daily
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Tuesday
June 14, 2016
3. Unbreakable bonds at The Citadel even stronger among twin cadets
The unbreakable bonds that develop between cadets during their four years at The Citadel are legendary; the close relationships are often touted one of the top benefits of being a member of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. Every year for almost 175 years strangers show up for their first day as a freshmen and have already formed life-long bonds by the end of the first week. But there is a small group of cadets who bring their built-in best friends with them. Identical twin brothers John and Wilson "Wil" Hope graduated from The Military College of South Carolina as members of The Citadel Class of 2016. That wasn't always the plan. Until March of their senior year at Byrnes High School, neither brother intended on going to The Citadel-they both had other (and separate) schools in their minds. But after they applied and both received full academic scholarship offers, both decided to commit to The Citadel. "I was really impressed by the fraternity of the alumni and the fact that I would have to earn my way to success; this combined with our family's military history, my desire to serve in the military, and our scholarships all sealed the deal," said John. The twins, who grew up in Spartanburg, were assigned to separate companies and battalions when they arrived.
Published in: GoUpstate.com
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Tuesday
June 14, 2016
4. Citadel history professor named to inaugural class of AASCU Emerging Leaders Program
The American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU) recently announced the 25 candidates selected to participate in the inaugural class of AASCU's Emerging Leaders Program (ELP). Citadel professor, Joelle Neulander, Ph.D. was among those selected from colleges and universities across the U.S. They will take part in a three-day seminar designed for promising mid-career professionals and faculty leaders in higher education that will be held June 11 - 14 in Washington, D.C. "We need a robust pipeline of talented professionals interested in advancing their careers in higher education," said AASCU President Muriel A. Howard. "AASCU has a long history of providing successful leadership development programs at every professional level of higher education administration. We identified a void at the mid-career level, and we believe our new Emerging Leaders Program will be an important complement in service to our members and others interested in advancing their careers." In addition to strengthening and enhancing leadership skills, participants in the Emerging Leaders Program will have the opportunity to engage in a national dialogue with experienced leaders and experts in higher education and to develop a network of colleagues from across the country. The program includes opportunities for hands-on practical exercises, a leadership self-assessment, and the development of a plan designed to help participants achieve their leadership goals.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Tuesday
June 14, 2016
5. Wilmington's Nicholas Troy Awarded Gold Star At The Citadel Military College
Nicholas Troy, of Wilmington, was recently awarded Gold Stars by The Citadel for earning a grade point average of 3.7 or higher during the 2016 spring semester. Students that achieve Gold Star recognition are also placed on The Citadel's Dean's List.
Published in: Wilmington Apple
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Tuesday
June 14, 2016
6. Waldrop Takes Top Honors at The Citadel in Spring 2016: Dean's List
Members of The Citadel South Carolina Corps of Cadets earned top honors in the spring 2016 semester. Dean's List recognition is given to cadets registered for 12 or more semester hours and whose grade point average is 3.2 or higher with no grade below a C for the previous semester's work. Robert Waldrop of South Plainfield, NJ (07080), was recognized for outstanding academic achievement and earned Dean's List recognition for the spring 2016 semester. The Citadel, founded in 1842, is a public, coeducational military college in Charleston, S.C., that offers a classic military education for men and women seeking a college experience that is meaningful, academically strong and is focused on educating and developing principled leaders for a strong military and a global workforce.
Published in: TAPinto.net
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Tuesday
June 14, 2016
7. Public invited to participate in creation of The Citadel's hazard mitigation plan
The Citadel is preparing a Disaster Resistant University Multi-Hazard Mitigation Plan in an effort to better protect the college's cadets, students, faculty and staff, as well as its property, from the effects of natural and man-made hazardous events. This goal is to identify ways The Citadel can mitigate risks from hazards ranging from flooding and earthquakes to tornadoes and severe winter weather. Public meetings will be held at 6:30p.m., on June 29 and 30, in room 165 of Bond Hall, which is #47 on the virtual map. Future meetings will be posted here and on The Citadel's Facebook and Twitter accounts. The development of the plan is funded by a grant from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). When final, the plan will be compliant with the Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000, which encourages coordination between local, state, and federal governmental entities to assess risks in order to help deflect the negative impacts of a hazardous event or natural disaster.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Tuesday
June 14, 2016
8. Former Citadel All-American Andre Roberts signs with Detroit Lions
Nearly a month after the Washington Redskins announced they were releasing him, former Citadel All-American Andre Roberts has found his new NFL home. Roberts, a standout wide receiver for the Bulldogs from 2006-09, signed with the Detroit Lions on Monday. The deal is for one year, according to reports. A Columbia native who attended Spring Valley High School, Roberts was drafted by the Arizona Cardinals in the third round of the 2010 NFL Draft after his four-year career with The Citadel. Roberts played four seasons with the Cardinals before joining the Redskins out of free agency in 2014. The 2016 season will mark his seventh professional season after his 2015 campaign was cut short at nine games due to injury. Roberts' best season was in 2012 with the Cardinals, when he registered 64 receptions for 759 yards and five touchdowns, all career-highs.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
June 13, 2016
1a. NSA designates Citadel as National Center of Academic Excellence
One of the world's most highly regarded intelligence and security agencies has named The Citadel a National Center of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense Education (CAE-CDE). On June 8 at the 8th Annual National Cyber Summit in Huntsville, Alabama The Citadel officially accepted the CAE-CDE designation certificate, becoming only the second college in the state of South Carolina to earn the recognition. The prestigious classification from the National Security Agency (NSA) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) gives emphasis to The Citadel's credibility in evolving technology field. "Cybersecurity has a tremendous impact on our daily lives," said Shankar Banik, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Science and Mathematics and program director for cybersecurity who attended the summit. "The Center of Academic Excellence designation will highlight The Citadel's role in securing the nation's cyberspace information systems and producing some of the country's top cybersecurity professionals."
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Monday
June 13, 2016
1b. NSA designates Citadel as National Center of Academic Excellence
the digital cybersecurity
Published in: TheDigitel.com
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Monday
June 13, 2016
2. Letter: Good Samaritan demonstrates integrity
On Saturday, May 13, I stopped in Mount Pleasant to fill up my car before heading up Highway 41 to visit my son in Virginia. In Emporia, Va., I stopped to get more gas and realized that I did not have my wallet, which held all my credit cards, driver's license, etc. Luckily, I had cash so I filled up and was at my son's home shortly thereafter. I started calling the filling station where I had first filled my tank and could not get any help from them. I called the Mount Pleasant Police Department and was told that a patrol officer would call me - no one ever did. I went online and confirmed that no one was using my cards. I was getting ready to cancel the card when I noted an instant message on Facebook. It was an Adam Gallagos telling me he had found my wallet on the side of Highway 17 N. I immediately contacted him and he held onto my wallet until I got home. On the way home, I stopped at The Citadel, where he worked, but we didn't connect. So I went home and he contacted me when he got off work. He so very kindly brought my wallet to my home that evening. I since found out that he and his wife had gone to great lengths on Facebook to find me. I was flabbergasted at the couple's integrity. Thank you again, Adam.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
June 13, 2016
3. How to remember the past without honoring past mistakes
According to legend, on January 9, 1861, a cadet from the South Carolina Military Academy fired the first shot of the Civil War, preventing the SS Star of the West from supplying Union troops at Fort Sumter. The one who pulled the lanyard on the cannon to fire this historic shot was, most likely, George Edward "Tuck" Haynsworth. Accompanying Haynsworth near the cannon was a soon-to-be graduate of what is known today as The Citadel, William Stewart Simkins. Years later, Simkins moved to Texas and was named as a professor of law at the University of Texas in Austin. And in the 1950s, a new men's dormitory was opened on the Austin campus, called Simkins Hall, named to honor The Citadel graduate. I lived in Simkins Hall while an undergraduate at the University of Texas in the 1964-65 school year. But none of us living there had any idea - or cared - that our dorm was named after this respected South Carolinian. Several years ago, I visited my old dorm, but it wasn't "Simkins Hall" anymore. The Board of Regents renamed it Creekside Residence Hall in 2010 after it became known that Citadel graduate Simkins and his brother had organized the Ku Klux Klan in Florida.
Published in: The State
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Monday
June 13, 2016
4. College Choice Releases 2016 Ranking of the Best Oceanside Colleges and Universities
College Choice has published its annual ranking of the best oceanside colleges and universities. Katie Amondson, Associate Editor of the ranking, says, "For students who are avid water sports fans, or who want to go into marine biology, aquaculture, or oceanography, there is one requirement--the school must be near water. A school near the ocean will undoubtedly have resources, programs, and even clubs that combine a love of the water with learning, and so this is where the journey for dedicated students begins." The College Choice 2016 Rankings of the Best Oceanside Colleges and Universities takes into account several key factors to ensure that you get the best rate of return on your educational investment. In addition to proximity to the ocean, these factors include academic ranking, cost of tuition, total net cost, average financial aid packages, and average early-career salary. The list includes: The Citadel, Charleston, SC
Published in: Finance.Yahoo.com
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Monday
June 13, 2016
5. State High graduates 'ready for what's next'
Graduation memory: Mark Weakland had mixed emotions about graduation. He said it's something he was excited for, but also added that he'll miss friends, and playing high school sports. Weakland played football, and was part of the track and field team. He'll attend The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, in the fall to play football, and hopes to join the Marines. "It's great to be finished, but there's a lot I'll miss," he said. "I'm ready for what's next."
Published in: Centre Daily Times
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Monday
June 13, 2016
6a. Conrad Geis of Streetsboro is a member of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets
Men and women who entered The Citadel as freshmen last fall have officially been sworn in as members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. Recognition Day 2016 marks the end of what many consider the toughest first-year college military training in the country.
Published in: Record-Courier
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Monday
June 13, 2016
6b. Citadel Recognition Day
Matthew Dymond of Tunkhannock and Andrew Hudak of Scranton are among 588 freshman cadets at The Citadel officially sworn into the South Carolina Corps of Cadets.
Published in: The Times-Tribune
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Monday
June 13, 2016
7. Review: 'Rebecca Play' merges sacred text with Charleston
"And the Lord said to her: 'Two nations are in your womb, and two peoples from within you will be separated; one people will be stronger than the other, and the older will serve the younger.'" Rebecca's story in the Book of Genesis may not immediately bring to mind two high school students taking a tour of The Citadel. But in "The Rebecca Play," the sacred story is skillfully translated to present-day Charleston. "The Rebecca Play" was presented at Pure Theatre for Piccolo Spoleto Festival by the In[heir]itance Project. The project, led by Jon Adam Ross, is a collaboration between the actor and five communities, including Charleston, to create original plays inspired by biblical figures from Genesis. In a program note, director Chantal Pavageaux writes: "We often heard unique stories with similar themes and people in 'opposing' communities who shared identical concerns. Things are complicated." And complicated it was. This complication was transformed into a series of scenes performed by Ross and Darian Dauchan. They didn't shy away from hot-button issues such as racism, affirmative action and police violence.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
June 13, 2016
8. In Death of Nashville News, Birth of the News Leader
The Nashville News is dead at age 138. Long live the Nashville News-Leader. The News was the longest continuously running business in Howard County, founded in 1878, but after a 13-year newspaper war that sprang from a family feud, it printed its last edition on May 31. That's the day the paper was sold to the editor of the rival Nashville Leader, himself a former Nashville News editor. The paper was one of four sold by Graves Publishing Inc., owned by the 10 sons and daughters of Louis "Swampy" Graves. One of the sons, Louie Graves, started the Leader in 2003 after "a notorious thing" happened, causing turmoil in the family. Nobody nowadays is saying precisely what the notorious thing was, but Louie Graves took several News staffers with him to the Leader, including the editor, John Schirmer. It was Schirmer who bought the News, along with the other Graves papers, the Murfreesboro Diamond, the Glenwood Herald and the Montgomery County News in Mount Ida. Financial details weren't disclosed. "The deal went down on Tuesday [May 31]," said Schirmer, a longtime Nashville High School teacher and newsman. "Gerry Bob Graves, chairman of the board for Graves Publishing, and I signed the paperwork. Most of the Graves family members were there." Gerry Bob, otherwise known as Dr. Gerald R. Graves of the engineering faculty at The Citadel in South Carolina, didn’t respond to an email seeking comment. The News printed its final issue that afternoon. The front page featured a photo of Graves family members in front of a printing press affectionately known as Agnes. The front page also included a picture of the News staff, along with regular fare like the meeting of a Parkinson's support group and a used piano being offered free to “a good church home."
Published in: Arkansas Business
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Monday
June 13, 2016
9a. Citadel earns two preseason All-American selections
The Citadel football team is represented by two cadet-athletes on the Athlon Sports FCS Preseason All-America Team released Thursday. One day after the Bulldogs were picked 10th in the publication's Preseason FCS Top 25, rising junior defensive back Dee Delaney and rising senior B-Back Tyler Renew were included among the list of 27 preseason All-Americans. The Citadel is one of six programs in the nation with two preseason All-Americans, joining five-time defending FCS champion North Dakota State, Jacksonville State, Chattanooga, James Madison and New Hampshire. In 2015, Delaney was named a Walter Camp All-American, first-team STATS All-American and a second-team All-American by the Associated Press and College Sports Madness. He also earned the College Football Performance Awards Elite Defensive Back Award and was a first-team All-Southern Conference selection.
Published in: Moultrie News
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Monday
June 13, 2016
9b. How Mariel Cooper Can Make an Impact on the 2016 Redskins
Mariel Cooper hails from a small football school in a small conference. He wasn't expecting to be drafted... and he wasn't. CBs are always in demand in the NFL, so Mariel was fortunate to get a tryout with the Redskins. Despite the incredible CB depth on the roster already, he was able to turn that tryout into a roster spot heading towards training camp in Richmond. His highlights are pretty impressive. You watch him play and think, "Maybe this guy could stick in the NFL." Still, he wasn't highly touted and there hasn't been a lot written on him aside from him joining The Audible right here on our very own Hogs Haven (June 7th and May 17th). After graduating from SC State, Cooper transferred to The Citadel for one final season of college football. He was a graduate student at The Citadel after graduating from SC State with a degree in civil engineering technology. He was pretty well recruited in SC after playing in the 2010 Shrine Bowl and being a two-time All-State pick in HS. While with SC State, he helped win two MEAC championships and made the MEAC All-Academic Team three years in a row. He studied sports management during his one year at The Citadel. Mariel is known for his work ethic/habits, approach to practice, and great habits in the film room. He has enough athleticism and strength to play in the NFL. Watching whatever tape I could find for Mariel, it seems apparent that he has good vision and takes good angles. He plays with the right attitude and goes hard until the whistle blows.
Published in: HogsHaven.com
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Thursday
June 9, 2016
1. Cadets taking top honors in the spring of 2016: Gold Stars
Gold Stars are awarded to cadets who have earned a grade point ratio of 3.7 or higher for the work accomplished in the spring semester of 2016. View the article to see the list of members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets who received the honor.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Thursday
June 9, 2016
2. Dean's List cadets and students announced for spring of 2016
Dean's List is a recognition given to cadets and students who are registered for 12 or more semester hours and whose grade point average is 3.20 or higher, with no grade of I (Incomplete) and no grade below C for work in a semester. In the case of cadets, the medal is worn on the cadet uniform during the following semester. View the article to see the list of cadets and students who earned Dean's List honors.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Thursday
June 9, 2016
3. Citadel settles suit from cadet who says he was bound, gagged, struck in groin
The Citadel has settled a lawsuit after a cadet said upperclassmen bound and gagged him while hitting him in the groin with an elastic belt. "The case has been settled as to all parties," said Mike Gruenloh, who represented Citadel cadet Zachary Rutherford in his suit against the school. Rutherford was a freshman at the time of the alleged attack in the fall of 2013. First-year cadets live regimented lives under the public military college's long-standing fourth-class system and must obey any lawful order from an upperclassman officer. Although hazing is forbidden by school policy, it has been a documented problem at the school for decades, and several cadets have reported in recent years that physical attacks remain rampant in the barracks. The school reported last April that a three-month internal investigation had confirmed 19 cases of hazing. According to the lawsuit, three sophomores entered Rutherford’s room as he was preparing for a commandant inspection about 11:45 p.m. on Nov. 15, 2013. The complaint states that they filled his mouth with coffee grounds and taped it shut; taped dirty underwear onto his head; and began striking him in the groin with a PT belt, a reflective elastic belt worn by cadets during physical training.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
June 9, 2016
4. New Jersey Democrat takes up fight to remove the Confederate flag from Citadel
Democrats in the U.S. House were unsuccessful in previous efforts to force the removal of the Confederate flag from The Citadel's Summerall Chapel. Now, a Senate Democrat is taking up their cause. U.S. Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., has filed an amendment to the pending 2017 National Defense Authorization Act identical to the one that failed in the House version earlier. Both call for withholding all Reserve Officers' Training Corps funding from any military academy that flies the Confederate flag. The Citadel in Charleston is currently the only institution that fits this category. "To millions, the Confederate battle flag is a symbol of racism, oppression and division," Booker said in a statement to The Post and Courier. "Recognizing this, the state of South Carolina removed the flag from its capitol grounds last year," he added, referencing the S.C. Statehouse vote after the deadly shooting at Mother Emanuel AME Church last June. "It's not an appropriate symbol to be flying above our public educational institutions either, especially institutions that prepare young men and women to serve as officers in the United States military," Booker said.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
June 9, 2016
5. Two associate judges appointed to full circuit positions in Kane County
The Illinois Supreme Court appointed two associate judges, Clint Hull, who is currently presiding judge of the juvenile division, and Rene Cruz, who is the county's first Hispanic associate judge, to fill two soon-to-be vacant positions in the 16th Judicial Circuit Court in Kane County, according to a news release. Sixteenth Circuit Judge Susan Clancy Boles made the announcement Tuesday that Cruz was appointed by the state Supreme Court to fill the vacancy of Judge Judith Brawka, who retires next month, in the First Subcircuit, according to a release on Kane County Connects. Hull will fill a vacancy created when Judge Thomas Mueller retires in September from the Fourth Subcircuit. Cruz was appointed as an associate judge in 2012. He is presently assigned to the Family Division as a family law trial judge. Prior to being appointed as associate judge, Cruz was a partner in The Gil Law Group, according to the release. Cruz graduated high school in Panama. In 1992, he graduated with honors from The Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina. He graduated in 1995 with honors from Northern Illinois University College of Law, the release stated.
Published in: Chicago Tribune
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Thursday
June 9, 2016
6. Local Marine scholarship recipient to attend The Citadel
Recipients of the Marine scholarships are Jacob Duggan and Ryan Days. Duggan is headed to The Citadel in South Carolina and is interested in a possible career in infantry or aviation. "I just knew since I was little that I wanted to join the service. I actually didn't choose Marines until probably junior year," said Duggan.
Broadcast on: WBFO-FM Buffalo, NY
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Thursday
June 9, 2016
7. USAMU welcomes new command sergeant major
Command Sgt. Maj. Isaac Ragusa III relinquished responsibility of the U.S. Army Marksmanship Unit (USAMU) to Command Sgt. Maj. Joseph Tinker May 26 in the Finals Hall of the Pool International Range Complex. Ragusa's new assignment will be brigade operations sergeant major at The Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina. Ragusa cited two people who have helped him most in his life: his wife Cindy, who he said is "...my everything," and his mentor and "dad," Morgan Arthur. He said although he is leaving for another assignment, USAMU is not just another unit to him. "From Civilians to Soldiers, from shooters to gunsmiths, everybody is a big family here," Ragusa said. "I am going to miss them and the friendships we have built over my last two years as the command sergeant major in this unit." During his 26 years in the Army, Ragusa served in positions from Infantry team leader to command sergeant major with assignments at Fort Carson, Colorado; Fort Bragg, North Carolina; and Fort Hood, Texas. His combat tours include Operation Just Cause, Bosnia, Kosovo, Operation Enduring Freedom I and II, Operation Iraqi Freedom II and III, and Operation Spartan Shield Kuwait.
Published in: DVIDSHub.net
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Thursday
June 9, 2016
8a. The Citadel ranked preseason top 10 for first time
The Citadel is ranked in the Top 10 of a preseason football poll for the first time in school history. The defending Southern Conference co-champion Bulldogs appear at No. 10 in the Athlon Sports 2016 preseason FCS Top 25 poll. The Citadel returns 14 starters this season led by first-year head coach Brent Thompson, who helped the Bulldogs to a 9-4 overall record, 6-1 in the SoCon as offensive coordinator of a team that won its first conference title since 1992 and advanced to the second round of the NCAA FCS Playoffs. The team's nine wins were the second most in school history and six conference wins tied a program record. "Offensive coordinator-turned-head coach Brent Thompson will keep the triple option humming," Athlon said in its description of the Bulldogs. "In QB Dominique Allen and backs Tyler Renew and Cam Jackson, the Bulldogs return three players who gained more than 750 yards. The defense features shutdown corner Dee Delaney."
Published in: Moultrie News
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Thursday
June 9, 2016
8b. Sertoma Classic matchups set for high school football season kickoff
The schedule for the 2016 Sertoma Football Classic has been set with 28 teams competing Aug. 11-12 at The Citadel's Johnson Hagood Stadium. This year's event, sponsored by the Hendrick Auto Group, marks the 46th year the Sertoma Club has kicked off the high school season with showcase scrimmages featuring Lowcountry teams. For the second consecutive year, powder puff football is included among the scrimmages with two one-quarter all-female games each night. Also, four of the scrimmages will be of the two-quarter variety this year. Berkeley county rivals Cane Bay and Stratford will play a half on Thursday night, followed by a half scrimmage between Hanahan and James Island. On Friday night, West Ashley will play Goose Creek for two quarters, followed by a half between Bishop England and Pinewood Prep. Two area schools are making their first appearance in the classic as Charleston Charter School for Math and Science and Oceanside Collegiate Academy will debut their programs. Also, for the second consecutive year, the classic will include eight-man football scrimmages - one each night.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
June 9, 2016
8c. Oakleaf High signs 10 in spring flurry
In baseball, Oakleaf High's battles with a strong lineup in district 2-8A with Atlantic Coast and Fleming Island, sharpened the steel for left handed pitcher Will Pillsbury who heads to The Citadel in South Carolina, one of the strongest baseball programs in all of the NCAA. Citadel coach Fred Jordan achieved his 800th career win, all at The Citadel, last year and finished with 814 wins to join 27 active NCAA Division I coaches with 800 career wins. The Bulldogs finished 17-41 last year.
Published in: Clay Today
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Wednesday
June 8, 2016
1. Marine aviator tapped to become next assistant commandant
Marine Lt. Gen. Glenn Walters has been nominated to serve as the next assistant commandant of the Marine Corps, Defense Secretary Ash Carter announced Tuesday. Walters, a career aviator who currently serves as the deputy commandant for Marine Corps Programs and Resources, was also tapped to receive a fourth star. If confirmed by the Senate, Walters will replace Gen. John Paxton Jr. as the Marine Corps' second-highest ranking officer and 33rd assistant commandant... Walters received his second star while deployed to Afghanistan where he led 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing (Forward). When the unit was deactivated in March 2012, bringing an end to its role as the aviation combat element in southwestern Afghanistan, Walters said the Marines were able to accomplish their objectives in large part because they implemented new technology, like iPads, into their missions. "Night and day difference in Marjah," he said at the deactivation ceremony, according to a Marine Corps release. "A year ago there were bloody battles and gunfire. When we left, you could go visit the schools, see the girls going to school, walk through the bazaar. Commerce is growing and booming." Walters was commissioned in the Marine Corps in 1979 after graduating from The Citadel, the prestigious military college in South Carolina. He was a platoon commander with Weapons Company, 3rd Battalion, 2nd Marines, at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, before attending flight training in Pensacola, Florida.
Published in: Marine Corps Times
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Wednesday
June 8, 2016
2. Q&A with Richland County Council District 3 candidate Michael Anthony D'Amelio
Five Richland County Council seats are up for election this year, and four of them will be contested in the June 14 Democratic primary. Incumbents Jim Manning and Julie-Ann Dixon face challengers. Incumbents Damon Jeter in District 3 and Torrey Rush in District 7 are not seeking re-election, and Kelvin Washington was removed from office in District 10 after pleading guilty this year to failure to file income taxes for three years. Michael Anthony D'Amelio - Employment, military and volunteer history: During HS I worked for a small local business, The Other Store. During college I was not allowed to hold a job, as I went to The Citadel, Which is a United States Senior Military College. I volunteered on many political and religious events, and programs such as YoungLife... believe that I am the most qualified for the position, because I understand, listen and act on behalf of the citizens of my district. I am not there to collect a paycheck or hold a title. The Richland Co. Council, controls nearly every aspect of the citizens of Richland Co.'s life. It is my duty to make sure that that is not taken lightly. We have serious issues facing us and the council has thrown its responsibility to the wayside. I believe if you have the ability to make a change for the better, and you idly stand by and do nothing, you are just as much at fault as those in power. I was taught throughout my life and during my time at The Citadel, that a man does not lie, cheat, or steal, nor tolerate those who do. It is my responsibility to hold the county responsible for their actions and repair the damage the council has done. We need to regain the consent of the governed.
Published in: The State
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Wednesday
June 8, 2016
3. School Board Completes Administrative Restructuring
The Moore County Board of Education took three personnel actions Monday that completed a major down-sizing and restructuring of its district-level administration. The School Board appointed Seth Powers as director of student support services, Robin Calcutt as director of planning, accountability and research, and Mike Metcalf as director of curriculum and instruction... Metcalf served as director of planning, accountability and research prior to shifting over to the interim role as director of curriculum and instruction last fall. He previously served as principal of Southern Middle School and Pinckney Academy. Prior to coming to Moore County Schools, served as a principal in Cairo, N.Y., and as a teacher and assistant principal in Charleston, S.C. Metcalf earned his Bachelor's degree from Gettysburg College in Pennsylvania, master's degrees in teaching from The College of Charleston and in education from The Citadel, and a doctorate in educational leadership from Fayetteville State University. "In his role as interim director during this past year, Mike Metcalf has worked hard to bring teachers and principals into the process of evaluating and revising our curriculum, pacing guides, assessments and professional development," Grimesey said. "He also has enabled teams of teachers and principals to visit schools that have experienced success with North Carolina's academic standards. In turn, he has encouraged our own people to formulate their own plans for improving student success. It has been gratifying to observe how he has restored the role of professionals who are directly engaged with our students in determining what is best for them."
Published in: ThePilot.com
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Wednesday
June 8, 2016
4. The Citadel dean's list - fall 2015
The Citadel has announced the following cadets on the fall 2015 dean's list: James Cunningham of Alpharetta, Tai Lum of Johns Creek, Mark Smith of Roswell, John Brunson of Alpharetta, Richard Dekold of Johns Creek, Zachary Knisel of Milton, Grant Miller of Roswell and Christopher Woods of Johns Creek.
Published in: North Fulton Herald
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Wednesday
June 8, 2016
5. The Citadel Volleyball Adds Grad Transfer
The Citadel volleyball coach Craig Mosqueda announced the addition of graduate transfer Priscilla Irizarry on Monday. Irizarry is the final member of the Bulldogs' group of newcomers in 2016, which includes four incoming freshmen. "Priscilla is a very good leader," Coach Mosqueda said. "She is very selfless, serving teammates before herself. We're excited to have her at The Citadel." Irizarry, who has immediate eligibility to compete next season, is a native of Puerto Rico. She attended high school at the Center for Instruction and Modern Education and was named to the 2011 Puerto Rican Junior National Championship All-Star Team during her prep career. Irizarry spent her undergrad playing for Coach Mosqueda at Anderson University in the Upstate before Mosqueda took the head coaching job at The Citadel prior to the 2015 campaign. At Anderson, Irizarry made an impact during the 2013 season, seeing action in 112 sets as Coach Mosqueda's right-side hitter.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Tuesday
June 7, 2016
1. Moving Forward in Education: using social media to teach social responsibility
When I began my undergraduate career in 2006, Facebook was a website that could only be joined by students with college email addresses. Twitter had just launched a few months prior, and Instagram was not yet born. Fast forward ten years: I am eight months away from graduating with a master's degree in teaching, and high school students are using social media platforms that I don't yet know about. At The Citadel, one thing that I have been impressed with is how forward-thinking the Zucker Family School of Education is in its curriculum. We take classes that celebrate the use of multiple forms of technology in the classroom and experiment with innovative teaching methods and materials. When looking at how social media can be relevant in a classroom, I sat down to think about it and do research with my English teacher goggles firmly in place. Education is no longer just about facts and memorizing lines of poetry-it also includes mindset, morals, responsibility. Social media plays a big part in the education of social responsibility for teens, and young adult literature has become an increasingly useful tool to help teach this basic principle.
Published in: DaretoLead.com
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Tuesday
June 7, 2016
2. Letter: Shout out to The Citadel
Oh, the power of The Citadel. I've had many an occasion to repeat that phrase. Lately, I uttered it as I've watched my nephew on the parade ground. He was a sometimes-struggling, often disinterested high school student; he now wears shiny gold stars on his Citadel uniform, and his family is full of pride. I said it many times as my aspiring pilot son endured the vagaries known as the "needs of the Navy" his senior year. Submarine duty? Surface warfare duty? His top-notch education prepared him and his Citadel family supported him through that year's ups and downs. He's now a naval aviator, living his dream, keeping us safe. I see The Citadel as a living, breathing entity, recognizing and responding to society's challenges. Yes, sometimes The Citadel stumbles and falls, as do most institutions, but the power of The Citadel prevails as young men and women, their families included, are changed through the experience.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
June 7, 2016
3. Campus improvement update: summer 2016
A paving project on the north end of The Citadel campus gets underway on June 16. Summer students, faculty, staff, visitors and vendors can expect road and parking access to be temporarily off-limits in various locations as the project progresses. Please click the article to view the 3 phases of the project.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Tuesday
June 7, 2016
4. College students graduate, earn honors
Virginia Morton of Ludowici graduated from The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, on May 7. She earned a Bachelor of Arts in psychology. More than 550 cadets graduated.
Published in: Coastal Courier
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Tuesday
June 7, 2016
5. Spring school notes
Gregory Krueger of Katonah was one of 78 cadets that were designated as commanders at The Citadel in Charleston, SC.
Published in: Lewisboro Ledger
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Tuesday
June 7, 2016
6. 7 Jack Britt grads headed to West Point, other service academies
You could call it the family business. Every year, hundreds of Fort Bragg-area students graduate high school and follow in their parents' footsteps, choosing to serve in the Armed Forces. But one school in particular is developing a reputation for churning out not only future troops, but future leaders. Jack Britt High School has seven students set to join a service academy or related school next year, building on an alumni group that already includes about a dozen cadets at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, New York. Five students from this year's graduating class will report to West Point this summer. Another student will join the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland. And one will attend the Naval Preparatory Academy in Newport, Rhode Island, school officials said. The school is proud of its students, which it heralds as being among the next generation of military leaders... The soon-to-be cadets are Sam Gordner, Jackson Sullivan, Samantha Sullivan, Bradley Wanovich and Christopher Blanding. The future midshipmen are Caroline Buzzard and Luke Thomas. For the students looking to join the Army officer ranks, the choice of future careers was relatively easy. Sam said he decided on the West Point path during his sophomore year. Even before that, he knew the military was for him. "I've definitely known I wanted to serve the country in some way, Reserve or active duty," he said. His father, retired Lt. Col. Mark Gordner, helped steer him to West Point. The elder Gordner attended The Citadel in South Carolina, and his military career took the family to Europe for several years when Sam was a boy. Sam said when he began to think of his future, he realized the Army was the logical next step.
Published in: Fayetteville Observer
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Tuesday
June 7, 2016
7. Rutgers adds new graduate assistants
And then there was one. Graduate assistant Sean Barowski is the only Rutgers coach remaining from the 2015 season. Chris Ash hired nine new full-time assistants after he took over as Rutgers' head coach in December. Rutgers' four graduate assistants were retained initially after the coaching change, but only Barowski remains. Collin Bauer is the most recent addition, taking Vallone's spot as defensive line graduate assistant. Bauer served as a student assistant while attending Towson. After graduating in 2013, Bauer spent one year as a graduate assistant at The Citadel and the past two years as a graduate assistant at Maryland.
Published in: NJ.com
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Tuesday
June 7, 2016
8. Pair of Soccer Camps Added for Summer
Head soccer coach Ciaran Traquair has announced dates for his Bulldog Youth Soccer Camp and the Elite Overnight ID Camp. The Bulldog Youth Soccer Camp is open for boys and girls ages 5-12 and is specifically designed for players who want to learn the fundamental skills of soccer. The camp, spanning from July 18-22, emphasizes the correct technique and is maximized by individual instruction. The learning environment will be enhanced by small-sided games, providing more touches on the ball. The camp will have qualified college coaches and players who will run each sessions as well as goalkeeper-specific training throughout the week. The camp will be held at W.L.I Field on the campus of The Citadel. Soccer experience is not necessary and spots will be on a first come, first served basis. In the Elite Overnight ID Camp, held July 14-16 at W.L.I Field, campers will mirror the training environment of a Division I soccer program to give participants the best possible idea of what it is like to be part of the program. The camp hopes to give all campers feedback on how to improve and prepare for the college level, specifically at the NCAA level. The camp staff will have representatives from several different college around the region.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Monday
June 6, 2016
1. The Citadel plans to open new nursing program next year
The Citadel plans to launch a new nursing program in January with a $4 million anonymous gift. The program, already endorsed by the state Commission on Higher Education, is pending approval from the South Carolina Board of Nursing. "We've been working on this for over a year now," said Connie Book, the college's provost and dean. "We're really focused on providing good nurses to the Armed Forces." Several schools in the Lowcountry, including the Medical University of South Carolina, Trident Technical College and Charleston Southern University, already offer nursing degrees. But Book said the health care industry needs more nurses. A 2014 federal report shows South Carolina will fall short of the number of nurses it needs by 2025. "It's also a critical need in the Armed Forces," Book said. "Part of what we're trying to do is respond to the marketplace and the military's needs."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
June 6, 2016
2. College president: Why we changed the uniform rules to allow a cadet to wear a hijab or yarmulke
When a Muslim student asked for an exception to the required uniform at The Citadel, the public military college that had accepted her, it provoked a strong response: Some alumni and others found the idea anathema to the defining principles of unity, uniformity and Corps before self; others thought it would send a message that all faiths were welcome and that the storied institution was not so bound to tradition that it could not evolve with a more diverse society. The Citadel denied Sana Hamze's request. But a private military college in Vermont, Norwich University, granted it. On Friday, Richard Schneider, the president of Norwich, explained the decision in detail in a letter to Norwich trustees, alumni, students, parents, faculty, staff and friends of the university: As you are aware, Norwich University received a letter requesting religious accommodations with respect to the Norwich University Corps of Cadets uniform from a female student accepted into the Corps of Cadets and the Class of 2020. Her request to the Commandant of the Corps of Cadets specifically addressed a religious accommodation to observe the hijab, a broad term that defines modest dress by Muslim women. She requested the university's permission to wear religious head covering to cover her hair and neck at all times in uniform, and for uniform accommodations that would enable the covering of her arms and legs.
Published in: Washington Post
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Monday
June 6, 2016
3. Higher ed's digital showcase
Just as websites morphed from digital brochures into versatile multimedia portals, electronic portfolios have evolved from information repositories to robust tools for showcasing student learning. Now generally referred to as "ePortfolios," these software systems house completed assignments, reflections on learning, photos, creative work and journal entries-all evidence of a student's education... Benefits beyond graduation - Officials at The Citadel in South Carolina launched an e-Leadership Portfolio in 2009 to measure student learning outcomes over time, says Tara Hornor, associate provost for planning, assessment and evaluation and dean of enrollment management. The system enabled the university to embed ePortfolios into multiple classes, including all leadership courses, and some English and science classes. All 2,300 undergraduate students have required assignments each year that measure multiple skill sets, from critical reasoning to written communication to ethical reasoning, and beyond. At the end of their time in school, students may have as many as 28 of these items in their ePortfolios, says Hornor.
Published in: University Business
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Monday
June 6, 2016
4. Here's how young Republicans are coping in the age of Trump
At least before the Rolling Stones asked him to knock it off, Donald Trump's standard campaign rally playlist included the band's classic ballad, "You Can't Always Get What You Want." For young Republicans who backed other candidates mowed down in the Republican presidential primaries by the Trump Train, the song turned out to be all too ironic. The candidates they preferred are gone. The general election is looming. Where do they go from here? Ryan Malouff, 21, who expressed interest in Jeb Bush and Marco Rubio during the GOP primary while still a student at the Citadel in South Carolina, said he's still getting his head around Trump's impending nomination. "I knew that it was a possibility that [Trump] could gain the nomination, but needless to say, it is quite surreal... Unfortunately, he might be my only choice," Malouff, now a second lieutenant in the Army Medical Services Corps, said in an interview.
Published in: Business Insider
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Monday
June 6, 2016
5. SC legislators need guts to take Confederate Flag down from Citadel chapel
Politicians are weak. Some, close to brainless. Only someone without guts, or a brain, would not want to take down the Confederate flag from The Citadel's chapel in Charleston. That flag of hate and racism, it flies in a church. Take it down. Somehow, a year after a white racist - who wanted to start a race war under the colors of that flag - killed nine black people in another church in the same city, the flag still flies in the chapel at a public college. South Carolina's politicians, the joke of America for so long because the state defiantly flew the Rebel Flag, have a chance to finally put the last celebrated Confederate flag to rest. They have not done so. The Citadel is a public college, supported by all - including blacks. It is a college where blacks were barred until 1966. A college where the Confederate flag did not fly until blacks wanted equality in the late 1950s and early 1960s. So the Citadel and political leaders in those days - who wanted neither integration, nor equality, nor black cadets – put the flag in a church, and incredibly it still flies.
Published in: The Herald
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Monday
June 6, 2016
6. USAMU welcomes new command sergeant major
Command Sgt. Maj. Isaac Ragusa III relinquished responsibility of the U.S. Army Marksmanship Unit (USAMU) to Command Sgt. Maj. Joseph Tinker May 26 in the Finals Hall of the Pool International Range Complex. Ragusa's new assignment will be brigade operations sergeant major at The Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina. Ragusa cited two people who have helped him most in his life: his wife Cindy, who he said is "...my everything," and his mentor and "dad," Morgan Arthur. He said although he is leaving for another assignment, USAMU is not just another unit to him. "From Civilians to Soldiers, from shooters to gunsmiths, everybody is a big family here," Ragusa said. "I am going to miss them and the friendships we have built over my last two years as the command sergeant major in this unit." During his 26 years in the Army, Ragusa served in positions from Infantry team leader to command sergeant major with assignments at Fort Carson, Colorado; Fort Bragg, North Carolina; and Fort Hood, Texas. His combat tours include Operation Just Cause, Bosnia, Kosovo, Operation Enduring Freedom I and II, Operation Iraqi Freedom II and III, and Operation Spartan Shield Kuwait. However, Ragusa's assignment to the USAMU represented one of the most difficult challenges in his military career. Ragusa immediately had to learn six different shooting disciplines and all of the competition rules so that when he accompanied his Soldiers to matches and championships, he could serve as their advocate if something was amiss.
Published in: Army.mil
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Monday
June 6, 2016
7. Letter: Deserving Star of the West winner
Bailey Richardson, the first female recipient of the exclusive and comprehensive Star of the West undergraduate scholarship, represents a giant leap forward for The Citadel's progression towards societal values of gender equality. This is especially so when you consider that her inspiration, Nancy Mace, was one of two ground-breaking female cadets just beginning their knob year at the school 20 years ago in August. Congratulations to Bailey and the Richardson family for raising an all-around well-balanced future cadet whose educational success and community actions allowed her to outshine all others in an estimated incoming class of 2,700-plus male and female applicants and an estimated 750-plus incoming freshmen. She was selected above all other incoming classmates as the recipient of this unique scholarship. As an alumnus of The Citadel and a sibling to the first pair of brothers to receive the Star of the West undergraduate scholarship (Dr. William L. Spearman, 1977, and Dr. James D. Spearman, 1979), I am very proud and pleased to see positive news coverage about the affirmative actions performed by The Citadel, a very proud and ever-evolving military school, 174 years after it was founded.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
June 6, 2016
8a. Michael Chen Among The Citadel's Class of 2016 Graduates
Michael Chen of Bedford, MA graduated from The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, on May 7, 2016. Chen earned a BS in Electrical Engineering. Members of The Citadel Class of 2016 were recognized for excellence in leadership, service and academics. The South Carolina Corps of Cadets celebrated the graduation of over 550 cadets, 11 active duty students and 27 veteran students from 32 states. Of those cadets, 151 were commissioned as officers. Top areas of study for the class included business administration, engineering, political science and criminal justice.
Published in: Bedford Patch
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Monday
June 6, 2016
8b. Recognition Day: South Carolina Corps of Cadets
The Citadel: Cedric Barnes of Dover, who entered the military college in fall 2015, was officially sworn into the South Carolina Corps of Cadets.
Published in: DelawareOnline.com
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Monday
June 6, 2016
9. South Warren grads march forward
Students graduating from South Warren High School on Saturday are moving on to higher education with the help of more than $12 million in scholarships. Four of those 263 students will attend prestigious military schools on full scholarships. "We are really proud of them," guidance counselor Angie Gage said. "We've been on a wait list to receive an ROTC program... we are the only county school that doesn't have one, so that makes it even more phenomenal because we don't have a feeder program." The JROTC from Warren East High School presented the colors at the graduation. Ryan Martin, who had his choice between going to the U.S. Naval Academy or the Air Force Academy, chose the Naval Academy. Luke Rice is going to the Air Force Academy and Brycen Lacey is headed to West Point. Hunter McGee will go to The Citadel that, while not a military academy, does prepare young people for a career in the military.
Published in: Bowling Green Daily News
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Friday
June 3, 2016
1. Haley supports furling flag in Citadel chapel
S.C. Gov. Nikki Haley said Thursday she would support lawmakers approving the removal of a Confederate flag from a chapel at The Citadel to a nearby museum. But Haley said she does not support the state lengthening a federal three-day waiting period to complete background checks before gun purchases. At the urging of Republican Haley, S.C. legislators removed the Confederate flag from the State House grounds last summer after a self-avowed racist, who had posed with the flag, was charged with slaying nine parishioners of Charleston's Emanuel AME Church. Subsequently, some legislators called on the state to close the so-called "Charleston loophole," which allows guns to be purchased if a background check has not been completed in three days. Dylann Roof, accused of shooting and killing nine African-American churchgoers in Charleston last June, was able to buy a gun because the three-day waiting period ran out before a background check had been completed accurately. Roof should have been barred from buying a gun because of an undiscovered pending drug charge, federal officials later said.
Published in: The State
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Friday
June 3, 2016
2. Horne faces 'uphill battle' in race with Sanford
Outgunned more than 50-to-1 in fundraising, state Rep. Jenny Horne knows she has to make every dollar count in her bid to unseat U.S. Rep. Mark Sanford in the June 14 GOP primary. "I'm not running a Cadillac campaign," said Horne, who had only $15,500 in cash on hand in March, according to her most recent Federal Election Commission filing. "I'm running a Chevrolet campaign." But Lowcountry Republican leaders and others say a lack of money is only one of several obstacles the Dorchester Republican faces in running against Sanford, who has a campaign war chest of more than $905,000. Making things more difficult for Horne, Sanford has crucial name recognition across the 1st District. Sanford's libertarian politics also align well with the leanings of his Lowcountry constituents, leaders and pundits say. And, some add, at a time when GOP voters nationally are ousting establishment candidates, the former S.C. governor seems immune to a challenge from a candidate approaching him from the left. "You can't accuse Mark Sanford of being an establishment Republican," Citadel political scientist Scott Buchanan said. "I don't anticipate him ... being in any trouble when it's all said and done." If re-elected, the famously frugal Sanford says he will continue to focus on curbing government spending. "We are nearing a point of financial reckoning that, I think, is going to have absolutely condemning consequences for the middle class, for the young people in America, if we don't get our finances in order," said the Mount Pleasant Republican, whose website includes a ticker that notes the growing U.S. national debt in real time.
Published in: The State
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Friday
June 3, 2016
3. Budd Lake, Flanders students earn college degrees, honors
Kevin Lenahan of Flanders, a 2016 graduate of The Citadel in Charleston, S.C., was commissioned into the Army. Lenahan received a degree in business administration from The Citadel.
Published in: Mount Olive Chronicle
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Friday
June 3, 2016
4. Student news: The Citadel
Christopher Vanacore of Ringoes at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina, has been chosen by Citadel faculty members for the 2016 list of Who's Who Among students in American Universities and Colleges. Nominations are based on strength of character, academic achievement, military achievement, leadership, campus activities and participation and excellence in athletics at the varsity, intramural or club sport level. ALSO: Michael Subach of Hillsborough received a bachelor's degree in criminal justice and commissions into the U.S. Army.
Published in: MyCentralJersey.com
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Thursday
June 2, 2016
1. Letter: Citadel flag flap exposes historic ignorance
I read a recent letter to the editor by an individual who supports continuing to fly the Naval Jack on a state-run campus. The writer also criticizes Rep. James Clyburn for his opinion that the Confederate Naval Jack should be removed from display on The Citadel's campus. What this letter writer failed to mention is that the Board of Visitors and the majority of students also want this archaic symbol removed. The letter writer tells Mr. Clyburn, in so many words, to mind his own business. Representing the citizens of South Carolina is his business and he has done an outstanding job, as his re-election margins indicate. The Confederate flag as well as the Naval Jack are symbols of a time when South Carolina and other states decided to secede from the Union and wage war on the United States of America. The writer fails to mention that the Confederate states started the Civil War and lost it. In doing so they ruined the economy of the state of South Carolina and relegated this state to third world status until the beginning of World War II.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
June 2, 2016
2. Navy Junior ROTC cadets earn scholarships
The Cmdr. Richard and Sherry Murray Scholarship Fund recently awarded scholarships to three graduating Clay County high school seniors. Cadet/Master Chief Savannah Green and Cadet/Commander Charese Chandler, both of Clay High and Cadet/Commander Vanessa Rodriguez of Ridgeview High were each awarded $1,000 scholarships from the Fund. Green will attend Savannah State University in Savannah, Ga., while Chandler will attend the Citadel in Charleston, S.C. and Rodriquez will attend the Navy Academy Preparatory School in Newport, Rhode Island and each graduate plans to become Marine or Naval officers. The scholarships were awarded May 26 to cadets who have demonstrated determination, perseverance and a personal resolve to better themselves and their communities in the face of adversity. Nominees should have demonstrated strong values such as honor, courage and commitment to their unit in a leadership role throughout the school year.
Published in: Clay Today
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Thursday
June 2, 2016
3. Felder guilty in drug case: Feds tell detailed story of dealings by ex-baseball player, second local man
A former Citadel and Clemson outfielder has pleaded guilty to federal drug charges. Bradley Lewis Felder, 27, admitted his involvement in a conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute and to distribute MDMA, also known as "molly," and 50 kilograms of marijuana, U.S. Attorney Bill Nettles said. Everette "Rhett" Carter Berry, 28, also pleaded guilty. Both men are from Bowman. U.S. District Judge Terry L. Wooten of Columbia accepted the guilty pleas and will impose sentence after he has reviewed the presentence report, which will be prepared by the U.S. Probation Office. Felder played for the Citadel for three years, later transferring to Clemson. He hit 25 home runs through his collegiate baseball career, including a solo home run in an NCAA regional loss to the South Carolina Gamecocks in June 2012.
Published in: The Times & Democrat
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Wednesday
June 1, 2016
1. Citadel professor wins gold at Pan American games in Cuba
A Citadel chemistry professor and former U.S. Navy antisubmarine warfare officer now holds one of the world's top titles in judo. Lisa Capriotti, Ph.D., competed in the Pan-American Judo Championships in Havana, Cuba, recently. Capriotti, part of Team USA, along with her husband and judo partner, Robert Gouthro, brought home two gold medals. The games were held at the Ciudad de Deportiva, a historic sports stadium in a quiet corner of Cuba's capital city. Amid swaying palms and vintage cars, judoists from across North and South America gathered to compete. Capriotti, Gouthro, and the other Team USA representatives were chosen based on their performance at the U.S. Senior National Championships. The first day featured kata competition and was dominated by the U.S., Brazil, and Canada. Kata is a two-person team skills demonstration. It is graded by expert judges and is technical, exacting, and precise. Capriotti and Gouthro earned gold medals by defeating teams from Brazil, Cuba, and Mexico. The total medal count for the U.S. team at the kata competition was three gold and three silver medals. "The best moment was standing on the podium in Cuba, watching the American flag rise to the top of the pole and hearing the Star-Spangled Banner throughout the stadium," said Capriotti. "It's a moment you usually get to see only on television. You can't really describe the feeling you get when it happens to you in person."
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Wednesday
June 1, 2016
2. Citadel graduates named to Charlie's 50 Most Progressive List
View the article to read more about Citadel graduates Justin Gaeta and Phillip Davis being named to Charlie's 50 Most Progressive list.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Wednesday
June 1, 2016
3. Daughter of CAIR leader, feels its her right to transform traditional American institutions to suit her on and off beliefs
Sana Hamze knew it would be controversial when she asked The Citadel, the historic military college in South Carolina, for an exception to the uniform rule: She wanted to wear a hijab because of her faith. "I knew it would be an uproar, just because of how Muslims are portrayed in the media now," she said. But she was surprised how soon word leaked out that an accepted student had requested a religious accommodation and how intense the reaction was. It made national headlines and generated debate about religious freedom, corps unity and the ideals of a system that requires uniforms to encourage cadets to work together and judge one another on character and leadership rather than individual preferences, habits and surface traits. Some talked about whether traditions were upheld because they embodied fundamental values or just because it had always been that way. The 17 year old from Florida said she wants to be an officer in the US Navy, so a military college seemed like a great first step toward that goal, she said. And not wearing hijab was not an option, given her beliefs.
Published in: GulfNews.com
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Wednesday
June 1, 2016
4. All faiths deserve visibility on campus
USC prides itself on the religious diversity of its campus. According to the website of the USC Interfaith Council, the school hosts more religious student groups than any other American university. In the wake of the death of former USC President Steven Sample in March, who was a strong advocate for religious involvement on campus, students should consider how they can serve as a symbol of religious tolerance for students at other American universities. Now more than ever, religious minorities on college campuses are in critical need of protection from discrimination... On May 10, The Citadel, a U.S. military academy, prohibited an admitted Muslim student from wearing a hijab with her cadet uniform. The decision ended a campus-wide debate spurred in part when a current Citadel cadet made a Facebook post about the request in April. "It's unfair to the school having to change rules and adjust to the individual, when the individual could've gone to USC without incident," he wrote. The disgruntled cadet's notion that it is "unfair" for The Citadel to accommodate a student's faith betrays an incorrect understanding of American secularity. The Citadel already accommodates Christian students by providing three Christian chaplain staff and more than a dozen Christian ministries on campus. The Citadel is overdue on its responsibility to ensure that Muslim students can practice their faith at college and should reverse its decision. As it stands, The Citadel is sending Islamic extremists exactly the message they want to hear - that the United States is at war with Islam.
Published in: Daily Trojan
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Wednesday
June 1, 2016
5. Leesburg High senior lands $100,000 scholarship
"There are no freebies in the world," said Nicholas Smith, a senior who will be graduating from Leesburg High School on Friday. "You get what you put in." The 18-year-old does not believe in taking shortcuts and values his high school education, which he said toughened him up for a career in the military. Graduating in the top 20 percent of his class, Smith has been given a $100,000 scholarship to The Citadel, a military college in Charleston, S.C. Kim Keelor, Citadel spokeswoman, said about 2,900 applied for fall admission to the school. But only 600, or about a fifth, were selected. Applicants are selected "based on a combination of academic achievement, engagement in their community and leadership," Keelor said. Smith said he was inspired to apply for the scholarship because his grandfather on his mother's side graduated from the school in 1955. "We went there in 2005 for his 50th year anniversary and I fell in love with the military lifestyle," Smith said. "I would like to continue the legacy. We need to be able to defend our freedoms no matter the cost. It does not matter if I am sleeping on the front lines as long as I know back home my family is free."
Published in: Daily Commercial
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Wednesday
June 1, 2016
6. Hard work pays off for Hartsville's Marshall Anderson
Marshall Anderson is a hard worker, and because of his work ethic, he has excelled in high school. A recent Hartsville High School graduate, Anderson earned high marks and the distinction of honor graduate. He is an IB certificate candidate and a Darlington County Board of Education Scholar. As an honor graduate, he took part in the graduation ceremony on May 27 introducing the stage guests. For Anderson, meeting his parents’ expectations, along with his own goals, was a major accomplishment, achieved through hard work. His work ethic applies not only to school but also to other areas of his life. After school, he helps in the family plumbing businesses in Hartsville. However, he is quick to point out that schoolwork always came first. He said his parents expected his best always. "I didn't give my parents much concern in that respect," he said. "I knew what was expected of me. I feel good about what I have accomplished." His advice to the next group of seniors at Hartsville High School is to not let being a senior take their motivation away. "You need to care," he said. "This is when it really counts. This year was the hardest year for me, study, homework and working. I am ready to move on." A son of Michelle and Phillip Anderson of Hartsville, Marshall will follow in his father's footsteps when he enters The Citadel, the military college of South Carolina, in the fall, majoring in civil engineering.
Published in: SCNow.com
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Wednesday
June 1, 2016
7. Gudenburr to Citadel
Doug Gudenburr, a four-time letterwinner and two-time PIAA qualifier for Ringgold High school, will attend The Citadel next fall to continue his academic and athletic careers. He will pursue a degree in engineering. The Citadel is a military college in Charleston, S.C. Gudenburr compiled a 130-29 career record, the most varsity wins in the program's history. He was third-place finisher in the WPIAL Class AAA Championships twice and finished as high as third in the Tri-CADA Wrestling Tournament.
Published in: Observer-Reporter
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