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About Today's News Clips
"Today's News Clips" is published into your e-mail box on normal Citadel business days, and contains links to recent news about The Citadel, the state of South Carolina, and other topics of interest to professionals working at institutes of higher education.
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The Citadel in the News: Archive

May 2016

PUBLISH DATE STORIES
Tuesday
May 31, 2016
1. First female student wins The Citadel's most prestigious scholarship
For the first time in The Citadel's history, a young woman has won its most prestigious and complete scholarship. Bailey Richardson, a senior at Aynor High School in Horry County, was awarded the Star of the West Undergraduate Scholarship. Started in 1952, the award, given to an incoming fourth classman, or "knob," every year, covers tuition, room and board, uniforms and books at The Citadel and includes a $500 per semester stipend for making the Dean's List. The scholarship also pays $8,000 annually for up to three years of graduate school. It also funds the recipient's Citadel ring and sword senior year and one summer abroad. Named after the Union steamship fired on by Citadel cadets preceding the Civil War, the scholarship awards the "most outstanding freshman cadet entering The Citadel regardless of economic need," said Citadel alum Charles Klinger, a member of the scholarship selection committee and previous Star of the West recipient.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
May 31, 2016
2. Citadel denies student hijab request - interview on CNN
Click the link to see the video as seen on CNN.
Broadcast on: CNN
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Tuesday
May 31, 2016
3a. Remember their names: Citadel War Memorial to honor fallen alumni
Three years after Army Sgt. Aaron X. Wittman died in combat in Nangarhar Province, Afghanistan, his name survives in many ways. A scholarship was established in his honor, a plaque in his hometown recalls his sacrifice, and a handful of relatives and friends have named children in his memory. In the fall of 2017, Wittman's name will appear on a new monument at The Citadel, the public military college where he graduated in 2007. A plea by 1967 Citadel grad John Warley will set the tone: "Speak softly in the company of heroes." For Aaron's father and fellow Citadel graduate, retired Maj. Duane Wittman, this memorial feels different from all the others. When Aaron's name appears in black granite beside the names of fallen servicemen dating back to 1846, it will project a sense of permanence - something that Wittman said many families of fallen veterans desperately need. "Probably the worst fear that a family can have is that people will forget the sacrifice their loved one has made," Wittman said. "That memorial represents, in a way, the attempt by everyone to ensure that whoever sees this memorial in the future... it's there for posterity." The Citadel Class of 1967, which lost several members in the Vietnam War, decided to fund the $1 million memorial's construction as a 50th-anniversary gift to their alma mater. The Citadel Foundation plans to break ground on the construction site beside Summerall Chapel during the November 2016 homecoming and dedicate the completed memorial during the fall 2017 homecoming.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
May 31, 2016
3b. Remember Civil War valor on both sides
"The soldier, above all other men, is required to practice the greatest act of religious training - sacrifice. In battle, and in the face of danger and death, he discloses those divine attributes which his Maker gave when He created man in His own image. No physical courage and no greater strength can take the place of the divine help which alone can sustain him. However hard the incidents of war may be, the soldier who is called upon to offer and to give his life for his country is the noblest development of mankind." - General of the Army Douglas MacArthur. On this Memorial Day, a day that traces its origins to a healing process that began in the aftermath of America’s bloodiest war, the War Between the States, it is right and proper that we take a moment to reflect on the courage and self-sacrifice of the soldiers and sailors who fought in that war on both sides, North and South... The evil of slavery, which the war brought to its formal but not final end (it is still practiced in parts of Africa and in some Muslim lands) is cited as justification for removal of anything Confederate in public display. The flying of a Confederate Naval Jack, one of many flags flown for many years in The Citadel's chapel, led Rep. James Clyburn, D-S.C., to seek curtailment or cancellation of Reserve Officer Training programs at the college. Really? Citadel cadets have served and bled in all U.S. wars since the college's founding, including and most particularly the Civil War, in which they likely fired the first shots. Very few Confederate soldiers were slaveholders or aspired to become one. They fought, rightly or wrongly, for what they were told was their country, the Confederacy. Does displaying a flag under which they honorably served justify its removal from the Citadel chapel? I think not.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
May 31, 2016
4. What should be done, if anything, with Confederate monuments in public places?
It has long been in dispute: Do Confederate flags and monuments represent pride in Southern heritage or an assertion of white supremacy? After the horrific shootings nearly a year ago at Emanuel AME Church in downtown Charleston that claimed nine lives, a photograph of the alleged perpetrator, Dylann Roof, circulated through the media. He was kneeling in a yard at night, holding a small Confederate battle flag. It became more difficult to maintain the view that the flag was merely an innocuous expression of Southern pride. The reinvigorated debate over the flag saw politicians switch positions and led to the flag's removal from the South Carolina Statehouse grounds by July. The debate then extended to Confederate monuments. Should we continue to honor historical figures who defended slavery or Jim Crow such as Benjamin "Pitchfork" Tillman, Wade Hampton and John C. Calhoun? In South Carolina, the question arose at Clemson University, which has a building named for Tillman; in Columbia, where lawmakers are divided on issues of race; and in Charleston, where the statue of Calhoun in Marion Square and the Fort Sumter Memorial in White Point Garden were defaced last summer; and where the Confederate flag hanging in The Citadel's Summerall Chapel now is under intense scrutiny.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
May 31, 2016
5a. Conflicting Meanings of Freedom
What does freedom mean? What is the purpose of government? And what should be the government's relationship to each of us as individuals and as members of society as a whole? These issues recently came up during a dinner conversation with a new acquaintance with whom I'd not previously had such a discussion. The views that I expressed in the calm and friendly and enjoyable exchange are those usually labeled as classical liberal or libertarian. My dinner companion reasoned from what is the "modern" liberal or "progressive" point-of-view. Like myself, he has been a professor in higher education, and he is widely read and very knowledgeable. What became clear, both during the conversation and from reflecting on it afterwards, are some of the following conclusions. For a classical liberal, freedom means that each individual possesses as a human being certain inviolable rights, those being rights to his life, liberty and honestly acquired property. And that human relationships should be based on voluntary consent and mutual agreement. For my interlocutor, freedom means "empowerment" or the ability to do or achieve certain things, without which "freedom" is not complete. These include a minimum or "decent" standard of living and the ability to attain certain potentials in life, which are everyone's "right" as a member of society. Dr. Richard M. Ebeling is the BB & T Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina.
Published in: NassauInstitute.org
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Tuesday
May 31, 2016
5b. Travelers Institute offers hurricane preparedness tips, awards $100,000 grant
The Travelers Institute offered tips for hurricane season this week at their annual "Kicking off Hurricane Preparedness Season" symposium at The Citadel. President of the Travelers Institute Joan Woodward moderated a panel discussion with leaders from All Hands Volunteers, the Insurance Institute for Business & Home Safety, The Citadel and the Weather Company about hurricane season safety. The Travelers Institute suggests preparing a survival kit, which should include water, non-perishable food, medications, portable radio, flashlight, batteries and chargers, according to their website. The Institute also advises planning evacuation routes and securing all outdoor objects to avoid injury when wind speeds increase. Understanding the forecast, especially the difference between a watch and a warning is vital, according to the Travelers Institute. A watch means hurricane conditions could be seen within the next 48 hours, meaning people should begin stocking up supplies in case of emergency. A warning means that hurricane-force winds, which are 74 mph or higher, are expected to hit the area within 36 hours. In this case, people should seek shelter or evacuate if told to do so.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
May 31, 2016
6a. Students receive degrees from The Citadel
Four area students were among more than 550 cadets recognized during graduation ceremonies at The Citadel on May 7. The graduates included 11 active duty students and 27 veteran students from 32 states. Locals graduating included Alcolu resident Lewis Warr, bachelor of science in business administration; Sumter residents Bradley Hansen, bachelor of science in business administration, and Barry Robinson, bachelor of science in exercise science; and Dalzell resident Lawrence Scarano, bachelor of arts in modern language.
Published in: ManningLive.com
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Tuesday
May 31, 2016
6b. Citadel graduates commission into military service
Local Citadel graduates from Summerville, North Charleston, Ladson and St. George commission into military services. View the article to see the entire list.
Published in: The Summerville Journal Scene
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Tuesday
May 31, 2016
7. Local arts in Brief for Week of May 29, 2016
Organist David Friddle, director of music at St. John the Beloved Church in Summerville, will perform a recital titled "An Organ Festival in C-minor" 4 p.m. today featuring music by J.S. Bach and Franz Liszt. The concert will be held at The Citadel's Summerall Chapel; Friddle will play its four-manual 120-stop Cornell Zimmer organ. The program includes Bach's Passacaglia and Fugue in C-minor, which has a central melody above which Bach writes a series of 21 variations, followed by an exciting fugue. The second work is Fantasy and Fugue on the chorale "Ad nos, ad salutarem undam" by Liszt. It is a massive three-part symphonic poem for organ. Friddle, a native of Greenville, attended the Julliard School in New York City and has studied with notable organists Albert Fuller, Robert Bailey and Gerre Hancock. He earned a doctorate in choral conducting from the University of Miami. He is also a composer and author. The recital is free, though donations are encouraged.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
May 31, 2016
8. Citadel's Fred Jordan determined to reverse baseball's slide
A year ago, Citadel baseball coach Fred Jordan watched with a feeling of pride and anxiety as three junior pitchers were taken in the MLB draft. All three could have returned to the Bulldogs for their senior seasons. Instead, all three - James Reeves, Skylar Hunter and Austin Mason - signed professional contracts. That won't be a problem for Jordan this year, as almost the entire Citadel pitching staff is set to return in 2017. The bad news - that's the same pitching staff that posted a 6.59 ERA as the Bulldogs went 17-42 this season, the most losses in school history. "That's got to be developed into a strength instead of a weakness," Jordan said last week after the Bulldogs finished a 1-2 appearance in the Southern Conference Tournament in Greenville. "Our pitching staff this year, with the exception of a few people who had quality innings in 2015, was all new. "Sometimes you have to fail before you succeed, and we hope the confidence factor will be where it needs to be next year because of what they experienced this year."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
May 31, 2016
9. Kenneth "Reid" Berglund Obituary
Kenneth "Reid" Berglund, 68, of Cashiers, passed away Friday, April 8. Reid loved the Carolina mountains, especially the beauty and the people of Cashiers. He was a friend and counselor to many. He was born in Augusta, Georgia, on September 15, 1947, to the late Virginia Sundquist Salle and Kenneth Carl Berglund. After moving to Atlanta and graduating from Dykes High School, he graduated from The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina, in 1969, and then graduated from the University of Georgia Law School in 1973. He served in the Army as a captain in the Judge Advocate General (JAG) Corps. Returning to Atlanta after his military service, Reid worked in the Court of Appeals prior to moving to Cashiers in 1976. Upon passing the North Carolina bar, he opened the first law office in the Cashiers community. K. Reid Berglund Law Practice remained in Cashiers until his passing. Having just reached his 40th year in the community, Reid was a well-respected member of the Cashiers community. He was very involved in the Church of the Good Shepherd, having served on the vestry. He was also an original member of the Cashiers Community Fund of the CFWNC. He loved music, golf, hiking and traveling.
Published in: Crossroads Chronicle
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Friday
May 27, 2016
1. The Citadel rejected her hijab, but another military school embraces Muslim student’s request
Norwich University, a nearly 200-year-old private military college in Vermont, has granted an accepted student’s request to wear hijab in keeping with her Muslim faith, a decision that was welcomed by some but also provoked outrage for some alumni and cadets. The same student requested a similar exception to the required uniform from The Citadel, touching off a highly charged debate at the public military college in South Carolina where loyalty to the corps is a fundamental value and individual preferences are set aside to encourage unity. The idea that the first exception might be for a Muslim student was particularly polarizing, given the national discussion and starkly divergent views about the role of Islam in U.S. culture. The Citadel denied her request. It was the first formal request for a religious accommodation to the uniform at Norwich, spokeswoman Daphne Larkin said, so they reached out to peer institutions “and came to the conclusion that it makes sense for Norwich to continue to be dynamic in how we serve our students.” “Regardless of their spiritual or religious affiliation, all students and employees should feel welcome and comfortable at Norwich University,” Norwich President Richard Schneider wrote in announcing the exception to the required Corps of Cadets uniform. “Norwich University is a learning community that is American in character yet global in perspective.” Jewish cadets will also now be allowed to wear a yarmulke. Ibrahim Hooper, a spokesman for the Council on American-Islamic Relations who has worked with the student and her parents, said, “She wants to go to The Citadel. But without the religious accommodation which now has been denied, she needed a backup plan to attend a university in the fall. Now that she has obtained that accommodation at another school, that opens up the possibility of her going there if The Citadel decision is not changed.” Hooper has said in the past that a lawsuit challenging that decision is possible.
Published in: Washington Post - Online
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Friday
May 27, 2016
2. Clyburn right about Citadel’s Confederate flag
Jim Clyburn is right. A Confederate flag should be retired to a museum from the Summerall Chapel at The Citadel, where it has been hanging since 1939. Clyburn, the representative from South Carolina’s 6th District and the highest ranking African American in Congress, pulled me into his fight this week. He did not discuss it with me. But he makes his case with my words from a column last week about a potential incoming cadet who wanted to wear Muslim headdress in the corps. “Mr. Lauderdale opines that The Citadel’s purpose as a military college is to build a corps, where ‘it is not about faith ... It is not about freedom of expression or constitutional rights ... people give up themselves for something larger,’ ” Clyburn wrote this week in a letter to The State newspaper and website in Columbia. “While reasonable people can disagree on the proper application of these sentiments to the hijab issue, I believe Mr. Lauderdale’s argument makes a compelling case that the Confederate battle flag has no place at a military college.” He’s right.
Published in: Island Packet - Online
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Friday
May 27, 2016
3. Citadel Graduates are Good To Go! (video)
Hear where some of our 2016 grads are headed and why they say others should consider The Citadel.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom - Online
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Friday
May 27, 2016
Citadel baseball season ends with 4-2 loss to ETSU
After he struck out swinging with the bases loaded in the ninth inning, Clay Martin knelt for a moment at home plate. The Citadel’s long, trying baseball season was over. The end came with a 4-2 loss to East Tennessee State on Thursday in the Southern Conference baseball tournament. The Citadel finished with a record of 17-42, the most losses in the program’s proud history and the worst season in coach Fred Jordan’s 25 years. The No. 8 seed Bulldogs went 1-2 in the tournament, rallying for a 3-2 win over VMI on Tuesday before a 13-1 loss to No. 1 seed Merce on Wednesday and Thursday’s loss to No. 5 ETSU and coach Tony Skole, a Citadel graduate who played on the Bulldogs’ 1990 College World Series team. The Citadel had a chance in the ninth, loading the bases with one out on two hits and a walk. But Jacob Watcher fouled out to first base before Martin struck out swinging.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Friday
May 27, 2016
Citadel javelin thrower Capers Williamson takes aim at history
Citadel javelin thrower Capers Williamson takes aim at history Friday, attempting to become the first Bulldog to qualify for the NCAA Track and Field Championships. Williamson, a former Citadel football player, will compete in the NCAA East Region preliminaries at the University of North Florida, with the javelin competition set to begin at noon. Williamson is ranked No. 12 in the NCAA East Region, and must place in the top 12 to advance to the NCAA championships on June 8 in Eugene, Oregon. Williamson’s throw of 239 feet, four inches at the Southern Conference championship broke his own school and conference records, and earned him a second straight SoCon title. He’s just one of 33 throwers in the nation to reach the 230-foot mark this season, and has done it three times.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Friday
May 27, 2016
Cunningham Earns Academic All-District Honors
The Citadel track and field sophomore Jamie Cunningham was named to the CoSIDA Academic All-District team, it was announced Thursday. Cunningham boasted an impressive 3.98 grade-point average during the spring semester as he pursues a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering. The sophomore from Alpharetta, Georgia, competes for both the cross country and track and field teams at The Citadel. Cunningham wrapped up his second campaign as a Bulldog on May 13 at the Southern Conference Outdoor Championships. He finished 15th overall in the men's 10,000-meter run with a time of 34:00.09. Cunningham paired that performance with a 17th-place finish in the 5,000-meter event at the Southern Conference Indoor Championships, as he clocked a personal-best 15:34.35. His top outing of the spring came at the Lowcountry Invitational where he placed second overall and earned 10 team points with a time of 9:24.34. Cunningham later added a fourth-place finish in the 1,500-meter run by clocking a 4:07.20. Cunningham is the fifth Bulldog to receive CoSIDA Academic All-District honors in 2015-16, joining Jennifer Burch of the rifle team, Derrick Henry of the basketball team and Joe Crochet and Kyle Weaver of the football team.
Published in: CitadelSports.com - Online
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Friday
May 27, 2016
Led by Alex MacDonald, Citadel rugby team takes aim at national title
At 6-4 and 225 pounds, Alex MacDonald looks like a perfect combination of tight end and linebacker — which is exactly what he played during his football career at Hilton Head High School. “I only played for one season, though,” MacDonald said. “My dad wouldn’t let me play because he was against contact sports.” No small irony, then, that MacDonald has found his greatest athletic success playing another contact sport — club team rugby at The Citadel. MacDonald, who just graduated from The Citadel with a degree in business administration, is president and team captain of Citadel rugby, which won the Southern Rugby Conference championship this year. The Bulldogs will compete for a national title this weekend at the USA Rugby College 7s Division II national championship in Cary, N.C. The progress of Citadel rugby has mirrored MacDonald’s own. A four-time all-conference pick, he has been selected to play for the ATAVUS All-Stars, a national development program that puts him on track to compete for a spot on the U.S. national team, the USA Eagles. Not bad for a guy who had never offloaded a pass or kicked a mulligrubber until he arrived at The Citadel.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Thursday
May 26, 2016
1. The Citadel thanks community following beach house fire
The Citadel released an open letter to the Lowcountry community Wednesday after a fire that damaged the Col. Robert R. McCormick Beach Club of the Citadel on the Isle of Palms. The May 8 fire heavily damaged the building. Two people were inside when the fire broke out, but escaped unharmed, according to Isle Of Palms Fire Chief Ann Graham. The letter, signed by The Citadel's President Lt. Gen. John W. Rosa, explains the importance of the building and expresses gratitude to emergency responders and those who helped during and after the fire. The letter reads:
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV 5 - Online
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Thursday
May 26, 2016
1.1 An open letter of thanks to the Lowcountry community
On May 8, the quiet early morning hours of Mothers’ Day on the Isle of Palms were interrupted by a fierce and fast-moving fire at the Col. Robert R. McCormick Beach Club of The Citadel. A neighbor saw the flames and called, and before we even knew it was burning, the Isle of Palms community was there working to save it with the help of other Lowcountry emergency responders. The rapid and heartfelt response from our community was inspiring and greatly appreciated. The list of those who have come to the aid of the beach club staff and our displaced clients is long; all should be thanked. But first, for those unfamiliar, here is why it is important. And our Isle of Palms neighbors know the couple who lived in the house: Susan, an MUSC nurse and her husband Michael, the property manager. They were awakened around 3:45 with the fire already well underway; glass from the windows exploding as they escaped the flames that shot 40 feet into the air. They lost almost everything they owned, but thankfully were not hurt. Clients, especially brides and grooms get to know Michael when planning their event. Many sent heartfelt notes of concern, even after learning that their important events must be moved:
Published in: The Digitel - Online
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Thursday
May 26, 2016
2. Washington Prize
A noted biographer whose work has focused on the women behind the great men of history has won the 2016 George Washington Prize. Flora Fraser was awarded the $50,000 prize for her book The Washingtons: George and Martha, “Join’d by Friendship, Crown’d by Love.” The award, which is one of the nation’s largest literary prizes, honors the best new works on the nation’s founding era, especially those that engage a broad public audience. Conferred by Washington College, the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, and George Washington’s Mount Vernon, it was presented to Fraser on May 25 at a black-tie gala at the Mount Vernon estate. The Mount Vernon event also honored six finalists for the 2016 George Washington Prize: Mary Sarah Bilder for Madison’s Hand: Revising the Constitutional Convention (Harvard), Kathleen DuVal for Independence Lost: Lives on the Edge of the American Revolution (Random House), Robert Middlekauff for Washington’s Revolution: The Making of America’s FirstLeader (Knopf), Janet Polasky for Revolutions Without Borders: The Call to Liberty in the Atlantic World (Yale), David Preston for Braddock’s Defeat: The Battle of the Monongahela and the Road to Revolution (Oxford), and John Sedgwick for War of Two: Alexander Hamilton, Aaron Burr, and the Duel That Stunned the Nation (Penguin).
Published in: Washington College - website
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Thursday
May 26, 2016
2.1 Three graduate from The Citadel
A Whitmire resident and two Union residents were among the nearly 600 cadets, active duty and veteran students to graduate from The Citadel earlier this month. In a statement released this past week, The Citadel announced that the members of its Class of 2016 were recognized for excellence in leadership, service and academics. The press release states that the South Carolina Corps of Cadets celebrated the graduation of over 550 cadets, 11 active duty students and 27 veteran students from 32 states on May 7, 2016. Of those cadets, 151 were commissioned as officers. Top areas of study for the class included business administration, engineering, political science and criminal justice. The Class of 2016 included the following residents of Whitmire and Union: • Daniel Boulware of Whitmire graduated with a BS in Education Social Studies. • Jacob Patterson of Jonesville graduated with a BS in Business Administration. • Jacob Robbins of Union graduated with a BA in Criminal Justice.
Published in: Union Daily Times - Online
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Thursday
May 26, 2016
2.1 Travelers Institute Hosts Sixth Annual Hurricane Preparedness Symposium in Charleston
The Travelers Institute, the public policy division of The Travelers Companies, Inc. TRV 0.01% , today hosts its annual "Kicking Off Hurricane Preparedness Season" symposium at The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina. In collaboration with the Insurance Institute for Business & Home Safety and the Independent Insurance Agents & Brokers of South Carolina, the event focuses on how local governments, businesses and families can prepare for and recover from severe weather as the Atlantic Hurricane Season officially begins June 1. "Preparedness is critical to staying safe during catastrophic events that can devastate communities and displace families and businesses," said Joan Woodward, President of the Travelers Institute and Executive Vice President of Public Policy at Travelers. "We are pleased to organize resources and provide a forum to share best practices on what communities can do to help protect lives and property during storm season."
Published in: benzinga.com - Online
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Thursday
May 26, 2016
High chance of tropical or subtropical formation off the Southeast U.S. coastline.
Click on view article below to see alerts.
Published in: National Hurricane Center - Online
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Thursday
May 26, 2016
Mercer blows past The Citadel at SoCon Tournament, 13-1
Mercer outfielder Trey Truitt set a Southern Conference Baseball Championship single-game record with three home runs as the top-seeded Bears clubbed No. 8 seed The Citadel 13-1 in seven innings Wednesday at Fluor Field. Mercer (36-21) hit six home runs overall, one shy of the tournament’s single-game record, en route to the mercy-rule victory. The defending champion Bears will face No. 4 seed Furman, a 3-0 winner over No. 5 seed ETSU in Wednesday’s first game, Thursday at 4 p.m. The Citadel (17-41) will face ETSU in an elimination game at 9 a.m. Thursday. The Bears’ six homers averaged just shy of 398 feet each, with three of them going over 400. Two-time SoCon Player of the Year Kyle Lewis’ fourth-inning blast went an estimated 461 feet. Jackson Ware and Truitt hit solo homers to stake Mercer starter Ryan Askew to a 2-0 lead in the third inning before the Bears blew things open with a nine-run fourth. Mercer sent 14 batters to the plate in the frame, getting homers from Ryan Hagan, Truitt and Lewis as The Citadel used three pitchers in the inning.
Published in: WCSC-TV 5 - Online
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Wednesday
May 25, 2016
1. Clyburn: To strengthen The Citadel, remove the Confederate flag
David Lauderdale’s column last week supporting The Citadel’s denial of a student’s request to wear a hijab brought to mind my opposition to flying the Confederate battle flag there. That objectionable banner, which was never the official flag of the Confederacy, is a symbol of white supremacy and resistance to the rule of law. Any doubt as to the flag’s meaning to a great swath of South Carolinians was erased by the perpetrator of the horrific shootings at Emanuel A.M.E. Church in Charleston on June 17 of last year. Mr. Lauderdale opines that The Citadel’s purpose as a military college is to build a corps, where “it is not about faith …. It is not about freedom of expression or constitutional rights … people give up themselves for something larger.” While reasonable people can disagree on the proper application of these sentiments to the hijab issue, I believe Mr. Lauderdale’s argument makes a compelling case that the Confederate battle flag has no place at a military college. That argument has been endorsed by the U.S. Supreme Court. “To accomplish its mission,” the court observed in 1986, “the military must foster instinctive obedience, unity, commitment and esprit de corps.”
Published in: The State - Online
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Wednesday
May 25, 2016
2. Letter: The Citadel unfairly besieged
The Citadel used to offer an educational experience like none other. Young men enrolled for its strict discipline and military environment. Now, much like all our armed services, it is becoming a watered down social experiment. Every year it seems there is another assault on its history and traditional values. What’s next? The knob experience? Gray uniforms? Brass buttons? The school has become a target. Following its present course, it is soon to become just another public university that offers ROTC. What a shame. Kurtis Kendle 42nd Avenue Isle of Palms
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Wednesday
May 25, 2016
2.1 Local Citadel students honored
Members of The Citadel Class of 2016 were recognized for excellence in leadership, service and academics. The South Carolina Corps of Cadets celebrated the graduation of over 550 cadets, 11 active duty students and 27 veteran students from 32 states on May 7, 2016. Of those cadets, 151 were commissioned as officers. Top areas of study for the class included business administration, engineering, political science and criminal justice. Hunter Blackwell of Loris graduated with a BS in Business Administration. Mason Floyd of Aynor graduated with a BS in Business Administration.
Published in: myhorrynews.com - Online
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Wednesday
May 25, 2016
3.0 Veteran students and degree completion: how are they faring?
Over the past five years, the veteran student population has become one of the most important constituencies in higher education. Many institutions have created programs, policies, and recruiting strategies to attract this group, and several colleges and universities have been quite successful in enhancing their veteran student enrollment. There is little doubt that the number of veterans returning from deployments wishing to further their education has grown. According to a 2015 report from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, between 2000 and 2012 nearly one million veterans and military service members received education benefits through the VA. Veteran students are typically older than other students, and nearly half are married and have famlies, making them an especially reliable poplutatuion for college and universities to recruit. In addition to being older than traditional students, nearly two-thirds of veteran students are the first in their family to attend college. This is significantly higher than the percentage of non-military students (43 percent) who are considered "first generation" students. Veteran students are also more likely to have enrolled in college at some other point in time. According to a 2013 study, the average veteran student enters their most current institution with about 28 credit hours, making them an academic sophomore upon acceptance. Such an enhanced starting point greatly improves degree completion, particularly for those who have family obligations and must manage taking classes along with work constraints, and family commitments.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom - Online
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Wednesday
May 25, 2016
3.1 Business Kudos
Carolina One New Homes, a division of Carolina One Real Estate, is announced that Eddie Pate has been named as the New Homes Division’s Sales Performance Coach. As Sales Performance Coach, Pate’s primary responsibility will be to establish and maintain a continuous sales and marketing training program for both experienced and inexperienced New Homes’ sales people. Jason Harper, the previous Performance Coach, will be moving solely into sales management with the rapidly expanding and highly successful New Homes Builder Team. Harper, with the assistance of the New Homes Management Team, will be assisting with Pate’s transition into his new role. Pate, a native of Farmville, NC is a graduate of East Carolina University and received his MBA from the Citadel. Prior to joining Carolina One Real Estate, Pate was employed as Sales Manager for nationally known builders Beazer Homes (10 years), Ryland Homes and Centex Homes. Pate’s career in the home building industry as a sales, marketing and operations executive has spanned nearly 30 years. Pate was honored on three separate occasions with a Prism Award for Sales Manager of the Year by the Charleston Trident Home Builders Association. Additionally, Pate served as an Adjunct Professor of Business at Trident Technical College in the field of business and business management. Pate is married to Cynthia Pate a top producing Loan Originator with Carolina One Mortgage.
Published in: Moultrie News - Online
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Wednesday
May 25, 2016
3.2 Virginia Couple To Attempt Life's Ambition: A Transatlantic Row
Perhaps more than most other human endeavors, ocean rowing tests the limits of marine engineering, human endurance and mental control. For a Virginia couple preparing to depart on a transatlantic row from Chatham, it will also be a test of their relationship. Cindy Way, 41, and James Caple, 47, are waiting for a window of favorable weather before departing Chatham – possibly as soon as this weekend. Their tandem ocean rowboat, Nautilus, is 24 feet long, and will soon be stocked to the gunwales with provisions for a three-month trip, including 180 prepackaged meals, 310 energy bars, 50 boxes of cereal, and nearly 80 gallons of fresh water, serving as ballast and an auxiliary drinking water supply. Caple, a distance runner and triathlete, is a graduate of the Citadel and of Boston University, and he rows competitively near his home in Northern Virginia. He has three children, ages 12 to 18. A U.S. Navy veteran, Way is a passionate equestrian, rower and triathlete, and had her first taste of rowing at Tabor Academy in Marion, Mass., which hosted a reception for them this week. Caple said he was inspired to take on an ocean row after reading about Roz Savage, the English athlete who holds four world records for ocean rowing, including being the first woman to row solo across three oceans, the Atlantic, the Pacific and the Indian.
Published in: Cape Cod Chronicle - Online
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Wednesday
May 25, 2016
4. Graduations for Lowcountry high schools start this week
Public school students across the Lowcountry will soon turn tassels and toss caps as they celebrate reaching the end of their high school careers. Berkeley County will kick off the festivities Wednesday with two graduations. Dorchester and Charleston county students will matriculate Saturday through June 4. The graduation schedule is as follows: June 2 West Ashley High - 9 a.m., North Charleston Coliseum Gregg Mathis Charter High - 10 a.m., Felix C. Davis Community Center Wando High - 3 p.m., North Charleston Coliseum James Island Charter High - 6 p.m., The Citadel McAlister Field House
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Wednesday
May 25, 2016
9. Citadel rallies for 3-2 win over VMI in SoCon Tournament
The Citadel baseball team survived by scoring the tying run on a squeeze play in the ninth inning, and then advanced on Bret Hines’ game-winning smash in the 10th. Hines’ triple to the wall in center field scored Mike Deese with the winning run, and the eighth-seeded Bulldogs pulled out a 3-2 win over No. 9 VMI in the Southern Conference Tournament at Fluor Field on Tuesday. The dramatic ending to a pitchers’ duel between The Citadel’s J.P. Sears and VMI’s Josh Winder sent the 17-40 Bulldogs into the tournament’s double-elimination main bracket to face No. 1 Mercer at 12:30 p.m. Wednesday. “Survive and advance,” Citadel coach Fred Jordan said. “Winder was very, very good for a freshman, but J.P. Sears and (reliever) Kyle Smith matched him, and we finally got the big hit there at the end of the game to secure it.” Deese singled with two outs in the 10th before Hines, a junior from Hanahan High School, jolted a ball to the fence in center field. VMI’s Will Malbon crashed into the wall in pursuit, but could not come up with the catch. Deese scored the winning run from first.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Wednesday
May 25, 2016
9.1 The Citadel survives SoCon play-in game with VMI
Bret Hines hit a walk-off RBI triple in the bottom of the 10th inning to lead No. 8 seed The Citadel past No. 9 seed VMI, 3-2, in the opening game of the Southern Conference Baseball Championship at Fluor Field on Tuesday. The Bulldogs (17-40) advance to face No. 1 seed Mercer (35-21) on Wednesday at 12:30 p.m. VMI saw its season end at 21-35. With two out and Mike Deese on first, Hines ripped a drive to straightaway center that chased VMI center fielder Will Malbon all the way to the wall. The ball glanced off of Malbon’s glove as the junior crashed full speed into the wall, allowing Deese to race home from first with the winning run and capping The Citadel’s exciting late-game rally. The Bulldogs were trailing by one and down to their last two outs in the ninth inning but tied things at 2 on a squeeze play to force extras. After drawing a leadoff walk, Steven Hansen moved to second on a wild pitch on a strikeout of Barrett Charpia, chasing VMI starter Josh Winder. Reliever Jack Gomersall promptly issued another wild pitch and a walk to put runners on the corners, and pinch-hitter Jacob Watcher greeted reliever Taylor Edens by laying down a sacrifice bunt that allowed Hansen to scamper home with the tying run.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV 5 - Online
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Wednesday
May 25, 2016
9.2 Parks eager to join The Citadel's up-tempo offense
At the same time Preston Parks was setting Wade Hampton's single-season scoring record, The Citadel, under first-year coach Duggar Baucom, was establishing a school record for points in a season. After signing with The Citadel, Parks figures he'll be right where he belongs. "Everybody knows I love to shoot, I love to get up and down, so that fit my style of play," Parks said. Parks, The Greenville News All-Upstate and Greenville County Player of the Year, chose The Citadel of the Southern Conference after having originally committed to Gardner-Webb. He said he still considered Gardner-Webb, as well as Presbyterian College, Liberty, USC-Aiken, Limestone and several prep schools and junior colleges. "The Citadel, I just felt like it was a great fit for me," Parks said. "Playing in the SoCon, that's a very good conference. New class, new coaches, so I felt like it was going to be a fresh start, and it fit my of play." As a senior, the 6-foot-1 Parks averaged 23.1 points and 3.2 assists and shot 76 percent from the free-throw line and 40 percent from 3-point range. He set school records for points in a career (1,596), season (566) and game (43). Under Baucom, The Citadel averaged 86 points per game — second in the nation and 22 more than the previous season. The Bulldogs also set school records for field goals made and 3-pointers made in a season.
Published in: Greenville News - Online
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Wednesday
May 25, 2016
9.3 Charleston Baseball Hall of Fame Releases 2016 Candidates
The Charleston Baseball Hall of Fame’s advisory committee has released its candidates for the Class of 2016, and enshrinement will be conducted by voting from local fans. The Committee also announced that fans will select the two that collect the most votes while the committee will vote in two members. Official ballots will be at Riley Park beginning today and on-line voting will also be available via a link posted at RiverDogs.com or at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/ZJYX2MJ. Voting will conclude on Friday, July 21. On Friday, Aug. 5, the top two individuals with the most votes will be inducted in August prior to a RiverDogs’ home game. The Charleston Baseball Hall of Fame is coordinated and operated by the Charleston RiverDogs. An advisory committee consisting of knowledgeable local volunteers was created to come up with the names as potential nominees. The Hall of Fame is located inside Joseph P. Riley, Jr. Park. The finalists, in alphabetical order, for the Class of 2016:
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV 5 - Online
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Wednesday
May 25, 2016
9.33 Pawlowski, Campbell, Swindle among Charleston Baseball Hall of Fame candidates
The seven-member 2016 Charleston Baseball Hall of Fame candidate class has lots of Cougar maroon but is a typically eclectic group. Former College of Charleston head coach John Pawlowski and former Cougars Chris Campbell and Nick Chigges join broadcaster Ted Byrne, youth coach Tim Linker, umpire John Couch and former Charleston Southern pitcher R.J. Swindell on a finalist list released Tuesday. Fans will select two of the candidates in an on-line vote that begins today on RiverDogs.com. The Hall of Fame committee will elect two members not on the candidate list to make up a four-member Class of 2016 to be added to the Hall of Fame located inside Riley Park. Voting will conclude July 21 with an induction ceremony set for Aug. 5 prior to a RiverDogs home game. The 2016 finalists, in alphabetical order:
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Tuesday
May 24, 2016
1. Rants & Raves: Muslim headdress at The Citadel (readers' opinion)
On The Citadel not allowing a Muslim student to wear her hijab: She knew the dress code and agreed by applying. This tells me she’s just looking for attention and causing trouble by agreeing to follow the rules and then wanting the rules to change when she gets there to suit her. There are fine colleges all over the country, go to one of those that suit your needs. Heather Toole Hawkins People are all about freedom of religion as long as it aligns with their ideology or their bigoted views. If it was someone telling a Christian to remove a cross pendant or something similar, heads would roll. Timothy Pate The Citadel started admitting women in 1995 and it didn’t weaken any traditions at the school. I think that was far more significant of a change than allowing a cadet to wear a hijab for religious reasons. Mike Sampogna The uniform is the uniform. One of the first thing taught is conformity and don’t stick out. Ric Snow The women who have been attending the Citadel since 1995 have been wearing the required uniform. I’m sorry, but a hijab is not part of the uniform, nor should it ever be. She knew the rules before making her decision to attend. If she didn’t like them, then she should go elsewhere — not try to change the rules to accommodate her own personal “uniform.” Terry Wright We’re all allowed to apply at any place we want to but if something doesn’t fit into your beliefs then don’t apply. Barbara Zsigovits The Citadel did not ban hijabs. She can wear a hijab during other activities in which she is not required to wear the uniform of the day. For example, during ROTC or PT and is allowed to wear it when going to religious services as well.
Published in: Island Packet - website
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Tuesday
May 24, 2016
10 Schools That Award the Most Financial Aid to Out-of-State Students
The U.S. News Short List, separate from our overall rankings, is a regular series that magnifies individual data points in hopes of providing students and parents a way to find which undergraduate or graduate programs excel or have room to grow in specific areas. Be sure to explore The Short List: College, The Short List: Grad School and The Short List: Online Programs to find data that matter to you in your college or graduate school search. The cost of attending college is even pricier when a student decides to attend a public school as an out-of-state student, but a significant financial aid award package can help pay for the bump in price. On average, tuition and fees for an out-of-state student for the 2014-2015 school year were double what in-state students paid, according to U.S. News data. But some public institutions offer larger financial awards to offset the higher costs and attract nonresident students. The Citadel, known as "The Military College of South Carolina," offers the largest average amount in financial aid to nonresident recipients – the highest out of the 283 public colleges and universities that submitted the data to U.S. News.
Published in: U.S. News and World Report - Online
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Tuesday
May 24, 2016
Citadel baseball gets a new start in SoCon Tournament
If ever a baseball team needed a fresh start to a season, it’s the 2016 Citadel Bulldogs. Coach Fred Jordan’s 25th Citadel squad trudged its way to a 16-40 record, the program’s most losses in a single season. The Citadel’s team batting average of .237 was the Bulldogs’ worst since 1972, and they’ve never had a higher team earned run average than this year’s figure of 6.58. By any measure, it was one of the worst seasons in the proud history of Citadel baseball, which includes 13 Southern Conference regular season titles, eight league tournament championships and a 1990 trip to the College World Series. The beleaguered Bulldogs get a chance to start over in the SoCon Tournament at Fluor Field in Greenville, where the No. 8 seed Citadel will take on No. 9 VMI at 10 a.m. Tuesday. The winner of the “play-in” game will join the tourney’s main bracket, taking on top seed and regular season champ Mercer on Wednesday.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Tuesday
May 24, 2016
The Citadel's Peden Voted to All-Freshman Team
Ben Peden was selected to the Southern Conference All-Freshman Team, it was announced Monday. The Greenville, South Carolina, native finished the regular season with a .241 batting average and 21 RBI while starting 41 games at first base. Peden belted a team-high eight home runs during the 2016 season, seven of which came against Southern Conference opponents. He is also the most recent Bulldog to hit two home runs in a single game, launching two against Samford on May 14. The freshman finished the SoCon slate with a .566 slugging percentage and scored 17 times. Since the Southern Conference began all-freshman recognition in 2009, Peden is the 11th Bulldog to receive the honor. The Bulldogs open SoCon Tournament play Tuesday against VMI. First pitch from Flour Field is set for 10 a.m. Live stats, video and audio will be available on CitadelSports.com.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV 5 (Charleston) - Online
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Monday
May 23, 2016
1. Letter: Citadel should make no exceptions
The truth is often the first casualty in so-called “political correctness” issues. Both the Muslim woman and her parents are heartbroken. They all must have had their eyes closed to what The Citadel makes crystal clear: The uniform is worn by all cadets. There has never been any exception in the uniform in 175 years. This applicant wanted special treatment, but I am reliably informed that the hajib does not appear anywhere in the Quran. It appeared during the rise of Islamic fundamentalism in the late 19th century On the wall outside of the Summerall Chapel are names of our alumni who died in the war on terror. With the exception of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, I know of no other college or university whose alumni have given their lives in the numbers of our dead alumni to provide the blanket of freedom that we all sleep under. Every American owes his freedom, albeit ever eroding, to someone who died for us. In the history of the world and our nation, no one has offered to die for us — except Jesus Christ for our souls and the men and women of our armed forces for our freedom. Any doubt can be resolved by a visit to any Nazi death camp or a visit to the American Cemetery in Normandy above Omaha Beach. This world has no shortage of evil men. Thinking otherwise is more than naive. It is both foolish and dangerous. The only people in the world who want to kill, and are killing, us and others worldwide, and vow to destroy the nation of Israel, justify their savagery in the name of Islam — the same religion that imposes the hajib on its women. The Citadel alumni who have died fighting Islamic terrorists did so for this nation and not for a hajib to be an exception to the uniform at their alma mater. G. Richardson Wieters The Citadel Class of 1971 Gracewood Drive Charleston
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Monday
May 23, 2016
2. Letter: Courageous Citadel cadet
Jennifer Berry Hawes did a terrific job of writing May 15 about Kenton Pendery’s remarkable story. Mr. Pendery is a courageous person, and his loving and supportive parents are models for what parents can do when faced with life-changing challenges. All of us have much to learn about the transgender experience, and Mr. Pendery and his parents can teach us a great deal. I hope that people, including students, parents and elected officials, will read this article with an open mind and an open heart. Andrew Perry Houston Northcutt Boulevard Mount Pleasan
Published in: The Post and Courier - Onine
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Monday
May 23, 2016
3. Letter: Naval Jack honors Citadel cadets
Recent letters to the editor and thoughts expressed by Rep. Jim Clyburn address the removal of the Confederate Naval Jack from the Citadel Chapel. Whether we like it or not, it is an historical fact that The Citadel cadets fired the first shots of the Civil War under the Confederate Naval Jack. At the time the cadet enrollment was 100 percent young men from South Carolina. The Naval Jack hanging in the chapel honors the cadets who fought under that banner. The Citadel is the only college, university or military academy in the entire country at the time that fought as a unit in nine major battles during the war. Twelve cadets lost their lives. It would indeed be shameful to remove the banner that the Corps and the cadets died for. Although I was born and raised in a Northern state, I would lie in front of the chapel door before I would allow the flag to be removed and would hope that thousands of like-minded people would join me. The nation and many citizens have taken political correctness to the extreme — like those in New Orleans who want to remove the statue of Robert E. Lee, which has stood for over 100 years. It is doubtful that our nation has ever produced a more honorable hero than this great general in the company of Dwight Eisenhower, Douglas MacArthur, George S. Patton and Stonewall Jackson. Ernest J. Berger Deer Point Road Johns Island
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Monday
May 23, 2016
4. Letter: School Shouldn't Bend to Religious Garb
I would like to commend the Citadel Military School in South Carolina! They denied a female Muslim an exception to wear a hijab. It is bad enough the school was forced to admit women in the 1990s. Now religious females want to change the dress code to their liking! Are these people aware of the tradition or military discipline? Obviously not! This young Islamist is considering a lawsuit to break a tradition of this school and this country. It is against my religion to listen to rap or hip hop! However, when it comes on the radio station, I don’t file a lawsuit; instead I change the channel, or turn off the radio! Problem solved. In other words, young ladies, there are a lot of schools in this country. Roger Paulson Shoshone
Published in: Magicvalley.com - Online
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Monday
May 23, 2016
5. The Citadel, not student, being treated unfairly
David Lauderdale writes a column for The Island Packet of Hilton Head-Bluffton. Lauderdale has won many awards over many years for his words about the people, culture, traditions and issues of the South Carolina Lowcountry. His columns are good, the type of stuff that makes the newspaper reader clip and save. Many columns are humorous. Some are provocative. All are insightful. Recently, Lauderdale ventured beyond the boundaries of southern Beaufort County to address controversy surrounding a Lowcountry institution that has seen its share, dating to the Civil War and before. Many people who criticize The Citadel do not understand the South Carolina Military College. Without detailing its history, Lauderdale fosters understanding in the context of addressing why the institution was right not to grant the request of a prospective female student to wear the hijab, traditional Muslim headdress. In the process, he hits the larger issue of a nation that has lost sight of what individual rights mean. As he states, the student is not facing discrimination, but The Citadel IS being treated unfairly.
Published in: The Times and Democrat - Online
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Monday
May 23, 2016
6. For College of Charleston student, wearing hijab boosts courage, confidence
When Marah Jadalla wears a hijab, she feels like Iron Man: Strong, confident and protected. “The hijab,” she said, “is my armor. Inside the reception area of the Central Mosque of Charleston, Jadalla wears a beige hijab draped neatly over her head and shoulders, framing her hazel-green eyes and wide dimples. Her dark hairline is barely exposed. A 19-year-old marketing and studio arts major at the College of Charleston, she started wearing the hijab — a scarf covering her head and neck — two years ago as an act of devotion to God and her Islamic faith. was a deeply personal, even courageous choice. The hijab is perhaps the most visible and misunderstood marker of Muslim identity, making American “Hijabis” involuntary ambassadors for their religion and potential targets for discrimination in this era of anti-Muslim hysteria. In the wake of the San Bernardino terrorist attack in December, presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump called for a “total and complete” ban on Muslims entering the U.S. while speaking aboard the USS Yorktown at Patriots Point. In April, The Citadel set off a social media firestorm after word got out that an incoming student had requested an exemption to the school’s strict uniform policy, so she could wear a hijab.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Monday
May 23, 2016
6. Tough votes loom for GOP under Ryan plan
Paul Ryan vowed when he took the speaker’s gavel last fall that the era of top-down, get-in-line leadership was over: Rank-and-file members would have their say, even if it meant a slower and messier legislative process. He’s made good on that promise, refusing to jam his conference on a budget they did not support, or a Senate-passed Zika virus package his members hated because it wasn’t paid for. They could also offer additional Confederate flag votes. While Ryan allowed the Confederate flag issue on the floor Thursday, it’s unclear if he would do the same for others, including those that specifically target the display of the Confederate flag at the Citadel military college in Charleston, South Carolina. Thus far, Ryan isn’t blinking.
Published in: Politico - website
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Monday
May 23, 2016
7. Citadel cadets selected for Airport Management summer internship
Two rising seniors from The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, will participate in the Charleston County Aviation Authority’s 2016 Airport Management Internship this summer. Tyus Carter of Birmingham, Ala., and Devan Washington of Summerville, will start work at Charleston International Airport on May 31. The Aviation Authority internship program is entering its second year. It is designed to give students from diverse cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds the opportunity for hands-on experience in airport operations and management. It also furthers the Aviation Authority’s commitment to cultivating and recruiting a diverse workforce through community and educational outreach.“During the 10-week internship, students spend time in each department to learn how each contributes to the overall operation of the airport,” said Sharon McGhee, director of community relations and creator of the internship program. “After a two-week orientation with all the departments that comprise the Aviation Authority, the cadets will be assigned to one department for the remainder of their time with us.”
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom - Online

Monday
May 23, 2016
7. Local achievements: May 22, 2016
John Taylor, of Waco, graduated from The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, in Charleston, South Carolina, on May 7. Taylor earned a Bachelor of Arts in criminal justice.
Published in: Waco Tribune - website
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Monday
May 23, 2016
7.1 Robert Waldrop among The Citadel's Class of 2016 graduates
Robert Waldrop of South Plainfield, NJ (07080) graduated from The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, on May 7, 2016. Waldrop earned a BA in Criminal Justice. Members of The Citadel Class of 2016 were recognized for excellence in leadership, service and academics. The South Carolina Corps of Cadets celebrated the graduation of over 550 cadets, 11 active duty students and 27 veteran students from 32 states. Of those cadets, 151 were commissioned as officers. Top areas of study for the class included business administration, engineering, political science and criminal justice.
Published in: Tapinto.com - website
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Monday
May 23, 2016
7.1 THE CITADEL (cadets officers for SY17)
The Citadel's Commandant of Cadets has designated commanders, regimental staff, sergeants major and first sergeants for the Class of 2017. Cadets who will assume the nine top-ranking positions were recognized during a private ceremony with The Citadel's president, Lt. Gen. John W. Rosa, The Citadel's Provost, Gen. Connie Ledoux Book, Ph.D., and the Commandant of Cadets, Capt. Geno Paluso. The new officers were presented with chevrons that will be added to their uniforms to reflect their ranks. They will assume their stations when the fall semester begins. William Duke of Manning was among 78 other cadets that have been designated as commanders, regimental staff and more.
Published in: The Sumter Items - Online
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Monday
May 23, 2016
8. Scholars: Area students are making the grade
Ryan D’Ambrosio of Collegeville was commissioned into the U.S. Army at The Citadel, Charleston, S.C., along with other commissioning cadets and students who took oaths accepting their appointments as officers in the U.S. armed services.
Published in: The Mercury - Online
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Monday
May 23, 2016
8.1 Class notes
Emily Kerbs of Aromas graduated with a bachelor of science degree in electrical engineering from The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, in Charleston, South Carolina.
Published in: Monterey Herald - Online
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Monday
May 23, 2016
9.1 The Citadel swept by ETSU to end regular season
The Citadel baseball team dropped the regular season finale at ETSU on Saturday afternoon 10-6 The Bulldogs (16-40, 6-18 SoCon) scored first for the third straight game as Bret Hines scampered home on a ground out to the second baseman by Clay Martin to give The Citadel a 1-0 lead in the third inning. ETSU (26-28, 13-11 SoCon) answered with nine runs over the next three innings to take a 9-2 lead. Ben Peden scored the only Bulldog run during that time in the fourth inning with his eighth home run of the season and second of the series. The freshman’s eight homers are a team best this season. The Citadel plated another run in the top of the sixth inning and then two more in the top of the seventh to cut into the ETSU lead. Stephen Windham plated two of the three runs with doubles in back-to-back at-bats. Peden also drove in his second RBI of the day with a ground out to the third baseman in the seventh inning, making it a 10-5 ballgame. The final run of the game came in the top of the ninth for the Bulldogs after Windham recorded his third RBI of the day with a sacrifice fly to center field to score Clay Martin from third.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV 5 (Charleston) - Online
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Monday
May 23, 2016
ETSU 10, The Citadel 6
The Citadel dropped its 40th game, falling to ETSU in the regular season finale. The Bulldogs (16-40, 6-18 SoCon) will face VMI in the Southern Conference Tournament at 10 a.m. Tuesday in Greenville. The Citadel scored first for the third straight game as Bret Hines scampered home on a groundout to the second baseman by Clay Martin for a 1-0 lead in the third inning. But ETSU (26-28, 13-11) answered with nine runs over the next three innings to take a 9-2 lead. Ben Peden scored the only Bulldogs run during that time in the fourth inning with his eighth home run of the season and second of the series. The freshman’s eight homers are a team best this season. The Citadel plated another run in the top of the sixth inning and then two more in the top of the seventh to cut into the ETSU lead. Stephen Windham plated two of the three runs with doubles in back-to-back at-bats. Peden also drove in his second RBI of the day with a groundout in the seventh inning, making it a 10-5 game. The final run came in the top of the ninth for the Bulldogs after Windham recorded his third RBI of the day with a sacrifice fly to center field to score Martin. Jordan Buster made his first career start on the mound for the Bulldogs, going 22/3 innings, striking out two and allowing four hits. Windham threw out two runners trying to steal in the contest, running his season total up to 25 this year.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Monday
May 23, 2016
WELCOMING THE PRODIGAL SON: 63-year-old surgeon back in fold but still regrets not playing as senior...
Some bonds last a lifetime. So it seems for the boys – now men, fathers and even grandfathers – who played football for Orangeburg High and then Orangeburg-Wilkinson High from 1969-71. On May 14, 45 players from those teams returned home, now an every-five-years ritual. They gathered at Orangeburg Country Club and other locations during the weekend, sharing handshakes and hugs, stories and laughs with each other and with the men who, 45 years ago, coached them to 28 wins, including a 13-0 state championship in the fall of 1971. It remains O-W’s only football title, coming in the school’s first year of existence. Dick Sheridan, the coach around whom that program, and those memories, was built, said Saturday that nowadays at these reunions, it’s as if he has 45 sons. “The bonds are still there,” the youthful-looking 75-year-old said. Forty-five sons — including a few prodigal ones. For Lane Tuten, once a 170-pound offensive lineman, now a 63-year-old surgeon living in Hampton, the reunions are both sweet and bitter reminders of what he calls “the worst mistake ever in my life.” The years passed, Tuten graduating from The Citadel and the Medical University of South Carolina, then – to repay a U.S. Army scholarship to med school – spending four years with Army Special Forces. Even then, OHS stuck with him. Sheridan’s arduous football practices, he said, got him through The Citadel’s plebe system and Ranger training. “They were nothing I hadn’t seen before.”
Published in: The Times and Democrat - Online
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Friday
May 20, 2016
1. Moral Victory on Confederate Flag, Painful Defeat on LGBT Protection
Democrats achieved a long-awaited moral victory Thursday as the House adopted an amendment to bar the Confederate flag from flying over some federal cemeteries. But that achievement was overshadowed moments later as Republicans rejected an amendment to prevent federal contractors from discriminating based on sexual orientation or gender identification. The defeat -- by a single vote -- came only after several members switched their votes at the last minute. Democrats chanted "Shame, Shame, Shame" as the vote count -- with time expired -- ticked down from 217 yeas to 212, and the nays rose to 213. The rapid-fire exchange of votes came as members seized on the opportunity to add amendments to two sweeping bills that cleared the House floor this week – a defense authorization bill and a Veterans Affairs appropriations bill. The House’s vote to ban the flag at veterans’ cemeteries was its first ever roll call on the hot-button issue, which derailed a $30 billion spending bill last year. - See more at: http://www.rollcall.com/news/moral-victory-confederate-flag-painful-defeat-lgbt-protection#sthash.BiVqMRXq.dpuf
Published in: Roll Call - Online
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Friday
May 20, 2016
1.1 House approves ban on Confederate flag in national cemeteries
Congress voted to restrict the use of Confederate flags at national veterans cemeteries on Thursday, a decision that comes as America has increasingly been reassessing its relationship with the controversial symbol. There was a heated battle behind the scenes, but the proposal, an amendment to a spending bill for veterans and military construction projects, came with support from 84 Republicans and all but one Democrat. Considering the flag's history, it was a rare show of compromise on an issue that has traditionally divided many Americans: Many continue to view it as a symbol of Southern pride, while others argue it is inexorably racist, a reminder of the oppression of slavery. Recommended: So you think you know Congress? Take our quiz. "Over 150 years ago, slavery was abolished," said Rep. Jared Huffman (D) of California, who sponsored the amendment. "Why in the year 2016 are we still condoning displays of this hateful symbol on our sacred national cemeteries?"
Published in: Christian Science Monitor - website
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Friday
May 20, 2016
3. No State Institution (Including the Citadel) Has the Right to Deny the Religious Freedom of an American
The Citadel is The Military College of South Carolina, a state institution. The reaction to the school’s decision to refuse to allow a Muslim student to cover her hair with a headscarf has unveiled a woeful ignorance of the nature of America’s strong Constitutional commitment to freedom of religion. I was especially disturbed by Asra Nomani’s statement, quoted in the Washington Post, “Women and girls, of course, should have a right to wear — or not wear — the headscarf in society, if they wish, but it is truly an insult to the struggle for secularism and civil rights in this country to conflate the headscarf with the struggle for religious and civil liberties in the United States.” We fully support Asra Nomani’s right to dissent from the majority opinion on Islamic law, but her presumption that religious freedom in America applies only to religiously mandated rather than religiously motivated action is flat wrong.
Published in: Minaret of Freedom Weblog - Online
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Friday
May 20, 2016
4. Demotech and WaterStreet Company Join Forces to Deliver an Insightful, Content-Rich Insurance Summit
In an industry overflowing with conventions and conferences, Demotech and WaterStreet Company joined forces to present a new kind of event: The 2016 Insurance Summit - a learning and sharing open forum with industry leaders and their peers. “For property and casualty insurers and their partners, the Summit was an opportunity to gain valuable information on topics that are top of mind for everyone in the industry,” said Joseph Petrelli, President of Demotech. “We felt there was a need to return to a format where subject matter experts could provide insights and content and check their marketing hats at the door.” During the May 9 - 11 event at the Wild Dunes Resort, Isle of Palms, S.C., participants attended interactive presentations that supported the theme, “Steadfast. Strong. Secure.” Kicking off the summit was keynote speaker Lt. Col. Michael Barth, PhD, of The Citadel’s School of Business Administration, who presented “Unconventional Warfare Techniques Applied to Unconventional Insurance Markets.” Following Lt. Col. Barth, other industry-leading experts covered such topics as digital strategies, enhancing company ratings, enterprise risk management, beyond the low interest rate environment, M&A considerations, management and professional liability, new product development, price optimization, recruiting and retaining talent, and the value of veterans as employees.
Published in: WXIX-TV 19 (Cincinnati, OH) - Online
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Friday
May 20, 2016
5. Local (SCCC) students graduate from The Citadel
Members of The Citadel Class of 2016 were recognized for excellence in leadership, service and academics. The S.C. Corps of Cadets celebrated the graduation of more than 550 cadets, 11 active duty students and 27 veteran students from 32 states on May 7. Of those cadets, 151 were commissioned as officers. Local graduates include: Lucinda Acuna; George Baker; Sean Bell; Kyle Borgman; Justin Brownlee; Charles Buehring; Daniel Castillo; Nathan Chapman; Donald Chestnut; Kai Clark; Lance Cook; William Cranford; Michael Deese; Chase Goodwin; Matthew Halter; Tyler Hardy; Hannah Holt; Bryce Hoopes; Tyler Kahn; William Lewis; Cameron Lutes; Evan Maes; Alexander Marin-Baskin; Jason McDonald; Marc Melfi; Jamie Meyer; Walker Myers; Johnathan Overcash; Matthew Paez; Landon Poe; Ryan Rhodus; Thomas Rogers; Jason Sanchez; Patrick Simmons; Koree Stillings; Brandon Stout; Timothy Walsh; Xiang Wang; Tevin Williams; Stephen Windham
Published in: Summerville Journal Scene - Online
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Friday
May 20, 2016
5.5 Local (CGC) students graduate from The Citadel
On May 7, more than 250 individuals were recognized for earning certificates, evening undergraduate and advanced degrees. The following local students were among those recognized by The Citadel Graduate College: Erin Ardrey of Summerville; Alexander Arntz of Summerville; Michael Balarillo of Ladson; Anjelika Brown of Summerville; Paul Bryant of Summerville; Tyson Cater of Summerville; William Cherry of Ridgeville; J Honey Colinco of North Charleston; Kevin Cook of Ladson; Randi Dauoheuang of Summerville; Oscar Douglas of Summerville; Brandon Eakins of Summerville; Nathaniel Edwards of Summerville; Zenovia Frazier of Ridgeville; Matthew Glavach of North Charleston; Paul Gorsky of Summerville; Tyler Hardy of Summerville; Heather Hay of Summerville; Christopher Jones of Ladson; Heather Judy of St George; Travis Junkins of Summerville; Jordan Karges of Summerville; Johnny King of Summerville; Thomas Lee of Summerville; Alyshia Linville of Ladson; Alicia Lopez-Floyd of Summerville; Lisa Lowe of Summerville; Skyler Lowery of Summerville; Michelle Maness of Summerville; Rebecca Marazita of Summerville; Carlyle Mark of North Charleston; Jelain McArthur of Summerville; Nicholas Michnovicz of Summerville; Kimberly Miller of Ladson; Eric Muckin of Summerville; Audwin Mumford of Summerville; William Nichols of Ladson; Michelle Power of Summerville; Thomas Pratt of Summerville; Joycelyn Pryor of Ridgeville; Melissa Quinn of Summerville; Timothy Reitano of Ladson; Roland Robbins of Summerville; Henry Thompson of Summerville; Kelly Walker of Summerville; Cedric Warren of Summerville; William Wilson of Summerville; Lauraie Zealy of Summerville.
Published in: Summerville Journal Scene - Online
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Friday
May 20, 2016
6. View from the sidelines; Ballard leaves legacy in sports medicine program
Faced with the choice of course registration for freshman year, senior Nathan Ballard saw an opportunity to stay involved in one of his favorite things, even if it was in a way he did not expect. “[As] an eighth grader I was really small, and I knew I couldn’t play football,” Ballard said. “But I still wanted to be involved in sports.” Sports medicine students are often seen as just the waterboys that use it as easy out of a P.E. credit. But these misconceptions could not be more false, as the dedication and time commitment plays in with their everyday lives. “We’ve been friends forever. He’s the type of person you can ask a question and can expect an answer, and he’s really good in a crisis which is really important to do this,” Smith said. Witnessing the level of professionalism Ballard demonstrates on a daily basis, coach Barry Jones has created a connection with Ballard that started his freshman year. After graduation, the bandaging and 5 a.m. wakeup call will come to an end. Although Ballard is not continuing on with sports medicine or physical therapy, the leadership skills he has learned made the decision to attend The Citadel. The Citadel, a military college in South Carolina, will provide Ballard with a way to say connected to what helped him become a leader these past four years and the legacy his family has created. “I’ve always wanted to go, and I needed a backup plan in case I did not get into the Naval Academy, and it just worked out,” Ballard said. “My father was in the Navy and I felt like I just wanted to serve my country.” Being on the sidelines for four years has exceeded Ballard’s expectations, and proved to Jones and the entire sports medicine program that his commitment to this program will continue to have a lasting impact.
Published in: Coppell Student Media - Online
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Friday
May 20, 2016
7. Bucs sink Citadel in series opener
Senior right-hander Lee Haeberle (Hendersonville, Tenn.) allowed two runs and struck out eight in 5.2 innings, while the Buccaneers scored nine runs in the first three frames as ETSU baseball cruised to an 11-2 series-opening win over The Citadel on Thursday night at Thomas Stadium. Please note, due to inclement weather expected to hit the Tri-Cities, Friday’s first pitch has been moved to 1 p.m. The Bucs, who were held to two runs in their last 19 innings coming into the series opener, sprinted out of the gates as they pounded 14 hits en route to capturing the nine-run victory.
Published in: WJHL-TV 11 (Johnson City, TN) - Online
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Friday
May 20, 2016
8. Bulldogs Launch Two Home Runs in Loss to ETSU
The Citadel baseball team was unable to overcome an early deficit and fell to ETSU 11-2 on Thursday evening. Mike Deese scored the first run of the game in the top of the first with his fifth home run of the year, smacking the 1-2 pitch over the right field wall to give the Bulldogs (16-38, 6-16 SoCon) an early 1-0 lead. Dating back to last season, Deese went two-for-three with two home runs in his first three career at-bats against ETSU (24-28, 11-11 SoCon). ETSU responded with a run of its own in the bottom of the frame, then plated five in the bottom of the second and three in the bottom of the third to take a 9-1 lead. The Citadel got one back in the top of the fifth thanks to Barrett Charpia’s fourth home run of the year. The junior now has 10 RBI this season.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV 5 (Charleston) - Online
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Thursday
May 19, 2016
1.1 House rejects effort to bar Confederate flag from the Citadel
Debate over flying the Confederate flag has returned to the House floor nearly a year after a racially motivated shooting in Charleston, S.C. House Democrats late Wednesday night used a procedural motion for the annual defense policy bill to attempt to add an amendment that would target the display of the Confederate flag at the Citadel military college in Charleston. Their measure, known as a motion to recommit, would also strip a Republican-authored provision in the defense authorization that Democrats warned would allow discrimination against the LGBT community. It failed along party lines by a vote of 181-243. Assistant Minority Leader Jim Clyburn (D-S.C.), a senior member of the Congressional Black Caucus, was denied a vote on his submitted Confederate flag amendment. In an emotional House floor speech, Clyburn noted that the Citadel is only about 2 miles from where last year's shooting took place at the historically black Mother Emanuel Church, leaving nine dead. "This objectionable banner, which has never been the official flag of the Confederacy, is a symbol of hate, racial oppression, resistance to the rule of law, and white supremacy," Clyburn said.
Published in: The Hill - Online
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Thursday
May 19, 2016
1.2 Clyburn and Sanford efforts to force full debates on tough issues fall short
spite the efforts of two South Carolina congressmen, the U.S. House will not be debating questions of whether the Confederate flag should fly at The Citadel or military recruits should have to buy U.S.-made sneakers. House Republican leaders opted late Tuesday night not to allow for an up or down vote on either amendment offered by Jim Clyburn and Mark Sanford, respectively, to the fiscal 2017 National Defense Authorization Act. It brings to an end several days of intense lobbying on the parts of both congressmen and their allies, who strongly believed their amendments should have been made subject to full debate on the chamber floor, even if they might not have ultimately passed. It’s not entirely unexpected that House GOP leadership would choose to exclude Clyburn’s amendment from floor debate. The third-highest ranking House Democrat faced an uphill battle from the start when he and House Armed Services Committee ranking member Adam Smith of Washington State proposed cutting off ROTC funding from any military institution that still displays the Confederate flag.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Thursday
May 19, 2016
1.3 Effort to remove Confederate Naval Jack at the Citadel fails in Washington
South Carolina’s only Democratic congressman says The Citadel should remove the Confederate flag from Summerall Chapel. Sixth District Rep. Jim Clyburn introduced an amendment to deny Federal funding to institutions displaying the flag. He said state lawmakers need to clear the way for removal of the Confederate Naval Jack from the chapel. The House Armed Services Committee rejected the amendment to the National Defense Authorization Act. State lawmakers removed the Confederate flag from the Statehouse grounds after the June shooting of nine people at a Charleston church.
Broadcast on: WCBD-TV 2 (Charleston) - Online
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Thursday
May 19, 2016
1.4 Defense Bill Passes After Democrats Last-Ditch Attempts to Change it
The House passed a sweeping defense bill Wednesday night that would authorize $602.2 billion for the Pentagon and defense-related programs in fiscal 2017. But the 277-147 vote reflected the unease among many Democrats about provisions within the bill, including language many lawmakers fear would open the door for federal contractors to discriminate based on sexual orientation or sexual identity. In fact, the top Democrat on the House Armed Services Committee, Rep. Adam Smith , D-Wash., voted against the bill, citing the "religious protections" provision for contractors as the "last straw." He and others also objected to the way the measure shifted $18 billion from war operations to pay for new weapons and facilities improvements. Even the Confederate flag was raised during the spirited evening debate. Rep. James E. Clyburn, D-S.C., made a motion to recommit the bill to committee until it came back with an amendment that would withhold support for the Citadel military college because it flies the Confederate flag. That measure failed.
Published in: Roll Call - Online
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Thursday
May 19, 2016
1.5 House slated for contentious vote on the Confederate flag
House Democrats will force a vote Thursday morning on whether the Confederate flag should continued to be displayed in national cemeteries run by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). The move resurrects a contentious debate that erupted nearly a year ago after the racially motivated shooting at a historically black church in Charleston, S.C. last June. Rep. Jared Huffman (D-Calif.) revived a similar amendment that he offered to an Interior Department spending bill last year that ultimately derailed the entire appropriations process due to divisions among Republicans over the Confederate flag. His latest amendment to the 2017 bill funding the VA and military construction projects, offered shortly after midnight on Thursday, would prohibit the large-scale display of the Confederate flag in VA cemeteries such as flying the banner over mass graves. However, it would still permit families to place small individual Confederate flags on graves for limited amounts of time two days a year. Huffman wants Republicans to go on the record about whether they support flying the Confederate flag after they avoided doing so last year. Hours earlier, Republicans rejected a Democratic attempt late Wednesday night to amend the defense authorization so that the Confederate flag could no longer be flown at the Citadel, which, incidentally, is about two miles from the Charleston church where last year's shooting occurred.
Published in: The Hill - Online
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Thursday
May 19, 2016
2. Citadel Class of 2016 graduate, Jason Soto, commissions into U.S. Army
Citadel Class of 2016 graduate, Jason Soto of Temecula has commissioned into the U.S. Army. Families, friends, faculty and staff assembled at the Summerall Chapel on The Citadel campus to honor the newly commissioned officers. The commissioning cadets and students took oaths accepting their appointments as officers in the U.S. armed services. Soto, who received a BA in Political Science May 7, was commissioned during a ceremony held May 6.
Published in: Valley News - Online
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Thursday
May 19, 2016
2.1 College notes
Brooks Wagstaff, of Columbus, was chosen by faculty members at The Citadel for the 2016 list of Who's Who Among Students in American Universities & Colleges. Wagstaff also was commissioned into the U.S. Army. in a ceremony May 6.
Published in: This Week Community News - Online
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Thursday
May 19, 2016
2.2 Cortlandt Manor Resident Graduates from The Citadel
Michelle Schoenfeld graduated Saturday, May 7 with a B.A. in Political Science.
Published in: Patch - Online
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Thursday
May 19, 2016
2.3 F.C. Residents Earn Academic Honors Across the Nation
Takumi Nemec, a 2016 graduate of The Citadel with a Bachelor’s degree in history, was commissioned into the U.S. Army in a ceremony on Friday, May 6.
Published in: News Press - Online
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Thursday
May 19, 2016
2.4 Local student graduates from the Citadel
Lewis Jackson of Bath, recently graduated from the Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina. Jackson earned a Bachelor of Science in physical education.
Published in: The Leader - Online
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Thursday
May 19, 2016
2.5 Student Kudos and Accolades
Men and women who entered The Citadel as freshmen last fall have officially been sworn in as members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets as of Saturday, April 9, 2016. Recognition Day 2016 marks the end of what many consider the toughest first year college military-training in the country. Each year, hundreds of people line the streets to cheer for the freshmen as they march, dressed in their brilliant, white uniforms, to attend “The Oath Renewal on The Citadel Green.” The oath marks their transition to officially becoming members of the Corps. The green at Marion Square was the original parade ground for the college, when it was founded in 1842 in the structure that is now the Embassy Suites. The march follows three weeks of Transition to Recognition Training during which the knobs take classes examining student ethics and leadership skills and the honor code. They also undergo inspections and drills training.
Published in: Moultrie News - Online
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Thursday
May 19, 2016
2.6 Students from Mendham, elsewhere win accolades at universities and colleges
James McManus of Mendham, graduated with a bachelor of science in education social studies and John Olcese of Long Valley, graduated with a bachelor of arts in criminal justice from The Citadel, Charleston, S.C. Cadet James McManus of Mendham, a member of The Citadel Class of 2016, will be headed to Oslo, Norway to teach English after being selected for a Fulbright U.S. Student Award. McManus is the regimental academic officer for the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, and a leading education major in the college's Zucker Family School of Education. In addition to earning a Fulbright fellowship, the Honors Program student was presented with The Citadel Palmetto Medal, one of the college's highest honors. He also earned the Star of the West Scholarship in his junior year, taking him to Europe to continue his research comparing the public school systems of different countries. McManus, who holds dual citizenship in the U.S. and the U.K., is the creator of The Oxford Observer, the home of his ongoing research, and a resource for educators. He is also the chief executive officer of Global Outreach Initiative for the improvement of education in emerging countries and studied at Oxford University's New College during the spring semester of 2014. McManus has been a certified Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) since the age of 17, working as a volunteer with the Mendham and Mendham Township first aid squads whenever he is home. During his time at The Citadel in Charleston, S.C., he held numerous positions of rank within the Corps of Cadets, including Commander of The Citadel Chorale, and Public Affairs NCO. He was the U.S. Coast Guard auxiliary commanding officer for The Citadel Detachment, and was elected Governor of the South Carolina Student Legislature in 2015.
Published in: NewJersey Hills - Online
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Thursday
May 19, 2016
3. The Citadel: To hijab or not to hijab
Ibtihaj Muhammad is a New Jersey-born fencer who is ranked seventh in the world in the saber. This summer in Rio, Ibtihaj will be the first American athlete to compete in the Olympics while wearing hijab, the Muslim head scarf many women wear – a tribute to the diversity and inclusiveness of the United States of America, a nation of many colors, many faiths, many cultures brought together under one flag – indivisible. There’s no such inclusiveness in Charleston, S.C. Last Tuesday, The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, rejected the appeal of a young Muslim woman whom they’d accepted for admission for a religious accommodation in order to wear hijab as part of her uniform. She also asked for accommodation to be able to cover her body, using long sleeves and presumably tights or leggings of some sort, for those activities like swimming that generally require minimal covering. While there’s disagreement among some scholars and many Muslims as to what extent Muslim women should – or should not – cover themselves in public there’s general agreement that a woman’s personal choice – to cover or not to cover – be honored without compulsion.
Published in: Concord Monitor - Online
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Thursday
May 19, 2016
3.1 In Theory: Military college says no to potential student's hijab
The school president of the Citadel military college has said that after a "considerable review," a prospective Muslim student will not be allowed to wear a hijab with her uniform should she enroll. "Uniformity is the cornerstone of this four-year leader development model," Lt. Gen. John Rosa said in a statement. "This process reflects an initial relinquishing of self during which cadets learn the value of teamwork to function as a single unit. Some students and alumni of the Charleston college spoke out against allowing the student to wear the headscarf, citing the need for cadets to learn uniformity in all senses. School officials said religious accomodations are handled on a case-by-case basis.
Published in: Los Angeles Times - Online
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Thursday
May 19, 2016
9. Redskins release wide receiver Andre Roberts
The Washington Redskins have released wide receiver Andre Roberts after two disappointing seasons. The move, which hardly came as a surprise because of Roberts’s inconsistent play and the drafting of Texas Christian’s Josh Doctson in the first round, will save Washington roughly $3 million against the salary cap. The Redskins could have designated Roberts as a post-June 1 release, which would have saved an additional million against the cap, but elected not to do so. Signed to a four-year, $16 million deal in 2014, Roberts originally came to Washington expecting to serve as the No. 2 wide receiver behind Pierre Garcon. Quarterback Robert Griffin III had lobbied hard for the team to sign Roberts, who spent the first four years of his career with Arizona, playing primarily in the slot. But weeks later, Washington signed DeSean Jackson after his surprise release by the Philadelphia Eagles, and Roberts became the No. 3 receiver.
Published in: Washington Post - Online
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Thursday
May 19, 2016
9.1 Gamecocks get 16-4 win over The Citadel
Sixteen runs on sixteen hits led sixth ranked South Carolina to a 16-4 victory over The Citadel in it’s final regular season home game on Tuesday night at Founders Park. The Gamecocks improved to 39-13, while the Bulldogs fell to 16-37 on the year. Sophomore right-hander Brandon Murray earned his second win of the season after 1.2 innings pitched with one walk and three runs on five hits. Junior left-hander Nate Brecklin suffered his first loss of the season in 0.1 innings pitched with two walks and three runs on two hits. The Gamecocks got out to an early 3-0 lead in the bottom of the first inning. Walks to Gene Cone and Alex Destino gave the Gamecocks a pair of runners with Dom Thompson-Williams loading the bases on a hit by pitch. John Jones knocked a single to left field to score Cone and Destino. Thompson-Williams and Jones then completed a double steal to set Jonah Bride up for a RBI single to left field.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV 5 (lCharleston) - Website
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Thursday
May 19, 2016
Maddox receives James A. Grimsley Award for undergraduate teaching excellence
The Class of 2016 named assistant professor of history, Melanie Maddox, Ph.D., as the recipient of the James A. Grimsley, Jr. Undergraduate Teaching Award for the 2015-16 academic year. The recipient of this award is chosen by the senior class from among permanent faculty members nominated by cadets, students, faculty and department heads. The cadets chose the professor who has meant the most to them during their undergraduate careers.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom - website
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Thursday
May 19, 2016
The Citadel Graduate College honors outstanding students and professors
The Citadel Graduate College (CGC) recently recognized 21 top students and professors for excellence in the areas of academics, leadership and service for the 2015-16 academic year. The awards were presented during an evening reception on campus Thurs., May 5.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom - Online
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Wednesday
May 18, 2016
1. Taking the political temperature at The Citadel
The political atmosphere in the U.S. is thick. It is charged with the kind of non-stop buzzing that can be heard when standing near those giant overhead powerlines near transmission towers; it can be mesmerizing and terrifying all at once. Much of that political energy has passed through The Citadel's campus in the past 18 months or so in the form of presidential candidates, or those considering candidacy. Jeb Bush, Ben Carson, Carly Fiorina, Bobby Jindal, John Kasich, Rand Paul, Rick Perry, Marco Rubio, Rick Santorum, Donald Trump, and Scott Walker, were all either hosted by a cadet-run club called The Citadel Republican Society or held their own events on campus sponsored by their campaigns or other supporters. Far before these people formally entered the race, in fact decades before, the college started what is now the well-known and respected Citadel Symposium on Southern Politics. The first symposium was held in 1978, propelling the college forward along on its course as a major player in the study of political science. Cadet Ali Guild is Regimental Public Affairs Officer for the South Carolina Corps of Cadets and a member of The Citadel Class of 2018. She is a political science major from Mooresville, North Carolina.
Published in: TheDigitel.com
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Wednesday
May 18, 2016
2. No, it's The Citadel that is being treated unfairly
The Citadel is not for everyone. South Carolina's military college in Charleston cannot be all things to all people. In fact, its essence is that it is one thing to a few people. As an outsider who has never passed through Lesesne Gate, much less worn the ring of a Citadel graduate, that essence seems to be creating a corps. And in doing so, leadership emerges that can help in all walks of life. Citadel cadets learn that life inside those walls is not about "I." Or "me." Or "my." It is about a corps. This is why The Citadel was right to tell an admitted student that an exception would not be made for her to wear a hijab, or headcover different from the corps. She requested the exception in keeping with her faith. But this is not about faith. It is about a corps. It is not about freedom of expression or constitutional rights. It's about a corps. It is not about "an outdated tradition," as defenders of the student claim. It is about a corps. In a corps, people give up themselves for something larger.
Published in: The Island Packet
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Wednesday
May 18, 2016
3. The Citadel Class of 2016
The Citadel's South Carolina Corps of Cadets, veteran and active duty students received degrees on Saturday, May 7, 2016 in McAlister Field House. View the article to see the entire list of the graduating class.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Wednesday
May 18, 2016
4. The Citadel Graduate College Class of 2016
The Citadel Graduate College conferred degrees on Saturday, May 7, 2016 in McAlister Field House and honored outstanding students in several departments. View the article to see the full list of the graduating class.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Wednesday
May 18, 2016
5. Last in line leaves lasting impression at 2016 SCCC commencement
It is a long standing tradition for the last cadet to receive a diploma at The Citadel's graduation ceremony to provide a speech. That cadet has the final word during the ceremony that is attended by thousands of family members and friends and webcast around the country each May. In 2016, that honor went to Cadet Justine Zukowski, who is originally from Ellenville, New York. View the article to watch the speech.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Wednesday
May 18, 2016
6. Gamecocks overpower Citadel 16-4 to close nonconferece schedule
For The Citadel, it was another long night in a season full of them. For South Carolina, it was a little bit of momentum before a last stab at an SEC championship. Jonah Bride drove in a career-best five runs on four hits, D.C. Arendas hit a grand slam, and the 10th-ranked Gamecocks continued to show signs of an offensive reawakening by closing their nonconference slate Tuesday with a 16-4 victory over The Citadel at Founders Park. South Carolina averaged 1.8 runs in losing four of five games before Sunday, when the Gamecocks finally broke out of their slump in a 10-7 victory over No. 2 Texas A&M. USC has now scored double-digit runs in consecutive games for the first time since mid-March. "It's been encouraging for everybody, because we got contributions from a number of people," Arendas said. "...Hopefully, we can continue to build off that." USC outfieder Brandon McIlwain recorded his first career hit and RBI with a single in the eighth. Also a quarterback on the football team, the freshman missed much of the baseball season due to spring practice. McIlwain, who had not received an at-bat since March 16 aganst Davidson, entered as a pinch-hitter in the fourth and finished 1-for-3.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
May 18, 2016
7. Washington Redskins sign one Citadel Bulldog, cut another
One Citadel Bulldog's good fortune was another's bad luck Tuesday, as the Washington Redskins announced the signing of former Bulldog Mariel Cooper and released ex-Citadel star Andre Roberts. Cooper, a cornerback who played one year at The Citadel after transferring from South Carolina State, signed a free-agent deal after impressing during the Redskins' rookie camp over the weekend. The release of Roberts, a six-year NFL veteran and All-America receiver at The Citadel, saves the Redskins $3 million against the salary cap. The 28-year-old Roberts signed a four-year, $16 million contract with the Redskins in 2014. He caught 47 passes for 588 yards and two touchdowns over two years in Washington, but had just 11 receptions last season. Roberts becomes the second NFL player from The Citadel looking for work, as the Steelers released cornerback Cortez Allen earlier this year. Cooper, 5-11 and 192 pounds, appeared in 12 games with 11 starts last season for the Bulldogs, helping lead The Citadel to the 2015 Southern Conference co-championship. The Sumter native had 30 tackles, including four for loss with eight pass breakups and one interception.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
May 18, 2016
8. Family says 99-year-old Darlington attorney lived a selfless life
A prominent Darlington attorney known by many people in the community lost his life over the weekend, just two weeks before his 100th birthday. Albert "Juny" James will never be forgotten in the Darlington community. His life was taken Saturday evening after his car collided with another vehicle at the corner of Woods and Hampton streets in Darlington, but that's not how his family will remember his last day. Son, Albert James III remembered a poem once told to him about crossing over after death. James said, "And daddy, I saw him passing over, but I knew he was alright." Albert James the third and his wife, Findley feel at peace now, because they know Juny lived a selfless and Godly life. Graham Segars, his granddaughter said, "Everyone knows him and he knows everyone else. He always took the time to get to know those people around him and he could make special connections with anyone." The family explained people would say how much Juny would take the time to talk to people in the community and ask how they were doing. They said Juny never made it about him. He knew city and county officials and was a strong influence throughout the Pee Dee. Juny was a graduate from The Citadel and the University of South Carolina law, and a World War II veteran. He practiced law in his Darlington office near the square for almost sixty years, and continued to come to work to work alongside son, Jay James. "He came to the office every day and was just a joy and still a big help and had good judgment on people and what was right and wrong,'" said James.
Broadcast on: WMBF-TV Myrtle Beach, SC
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Tuesday
May 17, 2016
1. White House cool on Clyburn plan to remove Confederate flag at Citadel, cites 'First Amendment concerns'
The Obama administration supports removing the Confederate flag from the chapel at The Citadel, but doesn't like the way Congressional Democrats are going about it. The White House on Monday is taking issue with an effort spearheaded by U.S. Rep. Jim Clyburn, D-S.C., to withhold Reserve Officers' Training Corps funds from any military academy that still displays the Confederate flag. "The Administration strongly supports the removal of the Confederate battle flag - a divisive symbol and reminder of systematic oppression and racial subjugation - from the Nation's universities and institutions," the administration wrote in its 17-page rebuttal to the House version of the fiscal 2017 National Defense Authorization Act, to which Clyburn is attempting to affix his amendment. "Cutting off Federal funding for an ROTC program on the ground that an institution displays the flag, however, raises First Amendment concerns. "The administration therefore urges Congress to pursue this important objective through other means," the statement concludes. Clyburn - via the House Armed Services Committee's ranking Democrat, U.S. Rep. Adam Smith of Washington State - sought to include the amendment during the panel's debate on the defense authorization bill. Ultimately, the provision was included, albeit amended so as to nullify the overall purpose. The Board of Visitors of the Citadel actually voted last year to remove the Confederate flag from Summerall Chapel, a reaction to the ongoing debate around the symbol in the aftermath of the shooting at Mother Emanuel AME Church. The board, however, claims it is prevented from going through with the plan due to a clause in the "Heritage Act." The S.C. state Legislature has to amend the law to allow the Citadel to proceed.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
May 17, 2016
2. Boys will be boys - or will they?
Smoking in the boys' room ... forging parents' signature on absence excuses and report cards... sneaking unfilled water balloons onto school grounds, filling them in the boys' room, then launching them at classmates... breaking stink rocks that emitted foul enough odors to force evacuations from classrooms... Ah, sweet nostalgia for long-lost youth. For those mystified by the "stink rocks" reference: It traces to a half-century ago at Charleston's late, great St. Andrews Junior High School, where in that special time and place curious chemical circumstances created a porous material that, when broken apart, emitted a strong, vile and lingering stench. The other vintage misdeeds listed above fall under the statute of limitations. And yes, it's also too late for those offenses in school to go on anyone's permanent record. Such delinquent diversions recall the good old days of being bad boys at not just St. Andrews Junior High but at the late, great St. Andrews High School, home of not stink rocks but the Rocks. Seriously, our teams were known as the Rocks. One of our fight songs, set to a familiar tune, was even "When the Rocks Go Marching In." Seriously, too, though smoking in the boys' room broke the rules, we had a specified smoking area for students. Times have changed. Now smoking is verboten for even teachers and administrators at most public schools. Attitudes about who can use which restrooms have also changed. On Friday, the U.S. Education and Justice departments warned every public school district in the nation: "A school may not require transgender students to use facilities inconsistent with their gender identity or to use individual-user facilities when other students are not required to do so." The White House said the directive is not legally binding. Not yet, anyway. Then again, it does carry the whiff of an eventual federal funding cutoff for districts that don't comply. OK, so it was stupid of the North Carolina Legislature, in an effort to counter a Charlotte ordinance granting transgender people bathroom-picking rights, to pass a bill in March reversing that relatively new notion. Then it was stupid for North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory to sign that bill. Then it was not so bright for state Sen. Lee Bright, R-Spartanburg, to introduce a similar bill in our General Assembly, where fortunately it's going nowhere fast. And yes, Post and Courier colleague Jennifer Berry Hawes' Sunday front-page story about a transgender cadet who graduated from The Citadel on May 7 shed understanding light on this issue.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
May 17, 2016
3. Letter: Right call at Citadel
On April 14, the Washington Post ran a story about a female Muslim cadet requesting of The Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina, that she be allowed to wear a hijab as part of her uniform. In its nearly 175-year history, the Citadel has never granted a religious or any other accommodation that resulted in a change to the uniform. The request was denied last week. Robert Azzi's column in the May 15 Sunday Monitor takes issue with the decision and believes it to be wrong. Azzi says the Citadel should have made an example by granting the request, to quote Azzi, "to recognize her quest for what it is - an affirmative signal to America's enemies that all Americans - including Muslims - repudiate all forces of terror and instability that threaten this nation." My take: Pure political correctness on the part of Mr. Azzi. I applaud John Rosa, a retired Air Force lieutenant general and president of The Citadel, for upholding the uniform standards.
Published in: Concord Monitor
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Tuesday
May 17, 2016
4. Citadel baseball great Richard Wieters enshrined in S.C. Athletic Hall of Fame
Attend college at The Citadel? Not a chance, a high school-aged Richard Wieters once thought. "My brother had been there two years before me," he said. "I said, 'I'm not going to The Citadel. I know what they go through.' I said, 'No way.' I went through him coming home on Sunday nights not wanting to go back." Wieters tells the story these days with a hearty smile, and a legacy as one of the best athletes the military college has ever produced. Not only did he attend The Citadel, he became a two-time Southern Conference Player of the Year in baseball, and on Monday was honored along with seven others as part of the 2016 class of the South Carolina Athletic Hall of Fame. At a dinner Monday night before nearly 1,000 people, Wieters was inducted along with New England Patriots receiver Troy Brown of Barnwell, former South Carolina basketball stars BJ McKie, Art Whisnant and Martha Parker-Hester, former Clemson basketball star Greg Buckner, late Clemson pitcher Flint Rhem, and coach and administrator Buddy Sasser. "It means a lot. It's nice that there are more than two schools in the state," Wieters said, referring to USC and Clemson. "There are a lot of great athletes at all the schools... It's nice to have other people be acknowledged."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
May 17, 2016
5. South Carolina's final-week push begins against The Citadel
Before each season, Chad Holbrook makes a prediction of how many games he thinks his South Carolina team will win overall and in SEC play. He writes it down, places it inside a sealed envelope, and usually keeps it to himself. Sunday afternoon, though, he gathered his USC team and told them. "I wanted to tell them, because they've exceeded my expectations," said USC's head coach. "... I think they've been walking around feeling the weight of the world on their shoulders. I'm no psychologist, but I just wanted to relieve some of the pressure they felt." As for what his prediction was, Holbrook wouldn't say. But the tactic seemed to help the Gamecocks shake out of their offensive funk, salvage the final game of their series against Texas A&M, and build some momentum entering the final week of the regular season, which opens with a game against The Citadel at 7 p.m. Tuesday. South Carolina (38-13) was ranked No. 10 in the newest Baseball America poll released Monday, and is one game behind Florida in the SEC standings with one conference series to go. But a span of four losses in five games before Sunday clearly shook the Gamecocks' confidence, evident in a pair of meek efforts in the first two contests against the Aggies this past weekend. "I saw some looks in their faces I really didn't like," Holbrook said.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
May 17, 2016
6. Citadel basketball adds 10th new player
Citadel coach Duggar Baucom will have what amounts to a brand new basketball team in his second season, as he added a 10th player to his 2016 recruiting class on Monday. Leandro Allendel of Miami, a 6-6 wing player and native of Puerto Rico, has signed his letter of intent, making him the 10th new player who will join the Bulldogs this fall. "We are very excited to have Leandro join our Citadel basketball family, completing our 2016 recruiting class," Baucom said. "Leandro can shoot the three extremely well, but can also create his own shot off the dribble and adds great size to the wing position. LA is an exceptional student and should flourish in the academic-military structure of The Citadel." Allende has competed internationally for Puerto Rico, beginning at age 14 when he played for the U15 junior national team, helping his squad to a gold medal at FIBA Centrobasket. Allende also has played for the Puerto Rico U16, U17 and U18 national teams, taking another gold medal at FIBA Centrobasket in 2015. He traveled with the U17 Puerto Rico team to Dubai for the 2014 FIBA World Championships and steered the squad to a fifth-place finish.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
May 17, 2016
7. Home runs sink Summerville in state championship series Game 1 defeat
When Summerville took an early lead on catcher Rusty Grayson's 2-run home run, its upstate opponent figured the long ball looked like a good way to go. Three blasts propelled J.L. Mann to a 5-3 home victory Monday in Game 1 of a best-of-three, Class AAAA state baseball championship series over the Green Wave, which can still claim the title with two wins later this week. Game 2 is Wednesday at 7 p.m. at Summerville. If necessary, Game 3 will be played Friday at a neutral site, likely Columbia. Cameron Jansen, Tripp Fairey and Patrick Frick each went deep for the Patriots, who are one victory from a championship and one victory further than they went last year. J.L. Mann was swept by Wando in the 2015 final series... All but one of J.L. Mann's starters Monday are college-committed; the Patriots who struck the game-tying and go-ahead homers are bound for the Lowcountry. Jansen has pledged to the Citadel while Fairey is off to Charleston Southern. Summerville starter Wilson Beattie took the loss, surrendering five runs on eight hits (including all three homers) in five innings of work. He walked two and struck out three. On the mound, the Green Wave will turn to seniors Bo Gobin (Citadel-signed) on Wednesday before, prospectively, giving the ball to Bridges (South Carolina-signed) on Friday. Bridges and Gobin, each owning sub-1.00 ERAs, pitched Summerville to victories Saturday over Carolina Forest in the Lower State finals.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
May 16, 2016
2. NASA, Space Station partners announce future mission crew members
NASA and its International Space Station partners have announced the crew members for missions to the orbiting laboratory in 2017. The selection includes first-time space flyer NASA astronaut Scott Tingle and veteran Randy Bresnik. “There’s so much going on aboard the space station at this point, so many science experiments and technology demonstrations,” said Chris Cassidy, chief of the Astronaut Office at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. “Scott and Randy have their work cut out for them, but I have no doubt they’ll do excellent jobs.” Bresnik’s mission will begin in November 2017, when he and his crewmates Sergey Ryazansky of Roscosmos and Norishige Kanai of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) will join Tingle, Skvortsov and Vagner on the station for Expedition 54. Bresnik, who considers Santa Monica, California, to be his hometown, is a retired colonel in the U.S. Marine Corps. Bresnik received his commission in May 1989 and was designated a Marine Corps aviator in 1992. He flew the F/A-18 Hornet in support of Operation Southern Watch and Operation Iraqi Freedom. He has accumulated more than 6,000 hours in 81 types of aircraft. Bresnik was selected as an astronaut in May 2004. His first spaceflight was in November 2009 aboard space shuttle Atlantis for STS-129, which lasted 11 days. The flight was the 31st shuttle flight to the space station, during which Bresnik conducted two spacewalks totaling 11 hours and 50 minutes. Bresnik graduated from The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina, in 1989 with a bachelor’s degree in mathematics, and earned a master’s degree in aviation systems from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, in 2002. He is also a 2008 graduate of the U.S. Air Force Air War College.
Published in: Jaacto Mist - Online
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Monday
May 16, 2016
2.1 Citadel cadet realizes his transgender identity
The Citadel’s imposing barracks stood oddly silent just before last weekend’s commencement, a long dumpster awaiting the spoils of yet another year from the 173-year-old Corps of Cadets. Kenton Pendery, a senior, strode briskly across the quad’s cement checkerboard floor to the room he shared with a female cadet. What passed for disarray at the military college awaited him — plastic storage bins, overflowing trash cans — as he packed up from a life-changing year, even by the standards of most senior years. People had begun to call the cadet “he.” And as a student teacher, he had stepped in front of a German class at Wando High School that had never known him as a female. “Who’s that?” a student asked the classroom teacher. “This is Mr. Pendery.”
Published in: The Post and Courier - website
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Monday
May 16, 2016
2.2 Citadel tackles policies regarding transgender cadets
By coincidence, as a cadet went public about being transgender, The Citadel’s leaders spent the recently ended school year tackling the college’s policies regarding transgender students. In August, as a cadet enrolled as Keisha Pendery first signed his name “Kenton,” the school’s diversity leaders handed their administration a set of proposals. They dealt with such potentially thorny issues for transgender cadets as physical fitness standards and tests, sports, bathrooms and roommates, said Julie Lipovsky, assistant provost of diversity initiatives. “People saw this coming down the pike,” said Lipovsky, also a professor of psychology, who worked on the recommendations. The Citadel’s leaders are finalizing those changes, which should be in place by August when school resumes, said Lt. Col. William Brett Ashworth, vice president for communications and marketing.
Published in: The Post and Courier - website
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Monday
May 16, 2016
3. One person’s outdated tradition might not be another’s
I think Ibrahim Hooper, a spokesman for the Council on American-Islamic Relations, should choose his words more carefully. He was quoted in the May 11 news article “Citadel won’t allow Muslim student to wear hijab” as saying that clinging “to these outdated ‘traditions’ merely out of a sense of not wanting to change anything is, I think, untenable in this day and age and in our increasingly diverse society.” One might think he was advocating for a woman’s right to be free of the hijab rather than, ironically, denigrating the Citadel’s clearly defined requirement for uniformity.
Published in: Washington Post - Online
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Monday
May 16, 2016
3.1 Letter: The Citadel fumbles again
Well, The Citadel has again “spoken” and hijabs will not be seen as uniform items on campus anytime soon. With history as a strong indicator, this will some day make its way into the court system where alumni donations do not sway rational decision-making processes. Just as the school had to be dragged kicking and screaming into the “women’s equality era,” hijabs as headgear shall likely come to pass. After all, Army publication AR 600-20 allows for this as do similar regulations in the other armed services. Of course The Citadel’s “fans” were thrilled by this refusal and lauded the president’s principled position. In reading the online comments to articles covering this matter, I often saw references to The Citadel’s other “heroic” stance on the Confederate Naval Jack flying in Summerall Chapel.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Onl8ine
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Monday
May 16, 2016
Citadel javelin throwers claim two SoCon titles
Citadel javelin throwers Capers Williamson and Mady Riegel won Southern Conference titles on Thursday in Cullowhee, N.C. Williamson broke his own SoCon and school record with a heave of 239 feet, 4 inches in the men’s javelin, almost 40 feet farther than the second-place effort. He’s won two straight league titles and ranks 10th in the NCAA East Region. He needs to finish in the top 12 at the NCAA East Regional May 26-28 to qualify for the NCAA Championships. Riegel followed up Williamson’s performance by shattering her own school record in the women’s javelin throw. Her best toss traveled 138 feet, 5 inches as she won her first career SoCon title.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Monday
May 16, 2016
South Carolina’s final-week push begins against The Citadel
Before each season, Chad Holbrook makes a prediction of how many games he thinks his South Carolina team will win overall and in SEC play. He writes it down, places it inside a sealed envelope, and usually keeps it to himself. Sunday afternoon, though, he gathered his USC team and told them. “I wanted to tell them, because they’ve exceeded my expectations,” said USC’s head coach. “... I think they’ve been walking around feeling the weight of the world on their shoulders. I’m no psychologist, but I just wanted to relieve some of the pressure they felt.” As for what his prediction was, Holbrook wouldn’t say. But the tactic seemed to help the Gamecocks shake out of their offensive funk, salvage the final game of their series against Texas A&M, and build some momentum entering the final week of the regular season, which opens with a game against The Citadel at 7 p.m. Tuesday.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Monday
May 16, 2016
The Citadel swept at home by Samford, 11-7
The Citadel baseball team finished out the 2016 home schedule at Joe Riley Park on Sunday, falling to Samford 11-7. Samford (30-22, 11-10 SoCon) got on the scoreboard in the first inning, scoring three on a home run, and then added two more in the second inning. The Citadel (16-36, 6-15 SoCon) pushed two runs across in the third inning as Ben Peden came around to score on a single by Barrett Charpia and then Cole Buffington scored from third on a sacrifice fly by William Kinney to close the gap to 5-2.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV 5 (Charleston) - Online
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Friday
May 13, 2016
1. Cause of Citadel Beach House fire undetermined, fire chief says
The cause of a fire that damaged the Citadel Beach Club is undetermined, the Isle Of Palms fire chief said Thursday. The fire that broke out early Sunday morning, heavily damaged the club. Chief Ann Graham said she hopes to have more information about a possible cause next week. Investigators say two people were inside when the fire broke out, but escaped unharmed. The beach house is rented out by the Citadel for wedding receptions and other functions. The Citadel says the venue will be closed indefinitely. Thirty five events that were scheduled at the facility between now and the end of summer had to be canceled, according to Citadel officials.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV 5 (Charleston) - Online
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Friday
May 13, 2016
1. Citadel uniform rules wear well
The Citadel has an admirable record of respecting and accommodating religious diversity in its Corps of Cadets. But that doesn’t mean the school should alter its traditional policy on requiring uniformity in cadet uniforms. The Citadel has drawn widespread criticism since announcing Tuesday that it has rejected an accepted student’s request, which she based on her Muslim faith, to wear a hijab (head scarf) with her cadet uniform. The applicant now says she will give up the opportunity to enroll in the school in August because of its decision to deny her that exception to the uniform rules. A spokesman for the family of the applicant, who was not named, described them as “heartbroken.” Yes, many Muslims serve in the U.S. Armed Forces. And the Pentagon in recent years has given more leeway to military members who want to wear religious clothing, including turbans, yarmulkes and head scarfs, with their uniforms. Yet while The Citadel is the Military College of South Carolina and many of its graduates become officers in the U.S. Armed Forces, that doesn’t require the college to follow the military’s standards.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Friday
May 13, 2016
U.S. Jewish Groups Join Efforts to Stop anti-Muslim Discrimination
Jewish groups this week joined efforts to stop anti-Muslim discrimination as they argued for the building of a mosque in New Jersey and defended a Muslim student who wants to wear a hijab at a military academy. Nearly a dozen Jewish groups are also backing legislation against banning entry to Muslims, prompted by a proposal for such a ban by presidential candidate Donald Trump. The American Association of Jewish Lawyers and Jurists joined the Becket Fund, a conservative group that advocates for religious liberty, in a friend of the court brief filed Wednesday on behalf of Muslims who have been blocked from building a mosque in Basking Ridge, New Jersey. Also Wednesday, the American Jewish Committee called on The Citadel, a military college in South Carolina, to allow a Muslim student to wear a hijab. The college president, Lt. Gen. John Rosa, said that deviations from the school’s uniform could detract from leadership training, the Washington Post reported Wednesday, adding that the college otherwise remains committed to diversity. “The Citadel should reverse its hijab ban as part of its commitment to preparing its students for
Published in: Haaretz.com - Online
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Thursday
May 12, 2016
1a. South Carolina Corps of Cadets Class of 2016 commencement speech
Click below to watch the full speech delivered by Gen. Stanley McChrystal at The Citadel to graduating cadets and their guests on May 7, 2016, in McAlister Field House.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom - online
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Thursday
May 12, 2016
1b. Video highlights from The Citadel Class of 2016 commencement ceremony
Congratulations, graduates! Click on view article below to view the video.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom - online
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Thursday
May 12, 2016
1c. Citadel alumni pilots deliver Maj. Gen. Livingston for commissioning ceremony
The state of South Carolina's highest military official, Maj. Gen. Robert Livingston, Jr., was personally delivered to assist with the commissioning of 105 of America's newest Army officers by two Black Hawk helicopters flown by two Citadel alumni. On May 6, CW2 Will Leineweber, '02 and CW2 Jim McCoy, '98 landed the helicopters on the college's WLI field where the general was greeted and escorted to Summerall Chapel for the ceremony. A total of 151 cadets commissioned in all branches of U.S. military service on that day.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom - online
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Thursday
May 12, 2016
1d. Unbreakable bonds at The Citadel even stronger among twin cadets
The unbreakable bonds that develop between cadets during their four years at The Citadel are legendary; the close relationships are often touted one of the top benefits of being a member of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. Every year for almost 175 years strangers show up for their first day as a freshmen and have already formed life-long bonds by the end of the first week. But there is a small group of cadets who bring their built-in best friends with them. Identical twin brothers John and Wilson “Wil” Hope graduated from The Military College of South Carolina as members of The Citadel Class of 2016. That wasn’t always the plan. Until March of their senior year at Byrnes High School in Duncan, South Carolina, neither brother intended on going to The Citadel—they both had other (and separate) schools in their minds. But after they applied and both received full academic scholarship offers, both decided to commit to The Citadel.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom - Online
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Thursday
May 12, 2016
2. Summervillians named to rising Citadel leadership
The Citadel’s Commandant of Cadets has designated commanders, regimental staff, sergeants major and first sergeants for the Class of 2017. Cadets who will assume the nine top-ranking positions were recognized during a private ceremony with The Citadel’s president, Lt. Gen. John W. Rosa, The Citadel’s Provost, Gen. Connie Ledoux Book, Ph.D., and the Commandant of Cadets, Capt. Geno Paluso. The new officers were presented with chevrons that will be added to their uniforms to reflect their ranks. They will assume their stations when the fall semester begins. Alex Bear and John Cordes of Summerville were among 78 other cadets who have been named as part of the rising leadership.
Published in: Summerville Journal Scene - website
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Thursday
May 12, 2016
2.1 Robbins commissions into U.S. Army
Citadel Class of 2016 graduate, Jacob Robbins of Union, SC, has commissioned into the U.S. Army. Families, friends, faculty and staff assembled at the Summerall Chapel on The Citadel campus to honor the newly commissioned officers. The commissioning cadets and students took oaths accepting their appointments as officers in the U.S. armed services. Robbins was commissioned during a ceremony on May 6, 2016. Robbins received a B.A. in Criminal Justice during commencement on May 7, 2016.
Published in: Unior Daily Times - Online
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Thursday
May 12, 2016
3. Uneasy lie the heads that wear these hats
A Jan. 22, 2014, Reuters dispatch began: “The Pentagon took steps on Wednesday to give individual troops greater latitude to wear turbans, head scarfs, yarmulkes and other religious clothing with their uniforms.” But The Citadel announced Tuesday that it would not allow Muslim women to wear hijabs (head scarves). From a statement by school President Lt. Gen. John Rosa: “The standardization of cadets in apparel, overall appearance, actions and privileges is essential to the learning goals and objectives of the college. This process reflects an initial relinquishing of self during which cadets learn the value of teamwork to function as a single unit.”
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Thursday
May 12, 2016
3.1 Arab Social Media Debates U.S. Citadel Student Banned from Wearing Muslim Garb
JAFFA, Israel – The decision of the Citadel, a military college in South Carolina, to reject the request of a Muslim woman to wear the hijab, a traditional Muslim headscarf, alongside the school’s uniform, has sparked a heated debate in the Arab world. The Citadel said that no addition to the standard uniform can be considered, including a hijab. The candidate’s family said they were considering “all legal options,” an advocate of the student told the Washington Post. Arab social media users were torn between criticism of the college and criticism of the woman who considered studying at a military college.
Published in: Breitbart.com - Online
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Thursday
May 12, 2016
The Citadel loses to Winthrop, 7-1
The Citadel baseball team dropped the final home midweek game of the season 7-1 to Winthrop on Wednesday evening. Winthrop (26-21) struck first, taking a 2-0 lead in the first inning and The Citadel (16-33) was unable to mount a rally despite outhitting the Eagles 9-8. Ben Peden, Stephen Windham and William Kinney all recorded two hits in the game and Clay Martin, Bret Hines and Taylor Cothran each chipped in one. With the hits, Windham and Hines have each reached base safely in nine consecutive games. Both of Kinney’s hits were doubles for his 22nd and 23rd of the year.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV 5 (Charleston) - Online
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Wednesday
May 11, 2016
1a. The Citadel will not allow an exception to the uniform to let a Muslim student wear her hijab
The Citadel will not allow a Muslim student to wear a hijab, an exception she had requested to the required uniform to keep her head covered, in keeping with her faith. The family of the accepted student is now considering "all legal options," according to an advocate authorized to speak for them. The uniform is traditional, and central to the ideals of the nearly 175-year-old public military college in South Carolina, so the fact that it was considering an exception to it for an accepted student set off shock waves among alumni. The idea pleased some in the close-knit corps, who felt it could be an important symbol of religious freedom and inclusiveness. But it upset others who felt it would clash with the mission and ideals of The Citadel, where loyalty, teamwork and uniformity are paramount. At The Citadel, students are expected to leave behind their individuality - and almost all of their possessions - and form opinions based on character rather than appearance. Allowing one student to wear something completely different struck many as antithetical to that mission. And some objected, as well, because exceptions have apparently not ever been made for other religions. Christian cadets have been told not to display crosses, for example.
Published in: Washington Post
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Wednesday
May 11, 2016
1b. hijab
hijab
Published in: The New York Times
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Wednesday
May 11, 2016
1c. hijab
hijab
Published in: ABC News
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Wednesday
May 11, 2016
1d. hijab
hijab
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
May 11, 2016
2. A matter of degrees
This is what you didn't see ten days ago after Carlos Dunlap flipped his University of Florida cap into the air and then called the name of Nick Vigil as the Bengals' third-round pick at the NFL Draft in Chicago. "Now you give me your cell phone," said Roger Goodell, who can sense an NFL Films moment with the best of them, "so I can video you walking out on the stage to give him a big hug." So Dr. Diane Ross, the elementary school principal who didn't wear "Dunlaps Mom," on her No. 96 jersey because they couldn't deliver the proper apostrophe, did exactly what the NFL commissioner told her to do. And he expertly captured every precious second. Because he knew exactly what it meant... Falling into place. That's the way Ross wanted it. She had her undergrad degree from South Carolina State, her master's from The Citadel, and she earned her doctorate while working full-time. By the time Dunlap was mulling college offers, she was the principal at Goodwin Elementary in North Charleston, S.C., where she still is in her 29th year of education. Her scouting report: not the best student. "I'd have to wake him up every day to get him to school," she said. "I'd ask him, what are you going to do when you go to Florida? I won't be there to wake you up. "He was a little like me. I did my best when I had to do everything at the last minute. But, yes, he did get better. I'm so proud of him."
Published in: Bengals.com
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Wednesday
May 11, 2016
3. Two Bulldogs Named To NWCA All-Academic Team
The Citadel seniors Matt Frisch and Marshall Haas have been selected to the National Wrestling Coaches Association Division I All-Academic Team. Frisch earned the NWCA academic recognition for the fourth straight year, while Haas earned his third consecutive honor. The Bulldog duo is included among the 123 individuals across the country honored for the 2015-16 season. The Citadel was one of 38 programs nationally to have multiple individuals recognized for their academic achievement and athletic success. Frisch is one of only six Bulldogs to reach the 100-win plateau and completed his collegiate career with 104 victories. The Oxford, Michigan, native was a three-time NCAA Championships qualifier and two-time Southern Conference champion who earned the conference crown at 157 pounds in 2013 and at 149 pounds in 2015. As a senior, Frisch won the All-Academy Championships at 149 pounds. He earned a bachelor's degree in business administration at The Citadel and is pursuing a master's degree in business. Haas won the Southern Conference championship at 197 pounds and earned a berth in the NCAA Championships as a sophomore in 2014. In 2016, he advanced to the final of the 197-pound bracket at the conference championship meet for the third straight year. The South Riding, Virginia, native twice earned SoCon honors during his senior season as he was tabbed SoCon Wrestler of the Week and December SoCon Wrestler of the Month after taking first place at the Reno Tournament of Champions. Haas graduated from The Citadel with a bachelor's degree in political science and is pursuing a master's degree in leadership with a leadership certificate.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Tuesday
May 10, 2016
1. Citadel President Statement
An American Muslim student admitted to the Class of 2020 requested a religious accommodation to wear a head cover, called a hijab, with the standard uniform of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. While we hope the student will enroll in the college this fall, the Commandant of Cadets, after considerable review, determined the uniform exception cannot be granted. Captain (Retired) Geno Paluso's decision was made with my support and the support of The Citadel Board of Visitors. As the Military College of South Carolina, The Citadel has relied upon a highly effective educational model requiring all cadets to adopt a common uniform. Uniformity is the cornerstone of this four-year leader development model. The standardization of cadets in apparel, overall appearance, actions and privileges is essential to the learning goals and objectives of the college. This process reflects an initial relinquishing of self during which cadets learn the value of teamwork to function as a single unit. Upon graduation, The Citadel's graduates are prepared to enter a life committed to principled leadership in military service and civilian careers. The Citadel recognizes the importance of a cadet's spiritual and religious beliefs, providing services for specific needs whenever possible. For example, during the first week of school faith-based organizations on campus and from the community meet with freshmen cadets. Cadet religious officers arrange transportation to churches, mosques, synagogues and other places of worship for those without cars. Accommodations for prayer and dietary needs are common at the college. The diversity of religions and cultural backgrounds represented in the Corps enriches the overall cadet experience and better prepares graduates to become principled leaders in all walks of life, underpinned by The Citadel's core values of honor, duty and respect. Lt Gen John Rosa, USAF (Ret), Citadel President
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Tuesday
May 10, 2016
2. The Citadel will not allow an exception to the uniform to let a Muslim student wear her hijab
The Citadel will not allow a Muslim student to wear a hijab, an exception she had requested to the required uniform in order to keep her head covered, in keeping with her faith. The public military college in South Carolina has never made an exception to the uniform in its long and storied history, so the fact that it was considering it set off shockwaves among alumni. That the first change might be for a Muslim student, at a time of national debate about Islam in U.S. culture, made the idea particularly polarizing, as some welcomed it as a sign of openness and inclusion, and others rejected it as a loss of The Citadel's core beliefs of uniformity and patriotism. The cadets' commandant called the student Tuesday morning to inform her, according to spokeswoman Kimberly Keelor. Lt. Gen John Rosa, Citadel president, issued a statement Tuesday morning.
Published in: Washington Post
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Tuesday
May 10, 2016
3. The Citadel denies cadet's request to wear a hijab
The Citadel has denied a request from an incoming Muslim cadet to wear a hijab. "As the Military College of South Carolina, The Citadel has relied upon a highly effective educational model requiring all cadets to adopt a common uniform," Citadel President Lt. Gen. John Rosa said in a statement. "Uniformity is the cornerstone of this four-year leader development model. The standardization of cadets in apparel, overall appearance, actions and privileges is essential to the learning goals and objectives of the college. This process reflects an initial relinquishing of self during which cadets learn the value of teamwork to function as a single unit. Upon graduation, The Citadel's graduates are prepared to enter a life committed to principled leadership in military service and civilian careers."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
May 10, 2016
4. Even after Emanuel, legislators' love affair with guns knows no bounds
Next time someone complains about the government trying to grab our guns, roll your eyes, and remind him that we live in South Carolina. If that doesn't shut him up, ask him about H.3799. That's the bill the House passed 101-5 and the Senate is poised to pass that abandons our standards and lets Georgia residents with zero training on gun safety or gun laws or anything else cross the border into our state with their guns in their belts. Ask him about H.4398. That's the bill the House passed 98-5 to make sure that people who file for bankruptcy can't have their guns taken by creditors. Perhaps so they can shoot anyone who calls them government-protected deadbeats. Ask him about H.4701. That bill, which passed the House by a much closer 69-27, makes it illegal for state agencies to "enforce any federal law, rule, or regulation that took effect after January 1, 2016, that limits the right of a person to own, possess, or use a firearm, ammunition, or firearm accessories." Ask him, for that matter, about The Citadel, which just got bullied into abandoning its internal student-conduct rule that prohibited students from storing guns in their on-campus vehicles.
Published in: The State
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Tuesday
May 10, 2016
5. Military school denies Muslim's request to wear headscarf
The Citadel military school in South Carolina has denied a request by a newly admitted student to wear a traditional Muslim headscarf. The Citadel said last month it was considering the woman's request to wear the head covering known as a hijab. But the college's president, retired Lt. Gen John Rosa, said in a statement Tuesday that after considerable review, the college has denied the request. He said the cadet system is based on a common uniform, and standardization of cadets in appearance, actions and privileges is essential to the military system. The statement said the college recognizes the importance of the spiritual and religious beliefs of cadets and makes accommodations for prayer and dietary needs. He said he still hopes the student, whose name hasn't been released, will enroll.
Published in: MiltaryTimes.com
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Tuesday
May 10, 2016
6. Long Valley Native Named Battalion Leader At The Citadel
Jesse Nardone was always a good kid. Now he's becoming an impressive young man. The Long Valley native and former Scout is heading into his final year at the Citadel in South Carolina, and he's been appointed to a leadership position at the military school. Nardone has been named a 2nd Battalion Commander for the class of 2017, one of nine top-ranking positions. Nardone and his fellow leaders were honored during a private ceremony with The Citadel's president, Lt. Gen. John. W. Rosa; The Citadel's Provost, Gen. Connie Ledoux Book, Ph.D., and the Commandant of Cadets, Capt. Geno Paluso. The new officers
Published in: Long Valley Patch
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Tuesday
May 10, 2016
7. Bride scrambles for wedding locale after Citadel Beach House fire
"I saw the picture," Elena Guidry, bride-to-be said. "It's just like seeing your dreams go up in flames." Guidry, who's from Rock Hill, was counting down the days until walking down the aisle at the Citadel Beach House. Then, she received an email that plans had suddenly changed. "I get this email saying the Citadel Beach House has had this massive fire," Guidry said, "And it is no more... basically there is going to be no wedding there." According to officials, Isle of Palms Fire Department responded to an alarm at The Citadel Beach House around 3:43 a.m Sunday morning. Fire crews from the Town of Sullivan's Island and the Town of Mount Pleasant also assisted the call. The house's caretaker and his wife who lived there escaped, but reports from The Citadel indicate significant structural damage to the event space. "I saw yesterday morning the real damage facing the house," Wild Dunes resident Al Brumfield. "It looks like it went all the way from the first floor to the roof." The Citadel reports the beach house is closed until further notice. Citadel spokeswoman Kimberly Keelor said event coordinators are "working around the clock" to help people who booked the beachside venue. Keelor didn't have data on the number of scheduled events but said the space is booked almost every weekend this time of year, particularly with wedding season.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
May 9, 2016
1. Citadel Class of 2016
View the clip of The Citadel's graduation from Live 5 News here.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
May 9, 2016
2. Graduation at The Citadel - photos from The Post and Courier
Please view the article to see a gallery of photos from The Citadel's graduation ceremony on May 7, 2016.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
May 9, 2016
3a. The Citadel names First and Second Honor Graduates
The David Shingler Spell First Honor Graduate Award is presented to the cadet graduate who has earned the highest cumulative grade point average based on all courses taken at The Citadel. 2nd Lt. Matthew Scalise, graduating with a degree in biology, received the prestigious award for the Class of 2016. Scalise has earned numerous scholarships and cadet awards. Recently, he received the Best Undergraduate Poster Presentation for Microbiology at the spring meeting of the South Carolina Branch of the American Society for Biology, the Skanchy Award, given to biology majors for outstanding research by a student, and the School of Science and Mathematics Outstanding Undergraduate Award. The David Shingler Spell Second Honor Graduate Award is presented to the cadet graduate who has earned the second highest cumulative grade point ratio based on all courses taken at The Citadel. Cadet Austen Lee earned the prestigious award, which was presented by Col. Gene Pinson, a member of The Citadel Board of Visitors.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Monday
May 9, 2016
3b. Class of 2016: The Citadel as family tradition
One father had the once in a lifetime opportunity to present two diplomas on the same stage Saturday. Ellison Matthew Smith, III, Class of 1981, presented his graduating smith-twins1twin sons, Ellison Smith, IV and Augustus Smith, II, with their diplomas. "I am honored to receive my diploma from my father who raised us on the very same core values he learned from his days at The Citadel," said Augustus Smith, II. "It means a lot to know that my brother and I are keeping the family tradition alive." Over 50 of The Citadel's Class of 2016 graduates saw a familiar face as they walked across the stage to accept their diplomas. A tradition since 1962, thousands of graduates share a legacy with their predecessors dating back to the late 1800s. This year there are 42 legacy graduates in the South Carolina Corps of Cadets and 12 legacy graduates in The Citadel Graduate College. View the article to see The Class of 2016 legacy graduates.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Monday
May 9, 2016
3c. Cadet Anthony Milani awarded John O. Willson ring
Presented each year to the senior cadet voted by classmates as the finest, purest and most courteous, the John O. Willson ring is a highly coveted honor among graduating cadets. Cadet Anthony Milani, 2016 recipient of the John O. Willson Ring Award and native of Redwood City, California, has earned recognition from his peers for his principled leadership during his four years at The Citadel. In addition to being named to the Dean's List several times, Milani has earned Gold Stars for his outstanding academic performance. An electrical engineering major and Company Commander, he commissioned into the U.S. Army on May 6, 2016. The award is named after Dr. John O. Willson, a Citadel Class of 1862 graduate, and Confederate Cavalryman in Company F, Sixth South Carolina Cavalry, a unit comprised of Citadel cadets. Following graduation, Willson became a successful lawyer, preacher and editor and served as the second president of Lander College in Greenwood, South Carolina. In 1911, the John O. Willson ring fund was established to recognize the finest and most courteous cadet in each graduating class.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Monday
May 9, 2016
3d. Professor and graduating cadet receive Algernon Sydney Sullivan awards
The Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award is a bronze medallion presented by the Provost of The Citadel at graduation each year through the New York Southern Society to a student and a faculty member in recognition of high thought and noble endeavor. The 2015-16 recipients of the awards are Tiffany Silverman, director of The Citadel Fine Arts Program, and Cadet Louis Boyd. As the Director of The Citadel Fine Arts Program, Tiffany Silverman, is responsible for transforming several existing courses into a full-scale Fine Arts curriculum that has sparked passion among cadets and has become one of the fastest-growing minors at the college. While cultivating enthusiasm for the arts on campus, Silverman has also brought the South Carolina Corps of Cadets outside the gates into the vibrant cultural landscape of Charleston through art walks and gallery tours. She has captured the attention of artists and donors who otherwise would not have visited campus, and through the Charleston Strong mural, she helped the city of Charleston heal the wounds of a tragic event. When India Company needed strong leadership, Cadet Louis Boyd was handpicked to command the struggling cadet company. Under his keen watch, India Company was awarded the Regimental Commander's Bowl for the highest overall performance in the training of cadre and their freshman, and for the first time in years, the company had a freshman retention rate of 100 percent through the cadre period. India Company had the highest overall semester and cumulative GPA in the Corps. In addition to his leadership in the Corps of Cadets, Boyd has been a servant leader in his hometown of St. Paul, Minnesota, where he has generously given his time by fundraising and volunteering with several nonprofit organizations.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Monday
May 9, 2016
3e. The Citadel Class of 2016: Honorary Degrees
The Citadel Board of Visitors presented honorary degrees to three people during commencement exercises for the South Carolina Corps of Cadets and The Citadel Graduate College on May 7, 2016. The list of those presented the honorary degrees are: Gen. Stanley Allen McChrystal, USA, (Ret.), Commencement speaker for The South Carolina Corps of Cadets, Col. Cole Christian Kingseed, USA, (Ret.), Commencement speaker for The Citadel Graduate College, Lonnie Norris Carter, Judge Robert Nathaniel Jenkins, Sr., 1st Lt. Patrick Cleburne McClary, III, USMC, (Ret.) and Lt. Col. Frederick James Whittle, USMC, (Ret.).
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Monday
May 9, 2016
4. The Class of 2016 has the most student loan debt yet
Soon college graduates will put on their cap and gown. The Citadel, Charleston Southern University and The College of Charleston all have graduation ceremonies the weekend of May 6th. For many, this means they will have to start paying back their student loans. According to student loan experts, the graduating class of 2016 has record levels of student loan debts. They have an average of $37,000 in student loan debt per student. That is a 6% increase from last year. There is also some good news for these graduates. Starting salaries are also on the rise. The average entry level salary for those who graduated in 2015 was $43,000 a year. That is a 7.5% increase from 2014.
Broadcast on: WCBD-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
May 9, 2016
5. Early morning blaze damages Citadel Beach Club, closes event venue indefinitely
A couple escaped without injury when an early morning fire broke out at The Citadel Beach Club on the Isle of Palms. Around 3:43 a.m., the Isle of Palms Fire Department received a call reporting the blaze at 4700 Palm Blvd. Two people were inside the building sleeping when the fire broke out. Isle of Palms Fire Chief Ann Graham said the man heard a noise, and after waking up, heard the blaring fire alarm. He woke his wife and both were able to escape. "They got out OK," Graham said. The Citadel confirmed in a tweet that no one inside was hurt. One firefighter was transported to East Cooper Medical Center, treated and released. The Citadel Beach Club is a popular event venue, spanning five acres of oceanfront property on Isle of Palms.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
May 9, 2016
6a. Brown, Williams commissioned as officers
Tyquain Brown, of Graniteville, and Corey Williams, of North Augusta, were among the 104 men and women from The Citadel commissioned into the Army. Families, friends, faculty and staff assembled at the Summerall Chapel on The Citadel campus to honor the newly commissioned officers. The commissioning cadets and students took oaths accepting their appointments as officers in the U.S. armed services.
Published in: Aiken Standard
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Monday
May 9, 2016
6b. Henry County gets officer designation at military college
Stephen Cleary of McDonough was recently designated an officer in the rising Class of 2017 at The Citadel in Charleston, S.C. He was among some 80 cadets designated as commanders, regimental staff, sergeants major or first sergeants in the class.
Published in: Henry Herald
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Monday
May 9, 2016
6c. Recognition Day at The Citadel
Men and women who entered The Citadel as freshmen last fall have officially been sworn in as members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets as of April 9. Recognition Day 2016 marks the end of what many consider the toughest first year of college military training in the country. Each year, hundreds of people line the streets to cheer for the freshmen as they march, dressed in their brilliant, white uniforms, to attend "The Oath Renewal on The Citadel Green." The oath marks their transition to officially becoming members of the Corps. The green at Marion Square was the original parade ground for the college, when it was founded in 1842 in the structure that is now the Embassy Suites. John Baker of Sumter was among 588 other freshmen cadets that have been officially sworn into the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. The march follows three weeks of Transition to Recognition Training during which the knobs take classes examining student ethics and leadership skills and the honor code. They also undergo inspections and drills training.
Published in: The Sumter Item
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Monday
May 9, 2016
7. 337th ACS welcomes new commander
Col. Keith McGuire, incoming commander 337th Air Control Squadron, addresses his new squadron at the 337th ACS change of command ceremony at Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla., May 5, 2016. McGuire received his commission from the Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina in May of 2000 and has more than 1,100 hours of operational experience on the E-8C Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System.
Published in: AETC.AF.mil
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Monday
May 9, 2016
8a. The Citadel falls to Mercer, 11-4 on Friday
The Citadel baseball team dropped the second game of its series to Mercer on Friday evening, 11-4. For the second time in the series, the Bulldogs (15-32, 5-12 SoCon) jumped out to a quick lead in the first inning of the ballgame after Clay Martin scored on a wild pitch and Bret Hines cleared the bases with a two-out single through the right side to put The Citadel on top 3-0. Mercer (30-17, 14-6 SoCon) responded with a run in the bottom of the frame and then added eight in the bottom of the second inning to take a 9-3 lead. Taylor Cothran connected for his first career double in the top of the seventh inning with one out and then came around to score on a single to right field by Martin to cut the Mercer lead to 10-4. Shy Phillips, Bret Hines, Cothran and Martin finished with two hits in the contest to account for eight of The Citadel's 10. Hines drove in two of the four runs and Martin tallied an RBI as well. Morgan Foulks pitched 2.0 innings of scoreless and hitless ball, fanning a new career-high four batters. The series now takes a break as six Bulldogs travel back to Charleston for graduation on Saturday. The final game between the two schools at Mercer is set for 1 p.m. on Sunday afternoon. Live stats and audio will be available at CitadelSports.com.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
May 9, 2016
8b. The Citadel salvages a 9-8 win over Mercer in series finale
The Citadel baseball team went 11-for-20 with two outs and collected 14 hits en route to a 9-8 win over second-place Mercer on Sunday. With the win over Mercer (30-18, 14-7 SoCon), the Bulldogs (16-32, 6-12 SoCon) have now taken at least one game from the top three teams in the conference. The Bulldogs scored in the first inning in all three games of the series, and Sunday's run came courtesy of a solo home run over the left field wall by Mike Deese, whose fourth home run of the year gave The Citadel a 1-0 lead. Mercer took the lead just a half inning later on a two-run home run over the right field wall, but William Kinney ended the scoring threat with an incredible bare-handed snag up the middle to throw the runner out at first. Thanks to a three-run, two-out rally an inning later, the Bulldogs retook the lead in the top of the second. Shy Phillips tied the game with a single to center field, scoring Taylor Cothran from second base, and Mike Deese tallied his second and third RBI of the day with a single up the middle to give The Citadel a 4-2 lead. The Citadel continued to do damage with two outs after Kinney plated three off of his second home run of the year to extend the lead to 7-2 in the top of the fourth. Both Kinney and Deese collected three RBI in the game.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
May 9, 2016
8c. South Lake's Jessy Page wins back-to-back state titles
For Jessy Page, years of practice, discipline and dedication boiled down to six throws of the discus. Page went to Bradenton IMG Academy for the Florida High School Athletic Association Class 3A state finals on Saturday and walked away from the final meet of her high school career with a second straight state title FHSAA title... Page's hard work has already bore fruit. She has earned an athletic scholarship to The Citadel, the storied military college in Charleston, South Carolina. It will be big change from life in Lake County, but not an unfamiliar one. An "Army brat," Page moved around a lot with her father and stepmother, now both retired from the military. The example of self sacrifice and hard work her parents set helped her become more grounded. Nonetheless, Page is open to a wide range of possibilities as her future unfolds. "I want to go in to the military," Page said. I either want to be an Apache pilot (an attack helicopter used by the U.S. Army) or do hospital administration."
Published in: Daily Commercial
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Friday
May 6, 2016
1. A profile of The Citadel Class of 2016 at commencement
The Citadel Class of 2016 includes 564 South Carolina Corps of Cadets, 11 active duty students, and 27 veteran students, as well as 299 graduate students from The Citadel Graduate College (CGC) 68 graduates from the Evening Undergraduate Program operated by the CGC. The total number of graduates from The Citadel is 898. Please view the article for more SCCC graduation statistics.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Friday
May 6, 2016
2. The Citadel Class of 2016 graduates recognized for leadership and achievements
Many leaders in the South Carolina Corps of Cadets have new awards to add to their resumes. More than 50 cadets and students were recognized for excellence in areas of academics, leadership and civic and military ROTC service at the 2016 Awards Convocation. The event was held Thursday, May 5, at The Citadel's McAlister Field House. View the article to see all award recipients.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Friday
May 6, 2016
3. America's newly commissioned officers from The Citadel Class of 2016
On May 6, 2016, over 150 men and women from The Citadel Class of 2016 commissioned into the Air Force, Army, Navy or Marine Corps. View the article to see the list of cadets and students that have commissioned into the armed services.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Friday
May 6, 2016
4a. Black Hawk helicopters land on Citadel campus for commissioning
From kindergarten to college, graduation season calls for pomp and circumstance. The Citadel will make no exception Friday morning, ahead of its annual military commissioning ceremonies. Three Black Hawk helicopters, flown by alumni of the Citadel, were scheduled to land on the military college's WLI field at 7:30 a.m. So far, two of them have landed. The Blackhawks will fly in honor of the 151 cadets who will be commissioned throughout the morning. They will officially be sworn in as officers during a ceremony for their military branch.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Friday
May 6, 2016
4b. commencement
commencement
Broadcast on: WTAT-TV Charleston, SC
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Friday
May 6, 2016
5. NASA, Space Station Partners Announce Future Mission Crew Members
NASA and its International Space Station partners have announced the crew members for missions to the orbiting laboratory in 2017. The selection includes first-time space flyer NASA astronaut Scott Tingle and veteran Randy Bresnik. "There's so much going on aboard the space station at this point, so many science experiments and technology demonstrations," said Chris Cassidy, chief of the Astronaut Office at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston. "Scott and Randy have their work cut out for them, but I have no doubt they'll do excellent jobs."... Bresnik's mission will begin in November 2017, when he and his crewmates Sergey Ryazansky of Roscosmos and Norishige Kanai of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) will join Tingle, Skvortsov and Vagner on the station for Expedition 54. Bresnik, who considers Santa Monica, California, to be his hometown, is a retired colonel in the U.S. Marine Corps. Bresnik received his commission in May 1989 and was designated a Marine Corps aviator in 1992. He flew the F/A-18 Hornet in support of Operation Southern Watch and Operation Iraqi Freedom. He has accumulated more than 6,000 hours in 81 types of aircraft. Bresnik was selected as an astronaut in May 2004. His first spaceflight was in November 2009 aboard space shuttle Atlantis for STS-129, which lasted 11 days. The flight was the 31st shuttle flight to the space station, during which Bresnik conducted two spacewalks totaling 11 hours and 50 minutes. Bresnik graduated from The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina, in 1989 with a bachelor's degree in mathematics, and earned a master's degree in aviation systems from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, in 2002. He is also a 2008 graduate of the U.S. Air Force Air War College.
Published in: FreshNews.com
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Friday
May 6, 2016
6. Make your bed
In small-town USA 1965, Dewey Poe was 20 years old when he failed out of state university and left to face his disappointed father. As the first of four children to attend college, anything short of graduation would have been unacceptable. Confused and demoralized, my grandfather found sanctuary at a Columbus Marine Corps Recruiting Office. At 21 he took the only option he felt possible and enlisted in the Marines. A move to simply save face ended up being a 27-year long career. He retired with the rank of Gunnery Sergeant, after travelling the world by ship. View the article to read the full essay written by Landon Poe, a cadet at The Citadel Military College of South Carolina. He majors in both Business Administration and International Relations. After graduation, he expects to pursue a masters degree in planning, growth and regeneration at the University of Cambridge. "Too often, race, poverty and environment converge nationwide to create communities near polluting industries, concentrating disadvantage within the community," he said. "I hope to become a policy maker, rejuvenating disadvantaged communities to create equal access to healthy living and working environments."
Published in: The Summerville Journal Scence
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Friday
May 6, 2016
7. Students named as Citadel leaders - Education Briefs - Week of 5/6
The Citadel's Commandant of Cadets has designated commanders, regimental staff, sergeants major and first sergeants for the Class of 2017. Cadets who will assume the nine top-ranking positions were recognized during a private ceremony. Alexandria Guild and Colby Hendrix of Mooresville were among 78 other cadets that have been named as part of the rising leadership.
Published in: Mooresville Weekly
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Friday
May 6, 2016
8. Mythical and toxic romance with a Confederate banner
Some years ago, I wrote an opinion piece on the various myths surrounding the third flag, the Confederate Navy Jack, which flew on our Statehouse dome from 1962 until 2000. In the piece, I discussed the mythical and somewhat perverted history of that flag. The reactions were venomous, and the threats were numerous. They led to law enforcement investigations and its regular presence with me for much of my last five years in state government. I wrote at the time that it was amazing how many people would rather worship an obvious myth than accept the proven truth. I pointed out that it is a myth that the Navy Jack flying atop the dome was ever the official flag of the Confederacy. I was ridiculed by the ill-informed and suffered silence from those who knew or should have known the truth. It is also a myth that the Navy Jack was placed on the dome to memorialize those who fought and died in that ill-fated cause. The fact is the Navy Jack was raised at the height of the state's rabid resistance to extending civil rights to its black citizens, though ostensibly to celebrate the centennial of the Civil War. Although the resolution that placed it on the dome is silent on the matter, the common understanding at the time was that the flag was intended to fly only for the duration of the celebration.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Friday
May 6, 2016
9a. Ex-Wando, Citadel receiver Brandon Eakins ready for NFL shot with Kansas City Chiefs
Brandon Eakins boarded an airplane for the first time Friday morning. Kansas City, here he comes. Nervous? "I'm definitely excited and a little nervous," said Eakins, the former football standout at Wando High School and The Citadel. “For one thing, I've never been on a plane before. My girlfriend told me there would be a little turbulence, but not to be scared." Turbulence aside, Eakins has added reason for butterflies this weekend. The 6-2, 205-pound wide receiver - who also earns his master's degree from The Citadel this weekend - is embarking on what he hopes is a life-changing journey, the first step toward an NFL career. An undrafted free agent, Eakins was invited to the Kansas City Chiefs rookie mini-camp which runs Saturday through Monday. If Eakins makes a good enough impression, he could return home with a free-agent contract in hand. "It's the same game I've played my whole life," said Eakins. "It's just a lot faster." Playing receiver in The Citadel's triple-option offense is not a ticket to eye-catching statistics, but Eakins' size and performance at The Citadel's pro day were enough to draw scouts' attention.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Friday
May 6, 2016
9b. The Citadel drops series opener at Mercer, 8-7
The Citadel baseball team came up one run short of a come-from-behind win over Mercer on Thursday night, dropping the first game of the series 8-7. Thanks to two leadoff home runs in the first and second innings by Clay Martin and Ben Peden, the Bulldogs (15-31, 5-11 SoCon) took an early 2-0 lead in the game. Mercer (29-17, 13-6 SoCon) answered with five runs of its own in the bottom of the second to take a 5-2 lead. The Citadel responded with another run in the top of the third as Martin took advantage of a Mercer error on a grounder hit by Stephen Windham to scamper home and close the gap to two. The Bears tacked on three more runs in the bottom of the fourth to make it an 8-3 ballgame. Ben Peden drove in his second run of the game in the top of the fifth inning, stroking a two-out single through the right side to score Shy Phillips from second base and make it 8-4 Bears. The Citadel added another run in the top of the sixth off of a home run by Bret Hines to trim the lead to 8-5. The homer was the first of the season for Hines and just the second of his career.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Thursday
May 5, 2016
1a. To walk at graduation, cadets take one final test
In the inky, predawn hours Wednesday, four senior cadets waited at the end line of Willson Field for their final exam of the year. Retired Army Lt. Col. Pamela Barton, The Citadel's assistant commandant for operations and training, called roll at 5:33 a.m. "Everybody stays here until I get full accountability," she barked. Bright field lights illuminated the end zone, where the grass was moist from the previous night's storm. As Charleston slept, four young men in blue shirts and shorts mustered all their strength for their last physical fitness test before graduation on Saturday. Every repetition matters. Each passing second counts. Senior cadets who fail the Citadel physical fitness test, or CPFT in cadet parlance, are deemed "physically deficient." They can't participate in commencement ceremonies or the Long Gray Line parade - a rite of passage for graduating Corps members, their final march across Summerall Field. They will receive their diplomas, but they will miss the pomp, circumstance and pride of graduation at The Citadel. For these cadets, Wednesday morning was their last chance to pass. "This is a test you can't cram for," said Sgt. 1st Class Arthur Rich of the Commandant's Physical Readiness Program. "You have to study for it all four years."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
May 5, 2016
1b. grad pt test
graduation
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Thursday
May 5, 2016
2. Webcast of Commencement 2016
If you cannot be in McAlister Field House with us, the webcast of Commencement exercises can be viewed at the link in the article.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Thursday
May 5, 2016
3. The Citadel names cadets and students to 2016 Who's Who list
Over 80 cadets, veterans and active duty students have been chosen by Citadel faculty members as the college's 2016 Who's Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges. Who's Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges is one of the most highly regarded and long-standing honors programs in the nation. Nominations are based on strength of character, academic achievement, military achievement, leadership, campus activities and participation and excellence in athletics at the varsity, intramural or club sport level. The Who's Who students were recognized during the annual Awards Convocation on May 5, 2016. Please view the article to see the list of students named to the list.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Thursday
May 5, 2016
4. Charleston Salt and Iron talks past, present, and future
Charleston Salt and Iron, edited by Wendy Nilsen Pollitzer, is a collection of 40 essays, written by local business owners, fishermen, writers, and artists, who are sincere in their dedication to Charleston. Complemented by large-format photos of the city, the book delves a little deeper into a city so many people know and love. In "Southern Paradox," Blue Bicycle owner and director of YALLFest, Jonathan Sanchez, talks about the two Charlestons he has come to know - the one he fell in love with when he moved here in 1996, and the one that he sees evolving before him today. He writes, "I write this not as an elegy to the past, nor to complain that Charleston has become, as I heard a kid say recently 'too bougie' (with a soft g, as in bourgeois), but more to show how long it held out, and still does." He goes on to describe the people trying to "make an ordinary life in an extraordinary place," like line cooks, carriage drivers, waitresses. "There's a true weirdness to Charleston," says Sanchez. "You have to be specific to show that weirdness." He gets specific in this evocative line, "And the Rue de Jean waitress, in the gravel parking lot by the dumpster, eating coq au vin out of a Styrofoam tray."
Published in: Charleston City Paper
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Thursday
May 5, 2016
5. Duke designated officer by Citadel's Commandant of Cadets
Manning native William Duke was one of 78 cadets to be designated an officer by The Citadel's Commandant of Cadets. The commandant designated commanders, regimental staff, sergeants major and first sergeants for the Class of 2017. Cadets who will assume the nine top-ranking positions were recognized during a private ceremony with The Citadel's president, Lt. Gen. John W. Rosa, The Citadel's Provost, Gen. Connie Ledoux Book, Ph.D., and the Commandant of Cadets, Capt. Geno Paluso. The new officers were presented with chevrons that will be added to their uniforms to reflect their ranks. They will assume their stations when the fall semester begins.
Published in: ManningLive.com
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Thursday
May 5, 2016
6. The Citadel holds Recognition Day for local students
Men and women who entered The Citadel as freshmen last fall have officially been sworn in as members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets as of April 9. Recognition Day 2016 marks the end of what many consider the toughest first year college military-training in the country. Each year, hundreds of people line the streets to cheer for the freshmen as they march, dressed in their brilliant, white uniforms, to attend "The Oath Renewal on The Citadel Green." The oath marks their transition to officially becoming members of the Corps. The green at Marion Square was the original parade ground for the college, when it was founded in 1842 in the structure that is now the Embassy Suites. The march follows three weeks of Transition to Recognition Training during which the knobs take classes examining student ethics and leadership skills and the honor code. They also undergo inspections and drills training. Among 588 freshman cadets who have been officially sworn into the South Carolina Corps of Cadets are: Columbia - Jackson Adams, Bradley Carter, Edward Chapman, Daiquan German, Eugene Matthews, Connor McCloskey, Preston Powell, Lake Riddle, Garrett Usrey; Elgin - Michael Conde, Andrew Laulusa; Blythewood - Gunter Corley, Sheldon Herbert, William James, Steven Pollard, Colin Shin.
Published in: The Northeast News
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Thursday
May 5, 2016
7. CCSD Teacher of the Year Finalist: Angie Greene
Tonight Charleston County School District will announce its teacher of the year. All week we've introduced you to the top five finalists. Angie Greene is a guidance counselor at James Simons Elementary. As a graduate of Winthrop University with a Masters degree from the Citadel, Ms. Greene has had the opportunity to serve as a classroom teacher, reading teacher, and school counselor. She says a profession in education is not easy. It requires passion, commitment, and a lot of grit. Greene says she is honored to be among the top finalist, "It is very shocking, very unexpected. Ii feel very honored and proud to represent James Simons," says Greene. The district teacher of the year will receive a free year's lease on a mini cooper from Mini of Charleston. CCSD will announce teacher of the year tonight during the Riverdogs game.
Broadcast on: WCBD-TV Charleston, SC
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Thursday
May 5, 2016
8a. Western's Hill ready for military life
Western Albemarle wrestler Russ Hill is planning on a career in the military after school anyway, so why wait to immerse himself in that life? Hill, who owns more than 100 career victories, is heading to The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina, where he anticipates a move up in weight class and plenty of pushups. "It will be kind of a mentally tough environment, especially the first year, but I just fall back on wrestling," Hill said. "It's a demanding sport and you have to be tough to succeed. I know I'm tough enough to make it through that first year." Hill's father, a career Army officer, is a Citadel alum, so the Warriors' leader goes in as a legacy. He went 36-1 this winter heading into the state tournament, and improved his career record to 107-4 before finishing third in the state at 145 pounds. Hill expects a move up to 149 or 157 pounds at the next level, and has spent three or four days a week in Lexington since the season ended, training with former Davidson All-American and current VMI assistant coach Alex Radsky to prepare for the added weight.
Published in: The Daily Progress
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Thursday
May 5, 2016
8b. 'Dogs Travel to Mercer For SoCon Series
The Citadel baseball team will travel to Macon, Georgia, for a three-game Southern Conference series against Mercer beginning on Thursday. The Citadel and Mercer met on the diamond at Joe Riley Park five times last season with the first matchup coming on April 2, 2015, when James Reeves tossed the sixth no-hitter in The Citadel history. Mercer is currently 28-17 and tied with the Western Carolina Catamounts, who the Bulldogs took two of three from two weeks ago, at second in the SoCon standings with a 12-6 record. Live stats, audio and video will be available at CitadelSports.com for the 6 p.m. games on Thursday and Friday. Sunday's contest, slated for 1 p.m., will have live stats and audio available at CitadelSports.com. All three games will be played at Claude Smith Field.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Thursday
May 5, 2016
9. William Tims III Obituary
William Clark Tims, III, of Andrews, passed away on April 27, 2016 at his river house outside of Andrews. He was the widower of Kaye B. Tims, whom he was married to for over thirty years. Though he had struggled with a decline in his health in recent years, he was known to say time and time again, "I've had a good life." Originally from Hemingway, South Carolina, he was born on November 16, 1949, and was the younger of W.C. and Margie Tims' two children. His love of hunting and the outdoors grew from time spent with his uncles during his childhood; as did his experience with the family car business, where he would go on to spend most of his career. He met the love of his life, Kaye, while attending classes at The Citadel in Charleston, SC, in 1968. They were married in 1971 and resided in Andrews where he owned his own car dealership for a number of years and she taught school until her passing in 2003. As a prolific and experienced deer hunter, he was especially proud of having entries in the state record book for two of his trophy bucks. He was able to attain his dream of owning his own land to hunt and taking long leisurely truck rides there. Over the years, he fed many a hungry hunting club with his massive pots of pileau. The pileau was a family favorite and longtime staple and was proclaimed, by many fortunate enough to try it, to be the best they'd ever had.
Published in: South Strand News
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Wednesday
May 4, 2016
1. Military achievements by local residents week of May 2 to 6
Matthew Bartolo, of Cicero, became a member of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets at The Citadel.
Published in: Syracuse.com
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Wednesday
May 4, 2016
2. Citadel will earn $500,000 for 2018 football game at Alabama
The Citadel's 2018 football game at defending national champion Alabama, announced Tuesday, has been in the works for a while -- long enough for Bulldogs coach Brent Thompson to shift his perspective. "When I was the offensive coordinator, I was like, 'Yeah, let’s do this!'" said Thompson. "But when you are the head coach, it's like, 'Whoa, wait a minute.'" In all seriousness, Thompson -- promoted from offensive coordinator to head coach in February -- sees nothing but good things emerging from the Nov. 17, 2018 game at Alabama in famed Bryant-Denny Stadium, which seats more than 100,000 fans. The Citadel will earn a guarantee of $500,000, bringing its total take from games against North Carolina, Clemson and Alabama over the next three years to $1.2 million. The game also means The Citadel will have played 12 of the 14 teams currently in the SEC, missing only Mississippi State and Missouri. And Thompson will get to match wits with Nick Saban, who has won five national titles at LSU and Alabama -- provided that both are still coaching their teams in 2018. "It will be fun, that's for sure," Thompson said. "When we played Florida State (in 2014), I was up in the coaches' box. So I'm excited to be on the field this time, and it will be a great experience for our kids."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
May 3, 2016
1. Learn online from The Citadel from almost anywhere in the U.S. or beyond
People living in most U.S. states and overseas can now learn from the proven producer of principled leaders. Starting in the fall of 2016, The Citadel's nationally-recognized programs will be available to prospective students who live in 38 states and almost anywhere in the world because of changes in policies governing online learning that were recently approved by the Governor of South Carolina. The Citadel's fully online programs include six master's degrees, two graduate certificates, and two undergraduate degree completion programs. Applications are currently being accepted for the fall semester of the 2016-17 academic year. "The admissions requirements and the deeply-rooted quality of the instruction provided by The Citadel haven't changed, only the locations from which students can study have changed," said Connie Book, Ph.D., provost and dean of the college for The Citadel. "The Citadel's newly expanded online learning is especially beneficial to career service people who want to complete an undergraduate degree in order to meet the criteria for military promotions. Now, they can receive a Citadel education from almost any American military base." While some of the programs have been available for years on campus, and some online, view the article to see all classes that are now all available fully online.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Tuesday
May 3, 2016
2. Class of 2017 rising leadership announced by Commandant of Cadets
The Citadel's Commandant of Cadets has designated commanders, regimental staff, sergeants major and first sergeants for the Class of 2017. Cadets who will assume the nine top-ranking positions were recognized during a private ceremony with The Citadel's president, Lt. Gen. John W. Rosa, The Citadel's Provost, Gen. Connie Ledoux Book, Ph.D., and the Commandant of Cadets, Capt. Geno Paluso. The new officers were presented with chevrons that will be added to their uniforms to reflect their ranks. They will assume their stations when the fall semester begins.
Published in: Moultrie News
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Tuesday
May 3, 2016
3. Editorial: Citadel should deny uniform exemption request
The Citadel is considering a change that would mark the school's second major progressive shift in more than 20 years. Most of the time, we're all-in when it comes to progressiveness in every sector, from education, to business, religion and sports. This time is different. In response to a request from a would-be cadet who has been accepted to the school, The Citadel is considering granting her permission to wear a hijab - a scarf that covers the hair and neck - in accordance with her Muslim faith. The school's uniform code does not allow for head coverings other than what's standard issue and if it allows the student to wear the hijab, it would be a historic deviation from tradition. We hope The Citadel sticks with tradition and that has nothing to do with Muslims or Islam. If the request came from a devout Jewish student who wants to wear a yarmulke, a Sikh whose faith requires wearing a turban or a Rastafarian regarding his or her dreadlocks, we would feel the same way. Although commonly referred to by the shortened version of its name, the school is called The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina. An excerpt from its website says, "The Citadel is best known nationally for its Corps of Cadets, which draws students from about 45 states and a dozen countries. The men and women in the Corps live and study under a classical military system that makes leadership and character development an essential part of the educational experience."
Published in: The Herald
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Tuesday
May 3, 2016
4. Recognition Day at The Citadel
Conrad Geis of Streetsboro is among the 588 freshman cadets that have been officially sworn into the South Carolina Corps of Cadets.
Published in: Statesboro Gateway News
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Tuesday
May 3, 2016
5. Cadets sworn in
Lawrence County natives Derek Earl Waddington and Adam Wawrzynski were among 588 freshman cadets who were officially sworn into the South Carolina Corps of Cadets at the Citadel on April 9. Recognition Day is the culmination of a freshman cadet's eight-month experience as Citadel knobs, during which they endured rigid formations, walked in single-file lines and maintained a highly regimented way of life at the Charleston military school. Waddington, a 2015 Mohawk graduate, is enrolled in The Citadel's School of Business and is a Highland bagpipe player in its Regimental Band and Pipes. Waddington resides with his grandparents, Dr. Robert D. and Judith Gurgacz Waddington, in Mahoning Township. Wawrzynski, a 2015 Neshannock graduate, was a defensive lineman on the Citadel Bulldog football team and is a mechanical engineering major, making the fall Dean's List. He is a son of Dr. Paul and LeeAnn Wawrzynski.
Published in: New Castle News
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Tuesday
May 3, 2016
6. CCSD Teacher of the Year Finalist: Karen Pickering
Charleston County School District has announced its top five finalists for district Teacher of the Year. Karen Pickering is an English teacher at Stall High School. She's a graduate of Winthrop University with a Masters Degree from The Citadel. She says she was inspired by her parents,' both former educators. Karen says teaching is her passion. "It is awesome! I did not expect it, so just is an awesome feeling, and I'm so happy to have this honor. To be a teacher is to be a person who is going to embark upon making change for our children for our future. so a teacher has a powerful role because he or she can make that difference in someone's life." The district's teacher of the year will receive a free year's lease on a mini cooper from Mini of Charleston. CCSD will announce Teacher of the Year on Thursday, May 5th, during the Riverdogs game. Coming up Tuesday on News 2 Today, we will introduce you to the second finalist for CCSD Teacher of the Year.
Broadcast on: WCBD-TV Charleston, SC
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Tuesday
May 3, 2016
7. Eight White Knoll High Athletes Sign Athletic Scholarships
White Knoll High School is celebrating after eight more of its student-athletes signed athletic scholarships to attend college. Here is the list, provided by the school, of who is going where: Caterra Barkins signed an athletic scholarship with Coker College, where Barkins will compete on the women's track team. Rian Burris signed an athletic scholarship with The Citadel.
Broadcast on: WLTX-TV Columbia, SC
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Monday
May 2, 2016
1. NSA lauds The Citadel for cybersecurity training
As a computer science intern at the Department of Homeland Security this spring, Citadel junior cadet Anthony Zovich said he helped make a little tweak that solved a big problem. "When I got there, they had an external firewall, but if someone on the inside wanted to do some damage, then they could find thousands of policemen and women's security numbers and addresses," said Zovich, who is president of the school's Cybersecurity Club. Zovich's solution - a new internal login system that he said is now in use at the department - is the sort of work The Citadel was hoping to produce when the school introduced its undergraduate minor in cybersecurity in 2013, and again when it started offering a graduate certificate in cybersecurity in 2014. Now the public military college's fledgling cybersecurity program is getting a big boost of credibility. The Citadel recently earned designation from the National Security Agency as a National Center of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense, becoming the second college in the state to earn the mark after the University of South Carolina. Provost Connie Book said the new laurel will be important as Citadel graduates seek jobs, not just in military and government, but also in areas like health care and business. "For us, having this new designation is critically important for our future," Book said. "It speaks to the unique proposition of a military college in modern day, when so many of the services of our defense system are contracted out to key companies."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
May 2, 2016
2. Class of 2017 rising leadership announced by Commandant of Cadets
The Citadel's Commandant of Cadets has designated commanders, regimental staff, sergeants major and first sergeants for the Class of 2017. Cadets who will assume the nine top-ranking positions were recognized during a private ceremony with The Citadel's president, Lt. Gen. John W. Rosa, The Citadel's Provost, Gen. Connie Ledoux Book, Ph.D., and the Commandant of Cadets, Capt. Geno Paluso. The new officers were presented with chevrons that will be added to their uniforms to reflect their ranks. They will assume their stations when the fall semester begins. View the article for the list of rising leadership.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Monday
May 2, 2016
3a. The Citadel's Confederate flag came down quietly, years before current debate
A black-domed surveillance camera keeps watch over The Citadel's Summerall Chapel. From its perch behind the pulpit, it has a clear shot of a Confederate naval jack that has flown inside the building since 1939 with only one notable exception. Col. Brett Ashworth, a spokesman for The Citadel, said the public military college installed the camera on March 17. About two weeks prior, police had arrested a 1993 Citadel graduate and self-described flag opponent in front of the chapel after he led them on a chase and demanded that somebody tell Citadel President Lt. Gen. John Rosa "to come see me and take it down now." The man may not have known it, but the flag had already come down once before, quietly, in the fall of 2013. The flag's removal and eventual reinstatement predate the current furor over the flag's white supremacist connotations and seem to show an administration that bent to pressure from defenders of the flag. As for the installation of the camera in the chapel, Ashworth said the late-night police chase expedited the process but that "there had been plans" to install it previously.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
May 2, 2016
3b. Confederate flag will fly at The Citadel, for now
The Confederate flag will continue to fly at The Citadel for the time being, after a U.S. House committee rejected an amendment to a defense budget Thursday. The House Armed Services Committee rejected a measure, championed by U.S. Rep. Jim Clyburn, D-Columbia, that would have forced The Citadel to choose between displaying the flag and federal money for its Reserve Officers' Training Corps program. "I am greatly disappointed that a majority of Republican members of the House Armed Services Committee have voted to keep the Confederate battle flag flying in a place of worship at The Citadel," Clyburn said in a statement. "Americans' tax dollars should not be directed to institutions where it is flown." The amendment, proposed by U.S. Rep. Adam Smith, D-Wash., would have barred the Defense Department from giving federal money to ROTC programs at any school that flies the Confederate flag. The Citadel, a public military college in Charleston, is the only school that fits that description. It has displayed a Confederate flag in its Summerall Chapel since 1939. "It is not appropriate to fly (the flag) over institutions that train our next generation of military officers, and it is bizarre to allow the flag to fly above an academy when the military services do not allow the same flag to be displayed in servicemembers' rooms," Smith said.
Published in: The State
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Monday
May 2, 2016
3c. Confederate flag controversy simmers on in Congress
The battle over the Confederate flag isn't over in Congress. Rep. James Clyburn of South Carolina, the assistant Democratic leader, said Friday he's not giving up his effort to force the flag's removal from a chapel at The Citadel military college in South Carolina. On Thursday, Republicans on the House Armed Services Committee voted down that proposal by Clyburn and Democratic Rep. Adam Smith of Washington state. "What I did last night was to remind people that... to continue to romance this flag rather than retiring it to a museum where it ought to be is just not a good thing for the state of South Carolina or for the country for that matter," Clyburn said Friday. The Armed Services Committee action was just the latest congressional skirmish over the Confederate flag. Democratic Rep. Bennie Thompson fought to remove all items from the House of Representatives that feature the flag emblem, including the flag of his home state of Mississippi. "The flag ought to be in a museum," he said. "We're not saying bury it."
Published in: Stars and Stripes
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Monday
May 2, 2016
3d. Editorial: Improper use of federal power
The Citadel should take the Confederate flag down, but Congress shouldn't force the school to do so. The flag, technically the Confederate naval jack, is hung at the Summerall Chapel on The Citadel campus. The military college's board of visitors voted to take it down last summer, about the same time the General Assembly decided to remove the Confederate battle flag from the Statehouse grounds. But the flag still hangs at the college. State law, the Heritage Act, requires the approval of the General Assembly before a Confederate monument, marker or flag on state property can be taken down. State lawmakers should allow The Citadel board to enact its policy and take down the flag. There is a diverse group of students at The Citadel, and to many of them, that flag represents oppression and racism. But the matter isn't a priority for lawmakers. They addressed the much higher-profile flag controversy on the Statehouse grounds last year, and few lawmakers want to revisit the issue.
Published in: Spartanburg Herald Journal
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Monday
May 2, 2016
4. Fulbright Fellowship, High Honor For Citadel Standout, Mendham Grad
James McManus, of Mendham, has shone brightly at the Citadel and will now take his talents abroad. The Citadel Class of 2016 member is headed to Oslo, Norway to teach English after being selected for a Fulbright U.S. Student Award, the school said. McManus is the regimental academic officer for the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, and a leading education major in the college's Zucker Family School of Education. Not only has McManus earned the Fulbright Scholarship, the Honors Program student was recently presented with The Citadel Palmetto Medal, one of the college's highest honors. "Cadet McManus' performance epitomizes our leadership development model here at The Citadel. He is a young person of integrity, is dedicated to the success of others, and is a leader of his peers," said Connie Book, Ph.D., provost and dean of the college, in a statement. "We are very proud of his Fulbright achievement and look forward to his future success as an educator." McManus created his own site, The Oxford Observer, where he records his ongoing research and a resource for educators and is also the chief executive officer of Global Outreach Initiative for the improvement of education in emerging countries.
Published in: Mendham Patch
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Monday
May 2, 2016
5. Nothing holding back differently abled CSU student
At the age of 74, New Jersey transplant Bill Walsh has spent the last year pushing his daughter, Caroline, all across the Charleston Southern University campus. The two of them attend every class together, and sometimes, Walsh is called on by a professor to add perspective to a particular topic from which the class might benefit. Caroline, 19, will readily tell you anything you want to know about any subject. Not bad, considering Caroline didn't talk at all until she was almost 5. She certainly has a story worth hearing. Walsh and his wife, Kim, had four biological children and lived a charmed life in New Jersey. After those children became adults and left home, Bill and Kim adopted four more in the years to come. Caroline was a drug baby, born with cerebral palsy. "She was the biggest challenge of our foster children, but she is also the smartest," Bill says, with his lip quivering and his voice shaking. The emotion builds in Bill, not from embarrassment, but from pride. A father proud to stick out his chest... The Walshes have a grandson about to graduate from The Citadel. The Walsh family hardly knew a thing about Charleston until there was a "Cid" connection. But he sure knows about the Lowcountry now. Caroline, meanwhile, was continuing to excel in her school work. Her middle school teacher told the Walshes, "I learn more through her than I can teach her." In high school, Caroline graduated with all A's and B's and started looking at colleges. In her wheelchair during a visit to Charleston Southern, Caroline found that she liked two things right away: The campus was flat, and people she didn't even know held the door open.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
May 2, 2016
6. Ball State University Senate adopts transparency resolution
Ball State University leaders have adopted a resolution that came about following the abrupt resignation of school President Paul Ferguson. The (Muncie) Star Press reports the University Senate approved the resolution on Thursday. It calls for Ball State to function with transparency and to maintain "open discussion and communication about policy decisions." Senate members had said after Ferguson's resignation in January that there was "unease" among faculty because the move was shrouded in secrecy. The Senate later tabled a draft resolution calling for the Indiana Legislature to change how Ball State's trustees are appointed. The University Senate also elected a new chairman Thursday. Kourtland Koch, an associate professor of special education, was tapped for the role. Koch has bachelor's, master's and education specialist degrees from The Citadel.
Published in: Herald Times
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Monday
May 2, 2016
7. Charleston RiverDogs offer a look at future club level
It's been about a month and a half since the Charleston RiverDogs announced a new, 6,000-square foot club level for weddings and other entertainment purposes would be coming to Riley Park in time for the 2017 season. Now, with new electronic renderings, the RiverDogs have a solid idea of what that space might look like. "The interior designers are designing the space based on the principle of Lowcountry elegance," said Marv Goldklang, principle owner of the RiverDogs. "That's the defining concept. The objective being the space will work for our 70 home games, but also for 100 other - at least 100 events - during the year, weddings to corporate events." The $3-million facility, which the Goldklang Group is financing, will be glass enclosed from the ground up with a view of the ballpark on one side and the Ashley River on the other. Goldklang said it will have a banquet-style seating capacity of 235, up from an original mark of 200 for functions. The overall capacity is around 300, but the RiverDogs plan to limit the game day capacity to about 175 so that people can move around freely without being too crowded. The venue, which is being designed by the LS3P architectural firm in Charleston, will have a bar, a kitchen and high definition flat screen televisions, as well. "When you mention clubs in other ballparks, it will be comparing apples and oranges," Goldklang said. "This will be a special place." Construction is set to begin the day after the RiverDogs' season comes to an end this year, and Goldklang said the group is targeting an opening day of March 1. He anticipates reservations for non-baseball events, such as weddings and banquets, to begin as early as this summer. The RiverDogs share Riley Park with The Citadel, but it's not known yet how the college will utilize the new club level. "Certainly we'll sit down with The Citadel and get a sense of just how and when they would like to be able to use the facility," Goldklang said. "And we'll work off that and develop and expand our relationship. But right now this is a RiverDogs project."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
May 2, 2016
8a. Dogs Come Up Short in SoCon Doubleheader
The Citadel baseball team dropped two games to Furman on Saturday afternoon inside Joe Riley Park. The Citadel (15-29, 5-9 SoCon) was narrowly defeated in the first game of the doubleheader, 9-6. The Bulldogs scored two runs on two hits in the bottom of the ninth but a fly out to center field stranded two runners on base. Jason Smith was three-for-five in the game with one run scored and Barrett Charpia collected two hits of his own. The Bulldogs had 10 hits in the loss. JP Sears got the start on the mound, striking out three over 5.0 innings of work. Jordan Buster, Kyle Smith and Beau Strickland pitched the remaining four innings in relief. In game two, Thomas Byelick made his 11th start this season and tossed 5.1 innings while fanning three. Freshman Dylan Spence worked 1.2 innings of relief, allowing just one hit and striking out two. Zach Lavery also pitched an inning and Kyle Smith closed the game out for his second appearance of the day on the mound. The Citadel held a 5-2 lead after four innings but allowed Furman (19-24, 7-7 SoCon) to tack on two runs in the top of the fifth to make it 5-4. Byelick was able to get out of the bases-loaded jam in the same frame by inducing a double play and a fly out to left field. The Paladins then added four runs in the sixth inning and, despite two runs in the seventh inning, the Bulldogs were unable to mount a comeback and eventually fell 12-7.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
May 2, 2016
8b. Furman edges The Citadel 4-1 in series finale
The Citadel baseball team was defeated 4-1 by Furman on Sunday afternoon inside Joe Riley Park. Jacob Watcher matched his career best with 6.0 innings of work on the mound, scattering six hits and fanning two. The sophomore allowed two base runners in the first five innings before giving up a home run with two outs that gave Furman (20-24, 8-7 SoCon) a 2-0 lead. Watcher threw just 83 pitches over the course of the six innings and did not issue a walk. The Citadel (15-30, 5-10 SoCon) answered with a run of its own in the bottom of the fifth frame on a double to the left field wall by Stephen Windham to score Mike Deese from first, but a hard-hit lineout to left field by Ben Peden just three pitches later stranded Windham on second. Mike Deese, Barrett Charpia and Windham all collected two hits in the contest. Jason Smith and Clay Martin accounted for the other two base knocks for The Citadel, finishing with eight hits total. The Bulldogs continue SoCon play at Mercer beginning on Thursday at 6 p.m. Live stats, audio and video will be available at CitadelSports.com for the game.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
May 2, 2016
8c. Gunn signs scholarship with The Citadel
Dickson County High School senior Al Gunn signed a $180,000 Marine Option NROTC Scholarship to The Citadel in Charleston, S.C. - Gunn's scholarship is for four years to the prestigious military college in South Carolina and he will start in the fall. Gunn will be joining his brother Andy Gunn, who also in the Marines. "It's a prestigious school. Pretty close to home. It's in a nice spot, Charleston," Al Gunn said. "It's going to be a fun experience." Marine Staff Sgt. Caleb Dean, who works in the Dickson Marine Corps. Recruiting office, has worked with Gunn since fall last year. "He's been coming to the recruiting office at least twice a week, physically improving and becoming more well-rounded," said Dean about Gunn's visits since Sept. 23. "He already had an impressive resume, we just took him to the next level." "The biggest thing they were looking for was an improvement... He really put it on it on overdrive," Dean added.
Published in: The Tennessean
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Monday
May 2, 2016
8d. New QBs get their chances
The majority of teams in the Midlands will be breaking in new quarterbacks. Of the top 21 passers in the Midlands last season, only seven return. That will mean the spring will be a good time for teams to get used to their new signal callers. One of the biggest shoes to fill will be at Chapin, where rising junior Trad Beatty replaces Logan Bailey, who had a record-breaking senior season and signed to play at The Citadel. Bailey accounted for 4,288 yards and 66 touchdowns and was a Mr. Football finalist. At 6-foot-5, Beatty is a contrast to Bailey, but Chapin coach Justin Gentry said he's more mobile than people think. Chapin also will have to break new receivers with the graduation of Evan Estridge and Joe Flowers, but return South Carolina commit Will Register at tight end.
Published in: The State
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Monday
May 2, 2016
9. Civic-minded Pitt official from Greensburg oversaw college expansion
Carl Rossman was a consummate professional in the office and a civic-minded, dedicated volunteer in his personal life. "He was just a super guy and a good family man," said Frank Cassell, former president of University of Pittsburgh-Greensburg, where Rossman worked for 17 years as vice president for administrative affairs. Carl A. Rossman Jr. of Greensburg died Sunday, April 24, 2016, of complications from pancreatic cancer. He was 68. Mr. Rossman was born in Hampton, Va., the son of the late Carl and Georgianna Burnett Rossman. He graduated from Augusta Military Academy High School in Virginia and from The Citadel in Charleston, S.C., with a bachelor's degree in education. His time at the University of Pittsburgh-Greensburg occurred after a 24-year career in the Air Force, during which he was a B-52 pilot and retired as a colonel. Friends and co-workers said it was easy to mark him as a military man. "He had a very erect posture and a very formal way of addressing you," said campus President Sharon Smith. "But he also had a wicked sense of humor. He'd get this little twinkle in his eye and come out with a dry comment that was always very appropriate - he'd make the kind of comment that would have you doing a double-take."
Published in: TribLive.com
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