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About Today's News Clips
"Today's News Clips" is published into your e-mail box on normal Citadel business days, and contains links to recent news about The Citadel, the state of South Carolina, and other topics of interest to professionals working at institutes of higher education.
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The Citadel in the News: Archive

April 2016

PUBLISH DATE STORIES
Thursday
April 28, 2016
1. Latest development in Congress Confederate flag debate: Congressional committee votes to keep Confederate flag at Citadel
In the early hours of Thursday morning, the U.S. House Armed Services Committee voted to keep the Confederate flag flying at The Citadel. The rejection of a Democratic effort to force the military institution to take down the flag at Summerall Chapel potentially paves the way for a bitter, extended fight on the issue, which is being championed by U.S. Rep. Jim Clyburn, D-S.C. U.S. Rep. Adam Smith, a Washington State Democrat and ranking member of the committee, offered an amendment to the fiscal 2017 National Defense Authorization Act to bar Reserve Officers’ Training Corps funds to any military university that displays the Confederate flag. The only university that falls into that category is The Citadel. The Board of Visitors voted to remove the flag last summer, after revelations that the deadly shooting of nine black parishioners at Mother Emanuel AME Church was motivated by race - an incident which, in turn, prompted the removal of the Confederate flag from the Statehouse grounds.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
April 28, 2016
2a. Clyburn brings Confederate flag debate to Capitol Hill
Democratic Rep. Jim Clyburn is bringing the ongoing debate over the display of the Confederate flag in South Carolina back to the attention of his colleagues in Congress. The only Democrat in the Palmetto State delegation stated his support of a proposed amendment to the annual defense policy bill on Wednesday that would bar federal funds from going to any senior Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) programs at institutions where the Confederate flag is being displayed. "The flag, which never was the official flag of the Confederacy, is a symbol of hate, racial oppression, and resistance to the rule of law," Clyburn said in a statement on Wednesday. The amendment is being proposed by Rep. Adam Smith, D-Wash., at the marathon markup of the 2017 National Defense Authorization Act by the House Armed Services Committee, which often lasts until the early morning hours. The Citadel, a public military college in Charleston, S.C., has displayed the Confederate Naval Jack in its Summerall Chapel since 1939. "It has been used for over a century as a symbol of southern defiance and white supremacy; it was viewed as such by the perpetrator of the horrific shootings at Emanuel AME Church in Charleston on June 17 of last year," Clyburn said in the statement. Last summer he was joined by Republican colleagues in the state's delegation and Gov. Nikki Haley in backing the removal of the Confederate flag from the South Carolina statehouse following the shooting of nine black congregants at Emanuel AME Church. The shooter, Dylan Roof, was a white supremacist who posted photos of himself with the Confederate symbol online. Clyburn also took a shot at S.C. Attorney General Alan Wilson for barring the flag's removal by citing the Heritage Act, which was passed by the S.C. General Assembly in 2000. In 2014, Wilson released an opinion stating that the Heritage Act bars the Citadel from removing the flag from a prominent place on campus.
Published in: McClatchy DC
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Thursday
April 28, 2016
2b. confederate flag debate
flag debate
Published in: Huffington Post
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Thursday
April 28, 2016
2c. confederate flag debate
confederate flag debate
Published in: The State
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Thursday
April 28, 2016
2d. confederate flag debate
confederate flag debate
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
April 28, 2016
3. Former mayor Joe Riley to be inducted into South Carolina Hall of Fame
Former Charleston mayor Joe Riley is set to be inducted into the South Carolina Hall of Fame Wednesday at The Citadel's Holliday Alumni Center. Riley served ten terms beginning in December 1975. "During Riley's forty-year tenure as mayor, the City of Charleston saw a substantial decrease in crime, a revitalization of the historic downtown business district, the creation and growth of Spoleto Festival U.S. A., an expansion of the city's park system, and the development of nationally-acclaimed affordable housing," a news release from event organizers state. The late David Drake, an enslaved African American potter from the Edgefield District, is also being recognized for his accomplishments. Drake was also known as "Dave the Potter." A reception for the induction begins at 5:30 p.m., according to the release. The ceremony begins at 6:30 p.m.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Thursday
April 28, 2016
4. Charleston World Affairs Council Brings In Depth Understanding Of World Events
The world today is a different place than what it was when we were growing up. In fact, our world has changed dramatically in just the last few years given the escalating instability in the Middle East, significant disease and pestilence outbreaks, massive immigration flows as a result of cultural/religious divides and wide ranging acts of terror. This has resulted in large-scale loss of life, compromised personal liberty and ongoing fear in our daily lives. These threats to world stability present serious challenges to leadership both in the US and elsewhere and fully understanding the larger picture remains challenging. Last week, The World Affairs Council of Charleston, a regional thought leader in presenting and discussing events that impact our world, hosted Mr. Andrew Peek, a Fellow in Middle Eastern Affairs at the American Foreign Policy Council in Washington D.C., at The Citadel Alumni Center in downtown Charleston. Peek came highly qualified to present an overview of the continuing volatility in the Middle East and ISIS: The Islamic State of Iraq and Syria. In addition to his affiliation with the Middle Eastern Affairs group, he teaches at American University and at the school of Advanced International Affairs at Johns Hopkins University where he is a candidate for his PhD. Peek also previously served as a strategic adviser to the top US and NATO commanders in Afghanistan.
Published in: The Island Eye News
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Thursday
April 28, 2016
5. Education Briefs - Week of 4/29
Men and women who entered The Citadel as freshmen last fall were officially sworn in as members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets earlier this month during a recognition day. Local students sworn in were Alexander Pang-Riddle, of Charlotte; Jonathan Taylor, of Davidson; and Noah Watts, of Huntersville.
Published in: The Herald Weekly
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Thursday
April 28, 2016
6. A funny thing happened on the road less traveled
Poetry. It sounds so beautiful and describes aspects of life so perfectly. Poetry has the power to inspire dreams and put thoughts into action. Too bad poetry doesn't come with a warning label that sometimes when you roll the dice, you lose your shirt. Our Blogmaster has challenged our team to write about a time that we "took the road less traveled", as in the Robert Frost poem. We can also describe a time when the road less traveled led us to a dead end. So here goes. The first thing that comes to mind is that Robert Frost's poem plays a prominent role at my husband's alma mater, The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina. The essence of the poem permeates the campus; it is an ethos of doing the right thing even when, no, especially when, it is the more difficult option. Be bold. Forge your own trail. Run your own race. All these things sound great on a Hallmark card, yet ring hollow after you have fallen flat on your face.
Published in: ChicagoNow.com
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Thursday
April 28, 2016
7. The Citadel adds 7 to basketball signing class
The Citadel head basketball coach Duggar Baucom and his staff announced seven new additions to the 2016 recruiting class on Wednesday. Kaelon Harris, Obinna Ofodile and Preston Parks inked National Letters of Intent, joining spring commitments Aaron Washington, Chris Ross, Tyler Burgess and Griffin Peevey. The seven future Bulldogs have been added to the 2016 class alongside November signees Ezekiel Balogun and Frankie Johnson, Jr. as The Citadel will welcome several new faces next season. "We are very excited to have such a large class of quality basketball players who see the advantage of an education at The Citadel," head coach Duggar Baucom said. "They all have the characteristics to excel on the court, in the classroom and within the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. I would like to compliment my staff on the awesome job they did recruiting these future cadet-athletes." Harris is an efficient and versatile scorer who played for head coach Michael Elliot at Mundy's Mill High School in Jonesboro, Georgia. The 6-foot-4 guard was a four-year captain and led his squad to a 2014 regional championship in the Atlanta area. He capped his career in style, averaging nearly 19 points per contest while shooting better than 60 percent from the field as a senior.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Thursday
April 28, 2016
8. Wando's Brandon Eakins among 5 Citadel football players in honor society
Wando High School graduate Brandon Eakins is among five Citadel football players included in the 2016 Hampshire Honor Society announced Wednesday. Eakins, a wide receiver, and fellow seniors Dane Anderson, Eric Goins, Hunter Morris and James Riley all received the honor, which is presented by the National Football Foundation and College Football Hall of Fame. The Honor Society includes football players in their final seasons of eligibility who maintained a grade-point average of at least 3.2 through their college careers. Qualifications also include being a starter or significant contributor and meeting all progress towards degree requirements. Eakins graduated in 3 1/2 years with a bachelor's degree in sport management and has a 3.68 GPA in his master's program. He was named to the Southern Conference academic honor roll three times and earned the SoCon Commissioner's Medal for excelling in the classroom. On the field, the McClellanville native appeared in all 25 games of his final two seasons and led the team with 14 receptions, 216 receiving yards and two receiving touchdowns in 2015.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
April 28, 2016
9. Aynor's Richardson signs with The Citadel
Aynor golfer Bailey Richardson will follow in her father's footsteps and attend The Citadel. The 18-year-old inked with the Bulldogs during a signing ceremony this past week at AHS. "I'm really excited because one of the biggest reasons I started playing golf was to get a scholarship, but I never really thought it would happen," she said. "I guess I was lucky because my dream school wanted me as much as I wanted them. I applied to some other schools but it was always The Citadel. I didn't really look at anyone else." The teen is a daughter of Joey and Lisa Richardson, and her dad competed in football, golf and basketball at AHS before playing one year of football with the Bulldogs. He graduated in 1995. "When I was there it was all boys," Richardson said. "I have two girls and I have said I wouldn't want my girls to go there. It's a place you have to want to do yourself." Bailey Richardson grew up playing t-ball and was a cheerleader in middle school. Although she often tagged along when her dad and grandfather were on the golf course, she didn't become serious about the sport until her freshman year of high school when Aynor fielded its first golf teams for girls only.
Published in: MyHorryNews.com
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Wednesday
April 27, 2016
1. Citadel civil engineering cadets and students receive national recognition
For a second consecutive year, civil engineering cadets and student at The Citadel earned national recognition as a finalist for the 2016 Robert Ridgway Student Chapter Award. The awards are presented annually by the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). The Ridgway Award recognizes student chapters for their outstanding organization, service, involvement and professionalism. "This is quite an accomplishment as this distinction was earned by only five out of 339 ASCE Student Chapters across the U.S. and 12 countries," said Leslie Payne, director of student member programs stated. "ASCE's national committee on student activities selects winning colleges/universities through a rigorous review process based on an annual report prepared by student officers." The award was based on criteria from 2015 when The Citadel chapter had 106 active members, held 13 professional meetings, delivered six presentations and participated in major events including the Workshop for Student Leaders, held in Miami, and the Carolinas Conference, held in Atlanta. (In 2016 the chapter scored numerous first place positions in the ASCE conference's concrete canoe competitions. See photo.) The Citadel Chapter also demonstrated leadership that year by hosting National Engineer's Week events on campus in Charleston, South Carolina, as well as a professional activities event featuring more than 30 companies at a career fair for engineering cadets and students.
Published in: The Digitel - Charleston
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Wednesday
April 27, 2016
2. Cadet chronicles Cambodia's genocide in the 1970s
Cadet Chad Williams, a freshman at The Citadel, has a lot to add to his resume after having only one full semester under his belt. Williams, a double major in French and political science, has spent the majority of his life overseas, much of it in Cambodia. His research and encounters in the country led him to chronicle his experiences by outlining a book he hopes to get published that is complemented by a photo exhibit. Originally from Chapel Hill, North Carolina, Williams only spent a few years during his childhood in the U.S. He considers Dubai his home after living there the past nine years. Just prior to matriculating at The Citadel, Williams spent a year working and traveling between Dubai and Southeast Asia. Seven months in that year were invested in learning about the people of Cambodia ultimately leading to his proposed book titled Tragedy and Triumph... Written by Cadet Devin Taylor - a junior majoring in accounting major in The Citadel School of Business. His hometown is Iva, South Carolina.
Published in: DaretoLead.com
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Wednesday
April 27, 2016
3. Letter: Advice from an old grad
I wish The Citadel's leadership, its alumni and most importantly, the Corps of Cadets well in exercising wisdom as they wrestle with the issue of allowing the hijab. It will be interesting to learn from the military and from other military schools. I especially hope the alumni will endorse the decisions they make that will sustain The Citadel and its Corps of Cadets. In a recent article, Cadet Nick Pinelli does The Citadel a disservice by dismissing rules changes as having been done "to save face." I hope he will explore the deeper tenets that must drive The Citadel's decisions. There's an old joke that goes like this: How many old grads would it take to change a light bulb? Answer: None, because old grads wouldn't change anything. As an old grad myself (from a military school other than The Citadel) I've been the butt of that joke for years. I have revisited it frequently over the past 40 years as I observe my old alma mater and, more significantly, the U.S. Army where I served 20 years, negotiate change.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
April 27, 2016
4. Grant Thornton names David Platt to lead firm's New England offices
Grant Thornton LLP has named David Platt office managing partner for its New England practice, which encompasses the firm's Boston and Westborough, Massachusetts offices. In this role, he will lead the firm's New England practice and oversee marketplace growth and talent development. Platt replaces Peter Resnick, who served as office managing partner for the past two years. Under his leadership, the New England practice experienced unprecedented growth. In addition to serving as the New England Forensics and Litigation Services practice leader, Resnick will be assuming additional responsibilities in the firm's national Forensics practice. Additionally, Kim O'Connor has been named partner-in-charge of the Westborough market, a role that was previously held by Platt. Platt is a certified public accountant (CPA) in Connecticut, Rhode Island and Massachusetts, is a member of the Connecticut, Rhode Island and Massachusetts Societies of CPAs, and is a member of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA). He also serves as vice chairman of the Rhode Island State Accountancy Board and is a member of the American Association of Attorney-Certified Public Accountants. Platt received a juris doctor degree from Roger Williams University School of Law and a bachelor's degree from The Citadel, the military college of South Carolina.
Published in: CNBC.com
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Wednesday
April 27, 2016
5. RBC Heritage invocation targets 'divots in our lives'
Everybody's been asking for it, so here it is. It's a copy of the invocation Keller Kissam gave at the opening ceremony of the RBC Heritage Presented by Boeing on April 11. Kissam burst into the tranquil scene at the 18th green of the Harbour Town Golf Links like a bolt of the electricity he works with as a vice president of SCANA Corp. and a president of S.C. Electric and Gas. His short-cropped hair and bold voice sounded like the cadet who was regimental commander at The Citadel. His words also seemed to tug on roots in Creston, S.C., population 33, and the Shady Grove United Methodist Church. I admire him for being an English major who doesn't have to worry about bouncing checks. Of course, he was summa cum laude. Mama always said her kids graduated thank the lawdy. Kissam didn't have any notes, so it took a while to get a transcript. I got it from Heritage Classic Foundation board member Charlie Rountree III of Columbia with permission to give it to all who asked for it. Rountree was honorary chairman of the tournament this year, so he invited his Sunday school teacher down to do the invocation. Kissam - who lives in Hopkins, near Columbia, where his wife's people are from - teaches an adult class at Shandon United Methodist Church in Columbia.
Published in: The Island Packet
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Wednesday
April 27, 2016
6. St. Tammany Parish Sheriff's Office remembers Captain killed in plane crash
The St. Tammany Parish Sheriff's Office says farewell to one of their own, in a video tribute that's going viral. Captain Wayne Fisher was laid to rest at the Southeast Louisiana Veterans Cemetery, following a ceremony at Northshore Church in Slidell. The 68 year old Slidell resident was killed April 19th in a plane crash, while flying for St. Tammany Mosquito Abatement. Capt. Fisher was a member of the STPSO reserve division and piloted the Sheriff's office helicopter. According to STPSO, he graduated from The Citadel in South Carolina, was a volunteer fireman and served in the U.S. Army, with tours in Vietnam. Tuesday's ceremonies included a multi-jurisdictional law enforcement procession, a 21-gun salute, a helicopter fly-over and a military flag presentation.
Published in: WGNO.com
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Wednesday
April 27, 2016
7. The Covenant School - Class of 2016 College Acceptances
The Covenant School is pleased to announce the following college acceptances for students in the Class of 2016. Covenant's College Reveal Day is Wednesday, May 4, at which time seniors will share the schools they will attend in the fall. 2016 College Acceptances: The Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina
Published in: CovenantSchool.org
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Wednesday
April 27, 2016
8a. Ex-Citadel pitcher James Reeves among RiverDogs called up to Tampa
Two former South Carolina college products have been called up to High-A Tampa from Charleston, the RiverDogs announced Tuesday. Citadel graduate James Reeves, a left-handed pitcher, and Brody Koerner, a right-hander out of Clemson, both got the nod to head to Florida immediately. Neither will suit up for the RiverDogs' three-game set with Lakewood, beginning Tuesday. After tossing the sixth no-hitter in the Citadel's history in 2015, Reeves joined the RiverDogs after the Yankees drafted him in the 10th round of the 2015 First-Year Player Draft. In four games with the RiverDogs, the Summerville native registered 15 strikeouts in 10 innings of relief with a 2.70 ERA. Koerner started three games for the RiverDogs, going 1-0 with a 1.74 ERA. In 20 2/3 innings pitched, he tallied 21 strikeouts to just three walks. The Yankees selected him in the 17th round of the 2015 draft.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
April 27, 2016
8b. Northwestern Tabs David Pierce As Head Football Coach
Northwestern High School has named long-time assistant, David Pierce, as the 7th head coach in the school's 45 year history. Pierce, who has served as an assistant for the Trojans since 1987, most recently was Assistant Head Coach and defensive line coach under former head coach Kyle Richardson. During his tenure, coach Pierce has tutored offensive and defensive lineman who went on to play at: South Carolina, The Citadel, Kansas, and Clemson. The Winthrop University graduate has won 6 state championships in his career, including 5 as a member of the Northwestern coaching staff. Pierce was an offensive lineman for Presbyterian College from 1981-1985. Coach Pierce takes over a Northwestern team that returns a most of last year's state championship team that went 14-1, including a 63-13 state championship win over Lexington. He replaces Kyle Richardson who left after five years for an assistant coaching job with the Clemson Tigers.
Published in: WHRI.com
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Wednesday
April 27, 2016
8c. Ballparks playing catch-up on foul-ball protection
Frank Harris and his family settled into their seats just above the first-base dugout at Riley Park for a Charleston RiverDogs baseball game. Harris, who grew up playing baseball and played football at The Citadel, knew sitting that close to the action required careful attention. He watched as the pitcher went through his wind-up and fired a strike to a left-handed batter. "The batter checked his swing and just sort of redirected the pitch," Harris recalled. "I wouldn't even call it a decent checked swing. But he redirected the ball just enough." The ball sped straight toward Harris, who managed to get his hand up just in time. The baseball broke his Citadel class ring in half and grazed his forehead, leaving a welt. "If I had not been paying attention, it would have hit me in the eye," said Harris, who lives in Summerville. "Taking a ball at 85 or 90 miles per hour in the face ... it could have been catastrophic." Harris was lucky, luckier than many who have been injured by foul balls at ballparks around the nation. Even at Riley Park, one woman had her nose broken by a ball tossed into the stands.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
April 27, 2016
9. The Citadel loses big at Charlotte, 15-4
The Citadel baseball team fell to Charlotte on Tuesday evening at Hayes Stadium. The 49ers (18-24) scored four runs in the first inning and then extended their lead with runs in the next two frames before clinching a 15-4 win. Clay Martin, Cole Buffington, Shy Phillips and Stephen Windham each had singles in the contest. Bret Hines drove in his 13th and 14th RBI of the year with a double down the right field line in the top of the ninth to score Phillips and Buffington. Barrett Charpia tacked on two more runs for the Bulldogs (15-27) in the same frame, crushing his third double of the year to deep left center field to score Ben Peden and Bret Hines. Taylor Cothran made his 15th appearance of the year, playing two innings in left field. The Citadel used four freshmen hurlers in the game. The Bulldogs now return home to Joe Riley Park to host SoCon foe Furman. The series begins with a 1 p.m. doubleheader on Saturday with the second game to follow thirty minutes after the conclusion of the first.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Tuesday
April 26, 2016
1. The Citadel Director's Institute brings Chick-Fil-A CEO Dan Cathy to South Carolina business leaders
In a room filled to capacity with business leaders from around South Carolina the Chairman and CEO of Chick-fil-A, Dan Cathy, discussed the role of governance and family in the fast-food chain. Cathy was one of two keynote speakers at the 2016 Citadel Directors' Institute held in late April at the Francis Marion Hotel in Charleston. Family values and strong faith were the central theme of Cathy's message as he discussed the restaurant chain's meteoric rise. "We're a business that still acknowledges in God we trust," he told the audience. Cathy's father S. Truett Cathy began the family business in 1946 when he sold his car and borrowed money from the bank to open a burger restaurant in Atlanta called the Dwarf Grill. After creating the Original Chicken Sandwich in 1965, the elder Cathy opened the first Chick-fil-A in an Atlanta mall in 1967. By 2014, Chick-fil-A had evolved into a fast-food giant that surpassed $5 billion in sales. The board of directors, Cathy said, began around the dinner table before he could even shave. Cathy, his brother and sister were all named shareholders. "My father had no tolerance whatsoever in reporting to a board of directors," Cathy said. "It wasn't until he passed away that we asked people to serve on a board."
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Tuesday
April 26, 2016
2. Recognition Day for Citadel class of 2019
Students who entered The Citadel as freshmen last fall officially were sworn in as members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets on April 9, 2016. Recognition Day 2016 marks the end of what many consider the toughest first year college military-training in the country. They are Colby Bruner and Octavia Wolfe, both of Orangeburg; Daniel Ilderton of St. George; and Dylan Lilly of Dorchester.
Published in: The Times and Democrat
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Tuesday
April 26, 2016
3. Army regs be dashed - she wants to wear hijab
A national security expert says political correctness may once again prevail in the case of a female Muslim student who wants to wear a headscarf with her Army uniform during ROTC events. The U.S. Army recently granted an exemption to a captain who wanted to wear a beard and turban in accordance with his Sikh faith. Now the historic Citadel military academy in Charleston, South Carolina, is considering whether to grant the request of a female student who wants to wear a Muslim head scarf, known as a "hijab." According to The Washington Post, the school is considering a second request as well from the student: that she be allowed to cover her arms and legs during exercise. The Post also clarifies that the woman has been "admitted" to the school but has not yet chosen to attend. At least one student posted on social media that Citadel cadets willingly give up their individuality and become a part of a group that upholds the time-honored traditions of the school. Lt. Col. Robert Maginnis (USA-Ret.), senior fellow for national security at the Family Research Council, concurs, explaining that The Citadel is bound by Army regulations.
Published in: OneNewsNow.com
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Tuesday
April 26, 2016
4. Get to Know Stevi Robinson
Stevi Robinson was named The Citadel volleyball's new assistant coach in January, bringing with her a wealth of playing and coaching experience. She joined the Bulldogs after a stint with the USA Women's Indoor Volleyball Team and a stellar collegiate career at both Pepperdine University and the Univeristy of Southern California. With a few months under her belt at The Citadel, Robinson has settled in and already begun making a major impact on the Bulldogs' program. To get to know her and hear from Robinson, watch the video in the article.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Tuesday
April 26, 2016
5. Bucs beat The Citadel, 4-0
On Friday, the No. 55-ranked ETSU men's tennis team came into the Southern Conference Tournament as the No. 1-seed, and they showed why. The Bucs ended their regular season with a 15-5 overall record and a 7-0 record in conference play. They finished the regular season with a 12-match win streak. To start off singles, junior David Biosca (Sant Fruitos de Bage, Spain), who is ranked No. 76 and was named to the All-SoCon First Team in singles, won the first set, 6-2, and the second set, 6-0, over The Citadel's Nicholas Bradley (Waldwick, N.J). Biosca is 16-4 on the season in singles and is on a 10-match win streak. He also earned SoCon Player of the Year honors. All-SoCon First Team senior Regerio Riberio (Sao Paulo, Brazil) won both sets, 6-3 and 6-0, over The Citadel's Artemie Amari (New York, N.Y.). Riberio is currently on a eight-match win streak in singles. Junior Diego Nunez (Monterrey, Mexico) beat The Citadel's Matthew Henson (Bristol, Tenn.), winning both sets, 6-2 and 4-3. Nunez is currently on a three-match win streak.
Published in: EastTennessean.com
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Monday
April 25, 2016
1. Zucker Family School of Education cadet selected for Fulbright Student Award
A member of The Citadel Class of 2016 will be headed to Oslo, Norway to teach English after being selected for a Fulbright U.S. Student. Award. Cadet James McManus, of Mendham, New Jersey, is the regimental academic officer for the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, and a leading education major in the college's Zucker Family School of Education. In addition to earning a Fulbright fellowship, the Honors Program student was recently presented with The Citadel Palmetto Medal, one of the college's highest honors. He also earned the Star of the West Scholarship in his junior year, taking him to Europe to continue his research comparing the public school systems of different countries. "Cadet McManus's performance epitomizes our leadership development model here at The Citadel. He is a young person of integrity, is dedicated to the success of others, and is a leader of his peers," said Connie Book, Ph.D., provost and dean of the college. "We are very proud of his Fulbright achievement and look forward to his future success as an educator."
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Monday
April 25, 2016
2. Col. Cole C. Kingseed to address The Citadel Graduate College Class of 2016
CGC commencement ceremony to be held at 3:30 p.m. on Saturday, May 7 Members of The Citadel Graduate College (CGC) Class of 2016 will be sent to the next step in their careers and their lives with the words delivered by a 30-year Army infantry veteran and author who is considered one of America's leading military historians. Col. Cole C. Kingseed, Ph.D., will address graduates during the commencement ceremony to be held at 3:30 p.m. on Saturday, May 7, at the college's McAlister Field House. Kingseed commanded at the platoon, company, and battalion level while serving in the Army from 1971 - 2001. A graduate of the University of Dayton, he served in a variety of military assignments that concluded with his tenure as Full Professor of History and Chief of Military History at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. Kingseed holds a Master of Arts and a Ph.D. from The Ohio State University, and a Master of Arts in National Security and Strategic Studies from the U.S. Naval War College.
Published in: Moultrie News
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Monday
April 25, 2016
3a. It's not just a hijab: The Citadel might be considering other exceptions for Muslim student, cadet says
When news spread that The Citadel was considering the first-ever exception to its strict uniform requirements to allow an admitted student to wear a hijab in keeping with her Muslim faith, reaction was intense. Some welcomed the possibility as an important symbol of religious freedom, but for many in the tight-knit community of cadets and alumni, the very idea of an exception was anathema because the ideals of loyalty, uniformity, and corps-before-self are so central to the storied public military college's mission and traditions. And at a time when the role of Islam in U.S. culture is so divisive - with national leaders and political candidates arguing whether the religion is one of violence or whether the fight against extremist terrorists is in no way a fight against the Muslim faith - the idea of making an exception for a Muslim student was particularly powerful for many on campus and far beyond. But that might not be the only change allowed for the admitted student, should she choose to attend the school in Charleston, S.C. The Citadel has considered other possible accommodations, according to a cadet who says a school official discussed possible exceptions to the public military college's rigid code in meetings with students.
Published in: Washington Post
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Monday
April 25, 2016
3b. In a changing US Army, turbans and hijabs allowed
Sitting in the barber chair as a brand-new cadet at West Point, Simratpal Singh couldn’t watch as the barber cut his hair for the first time in the Sikh's life. "It was excruciating," says Captain Singh of having to remove his turban and be shorn of his long hair and beard. He asked to turn his barber chair around, and had trouble looking at himself in the mirror for weeks afterward... A hijab at The Citadel? In a sign of the changing face of the American military, the US Army isn't the only military entity weighing the needs of religious minorities this week. The Citadel is considering a request from an admitted student that she be allowed to wear a hijab. If the accommodation is granted, it reportedly would be the first uniform exception allowed in the military college's more than 170-year history. This week's decision is a clear sign that the US Army is becoming increasingly open to diversity, says Diana Verm, an attorney at the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty, a nonprofit public interest law firm that specializes in religious freedom cases. "We're hopeful that this will lead to a change in policy in the near future," says Ms. Verm, who has worked on the case. Before 1974, Sikh Americans were allowed to serve in the US military while keeping their articles of faith. Since 1981, stricter grooming regulations required recruits to request religious accommodations on an individual basis. Prior to this year, only three Sikhs had been successful.
Published in: The Christian Science Monitor
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Monday
April 25, 2016
3c. Letter: Citadel travesty mirrors America
The Citadel, like all military institutions, has a uniform policy for its cadets. It has had it for more than 150 years. It does not include a head scarf or burka (the next step?). I would suggest that the young lady who feels she needs to wear a head scarf, in defiance of the school’s uniform code, find another school. This is just another orchestrated attack on America, its institutions, and who we are. For eight years now, our esteemed president has been chipping away at our country and its institutions. A hapless Congress has stood by and let it happen. He has made it his business to push the Muslim cause, importing almost 700,000 of them from the Middle East and Africa. Unfortunately, he has been very effective in what he set out to do as defined in his apology tour of 2009 ... undermining America and making sure we are no longer seen as the world's superpower. What a tragedy.
Published in: The Island Packet
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Monday
April 25, 2016
4. The most surprising things about The Citadel's new gun regulations
That's going to make "Hell Week" a lot more interesting. Think about it - knobs go through an intense, confrontational plebe year that is, frankly, hard for outsiders to understand. Some folks no doubt think any hotheaded fresh meat who gets his head dunked in a toilet might be inclined to retaliate - especially if he had a pistol nearby. Even if that is the exact opposite of what plebe year is supposed to instill. But that was the joke around Charleston after Cadet Austin Lee brought up the issue with Gov. Nikki Haley when she appeared on campus last month. Actually, he'd raised the same question with administration months before - and had a petition signed by half the Corps of Cadets. At the time, however, the college had pillowcase-gate fish to fry, so Lee didn't get an answer before he had the chance to turn this into news. Officials at The Citadel say when Lee initially brought this up, they also thought about the potential for lethal hazing... and any number of other potentially ugly scenarios. Of course they did. The men and women behind the Lesesne Gate are neither stupid nor naïve.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
April 25, 2016
5a. Cheryl Hall: Expect crisis prep rally, not Fed pep rally at Las Colinas conference
George Selgin thinks we're being hoodwinked into believing that Federal Reserve policy under Janet Yellen is returning to normal. "Fed policy is now weirder than ever," says the director of the Center for Monetary and Financial Alternatives at the Cato Institute in Washington, D.C. "We're far from being safe or out of the woods when it comes to financial stability." A growing number of economic thinkers and market watchers see another American financial meltdown building just beneath the bull-headed stock market and a too-loose Fed monetary policy. Selgin, along with a half-dozen bankers, economists and whistleblowers, will sound that alarm at a National Center for Policy Analysis conference next week. They'll attempt to answer the burning question: "Can We Prevent the Next Credit Crisis?" You can expect the speakers to be in line with the libertarian bent of the NCPA. But if you're not convinced that we're dancing in the ship's ballroom while the Titanic heads into the iceberg, they promise to offer insight into why you should be. Richard Ebeling, professor of ethics and free enterprise at The Citadel in Charleston, S.C., foresees "an inevitable and inescapable" market correction and a subsequent downturn.
Published in: The Dallas Morning News
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Monday
April 25, 2016
5b. Big Government Fuels Income Inequality
policies will "create jobs," will reduce or even block the "unfair" competition of market rivals in foreign lands, will restore or create prosperity for all, and will assure "fairness" for everyone, even if it means imposing regulatory or special tax burdens on some to guarantee politically provided privileges and benefits for others who are deemed "deserving." All of these promises are premised on the fundamental idea that governments and, more precisely, those who hold political office and power can successfully redesign and "plan" aspects of society considered more "socially just" or economically "fair." These are old ideas, tried many times in many places. And everywhere they have created corruption, favoritism, and stagnation or at least slower growth and less material improvement than otherwise might have been the case. What actually makes for a more just society experiencing greater opportunity, improved conditions and rising standards of living for virtually all over the long run? In a nutshell, three words: freedom, competition and trade. These are the "open sesame" to alleviate poverty, privilege, and inequity in society. All of this was first explained with clarity, some times eloquence, and always logical and historical insight and wisdom by the Scottish moral philosopher and political economist, Adam Smith (1723-1790) in his great book, An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations, which was published 240 years ago on March 5, 1776. Dr. Richard M. Ebeling is the BB & T Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina.
Published in: NassauInstitute.org
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Monday
April 25, 2016
6a. Avon Lake cadet selected for honor at The Citadel
Stephen Liljeberg is a member of the Class of 2017 Summerall Guards. Earning the title Summerall Guard is one of the highest honors that can be achieved by a member of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets at The Citadel. Each winter, cadets who are juniors endure weeks of rigorous physical training and drilling in an attempt to be named a member of the famous platoon for their senior year. Consisting of 61 members, all of the Summerall Guards were chosen for their physical stamina and drill proficiency. The platoon's purpose is to exemplify, through a unique series of movements based on the old German close-order drill, the exactness and thoroughness with which a cadet is trained. The drill, which has never been written down, is performed to a silent count. Each year's platoon takes responsibility for teaching the precise drill to the upcoming unit. Liljeberg of Avon Lake was among 60 other cadets selected.
Published in: The Morning Journal
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Monday
April 25, 2016
6b. Education Briefs - Week of 4/22
Mooresville residents Marcus Householder and Abigail Murn, who entered The Citadel as freshmen last fall, have officially been sworn in as members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets as of Saturday, April 9.
Published in: Mooresville Weekly
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Monday
April 25, 2016
6c. College Notes - Citadel Recognition Day
Liam Gribbin of Garden City was among 588 other freshman cadets that have been officially sworn into the South Carolina Corps of Cadets at The Citadel, in Charleston, South Carolina.
Published in: The Garden City News
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Monday
April 25, 2016
6d. College Notebook - April 24, 2016
A former Albany resident is one of 61 cadets who has earned the title Summerall Guard, one of the highest honors that can be achieved by a member of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets at The Citadel. John William "Jay" Brunson, who attended middle school in Albany, was selected to the Class of 2017 Summerall Guards. He is the son of Mabre Bottoms and Johnny Brunson, and the grandson of Albany residents Gilbert Haskins, Harriet Haskins, John Brunson and Montie Coston. Each winter, cadets who are juniors endure weeks of rigorous physical training and drilling in an attempt to be named a member of the platoon their senior year. Summerall Guards are chosen for physical stamina and drill proficiency. The platoon's purpose is to exemplify, through a unique series of movements based on the old German close-order drill, the exactness and thoroughness with which a cadet is trained. The drill is performed to a silent count. Created in 1932, the platoon is named for Gen. Charles P. Summerall, former chief of staff of the U.S. Army and Citadel president 1931-53.
Published in: Albany Herald
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Monday
April 25, 2016
6e. Citadel alumni host annual muster
Members of the Southside Atlanta Citadel Club from Fayette and Coweta counties and other locations recently held the club's annual muster in Newnan. The muster honored 213 Citadel graduates who passed away during 2015, according to club representatives. Among those distinguished graduates remembered at the ceremony was John Ziegler, class of 1932, and Pat Conroy, class of 1967. Ziegler was the founder of the college's literary magazine and at age 103 was the oldest living alumnus. Pat Conroy, class of 1967, is the internationally acclaimed author of "The Lords of Discipline" and "The Prince of Tides," among others. The annual muster has been a Citadel tradition since 1998 and is conducted on March 20 each year at The Citadel in Charleston, S.C., and at locations all over the world as close to that date as possible. The Southside Atlanta Citadel Club draws its members mostly from Fayette and Coweta counties. For more information about The Citadel Alumni Clubs, contact Ed White at 1966elcid@gmail.com
Published in: The Citizen
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Monday
April 25, 2016
6f. Citadel grad dominates at Army's Best Ranger Competition
Army National Guard Capt. Robert Killian, a South Carolina native and 2004 Citadel graduate, was part of a two-man team that took first place last weekend in the famously grueling Best Ranger Competition. Killian, 34, and teammate Staff Sgt. Erich Friedlein of Pennsylvania earned the highest combined score in the three-day series of events at Fort Benning, Ga., that included obstacle courses, extended slogs through the mud, marksmanship challenges and a middle-of-the-night marathon run over rough terrain. Of the 50 teams that entered the competition, only 23 made it to the final day. "I definitely have some blisters, some sore muscles, but overall I'm feeling much better today than I did yesterday," Killian said when reached by phone Tuesday. Killian grew up in the Charleston area and Sumter before attending The Citadel. Even within the world of obstacle and endurance racing, it doesn't get much tougher than the annual Ranger contest, now in its 33rd year. Competitors are only allowed to eat five Meal Ready-to-Eat rations during the contest, and this year saw the addition of a concrete ball-carrying event and a Spartan Race competition at the start of Day Two.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
April 25, 2016
7a. College Baseball: The Citadel holds off Western Carolina, 6-4
The Citadel took its series over Southern Conference-leading Western Carolina with a 6-4 win Sunday at Riley Park. The Bulldogs (15-26, 5-7) struck first with three runs in the third inning. Clay Martin drew a bases-loaded walk with one out to give the Dogs a 1-0 lead, and then Shy Phillips followed with a two-run single up the middle to make it 3-0. Following the end of the frame, Western Carolina (21-18, 11-4) was forced to make a pitching change, removing its starter after just three innings. The Citadel continued to pad its lead in the fourth inning, scoring two after William Kinney laced a one-out double down the left-field line to make it 5-0. Western Carolina scored its first run of the game in the fifth inning, stringing together three hits in the frame, but Jacob Watcher forced two flyouts to keep the lead at four. The Bulldogs kept the offense rolling in the fifth inning as Stephen Windham smacked a two-out double to the right-field wall to score Martin from third.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
April 25, 2016
7b. The Citadel shutout by Western Carolina, 11-0
The Citadel baseball team dropped the second game of the series against Western Carolina on Saturday afternoon inside Joe Riley Park. The Bulldogs earned a 2-1 win over the first-place Catamounts (21-17, 11-3 SoCon) in game one of the three-game series Friday, but struggled offensively in the 11-0 loss Saturday. Jason Smith, Mike Deese and Steven Hansen each recorded a hit in the game for the Bulldogs (14-26, 4-7 SoCon) including a double by Deese for his seventh this year. Chris Kellahan made his Bulldog debut on the mound in the ninth inning, striking out one in one inning of work, and Justin Craft drew a walk in his first collegiate at bat. The Citadel used seven pitchers in the contest. The rubber match between the SoCon foes is set for 1 p.m. on Sunday inside Joe Riley Park. Live stats, video and audio will be available at CitadelSports.com for the game. For tickets, call 843-953-DOGS (3647) or visit CitadelSports.com/tickets.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
April 25, 2016
7c. Bulldogs Top First-Place Catamounts, 2-1
The Citadel baseball team picked up a hard-fought 2-1 win over Western Carolina on Friday afternoon inside Joe Riley Park. JP Sears got the start on the mound for the Bulldogs (14-25, 4-6 SoCon), tossing 6.0 innings. The lefty allowed just one run in the first inning and then proceeded to hold Western Carolina scoreless for the next five innings, giving up three hits and fanning five. Kyle Smith and Zach Lavery followed the trend set by Sears, as the duo combined to throw the last three innings and give up just one hit. The Catamounts (20-17, 10-3 SoCon) were hitless from the third through the sixth inning. Mike Deese tied the ballgame for the Bulldogs in the bottom of the sixth, crushing a double to the right field wall to score a sprinting Shy Phillips from first to make it 1-1. On the next pitch, Stephen Windham laced a single up the middle to score Deese from second to give The Citadel the lead for good. Deese finished two-for-three with the game-tying RBI and the game-winning run, and Shy Phillips collected a hit and scored one run in the contest. The Bulldogs outhit the Catamounts 6-4.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
April 25, 2016
8a. Fred Jordan: Citadel baseball 'will overcome, I guarantee it'
Fred Jordan won his 800th career game earlier this year, becoming the first Southern Conference baseball coach and one of 27 active coaches in Division I to reach the milestone. "It was very humbling, the amount of encouragement and messages we got from across the country," said Jordan, in his 25th year as The Citadel's coach. The painful irony is that Jordan's milestone victory came in the midst of what might be the worst of his 25 seasons. The current Bulldogs are 13-25 overall and 3-6 in the Southern Conference heading into this weekend's series with league-leading Western Carolina at Riley Park. The Citadel has lost 12 of its last 13 games, that skid starting on March 30 when three starters were suspended (and later dismissed). For a proud man whose Citadel teams won six SoCon tournament titles and four regular-season titles between 1994 and 2004 - and whose 2009 and 2010 teams won a combined 80 games and two more SoCon championships - the losing is tough to take. The Bulldogs have had just one winning season in the last five, and it's worn on the 58-year-old Jordan. "Of course it has," said Louisville coach Dan McDonnell, a former Bulldog player who served as an assistant coach under Jordan. "I've reached out to him. And I can tell you, he's a competitor who doesn't like to make excuses."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
April 25, 2016
8b. Mauldin's Joe Jackson acclimating well to next rung in pro baseball
Joe Jackson is 10 games into his Double-A career, and Frisco RoughRiders manager Joe Mikulik likes what he has seen from the former Mauldin High star thus far. "He swings the bat very well, he takes some good at-bats. He's had some big hits for us already this year," Mikulik said. Jackson, 23, who has been Frisco's designated hitter in nine of their first 10 games, is hitting .250 with 6 RBIs and an OPS of .678 for the Double-A affiliate of the Texas Rangers. "I've been doing pretty well and I'm seeing the ball pretty well right now. Getting off to a quick start is huge," Jackson said. "I feel like I'm not giving at-bats away, which is good."... "I haven't had many (guys from schools like The Citadel play for me) and obviously those guys take care of themselves," Mikulik said. "They’re mature and they're disciplined and they'll do what you ask, and that's always easy to manage. Obviously, they've had some structure. They've had some good discipline. It always makes it easier when you have those types of players." During his time at The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, Jackson didn't understand why he was being asked to do certain things, but now that he's been away from there for several years and settled into life as a professional ballplayer, the repetitive nature of those tasks and the reasoning behind them all make sense. And that routine is part of the reason why he's acclimated so well to Double-A.
Published in: Greenville Online
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Monday
April 25, 2016
8c. Moore adjusts to a new life
Ashton Moore's life right now is a study in contrasts. But at least one important thing remains the same - he is taking care of business on the basketball court. After a successful high school career at Nansemond River High School and a standout college career at The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, Moore has been enjoying a starring role as a professional basketball player on BC Beroe, a team in Bulgaria. "It's definitely been a great experience to be able to do what I love as a profession while getting out and experiencing different parts of the world," Moore said. BC Beroe recently played in an international league called the Balkan League, which organized teams for competition by putting them in different groups. "We lost in the semifinals to the top seed in the other group, and they're returning champions of the Balkan League," Moore said, referring to Sigal Prishtina. "They won it all last season." Moore noted that during his team’s run in this league, he was BC Beroe's leading scorer. The squad is now participating in a Bulgarian league called the National Basketball League and is third in the standings with a record of 20-7.
Published in: Suffolk News-Herald
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Monday
April 25, 2016
8d. Windsor schools Students of the Month announced
Autumn Bennett has been named Windsor High School's March Student-of-the-Month. Autumn is the daughter of Lori Bennett and Matt and Tiffany Bennett. She is currently a senior and is involved in Volleyball, Student Council, FFA, Spanish Club, Physics Club, Pep Club, WYSE, DARE Role Model, Team Quest, Class Officer, 4-H, American Legion Junior Auxillary, Youth Group, and Club Volleyball. After graduation Autumn plans to attend college at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina, where she will continue to play volleyball and study Criminal Justice.
Published in: Shelby County News
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Monday
April 25, 2016
8e. Sapakoff: More to it than Bill Murray's chinch bugs, groundskeeper Mike Williams is Riley Park MVP
Mike Williams could see the backstop at the high school baseball field through the double-glass doors of his boyhood home on Clinton Street in Athens, Ohio. At the first sight of action on the magnetic diamond, young Mike grabbed a glove and hurried over to imitate his heroes of the 1970s, players on Cincinnati's "Big Red Machine" or the nearly equidistant Pittsburgh Pirates. "There weren't any more cowboys and Indians played," he said. "No more Tonka toys." As a prideful 6-year-old, Williams began taking care of the ballfield. Some weed-pulling. Tender loving dirt care. Almost a half-century later, the best and busiest groundskeeper in minor league baseball just wants a smile. "A lot of people think groundskeeping is just mowing the grass and dragging the field. Well, it's not," said Williams a former Major League Baseball groundskeeper who is in his 11th year managing the field at Riley Park, home of the Charleston RiverDogs and Citadel Bulldogs. "It's soil biology. It's chemistry. It's knowing all the things that go into providing a beautiful playing surface not only for the players, but as soon as the fans walk through the breezeway. It's the 'Wow' factor."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
April 25, 2016
9. Paul Koshewa Obituary
Paul Adolph Koshewa, of Atlanta, Georgia, died Thursday, April 14, 2016, at the age of 93. He was born in Louisville, Kentucky, on October 4, 1922. Family and humor were an important part of Paul's life. One of Paul's greatest achievements was his widespread role as a friend and mentor. He went out of his way to help people. His patience, persistence, and constant affirmation of the assets of others earned him universal respect and admiration. After attending Male High in Louisville, where he was captain of the football team and also ran track, Paul received an academic scholarship to attend Centre College, where he also played football. His academic career was interrupted by World War II, when he joined the Army Air Corps to become a navigator. In 1945, Paul returned to Centre and graduated with an AB in Mathematics. After graduation, he taught and coached at Danville High School for two years. This was followed by two years coaching football and track at the Citadel in Charleston, SC, where he met Anne (Nancy) Deas Koshewa of nearby Mt. Pleasant, SC. They married in August of 1950, shortly after which he was recalled to serve in the Korean Conflict, this time in the US Air Force. In 1955, Paul moved to Atlanta to teach mathematics and coach football and track at The Westminster Schools. During this time, he also attained an MAT in Mathematics from Emory University. In 1968, Paul was recalled to active duty during the Tet Offensive in the Vietnam Conflict. He retired in 1982 with the rank of colonel. His military decorations include the Purple Heart in 1944, the Distinguished Flying Cross in 1944 and 1954, and the Air Medal in 1944 and 1954.
Published in: Gwinnett Daily Post
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Thursday
April 21, 2016
1. Citadel to allow cadets with state permits to have guns in cars
The Citadel has bowed to cadet pressure - and influence from Gov. Nikki Haley - and will allow cadets with concealed weapons permits to keep their personal guns in their cars. The school's Board of Visitors last weekend voted to suspend its code of regulations and instead will recognize state law that allows all state permit carriers to keep their weapons locked in their vehicles. The move came after cadets last month used a speaking visit by the governor to get her to use her influence with school president Lt. Gen. John Rosa to make the regulation change. Cadet Austin Lee, who originally confronted the governor during a speech at McAlister Field House, praised the decision in a group statement he issued with three other cadets Wednesday. "We would like to thank all of the cadets and gun-rights supporters who made this change possible," said Lee, a soon-to-be graduating senior. "It has been a long hard road, but we are ecstatic about today's victory." Lee credited three other gun rights-supporting cadets - Kameron Hamlin, Evan Maes and Jake Moore - for the change but noted they will not be able to enjoy the outcome.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
April 21, 2016
2. Is Physical Inactivity the New Smoking in South Carolina?
If smoking isn't tolerated in South Carolina schools, workplaces, and public transportation, then why is physical inactivity tolerated in our towns, cities, and state? Physical inactivity is the fourth leading cause of death worldwide, and has been labeled one of the greatest public health challenges of the 21st century. However, outside of the public health field, nobody seems to care. Do you really care how physically active your co-workers, friends, or family members are? If you're like most, you don't care because others' physical activity seemingly has little-to-no impact on you. But what if those same co-workers, friends, and family members were smokers, would you care about their smoking behavior? Many care deeply about others' smoking behavior because of the effects of second-hand smoke. In-fact, it was the evidence on the detrimental effects of second-hand smoke that led to the demand for taxes on cigarettes and no-smoking zones. Anti-smoking advocates learned that simply warning people about the dangers of smoking was not sufficient to alter smoking prevalence, and that polices aimed at limiting access to cigarettes and opportunities to smoke were required. Similar to smoking, there is clear evidence on how the physical inactivity of some negatively impacts society on the whole. For example, the economic burden imposed by physical inactivity on the U.S. healthcare system has been estimated between $50 and $134 billion annually. Additionally, the U.S. Department of Defense has shown great concern over the impact of physical inactivity on military readiness.
Published in: LowcountryBizSC.com
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Thursday
April 21, 2016
3. The Citadel School of Business Hall of Fame to induct newest honorees
Three influential South Carolina business leaders will be inducted into The Citadel School of Business Hall of Fame on Thursday, April 21. Honorees will include Jonathan Zucker, president of The InterTech Group, Inc.; Tommy Baker, founder of Baker Motor Company, and William W. Gaffney, Jr., president of Citadel Management, LLC. Zucker will be the recipient of The Alvah H. Chapman, Jr. Distinguished Leadership Award. Leader of Principle Awards will be given to Baker and Gaffney. "This celebrated, annual event allows The Citadel School of Business to recognize some of the top executive leadership in South Carolina," said Bill Trumbull, Ph.D. dean of The Citadel School of Business. "This year's recipients are highly successful professionals who lead organizations, create jobs and serve as stewards for their communities." As President of The InterTech Group, Inc. Zucker oversees a diversified holding enterprise with companies and portfolio investments in multiple sectors including aerospace, industrial and engineered products, financial transaction services, utilities and energy, specialty chemicals, recreation and leisure, medical technology, security and real estate. The company has operations in North America, Latin America, South America, Europe and the Far East. Zucker is also a trustee for the South Carolina Research Authority, as well as the Roper St. Francis Clinical Biotechnology Research Institute, and serves as the current board chairman for the South Carolina Aquarium. He received his Master of Business Administration with highest honors from The Citadel Graduate College, and his bachelor of science in management and information systems with high honors from Georgia Institute of Technology.
Published in: Moultrie News
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Thursday
April 21, 2016
4. The Citadel Recognition Day
The Citadel: Among the students to be named members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets is Jacob Fritz, of Stewartstown.
Published in: York Dispatch
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Thursday
April 21, 2016
5. The Citadel falls at home to Georgia Southern, 7-5
The Citadel baseball team's late-game rally came up just shy on Wednesday evening as the Bulldogs fell to Georgia Southern 7-5 inside Joe Riley Park. The Citadel's (13-25) rally began in the sixth inning when Ben Peden scored from third on a two-out double to right field by William Kinney to make the score 5-2. The 'Dogs tacked on two more runs in the bottom of the seventh to slim the Eagles' (23-15) lead to just one. In the eighth inning, Clay Martin tied the game at 5-5 with a sacrifice fly to center field to score William Kinney from third. Martin finished the game one-for-one with a triple, one run scored and three walks. The sophomore had reached base in all previous at-bats before tying the game on the sacrifice fly. But with two hits and two runs in the top of the ninth, Georgia Southern took the lead for good and clinched the 7-5 victory. Along with Martin, Stephen Windham, Ben Peden and William Kinney recorded one RBI in the game.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Thursday
April 21, 2016
6. HHH wrestler Martin Duane chooses The Citadel as his next stop
After so many years centered around the discipline of wrestling, it's little surprise that Martin Duane would gravitate toward a structured college environment. And they don't come much more structured than where he'll be wrestling next. The Hilton Head Island standout signed a national letter-of-intent Wednesday to compete for The Citadel, allowing him to compete while pursuing his military aspirations. "It's a great option for me all around," said Duane, one of the Seahawks' twin unbeatens this season with Talon Seitz. "Wrestling is one of those sports (wherein) only a few get to go to the Olympics, but I want to go into the Navy and make it a career." Duane was one of eight Seahawks to formalize their college plans Wednesday, including four others that will compete at the NCAA Division I level. Ella Patrick (lacrosse) and Maekenzie Poplin (soccer) will play for Wofford, while brothers Jack and Sam Beattie will run cross country and track at College of Charleston.
Published in: The Island Packet
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Thursday
April 21, 2016
8. Malin Craig 'Boon' Threatt Obituary
Malin Craig "Boone" Threatt, 80, of Bamberg, passed away during the early hours of Wednesday, April 20, 2016. A memorial service will be held at 3 p.m. Friday, April 22, in the Cooner Funeral Home chapel, Bamberg. The family will receive friends one hour prior to the service at the funeral home Friday. He was born in White Plains, Chesterfield County, on Sept. 29, 1935, the third son of Herman H. and Ruby G. Threatt. His brothers, Heywood "Red" and Richard Threatt, preceded him in death. Boone and his brothers came to Bamberg at an early age to attend Carlisle Military School. After graduation, he was a lifelong educator and school administrator, having taught and coached for many years at Carlisle. He was a principal of Bamberg–Ehrhardt High School, Denmark Elementary School and at other schools. He attended The Citadel and the University of South Carolina and was a graduate of both institutions. He also attended Wake Forest, Appalachian State and North Carolina State. Boone was am employee of the Department of Corrections, from which he retired in the early 1990s. He was a member of First and Ashton Baptist Church of Bamberg and an avid lover of sports.
Published in: The Times & Democrat
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Wednesday
April 20, 2016
1. Student athletic fees continue to rise in South Carolina
Student athletic fees, which fuel college athletics at the state's mid-major schools, continue to rise in South Carolina. The state's six public mid-major schools (FCS and non-football Division I programs) raised their athletic fees for in-state students by an average of 11.5 percent in 2014-15, according to figures from the state Commission on Higher Education. The increases ranged from 51.4 percent at Coastal Carolina to 2.9 percent at College of Charleston, with South Carolina State decreasing its reported fee by 3 percent. The Citadel boosted its fee some 3.9 percent to $2,486 per student, while College of Charleston's fee rose almost 3 percent to $1,246 per student. Student athletic fees and other subsidies pay for most of college athletics at the state's Division I schools other than Clemson and South Carolina. USA Today’s most recent financial database, for the 2014-15 school year, show that the state’s public mid-major schools depend on student athletic fees and other subsidies for 78.03 percent of their athletic department budgets. Those figures range from 83.14 percent at Coastal Carolina to 68.14 percent at The Citadel. Student fees and subsidies provide 78.9 percent of the athletic budget at College of Charleston.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
April 20, 2016
2. Pitching plans: Bulldog Business Bowl
One aspiring entrepreneur is going to walk away with $10,000 Wednesday at The Citadel. The military college is hosting its annual Bulldog Business Bowl, and five teams are vying for the prize and free office space as they present full business plans for an array of products and services. More than 25 teams entered the competition in October for the first of three rounds, when eight semi-finalists were chosen. In January, the eight were narrowed to five. Each finalist team was assigned a coach and provided with the opportunity to attend workshops on how to develop a full business plan. "One of the teams walked in with an idea and will walk out ready to begin their business - that's our intention," said Patrick Manna, a Citadel business professor who founded the bowl. The final round will run 9 a.m.-2:15 p.m. Wednesday in Bond Hall auditorium with the awards ceremony at 3:45 p.m. Both are free and open to the public. The finalists are Little Rock Pharmacy & Medicine Therapy Consultants, Traveler's Point, Agricultural Clays, Campus Connect and SC Property Tax Relief. In addition to the cash, the winning team will get one year of office space at the Charleston Metro Chamber of Commerce Catalyst Center. The second-place team receives $5,000 with a year of office space. The competition is open to members of the S.C. Corps of Cadets as well as The Citadel Graduate College's evening undergraduate and graduate students.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
April 20, 2016
3. Physical Activity Section's Bornstein on National Physical Activity Plan
Today the National Physical Activity Plan Alliance - a nonprofit including 25 organizational partners including the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - updated the U.S. National Physical Activity Plan, a strategy aimed at fulfilling the alliance's vision that "one day, all Americans will be physically active, and they will live, work and play in environments that encourage and support regular physical activity." APHA's Physical Activity Section Chair Dan Bornstein, PhD, assistant professor at The Citadel, was in attendance for both the plan's creation in 2010 and today's update at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. Public Health Newswire talked to Bornstein about the significance of the plan and the growth of his Section, which was created as a Special Primary Interest Group in 2009. View the article to read more on Dr. Bornstein's interview.
Published in: Public Health Newswire
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Wednesday
April 20, 2016
4. Don't expect to hear from fans of Yellen, SEC or Congress at NCPA event
George Selgin thinks we're being hoodwinked into believing that Federal Reserve policy under Janet Yellen is returning to normal. "Fed policy is now weirder than ever," says the director of the Center for Monetary and Financial Alternatives at the Cato Institute in Washington, D.C. "We're far from being safe or out of the woods when it comes to financial stability." A growing number of economic thinkers and market watchers see another American financial meltdown building just beneath the bull-headed stock market and a too-loose Fed monetary policy. Selgin, along with a half-dozen bankers, economists and whistleblowers, will sound that alarm at a National Center for Policy Analysis conference next week. They'll attempt to answer the burning question: "Can We Prevent the Next Credit Crisis?" You can expect the speakers to be in line with the libertarian bent of the NCPA. But if you're not convinced that we're dancing in the ship's ballroom while the Titanic heads into the iceberg, they promise to offer insight into why you should be. Richard Ebeling, professor of ethics and free enterprise at the Citadel in Charleston, S.C., foresees "an inevitable and inescapable" market correction and a subsequent downturn.
Published in: The Dallas Morning News
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Wednesday
April 20, 2016
5. Freshmen cadets sworn in as members of Citadel corps
Men and women who entered The Citadel as freshmen last fall have officially been sworn in as members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets as of Saturday, April 9. Recognition Day 2016 marks the end of what many consider the toughest first year college military-training in the country. Each year, hundreds of people line the streets to cheer for the freshmen as they march, dressed in their brilliant white uniforms, to attend "The Oath Renewal on The Citadel Green." The oath marks their transition to officially becoming members of the Corps. The green at Marion Square was the original parade ground for the college, when it was founded in 1842 in the structure that is now the Embassy Suites. The march follows three weeks of Transition to Recognition Training during which the knobs take classes examining student ethics and leadership skills and the honor code. They also undergo inspections and drills training. Among the 588 freshmen cadets officially sworn in were: Richard Blanchard of Summerville; Nicholas Brace of North Charleston; Cole Cleland of Harleyville; Daniel Ilderton of Saint George; Emmanuel Johnson of Ladson; Jerod Lacy of Ladson; Dylan Lilly of Dorchester; John-Robert Maddray of Summerville; John McLeod of Summerville; Michael Murphy of Summerville; Dane Petersen of Summerville; Nathaniel Phillip of North Charleston; Matthew Tipton of Summerville.
Published in: The Summerville Journal Scene
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Wednesday
April 20, 2016
6. Neeley signs to run at The Citadel
Senior sprinter and distance runner Jordan Neeley, who lived in South Carolina before her family moved to northwest Arkansas during her freshman year, will head back to that area. Neeley made that happen Wednesday when she signed her national letter of intent to run track and cross country at The Citadel, a military college in South Carolina.
Published in: Westside Eagle Observer
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Wednesday
April 20, 2016
7. Georgia Southern beats The Citadel, 10-2
The Citadel baseball team fell to Georgia Southern 10-2 in the first of a two-game series on Tuesday evening at J.I. Clements Stadium. Jason Smith needed just four pitches to put the Bulldogs (13-24) on the board, launching a leadoff home run to center field to give put the 'Dogs on top 1-0. The homer was the first of the senior's career. Georgia Southern (22-15) scored its first runs of the game in the second inning and then added more in the third, scoring four runs over the two frames to take a 4-1 lead. Stephen Windham took back one of the runs for The Citadel in the top of the fourth hitting, hitting his second home run this season to left center field to close the gap to just two. Freshman Dylan Spence, making his third start this season, pitched 3.0 innings and allowed four runs while striking out two. Fellow classmate Johnny Croley worked 2.2 scoreless innings in relief. The series now moves to Charleston as the Bulldogs host the Eagles inside Joe Riley Park on Wednesday. Live stats, video and audio will be available at CitadelSports.com for the 6 p.m. game. For tickets, call 843-953-DOGS (3647) or visit CitadelSports.com/tickets.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Wednesday
April 20, 2016
8. The Citadel Opens SoCon Tournament Friday
The Citadel tennis team begins its postseason Friday against No. 55 ETSU in the opening match of the Southern Conference Tournament. The Bulldogs (9-28, 0-7 SoCon) and Buccaneers (15-5, 7-0) are playing for the second time in six days following a 7-0 win by ETSU in Charleston on Saturday. Later that afternoon, The Citadel defeated USC Sumter 9-0 to earn the program's highest single-season win total under head coach Chuck Kriese and the most wins in a season since 2008. The Citadel has experienced its best season in years due in large part to young talent that continues to develop under Coach Kriese's guidance. Freshmen and sophomores have combined to claim 65 of the Bulldogs' 73 singles victories this season, resulting in 89 percent of the team's individual wins being produced by underclassmen. Sophomore Artemie Amari leads the team with 15 wins in singles play, including a team-high three in conference, and has won three of his last four matches. Fellow sophomore Nicholas Bradley is next on the team with 12 singles victories and has won two of his last three contests.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Tuesday
April 19, 2016
1a. The Citadel School of Business Hall of Fame to induct newest honorees
Three influential South Carolina business leaders will be inducted into The Citadel School of Business Hall of Fame on Thursday, April 21. Honorees will include Jonathan Zucker, president of The InterTech Group, Inc.; Tommy Baker, founder of Baker Motor Company, and William W. Gaffney, Jr., president of Citadel Management, LLC. Zucker will be the recipient of The Alvah H. Chapman, Jr. Distinguished Leadership Award. Leader of Principle Awards will be given to Baker and Gaffney. "This celebrated, annual event allows The Citadel School of Business to recognize some of the top executive leadership in South Carolina," said Bill Trumbull, Ph.D. dean of The Citadel School of Business. "This year's recipients are highly successful professionals who lead organizations, create jobs and serve as stewards for their communities."
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Tuesday
April 19, 2016
1b. business HOF
business HOF
Published in: LowcountryBizSC.com
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Tuesday
April 19, 2016
2. STEM Teacher of the Year taking state's robotics champs to world competition
Their robots rumbled at the local, regional, and national competitions, and returned to West Ashley High School as champions. Now, the school's robotics teams are following their leader to the world competitions in Louisville, Kentucky, which will be held April 20 - 23. Their teacher, Nicholas Holmes is the high school's mechatronics and trebuchet teacher, and was recently named the Air Force Association's STEM Teacher of the Year for the Charleston County School District. Holmes likes to keep his classes on the forefront of mechatronics technology. He is currently pursuing a Master of Education in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics), which is a new program offered through The Citadel STEM Center of Excellence. "It's a very exciting and constantly evolving field, but it is still not unusual to have to explain to the parents of my students what mechatronics is," said Holmes. "Many of my students, though, are familiar with mechatronics when they enter my class. I want to know as much as I can about how to effectively teach them." Holmes explained that mechatronics is methodology for designing products that incorporate mechanical design with sensors and electronic controls. "We engineer small robots and then compete with them," he said.
Published in: LowcountryBizSC.com
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Tuesday
April 19, 2016
3. The Water Bearer - Phillip Davis named as part of 50 Most Progressive in Charleston
Phillip Davis is rethinking how Charlestonians drink water. While in medical school at MUSC, Phillip discovered that more than one billion people worldwide suffer from vitamin D deficiencies. He decided to change that statistic. Vitamin D deficiency is often associated with increased risk of disease, cancer, and autoimmune disorders, just to name a few. So Davis started to work on something to remedy this problem. His solution? Shine Water. This water is naturally sweetened, infused with vitamin D, and is packed with antioxidants to promote a healthy lifestyle. Phillip started small. He cofounded Shine Water with his wife, Angel, simply as a means to provide more vitamin D to the local community. But Shine Water quickly turned into a philanthropic powerhouse with an entire team working to make a positive difference around the world. While taking an MBA class at The Citadel, Phillip was introduced to Pat Manna, the school's Entrepreneur in Residence. Manna connected Phillip with Fresh Hospitality, which provided the financial backing Shine Water needed to get off the ground. Once Shine Water was in stores across Charleston and Nashville and available for sale on Amazon, Phillip realized he could also affect change internationally. He and Angel then partnered with Palmetto Medical Initiative to donate 5 percent of each bottle sold to provide life-saving vitamins to women and children in Africa and Central America.
Published in: ReadCharlie.com
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Tuesday
April 19, 2016
4. South Carolina considering law to block bans on plastic bags
Plastic bags that shoppers use to carry groceries home from the store are an increasing menace to marine life and a general litter problem across South Carolina, say some scientists and conservationists who support curbing the use of the handy carriers. Many sea creatures eat plastic bags, or the remnants of the bags, that get into the ocean, thinking the floating trash is food. That then clogs their digestive systems, which can kill animals or reduce their abilities to grow and reproduce, bag critics contend. Toxins in the fiber of plastic bags also threaten sea life, they say. Without a ban or limits on plastic bags, the ocean off South Carolina will remain fraught with unnatural perils for sea turtles, shrimp and other creatures, according to the S.C. Coastal Conservation League and the Conservation Voters of South Carolina, two leading environmental organizations... John Weinstein, a biology professor at The Citadel who has studied the effects of plastics on marine life, said sea turtles feed on jellyfish, but turtles can't always distinguish between the bags and their natural prey. Plastic bags eaten by turtles "block the gut of the sea turtle and the sea turtle eventually dies," he said. The primary species of sea turtle in South Carolina, the loggerhead, is a federally protected species.
Published in: The State
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Tuesday
April 19, 2016
5. Citadel Cadet Becomes First Amputee to Make Precision Drill Platoon
When 20-year-old U.S. Navy hopeful Cameron Massengale lost his arm in a work accident, he wasn't sure he'd ever be able to march as a cadet at The Citadel again. But thanks to a custom prosthetic arm and his refusal to settle, Massengale has not only returned to the group but also became the first amputee to make the university's Summerall Guards, a silent precision drill platoon, in January. Massengale is the first amputee to make the platoon at The Citadel, a military college in Charleston, S.C. "I'm still not completely sure how I'm doing it. It just kind of happens," Massengale told FoxNews.com. "I call it magic." Massengale has four prosthetics, including one myoelectric prosthetic with a bionic hand and a drill prosthetic has a two-fingered hook so he can perform quick, open-and-close movements like picking up or setting down his rifle. Creating his drill arm took some trial and error, said Jon Nottingham, a certified prosthetist orthotist and area clinic manager at the Hanger Clinic in Greenville, South Carolina. The length of his drill prosthetic was also shortened so The Citadel senior can look uniform with his platoon, and it has a specialized wrist that he can rotate or flex in three or four positions.
Published in: Military.com
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Tuesday
April 19, 2016
6. Andre Roberts Hosted A Military Football Camp In Germany
Andre Roberts' military background is well-established by now. Last year's team nominee for the Salute to Service Award, Roberts, the son of two former U.S. Army members and graduate of The Citadel, continued his support of military families overseas. The wide receiver spent time in Germany's Ramstein Air Base last weekend along with Chargers wide receiver Keenan Allen to host a youth football camp, which had 200 military children attend. The first through eighth graders from the Kaiserslautern Military community learned about the importance of living healthy lives and reinforced that "the Commissary is the center of the community and so much more than a grocery store." Plus, they got some football skills in, too. "I wouldn't trade my childhood for anything in the world," Roberts said. "It shaped who I am today and I have amazing memories of the base community coming together and supporting me and my family."
Published in: Redskins.com
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Tuesday
April 19, 2016
7. Fourteen local athletes have made decisions for college
Fourteen local athletes have taken advantage of the regular signing period, which opened last week, or plan to do so in the coming days. The list includes The Sun News Toast of the Coast Boys Basketball Player of the Year and Wrestler of the Year, an upcoming Ivy League baseball player and one of the best two-sport athletes St. James has had in the past five years. The signing period remains open until Aug. 1 and is expected to eventually be utilized by a number of other area athletes who were still deciding their college future or awaiting official offers. In the meantime, several have already made their decisions. Carvers Bay basketball standout Arkel Williams fulfilled a commitment to Northeastern Oklahoma A&M Community College. St. James wrestler Michael Mewhorter inked with The Citadel. Myrtle Beach's Michael Calamari signed financial aid paperwork with Dartmouth. Kelsi Bachmann, who has been a Toast honoree in both softball and basketball, committed to Coker to continue playing both. Announced signees are: Aynor: Bailey Richardson, golf, The Citadel; Carvers Bay: Arkel Williams, basketball, Northeastern Oklahoma A&M; Myrtle Beach: Isaac Giddens, tennis, Erskine; Michael Calamari, baseball, Dartmouth; Chris Timmons, baseball, Rockingham; Anthony Taylor, football, Greensboro; North Myrtle Beach: Austin Bolton, soccer, Coker; Austin Griffin, baseball, Methodist; Michael Genovese, baseball, USC Sumter; Josh Livingston, basketball, Hargrave Military; St. James: Kelsi Bachmann, basketball/softball, Coker; Shelby Spaziani, softball, Coppin State; Austin McCutchen, lacrosse, Coker; Michael Mewhorter, wrestling, The Citadel.
Published in: Myrtle Beach Online
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Monday
April 18, 2016
1. Citadel cadet becomes first amputee to make precision drill platoon
When 20-year-old U.S. Navy hopeful Cameron Massengale lost his arm in a work accident, he wasn't sure he'd ever be able to march as a cadet at The Citadel again. But thanks to a custom prosthetic arm and his refusal to settle, Massengale has not only returned to the group but also became the first amputee to make the university’s Summerall Guards, a silent precision drill platoon, in January. Massengale is the first amputee to make the platoon at The Citadel, a military college in Charleston, S.C. "I'm still not completely sure how I'm doing it. It just kind of happens, Massengale told FoxNews.com. "I call it magic." Massengale has four prosthetics, including one myoelectric prosthetic with a bionic hand and a drill prosthetic has a two-fingered hook so he can perform quick, open-and-close movements like picking up or setting down his rifle. Creating his drill arm took some trial and error, said Jon Nottingham, a certified prosthetist orthotist and area clinic manager at the Hanger Clinic in Greenville, South Carolina. The length of his drill prosthetic was also shortened so The Citadel senior can look uniform with his platoon, and it has a specialized wrist that he can rotate or flex in three or four positions.
Published in: Fox News
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Monday
April 18, 2016
2. 2004 Citadel grad wins Best Ranger Competition
After coming in second place two years in a row, Capt. Robert Killian and his partner, Staff Sgt. Erich Friedlein, on Sunday were named the winners of the 2016 Best Ranger Competition. The pair, representing the Army National Guard, earned the title of Best Ranger. Killian, competing with different partners both times, came in second place in 2015 and 2014. In all, the Special Forces captain from the Colorado Guard and 2015 Reebok Spartan Race World Championship winner has competed five times in the Best Ranger Competition. This year's second-place team is 1st Sgt. David Floutier and Staff Sgt. Joshua Rolfes from the Airborne and Ranger Training Brigade. In third place this year is a team from the Maneuver Center of Excellence - Capt. Michael Blanchard and Capt. Brian Slamkowski.
Published in: ArmyTimes.com
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Monday
April 18, 2016
3a. The Citadel considers exception to allow Muslim headscarf
An incoming freshman female student at The Citadel has asked the military college to let her wear a traditional Muslim headscarf when she begins classes in the fall, the first time such a request has been made at the school known for its buttoned-up uniforms and close-cropped haircuts. Citadel spokeswoman Kim Keelor said Friday that although a number of Muslims have attended the public college, she hasn't heard of any of them ever asking to wear a headscarf. South Carolina's military college, founded in 1842, has a policy that states the college will approve religious accommodation requests unless it "will have an adverse impact on a competing institutional interest including, but not limited to, cohesion, morale, good order and discipline, cadet welfare, safety and/or health." The policy also says "accommodation of a cadet's religious practices must be examined considering these factors and cannot be guaranteed at all times." The school said it was reviewing the student's request. Keelor wouldn't identify the student or say where she was from, citing privacy concerns. The request was first reported by The Washington Post, which identified students, alumni and others reacting on social media. Cadet Nick Pinelli, who is expecting to graduate in May, told The Associated Press on Friday that he doesn't think she should be able to wear the headscarf. "It has nothing to do with her religion," he said. "It's in no way against her. I've heard very positive things. She wants to be a JAG officer."
Published in: Fox News
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Monday
April 18, 2016
3b. hijab
hijab
Published in: The Daily Beast
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Monday
April 18, 2016
3c. hijab
hijab
Published in: Washington Post
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Monday
April 18, 2016
4a. Citadel students join Corps of Cadets
The following area men and women who entered The Citadel as freshman last fall have officially been sworn in as members of the S.C. Corps of Cadets: Luke Barone, Charles Campbell, Aaron Gurley, Cory Little, Kyle Neira, Briggs Smith, James Strickland, Preston Wilson and Sarah Zorn.
Published in: Aiken Standard
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Monday
April 18, 2016
4b. Citadel cadet freshmen sworn in
Men and women who entered The Citadel as freshmen last fall were officially sworn in as members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets on April 9. This is the end of what many consider as the toughest first year college military-training in the country. Hundreds line the streets to cheer as the freshmen march, dressed in brilliant white uniforms, to attend "The Oath Renewal on The Citadel Green." This is their transition to officially becoming members of the Corps. The green at Marion Square was the original parade ground for the college, founded in 1842 in the structure that is now the Embassy Suites. The march follows three weeks of Transition to Recognition Training during which they take classes examining student ethics, leadership skills and the honor code. They also undergo inspections and drills training. The following were among 588 other freshman cadets officially sworn into the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. They include: Kylie Flynn of Fort Myers; Qwandell Newton of Estero; Peter Zolik of Cape Coral.
Published in: News-press.com
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Monday
April 18, 2016
4c. College notes: The Citadel
Men and women who entered The Citadel as freshmen last fall were officially been sworn in as members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets on April 9. Recognition Day 2016 marks the end of what many consider the toughest first year college military-training in the country. Each year, hundreds of people line the streets of Charleston, S.C., to cheer for the freshmen as they march, dressed in their brilliant, white uniforms, to attend the Oath Renewal on The Citadel Green. The march follows three weeks of Transition to Recognition Training during which the knobs take classes examining student ethics and leadership skills and the honor code. They also undergo inspections and drills training. Among the cadets to advanced to the corps were: Jacob Ligon of Stafford County, Shona Sulzbach of Spotsylvania County and Griffin Swope of Stafford County.
Published in: Fredericksburg.com
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Monday
April 18, 2016
4d. Recognition Day held for The Citadel Class of 2019
Men and women who entered The Citadel as freshmen last fall have officially been sworn in as members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets as of April 9. Recognition Day 2016 marks the end of what many consider the toughest first-year college military training in the country. Area students include: Logan Roberts of Keedysville Braeden Bartrum of Frederick, Md. Andrew Diaz of Frederick Stone Ganley of Thurmont, Md. Devan Wilson of Shenandoah Junction, W.Va.
Published in: Herald-Mail Media
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Monday
April 18, 2016
4e. Bragbook for April 15 - Summerall Guards
John Brunson of Alpharetta and John Hiles of Atlanta earned the title Summerall Guard at The Citadel.
Published in: AJC.com
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Monday
April 18, 2016
5a. Exploring the secrets that inspire novels
I read every word in The Post and Courier connected with Pat Conroy's death. Author postmortems and bios accompanying book reviews always grab my attention. They give me a small window into understanding the minds of those who are capable of writing novels, and may, hopefully enable me to discover the secret of how to unearth my novel. One of Conroy's quotes in the paper points out my problem. He said, "Because I read, I wanted to write. Because I lived and read, I wanted to write stories, 'cause I lived in South Carolina, 'cause I went to The Citadel - and my Lord, The Citadel - I had stories flying out of me from everywhere." Stories, yes, but what is his spark that inspires novels? Is it the person's own experiences that kindles him/her to organize thoughts and express them in an interesting story line? If it is living unique youthful experiences that create the novelist, I am doomed to writing articles on travel, wine and golf, guaranteed to be forgotten as soon as read.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
April 18, 2016
5b. Dave the Potter to be inducted into Hall of Fame
An effort led by the Aiken County Historical Museum and its executive director Brenda Baratto helped Dave the Potter earn a spot in the South Carolina Hall of Fame in Myrtle Beach. An induction ceremony will be held April 27 at the Holliday Alumni Center at The Citadel in Charleston. Joe Riley, who served as Charleston's mayor for 40 years, also will be honored. "I'm elated," Baratto said. "The Historical Museum put forth Dave's nomination, which was written by Leonard Todd." Todd is the author of a book about the potter called "Carolina Clay." An enslaved African-American owned by Todd's ancestors, Dave lived in the Edgefield District in the 1800s and made jugs, storage jars and other stoneware vessels. He knew how to read and write, and sometimes he put his name on his pieces and decorated them with poems. Some of Dave's creations have been sold for tens of thousands of dollars. The Historical Museum has five storage jars and a cup-and-saucer set made by Dave.
Published in: Aiken Standard
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Monday
April 18, 2016
6. Capers Williamson, The Citadel's accidental javelinist, among nation’s best
Capers Williamson's first attempt at throwing the javelin in competition was so bad, even his coach was embarrassed. "I hit myself in the back of the head with the javelin, and it went about 30 meters or so," Williamson recalls. "My coach said, 'Man, this is embarrassing. You're gonna have to do something other than this, go high jump or something, or you'll be off the team.'" "That lit a fire under my butt." Three years later, Williamson - a Citadel graduate student and former tight end on the Bulldogs' football team - is one of the best collegiate javelin throwers in the nation. His latest effort of 231 feet, five inches (70.55 meters) is a Citadel and Southern Conference record, and ranks 20th in the nation in Division I this year. That effort would have placed eighth in the NCAA outdoor championships last year. Williamson needs to finish in the top 12 in the NCAA East Region to make the NCAA championships this season, a goal that's barely eluded him the last two years. "I know I can do it," Williamson said. "It's just a matter of doing it when they call your name." At 6-foot-7 and about 235 pounds, Williamson has the perfect frame for throwing the javelin, a spear that's about eight feet long.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
April 18, 2016
7a. The Citadel swept by Wofford, 10-8
The Citadel baseball team was edged on the road 10-8 at Wofford on Sunday afternoon. Jacob Watcher held a one-hitter heading into the bottom of the fifth inning but a couple of base knocks for Wofford allowed them to tack on two runs to take a 2-0 lead. The Bulldogs retaliated and tied the game at 2-2 in the seventh inning. Barrett Charpia got The Citadel on the board first with a leadoff home run over the left field fence it make it 2-1. Shy Phillipstied the game one batter later, smacking his third single of the day to score Jason Smith from second. The 'Dogs broke it open after those two runs, plating four more runners to make it a 6-2 lead and forcing Wofford to use four pitchers in the seventh inning alone. Wofford answered with three runs of its own in the bottom of the seventh to make it 6-5 but Ryan Stamler forced two fly outs and a groundout in relief to preserve the 'Dogs lead. The Terriers then scored five in the bottom of the eighth to take control of the game for good. The only other runs in the game came via a two-run home run by Barrett Charpia. The homers were the first of the junior's career. As a team, the Bulldogs recorded their second double-digit hit game in as many days and outhit the Terriers 14-13. Ben Peden, Phillips and Charpia all finished with three hits. Charpia also tallied three RBI and two runs. Stephen Windham had two hits in the game. Watcher pitched 6.0 innings in his seventh start this season, allowing three runs and fanning three.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
April 18, 2016
7b. Bulldogs Lose Heartbreaker 10-9 to Wofford
After battling back from four runs down to take the lead, The Citadel baseball team lost the second game of the series to Wofford on Saturday afternoon 10-9. The Bulldogs (13-22, 3-5 SoCon) jumped on top early, scoring three runs off of two walks and a hit by pitch in the top of the first inning. Wofford (20-17, 4-7 SoCon) answered with two runs of its own in the bottom of the frame on a double to right field, but Thomas Byelick fanned the last two batters of the inning to end the Terriers' scoring threat and keep the Bulldogs' lead at one. The Terriers took their first lead of the game in the third inning, tacking on five runs in the bottom of the frame and then another run in the fourth to make it 8-4. The Citadel responded with two runs of its own in the fifth inning to cut the Wofford lead to just two and then added two more runs in the seventh inning on a two-out double to the right field wall by Jacob Watcher that tied the score 8-8. The Citadel recaptured the lead in the eighth inning on a double off the left field wall by Steven Hansen with two outs to make it 9-8 in favor of the Bulldogs. Wofford regained the lead for good in the eighth inning. With the bases loaded shortstop William Kinney fielded the ball and threw to second where the runner called safe forcing Watcher to throw home where the Wofford runner was able to slide around the tag and score the winning run.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
April 18, 2016
7c. Wofford beats The Citadel 10-5
The Citadel baseball team fell to Wofford in the first game of the series on Friday night 10-5. The Bulldogs (13-21, 3-4 SoCon) scored first in the contest as Bret Hines scampered home on a groundout by Jacob Watcher in the second inning to make it 1-0. Wofford (19-17, 3-7 SoCon) quickly evened things in the bottom half of the third inning and the score remained 1-1 heading into the fifth when the Bulldogs regained the lead on wild pitch. Wofford answered just a half inning later and tied the game at 2-2. Ben Peden handed The Citadel the lead once again in the back-and-forth affair, blasting his third career home run to right field to give the 'Dogs a 3-2 lead in the top of the sixth. The score stayed 3-2 in favor of the Bulldogs until the bottom of the seventh when the Terriers took the lead for good with a six-run frame. Clay Martin finished the contest two-for-three with one run scored. The Bulldogs tallied nine hits as a team.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
April 18, 2016
8a. NCAA ban of 'satellite camps' foils Jim Harbaugh's Palmetto State plans - for now
The NCAA's ban on satellite camps came down just in time to halt Michigan coach Jim Harbaugh's latest planned incursion - into the state of South Carolina. Harbaugh caused a kerfuffle in the world of college football with his so-called "satellite camp" in Alabama last summer, drawing more than 500 high school players to a one-day camp right in the heart of Nick Saban country. His "Summer Swarm" of nine camps around the South attracted about 6,500 players. This summer, Harbaugh planned to invade South Carolina as well, combining with Wofford College for a satellite camp in June that would land him squarely in Clemson and South Carolina territory... The ban's impact in South Carolina is limited because of the landscape of college football in the Palmetto State. FBS schools Clemson and South Carolina were not holding satellite camps anyway, and the six FCS schools in the state - The Citadel, Charleston Southern, Wofford, Furman, Presbyterian and South Carolina State - are not affected by the ban. Coastal Carolina is in the process of moving from the FCS to the FBS Sun Belt Conference, and it is those programs - in lower-tier FBS leagues such as the Sun Belt, Mid-American and Conference USA - that will be most impacted. "For the FCS schools in our state, that rule does not change anything," said Presbyterian coach Harold Nichols, who is on the AFCA's FCS committee. "We can hold camps within the state, and we're still allowed to go and work at a South Carolina camp, a Clemson camp, a Georgia camp. "The rule has not changed for us, and it really affects the MAC, the Sun Belt and Conference USA more than anybody." The Citadel has held satellite camps of its own around the state and plans to do so again this summer. "Last year, we held camps in Rock Hill, Spartanburg and Aiken," said Citadel coach Brent Thompson. "It helps us spread out and maybe get into areas that we weren't necessarily reaching - Charlotte, north Georgia, south Georgia. It was beneficial for us, an opportunity for us to get our brand in front of a lot more guys.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
April 18, 2016
8b. NCAA grants Citadel commit's release after white hood incident
The NCAA granted a Citadel basketball recruits release from the school after he expressed concern about the white hood incident. Derek Satterfield Assistant Athletic Director says the school denied Kabir Mohammed's request to be released from his letter of intent. "There wasn't really a reason. He asked to get out of his national letter of intent. We said no. And then the NCAA granted his release," Satterfield said. "He cited the skit where they were dressed up as the Ghost of Christmas Past. As our investigation showed and General Rosa mentioned, we felt it was misrepresented. They weren't trying to portray what they appeared they were portraying." Mohammed is a 6-foot, 5-inch guard who signed wit hthe school last fall, a few months before the white hood incident. Mohammed led his D.C.-area school to a 30-2 record last season, bringing with it a lot more attention on the graduating guard.
Published in: WCIV-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
April 18, 2016
9. Michael Ragsdale McKown Obituary
Michael Ragsdale McKown, 75, went home to the Lord on April 10, 2016. Mike was born on June 29, 1940, to Edward L. McKown and Sue Ragsdale McKown in Gaffney, South Carolina. He was raised in the small town of Belton, South Carolina, and graduated Belton High School in 1958. After high school, he attended The Citadel in Charleston, SC, and Clemson College (now Clemson University) before joining the USAF aviation cadet program at age 20. He was awarded his navigator wings in 1961. During his 24-year career with the Air Force, Mike flew transport missions to Europe and the Far East, flew air sea rescue missions out of Libya where he met his wife Norma (Graf) and participated in early special operations test projects involving infrared targeting and the earliest night vision technology. Mike flew two tours of duty in Vietnam, amassing more than 1,000 hours of combat flying time and four Distinguished Flying Crosses. In 1972, he transferred to Travis AFB where he navigated the C-5A and finished out his career. He retired a Lieutenant Colonel in August 1984. In 1977, Mike started a small firewood business, GMS Enterprises, with two partners. Over time, Mike renamed it Solano Lawn and Garden and became its sole proprietor. The business grew and thrived for 15 years during which he joined Rotary Intl and developed many relationships in the community.
Published in: Daily Republic
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Friday
April 15, 2016
1. The Citadel considers first-ever uniform exception: allowing a Muslim hijab
The Citadel is considering a request from an admitted student that she be allowed to wear a hijab in keeping with her Muslim faith, a move that would be an unprecedented exception to the school’s longstanding uniform requirements. If the request for the traditional Muslim hair covering is granted, it apparently would be the first exception made to the Citadel’s uniform, which all cadets at the storied public military college in South Carolina are required to wear at nearly all times. (At beaches, for example, college rules stipulate that, “Cadets will change into appropriate swimwear upon arrival and change back into uniform when departing.”) A spokeswoman said that to her knowledge, in its nearly 175-year history, the school has never granted a religious, or other, accommodation that resulted in a change to the uniform.
Published in: Washington Post - online
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Friday
April 15, 2016
2. STEM Teacher of the Year taking state’s robotics champs to world competition
Their robots rumbled at the local, regional, and national competitions, and they returned to West Ashley High School as champions. Now, the school’s robotics teams are following their leader to the world competitions which will be held April 20 - 23 in Louisville, Kentucky. Their teacher, Nicholas Holmes is the high school’s mechatronics and trebuchet teacher, and was recently named the Air Force Association’s STEM Teacher of the Year for the Charleston County School District. Holmes likes to keep his classes on the forefront of mechatronics technology. He is currently pursuing a Master of Education in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics), which is a new program offered through The Citadel STEM Center of Excellence. “It’s a very exciting and constantly evolving field, but it is still not unusual to have to explain to the parents of my students what mechatronics is,” said Holmes. “Many of my students, though, are familiar with mechatronics when they enter my class. I want to know as much as I can about how to effectively teach them.”
Published in: The Digitel - online
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Friday
April 15, 2016
2.1 Recognition Day at The Citadel
Men and women who entered The Citadel as freshmen last fall have officially been sworn in as members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets as of Saturday, April 9, 2016. Recognition Day 2016 marks the end of what many consider the toughest first year college military-training in the country. Each year, hundreds of people line the streets to cheer for the freshmen as they march, dressed in their brilliant, white uniforms, to attend “The Oath Renewal on The Citadel Green.” The oath marks their transition to officially becoming members of the Corps. The green at Marion Square was the original parade ground for the college, when it was founded in 1842 in the structure that is now the Embassy Suites. The march follows three weeks of Transition to Recognition Training during which the knobs take classes examining student ethics and leadership skills and the honor code. They also undergo inspections and drills training.
Published in: Union Daily Times - online
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Friday
April 15, 2016
NCAA grants release to Citadel basketball recruit due to ‘white hoods’ photo
The NCAA has granted a release from his letter of intent with The Citadel to high school basketball player Mohammed Kabir of Fort Washington, Md. Kabir, a 6-5 guard at National Christian Academy, signed with the Bulldogs last fall. He asked for a release from his letter of intent after the “white hoods” photos that emerged at the military school last December. The photos showed cadets singing Christmas carols while wearing pillowcases that some thought resembled costumes worn by the Ku Klux Klan. Citadel president Lt. Gen. John Rosa called the photos “offensive and disturbing” and suspended the cadets involved. Kabir requested his release in January, citing the photos. “It was messed up,” he told the Washington Post at the time. “I talked to my family and my coach about the situation, and it was not a good move for me because this is not the first time something like this has happened at The Citadel.”
Published in: The Post and Courier - online
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Thursday
April 14, 2016
1. Recognition Day at The Citadel
Men and women who entered The Citadel as freshmen last fall have officially been sworn in as members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets as of Saturday, April 9, 2016. Recognition Day 2016 marks the end of what many consider the toughest first year college military-training in the country. Each year, hundreds of people line the streets to cheer for the freshmen as they march, dressed in their brilliant, white uniforms, to attend "The Oath Renewal on The Citadel Green." The oath marks their transition to officially becoming members of the Corps. The green at Marion Square was the original parade ground for the college, when it was founded in 1842 in the structure that is now the Embassy Suites. The march follows three weeks of Transition to Recognition Training during which the knobs take classes examining student ethics and leadership skills and the honor code. They also undergo inspections and drills training. Brandon Copeland of Enoree, South Carolina, was among 588 other freshman cadets that have been officially sworn into the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. Christian Petty of Union, South Carolina, was among 588 other freshman cadets that have been officially sworn into the South Carolina Corps of Cadets.
Published in: The Union Times
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Thursday
April 14, 2016
2. Cybersecurity Competition Boosts Student Interest in STEM Careers
To emphasize the importance of growing our cyber workforce, South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley made an appearance Saturday to talk to the competing high school students and connect the competition activities to the real-life cyber attacks on state agencies. "We need you to care about cyber security because it is real," the governor said. Capt. Scott Heller, commanding officer of SSC Atlantic, also noted that PCDC "is a great opportunity to build on the vast cyber and military assets here in the Lowcountry and to attract the next generation of cyber professionals." Over 300 people attended the event, including approximately 80 volunteers from SSC Atlantic, corporate partners, South Carolina National Guard and Navy Reserve. Eight high school teams that had prequalified through Cyber Patriot, along with eight college teams, battled Red Team hackers trying to penetrate their medical supply distribution business networks. All the while they had to maintain network availability and configure and protect their network against threats. Winning team members each received a $500 scholarship. High school students from around South Carolina competed Saturday, with returning Palmetto Scholars Academy taking first place. Porter-Gaud School earned second, and third went to Stratford High School. All eight competing schools received a Raspberry PI. Max Harley of Porter-Gaud was voted Most Valuable Player (MVP), receiving a $1,000 award. Other high schools competing were Ashley Ridge, Blythewood, Home School Network, South Aiken and Wando. One theme resonating across the teams was the appreciation of the challenge. Anderson Reese from Home School Network said, "It was exhilarating to have a live environment; it is different from anything else we've experienced." Clemson University took first place, University of South Carolina second and The Citadel third in Sunday's collegiate competition. Clemson's MacKenzie Binns earned MVP receiving $1,000. Charleston Southern University, College of Charleston, ECPI University, South Carolina State University, Trident Technical College also competed in the event. "We loved the experience and environment," said Meagin Arrocha of Charleston Southern University. "We were always learning. We want to give back and help in the competition next year."
Published in: DVIDSHub.net
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Thursday
April 14, 2016
3. South Carolina high school students move to 10-point grading scale
On an empty field at Fort Dorchester High School, Drew Yniesta puts in the extra work. "I've been playing my whole life," Yniesta said. "When the team needs you, bottom of the ninth, two men on base, you gotta' get that hit, it's the greatest feeling ever." A junior at Fort Dorchester, he's being recruited by several schools. "C of C, Winthrop, The Citadel, a lot of the smaller schools in Charleston," he said. He says he's now at an advantage after South Carolina schools officially moved from a seven-point grading scale to a 10-point scale. "It's good to hear," he said. "Across the country it's on a 10 point. If you think about it, it does level out the playing field." Coaches and parents pushed for the change, saying they felt South Carolina students were missing out on scholarships. Drew's father, Manny, agrees. "I think it is a big deal. It gives guys in South Carolina bigger opportunity because we have more schools here per capita for baseball, so they can compete for academic scholarship," Manny said.
Broadcast on: WCIV-TV Charleston, SC
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Thursday
April 14, 2016
4. Gravette's Neeley chooses The Citadel
Jordan Neeley's route to college track will also be a return to her younger days. The senior sprinter, who lived in South Carolina before her family moved to Northwest Arkansas during her freshman year, will head back to that area. Neeley made that happen Wednesday when she signed her national letter of intent to run track and cross country at The Citadel. "My whole family is from there," she said. "I love the area, and Charleston is gorgeous. I fell in love with the school at first sight, and ever since that's where I wanted to go. The Citadel is an amazing school with a great business program. "The track program there is great. I actually spent the night with some of the girls there and was part of the team. I'm looking forward to what is head of me." Neeley has mainly been a sprinter during her high school career, but she made the transition to cross country ranks in the fall and flourished. She finished 13th in the Class 4A state meet with a time of 21 minutes, 56.2 seconds and helped Gravette finish fifth in its classification. She has also done well in the track ranks, starting with her win in the 400-meter dash during last month's Panther Relays in Siloam Springs. She claimed three wins in her last meet, taking the 100, the 200 and the 400 during the Blackhawk Relays in Pea Ridge, and has season-bests of 13.04 seconds in the 100, 27.12 in the 200 and 1:02.14 in the 400.
Published in: Arkansas Online
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Thursday
April 14, 2016
5. Williamson Earns Second SoCon Weekly Award
The Citadel graduate senior Capers Williamson was named Southern Conference Men's Field Athlete of the Week for the second time in four weeks, as announced by the league office on Wednesday. He becomes the first track and field athlete from The Citadel to earn two SoCon weekly honors in the same season after receiving the award on March 23. Williamson also earned Southern Conference Men's Field Athlete of the Month recognition for March last week. The Citadel graduate senior broke his own program record in the javelin event for the second time in less than a month this past Friday to highlight the Bulldogs' weekend at the Bill Carson Invitational in Greenville, North Carolina. Williamson won the javelin competition at the meet with a throw of 231 feet, 5 inches and set a new program-best mark after totaling 231 feet, 1 inch with a heave in mid-March. His latest school record-breaking performance ranks first in the Southern Conference and 20th nationally.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Thursday
April 14, 2016
6. The Citadel Falls In Close Contest At Wofford
The Citadel tennis team dropped a competitive, 4-3 decision to Wofford at the Reeves Tennis Center on Wednesday afternoon. "It was a great battle," head coach Chuck Kriese said. "I give credit to Wofford for fighting us off all day. Their doubles gave them the early edge. We have been fighters all season and maybe we are starting to see the small things that you mentally have to do to win close matches. I wish we had a month left in the season, but we don't so we have to see what we can get done here at the end." Wofford (9-11, 3-3 SoCon) took an early 1-0 lead by claiming wins at No. 2 and No. 3 doubles. At No. 1 in the lineup, sophomore Artemie Amari and freshman Matthew Henson picked up their seventh win this season courtesy of a 6-3 victory. Doubles play proved to be the deciding point after the teams split the six singles matches, with The Citadel (8-27, 0-6 SoCon) winning at the top three positions in the lineup. Amari won in straight sets 7-5, 7-6 (5) at No. 2 for his team-leading 14th singles victory in 2016. At No. 1, sophomore Nicholas Bradley earned his 11th win of the season with a 6-3, 1-6, 6-3 decision. Henson battled back after dropping his first set at No. 3 and claimed a 3-6, 6-4, 6-1 victory for his 11th win this year.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Wednesday
April 13, 2016
1a. One team to earn $10,000 and office space from the Bulldog Business Bowl
Entrepreneurs who are finalists in The Citadel Bulldog Business Bowl will soon compete for $10,000 in seed money, as well as office space. Five teams will present full business plans for a diverse array of products and services on April 20 on campus. Competitors include a proposed clothing brand promoting environmental conservation, a collaborative therapy drug management consulting firm, a campus security system giving students the opportunity to self-report shootings, environmentally friendly clay pigeons designed to improve hunting grounds, and a property-tax relief consulting firm. More than 25 teams submitted entry packages in October 2015, for the first round of the bowl, which consists of three rounds. Eight semi-finalists were chosen in the first round last fall. In December, round two consisted of elevator pitches made to the competition committee and the five finalists were chosen at that time. Each finalist team was assigned a coach and provided with the opportunity to attend a series of educational workshops on how to develop a full business plan. "One of the teams walked in with an idea and will walk out ready to begin their business - that's our intention," said Patrick Manna, a professor in The Citadel School of Business who founded the bowl.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Wednesday
April 13, 2016
1b. Bulldog Business Bowl
Bulldog Business Bowl
Published in: LowcountryBizSC.com
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Wednesday
April 13, 2016
2. Away from Home Announcements for April
Men and women who entered The Citadel as freshmen last fall have officially been sworn in as members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets as of April 9. Recognition Day 2016 marks the end of what many consider the toughest first year college military-training in the country. Each year, hundreds of people line the streets to cheer for the freshmen as they march, dressed in their brilliant, white uniforms, to attend "The Oath Renewal on The Citadel Green." The oath marks their transition to officially becoming members of the Corps. The green at Marion Square was the original parade ground for the college, when it was founded in 1842 in the structure that is now the Embassy Suites. John Campbell of Cape May was among 588 other freshman cadets who have been officially sworn into the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. The march follows three weeks of Transition to Recognition Training during which the knobs take classes examining student ethics and leadership skills and the honor code. They also undergo inspections and drills training.
Published in: Cape May County Herald
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Wednesday
April 13, 2016
3. Heritage notebook: Seen and heard at Harbour Town
Invocation draws applause, laughter - Who was that man whose invocation to open the 48th RBC Heritage was interrupted by applause? He's Keller Kissam of Hopkins, brought to the tournament by honorary chairman Charlie Rountree III. Kissam is Rountree's Sunday school teacher at Shandon United Methodist Church in Columbia. He is a senior vice president of SCANA Corp. and president of retail operations of its subsidiary, SCE&G. Kissam was reared in Creston, population 33, in Calhoun County. He was able to go to college thanks to an academic scholarship. He was a summa cum laude English major in The Citadel class of 1988. He earned the military school's top honors - regimental commander and the Wade Hampton Sabre. Citadel bagpipe band recognized - The Regimental Band and Pipes of The Citadel was recognized this week as an important part of the tartan fiber of the RBC Heritage. Heritage Classic Foundation chairman Simon Fraser acknowledged the pipe band in the opening ceremony, saying that as far as anyone knows the band has been a part of all 48 opening ceremonies. The Citadel has the only all-student bagpipe band in the country, according to the website of the military school in Charleston. Few of the freshmen recruited to the band each year have ever played a bagpipe before. But their play soon becomes a staple for the Friday afternoon parade on campus and the annual march around the Harbour Town Yacht Basin to the 18th green at Harbour Town.
Published in: The Island Packet
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Wednesday
April 13, 2016
4. Planned subdivision on S.C. 81 gets early OK
A proposed 84-lot subdivision near North Pointe Elementary School in Anderson received preliminary approval from the county's planning commission Tuesday night. T. Walter Brashier, the owner of the property, is a well-known minister and developer in Greenville County who has real estate projects throughout the nation. Brashier has contributed millions toward scholarships in South Carolina. His gifts include a $2.5 million parcel to fund scholarships at The Citadel. He has also made donations to Charleston Southern University and given significant support to Greenville Technical College. A graduate school at North Greenville University is named for him. According an application filed with the Anderson County development standards division, the subdivision planned for this part of the Upstate would encompass 62 acres along S.C. 81. "This highway, S.C. 81, is a very popular road," Brashier said in an earlier interview with the Independent Mail.
Published in: Independent Mail
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Wednesday
April 13, 2016
5. College of Charleston, Citadel baseball postponed
College of Charleston's Tuesday non-conference game against Coastal Carolina in Conway, S.C., has been rescheduled for Wednesday at 3 p.m. due to inclement weather. The Cougars (21-10-1) defeated Coastal Carolina (23-10) in both of the team's previous meetings this season - both at Patirots Point. CofC travels to face Hofstra over the weekend. The Citadel baseball team's scheduled 6 p.m. contest at Winthrop has been postponed due to inclement weather. There is no makeup date scheduled for the contest at this time. This is the second time the midweek matchup between the two schools has been postponed this season after rain forced the game to be rescheduled on Feb. 23. The Bulldogs return to action on Friday at 6 p.m. when they travel to Wofford for a three-game Southern Conference series. Live stats and audio will be available at CitadelSports.com for all three games of the series.
Published in: Moultrie News
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Tuesday
April 12, 2016
1a. Citadel Professor named a Knight Commander of the British Commonwealth
The Citadel's John C. West Professor of American Government and International Relations, Mallory Factor, will now be referred to as Professor Sir Mallory Factor KCN. The Governor-General of Grenada has awarded the Most Distinguished Order of the Nation to Factor for his contributions to the development of Grenada. "We are proud to have such a dedicated leader with extensive knowledge of global economies and politics be named Knight Commander of Grenada," said Connie Ledoux Book, provost and dean of the college. During his time at The Citadel, Factor has taught courses on geopolitics and the American conservative tradition and directed a year-long speaker series that included guest lectures from former House of Representatives Speaker Newt Gingrich, former Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld and former National Rifle Association President David A. Keene among many others. Factor also played a critical role in developing The Citadel's cadet intern partnership with the British Parliament. Each semester, the prestigious program gives two cadets the opportunity to work alongside some of the world's most respected political leaders while representing the United States.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Tuesday
April 12, 2016
1b. Citadel Professor named a Knight Commander of the British Commonwealth
knight commander
Published in: LowcountryBizSC.com
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Tuesday
April 12, 2016
2. One team to earn $10,000 and office space from the Bulldog Business Bowl
Winners to be named April 20 after five teams present full business plans in final round. Entrepreneurs who are finalists in The Citadel Bulldog Business Bowl will soon compete for $10,000 in seed money, as well as office space. Five teams will present full business plans for a diverse array of products and services on April 20 on campus. Competitors include a proposed clothing brand promoting environmental conservation, a collaborative therapy drug management consulting firm, a campus security system giving students the opportunity to self-report shootings, environmentally friendly clay pigeons designed to improve hunting grounds, and a property-tax relief consulting firm. More than 25 teams submitted entry packages in October 2015, for the first round of the bowl, which consists of three rounds. Eight semi-finalists were chosen in the first round last fall. In January, round two consisted of elevator pitches made to the competition committee and the five finalists were chosen at that time. Each finalist team was assigned a coach and provided with the opportunity to attend a series of educational workshops on how to develop a full business plan. "One of the teams walked in with an idea and will walk out ready to begin their business – that's our intention," said Patrick Manna, a professor in The Citadel School of Business who founded the bowl.
Published in: Moultrie News
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Tuesday
April 12, 2016
3. Col. Cole C. Kingseed to Address the Citadel Graduate College Class of 2016
Members of The Citadel Graduate College (CGC) Class of 2016 will be sent to the next step in their careers and their lives with the words delivered by a 30-year Army infantry veteran and author who is considered one of America's leading military historians. Col. Cole C. Kingseed, Ph.D., will address graduates during the commencement ceremony to be held at 3:30 p.m. on Saturday, May 7, at the college's McAlister Field House. Kingseed commanded at the platoon, company, and battalion level while serving in the Army from 1971-2001. A graduate of the University of Dayton, he served in a variety of military assignments that concluded with his tenure as Full Professor of History and Chief of Military History at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. Kingseed holds a Master of Arts and a Ph.D. from The Ohio State University, and a Master of Arts in National Security and Strategic Studies from the U.S. Naval War College.
Published in: LowcountryBizSC.com
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Tuesday
April 12, 2016
4. The Citadel's Tobacco-Free Campus
Why The Citadel is going tobacco-free: The Citadel is committed to providing a safe and healthy learning and working environment for our cadets, students, faculty, staff and visitors and recognizes that tobacco use in any form is a significant health hazard. As a result, effective July 1, 2016, The Citadel will become a tobacco product free campus. Click the article to view detailed information on the policy.
Published in: Citadel.edu
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Tuesday
April 12, 2016
5. Volunteers take aim at Morris Island debris
A spring cleaning of Morris Island on Saturday aims to remove tons of trash that litters its shoreline and poses a threat to marine life. "It's incredible the amount of debris that is collecting over there," said Katie Zimmerman, program director for air, water and public health at the Coastal Conservation League. Some 50 volunteers have signed up for the effort and more are welcome. "We've got a serious situation. We're going to focus on plastics. It's important to prevent that stuff from getting into the waterways," said Andrew Wunderley of Charleston Waterkeeper. Some 7 tons of plastic are estimated to be breaking down to microplastics in the tide and waves around Charleston Harbor at any given time, according to a study led by Citadel physiology professor John Weinstein. Sooner or later, a portion of that waste gets eaten by marine critters, such as shrimp, and works its way up the food chain. On top of that, recent research has shown the plastics pick up toxins in the water before they are eaten. Rudy Socha, CEO of Wounded Nature, helped haul away a dumpster full of Morris Island debris last spring. "We actually found a 4-foot barbecue grill out there," he said. Island debris also has included an abandoned boat, soda cans, plastic cups and lumber treated with a pesticide that leaches into the environment.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
April 12, 2016
6a. Keeping the Holy City Holy
Justin Gaeta is the quintessential Charleston guy. Raised on the Isle of Palms, he is an avid surfer, sailor, scuba diver, and Ultimate Frisbee pro. He is a graduate of Bishop England and College of Charleston, and he is working on his MBA at The Citadel. Justin knows and loves Charleston like nobody's business, which is why he has literally made it his business to keep the Holy City...well, holy. As the Director of Vocational Activities and Promotions for the Catholic Diocese of Charleston, Justin's job is to help people listen for God's voice and find their God-given vocations. "I tell people that there's one universal vocation: We are all called to holiness, which means knowing, loving, and serving God. Then we each have a holy vocation." Helping people discern what God would have them do with their lives is Justin's holy vocation, as is sharing a love of the Catholic faith and the traditions of the Catholic Church. He does this through his work with the Catholic Diocese of Charleston, but also through more progressive and non-traditional channels. Justin is well traveled and has even spent time living in India and France. As a result of a broader worldview, he's embraced modern methods of sharing the Catholic faith. One of his favorite progressive projects is the Catholic Surfing Ministries, a faith-based surf camp on the Big Island of Hawai'i that integrates surfing with authentic Christian living. Another is through his video company, Thursday Night Productions, which creates custom videos for the Catholic Church.
Published in: ReadCharlie.com
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Tuesday
April 12, 2016
6b. Odyssey Finally Arrives At The Citadel
I am pleased to announce the creation of our own team of writers here at The Citadel for Odyssey. This will provide an opportunity for cadets to have their voice heard outside of our small campus reach. Writing for Odyssey will also allow cadets to further develop writing and critical thinking abilities, and there will be an executive staff of cadets to oversee the progress. Good leaders are able to effectively share their thoughts, and we hope to start a tradition of writing articles that challenge our readers to think and act in a manner that is moral and right. We will address any number of topics both related to our lives here at The Citadel and on current events and stories occurring worldwide. We are still assembling our team and we hope to develop one that includes representation from all four classes and all five battalions. If you would like to join our team, take a few moments to fill out an application at theodysseyonline.com/apply. In our world today, writing is an often ignored and forgotten art. Those of us who are a part of this team wish to make it clear that we value well written work and we are grateful to the staff at Odyssey for affording us the opportunity to publish our articles. In doing this, they are giving us the opportunity to develop our writing abilities and refine our thought process so that we can be at the cutting edge when it comes to our ability to keep written records.
Published in: The Odyssey Online
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Tuesday
April 12, 2016
7. Citadel top-ranked S.C. school in Forbes' list
The Citadel is the top-ranked South Carolina college and 50th ranked nationally in Forbes' magazine's 2016 Best Value Colleges list. The revamped Best Value Colleges ranking considers quality, dropout risk, graduation time, alumni salaries and skills and gross tuition and fees. Forbes partnered with the Center for College Affordability and Productivity to compile the rankings. Other South Carolina colleges and universities ranked among the magazine's 300 "Best Value Colleges 2016" were Clemson University at 124th, Wofford College at 134th, Furman University at 163rd, Presbyterian College at 277th and the University of South Carolina at 287th.
Published in: Greenville Journal
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Tuesday
April 12, 2016
8. Public hearing set to discuss impact of possible passenger terminal
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is holding a public hearing on a contentious $35 million passenger cruise terminal first proposed for the Charleston waterfront in 2010. The public hearing comes as the agency reviews an application by the South Carolina Ports Authority to renovate an old warehouse on the Cooper River for the terminal. The authority needs to put additional pilings beneath the warehouse. The corps has received 300 written comments on the permit, according to an agency spokeswoman. A federal judge tossed out a previous permit saying regulators needed to look at not only the impact of the pilings on the river but the larger impact the terminal would have on historic Charleston. The corps is studying whether an extensive environmental impact statement is needed. The public hearing is scheduled for 5:30-9 p.m. at The Citadel's Holliday Alumni Center.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Tuesday
April 12, 2016
9a. NCAA says no new bowl games for 3 years
The NCAA has approved a three-year moratorium on new bowl games which would include the Medal of Honor Bowl that was set to be played at Johnson Hagood Stadium in Charleston. The decision means no new bowl games could be started until after the 2019 season. Last year, a record 41 bowl games were played. Three teams with losing records played in bowl games, which was an NCAA record. The Medal of Honor Bowl committee announced in August of 2015 that they were dropping the all-star game format they had used in their first two years of existence in favor of a conventional bowl game that would pit two FBS schools against each other. The tentative date of the game was set to be December 16th of this year. They had been in talks with the NCAA to receive certification to play the game this year. South Carolina was previously unable to host any NCAA sanctioned bowl games due to the Confederate Flag flying over the statehouse in Columbia. When the flag was taken down in July of last year, that opened the door for the game in Charleston. The Medal of Honor Bowl will now have to revert back to being an all-star game, which is the format it's been for the last two bowl games, according to Tom McQueeney, Medal of Honor Bowl Chairman. "When Captain Jim Livingston (now Maj. Gen. Jim Livingston, MOH recipient of Mt. Pleasant) was confronted with 10,000 Viet Cong in 1968, his band of less than 200 Marines stood their ground and - after three days - forced the enemy to retreat. Quitting was not an option. We will not leave the field either. We will bring an FBS bowl game to Charleston," said McQueeney. McQueeney says the Medal of Honor board will meet Tuesday to discuss how to move forward. Two other cities, Austin and Myrtle Beach, were also looking to add new bowl games and will be impacted by this moratorium.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Tuesday
April 12, 2016
9b. The Citadel Golf Closes 2015-16 Season
The Citadel golf squad wrapped up play at the Southern Conference Championships at Savannah Quarters in Pooler, Georgia on Monday. The conclusion of the three-round tournament marked the end of the 2015-16 campaign for the Bulldogs. Head coach Lori Bonacci's group placed ninth overall, carding a 1,072 over three rounds. The Citadel ended with its best 18 holes of the tournament as a team in round three, firing a 345 in the final round Monday. Senior Eraina Manor finished her illustrious career with a 79 on the final 18 holes and recorded her 11th round in the 70s of the 2015-16 campaign. She shot a three-round 261 to post a team-high score at the Southern Conference Championships. Manor ended her career as the first Bulldog to ever record a sub-81 career scoring average over four years. She carded an 18-hole average of 80.53 as a senior.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Monday
April 11, 2016
1. Col. Cole C. Kingseed to address The Citadel Graduate College Class of 2016
Members of The Citadel Graduate College (CGC) Class of 2016 will be sent to the next step in their careers and their lives with the words delivered by a 30-year Army infantry veteran and author who is considered one of America's leading military historians. Col. Cole C. Kingseed, Ph.D., will address graduates during the commencement ceremony to be held at 3:30 p.m. on Saturday, May 7, at the college's McAlister Field House. Kingseed commanded at the platoon, company, and battalion level while serving in the Army from 1971-2001. A graduate of the University of Dayton, he served in a variety of military assignments that concluded with his tenure as Full Professor of History and Chief of Military History at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. Kingseed holds a Master of Arts and a Ph.D. from The Ohio State University, and a Master of Arts in National Security and Strategic Studies from the U.S. Naval War College. He is the internationally acclaimed author of The New York Times bestseller Beyond Band of Brothers: The War Memoirs of Major Dick Winters, and has written numerous historical works, including Eisenhower and the Suez Crisis of 1956 (1995), The American Civil War (2004), From Omaha Beach to Dawson's Ridge (2005), Old Glory Stories (2006), and Conversations with Major Dick Winters (2014). A recognized expert on military history and leadership, Kingseed has written and edited six books and written more than 60 articles on leadership, in addition to authoring 300 book reviews. He has appeared in documentaries about Generals George S. Patton, Jr., and Douglas MacArthur. In 2009, Kingseed received the Army Historical Foundation's Distinguished Writing Award for his article on U.S. Army leadership during World War II.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Monday
April 11, 2016
2. Recogniton Day at The Citadel
Today is a big day for freshmen at The Citadel - they'll become official members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. Recognition Day as it's called marks the end of what many consider the toughest first year college military training in the country. Each year hundreds of people line the streets to cheer for the freshmen as they march dressed in their white uniforms.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
April 11, 2016
3. Student from Clayton earns Citadel honor
Patrick McIver of Clayton has been named a member of the 2017 Summerall Guards at The Citadel, where he is a junior. Each winter, cadets who are juniors endure weeks of rigorous physical training and drilling in an attempt to be named a member of the platoon for their senior year.
Published in: The News & Observer
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Monday
April 11, 2016
4. Hand places first in competition
Bob Jones University has announced engineering student Brian Hand placed first in the engineering ethics competition at the SoutheastCon Engineering Conference in Norfolk, Va. Hand, a junior from Farmington, received a $400 cash prize for his first-place finish. He competed against 24 student teams from universities around the Southeast. In this competition, students are given a real-life scenario from the engineering workplace in which ethical issues are important. In the first round, students write an essay. In the second round, they give an oral presentation discussing the ethical issues involved in each case and make recommendations. This year's cases involved e-waste and hacking. Other finalists included The Citadel, University of Alabama at Birmingham, the University of Florida and the University of Georgia. This year's competition was BJU's second visit to SoutheastCon but the first time BJU students have participated in the ethics competition.
Published in: Sun Journal
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Monday
April 11, 2016
5. The Citadel mentioned on ESPN during Volvo Car Open tennis tournament
The Citadel, on the great military schools in the country and the world. It's a huge town for the people who keep us safe...
Broadcast on: ESPN
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Monday
April 11, 2016
6a. UNCG takes series from The Citadel with 7-4 win
The Citadel baseball team dropped the series finale against UNCG on Sunday afternoon 7-4. Jacob Watcher kept hot-hitting UNCG (25-8, 5-1 SoCon) in check, giving up just six hits in 5.1 innings pitched and fanning three. Kyle Smith pitched 2.1 innings in relief and allowed three hits to the Spartans, who lead the nation in batting average. Ben Peden finished the day two-for-three with two runs scored, and Steven Hansen knocked in two runs. Mike Deese capped off the series with a hit and an RBI in the first inning and finished the three-game homestand with a hit in each game. Shy Phillips recorded his first stolen base of the year and Stephen Windham mowed down two base runners attempting to steal, pushing his season total to 15 runners thrown out this year. The Bulldogs now hit the road for a four-game road swing beginning Tuesday at Winthrop. The non-conference matchup is set to begin at 6 p.m. The Citadel continues its SoCon slate with a trip to Wofford April 15-17. Live stats will be available for the series against the Terriers.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
April 11, 2016
6b. Bulldogs Hand UNCG First SoCon Loss
The Citadel baseball team downed SoCon foe UNCG on Saturday afternoon 7-5 to even the series at one game apiece. Mike Deese had a stellar day at the plate, going four-for-five with two triples and two singles. Deese was also three-for-three when stepping to the plate with two outs and is the first Bulldog to record two triples in the same game since Brad Felder did so against St. Joseph's in 2010. The senior had three of the seven RBI for the Dogs (13-19, 3-2 SoCon) and half of The Citadel's eight hits. Sophomore William Kinney gave the Dogs the lead for good in the second inning with his first home run this season over the left field wall. Freshman Ben Peden also had a great day at the dish, smacking his second career home run in the fourth inning and plating three runs. Shy Phillips went one-for-three and scored three of the Bulldogs' seven runs. As a team, The Citadel scored five of its seven runs with two outs. Thomas Byelick earned his first win this season, throwing 6.0 effective innings, scattering seven hits and fanning six. Zach Lavery finished his 14th game this year, working 3.0 innings and allowing just one hit and striking out three. The senior had a clutch strikeout with the bases loaded to end the seventh inning and preserve the Bulldogs' two run lead.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
April 11, 2016
6c. UNCG pounds The Citadel, 14-1
The Citadel baseball team fell to UNC-Greensboro, 14-1, inside Joe Riley Park on Friday night. Mike Deese went two-for-three and Clay Martin, Shy Phillips, William Kinney and Steven Hansen each had a hit in the contest. Jacob Watcher scored the lone run for the Bulldogs (12-19, 2-2 SoCon) in the defeat, and Phillips recorded his second double in as many games. JP Sears worked 5.1 innings and recorded seven strikeouts, including striking out the side in the fifth inning, and allowed nine hits. The sophomore struck out the last two outs in the fifth frame with the bases loaded to keep UNCG's (24-7, 4-0 SoCon) lead to just two. Beau Strickland added a strikeout in his 1.1 innings of work to give The Citadel pitching staff eight total Ks.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
April 11, 2016
7. Citadel Golf Ready for SoCon Championships
The Citadel women's golf team is gearing up for the Southern Conference Championships from April 10-12. The 23rd edition of the tournament is taking place at Savannah Quarters in Pooler, Georgia, for the second consecutive year. Tee times are still to be determined by the conference. The tournament features three rounds, with 18 holes each on Sunday, Monday and Tuesday. Admission to the event is free. The Bulldogs are coming off a dual win over Wooster College, their second straight victory in a head-to-head format with the last coming against Dayton on March 9, 2014. Head coach Lori Bonacci's squad carded a 333 to out-pace Wooster. Sophomore Cameron Little earned medalist honors at the dual for the first time in her career, topping the field with a 6-over-par 78. Entering the Southern Conference Championships, senior Eraina Manor boasts a team-best 79.31 season scoring average, the lowest ever by a Bulldog in program history thus far. If she can maintain a sub-80 scoring average, she will become the first Bulldog to record sub-80 scoring averages in back-to-back seasons.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Friday
April 8, 2016
1. Recognition Day for The Citadel Class of 2019 is Saturday
The Citadel's current freshmen will become official members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets Saturday, April 9. Men and women who entered The Citadel as freshmen last fall are counting down the hours until their fourth-class status ends and they are officially sworn in as members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. That will happen Saturday, April 9, on Recognition Day 2016. For freshmen, known on campus as knobs, Recognition Day marks the end of what many consider the toughest first year college military-training in the country. Each year, hundreds of people line the streets to cheer for the freshmen as they march, dressed in their brilliant, white uniforms, to attend "The Oath Renewal on The Citadel Green." The oath marks their transition to officially becoming members of the Corps. The green at Marion Square was the original parade ground for the college, when it was founded in 1842 in the structure that is now the Embassy Suites. The march follows three weeks of Transition to Recognition Training during which the knobs take classes examining student ethics and leadership skills and the honor code. They also undergo inspections and drills training.
Published in: Moultrie News
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Friday
April 8, 2016
2. Recognition Day on Good Morning Charleston
It will be a big weekend for the freshmen at The Citadel. Tomorrow the knobs will be officially sworn in as members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. Known as Recognition Day, it marks the end of what some consider to be the toughest first year of college military training. Each year hundreds of people line the street to cheer for the freshmen as the march in their brilliant white uniforms to attend the oath renewal. If you would like to see those men and women they will leave The Citadel's campus at 3 and head down Moultrie St. and then onto King headed for Marion Square.
Broadcast on: WCIV-TV Charleston, SC
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Friday
April 8, 2016
3. Azalea queen, court and guests have busy day around town
It was a whirlwind day on the N.C. Azalea Festival tour of the Port City on Thursday, starting bright and early at Ogden Elementary. The elementary-schoolers were out in their festival best to greet Queen Azalea Anna Kooiman, her court, festival special guests and festival board members. Bright pastel outfits including many azalea touches, smiling faces and big waves welcomed the guests as they took a quick trip through the school, ending in the multipurpose room. There, students entertained the guests with songs, dance performances and poetry. When Kooiman addressed the student body, she told the kids to make sure they thank their parents often. And she reminded them that they can do and be anything... "It's kind of surreal to be on this side of things," Huggins said. "To be able to come to the hospital and go to the elementary school, it's just a dream come true for me." Huggins will be escorted by Cadet Ryan Salke for the week's events. He said to be chosen from among The Citadel's 61-man Summerall Guard platoon to participate in the festival, the eight men who escort the queen's court must not only be top notch but also be tall. "Funny enough, there is a height requirement because obviously they are all wearing heels, so everyone has to be 6 feet or taller," he said.
Published in: Star News Online
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Friday
April 8, 2016
4. Summerall Guards on Good Morning Carolina
To kick off the Azalea Garden Tour today there is an exciting program planned this morning. At 10 a.m. at the Greenfield Lake Amphitheater you can see the belles, The Citadel's Summerall Guards and all the celeb guests. After that there is a reception.
Broadcast on: WWAY-TV Wilmington, NC
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Friday
April 8, 2016
5. CGC student William LaMieux leads Fort Bragg team to remember Bataan Death March
With the sun settling in the sky directly above them - its glaring rays stabbing their sweaty faces - the teams from Fort Bragg began to feel as though their 35-pound rucks weighed a ton. Off in the distance they could see the water tower at White Sands Missile Range and although it was in sight, it still felt like leagues away and they wondered if they would ever get to the finish line. This was mile 21 of the Bataan Memorial Death March in New Mexico, March 20. Despite the hills, the sand, and the aches and pains, the competitors at least had water to drink, unlike the tens of thousands of American and Filipino troops who trudged for days to prisoner of war camps during the Bataan Death March in World War II. "When I crossed the finish line last year, a survivor asked me if we had water out there (on the course), we were kind of taken aback and said, 'yea, sure - there was water out there.' In a non-boasting manner, almost as if he was recalling it from a recent memory, he came back with 'we didn't have water out there when we marched,'" said Capt. William LeMieux, Fort Bragg men's team captain. "Even though we had done our research on how the American and Filipino POWs were treated, we were stunned and so very thankful to actually hear firsthand of their hardships and sufferings." The troops had surrendered to Japanese forces after defending the islands of Luzon and Corregidor in the Philippines.
Published in: Paraglide Online
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Friday
April 8, 2016
6. Forbes ranks S.C. colleges
Six schools in South Carolina are among Forbes magazine's 300 Best Value Colleges 2016. The list is based on tuition costs, school quality, graduation success rates, and postgraduate earnings. The Citadel is ranked No. 50, followed by Clemson University at 124, Wofford College at 134, Furman University at 163, Presbyterian College at 277 and the University of South Carolina at 287.
Published in: The Columbia Star
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Thursday
April 7, 2016
1. Recognition Day for The Citadel Class of 2019
Men and women who entered The Citadel as freshmen last fall are counting down the hours until their fourth-class status ends and they are officially sworn in as members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. That will happen Saturday, April 9, on Recognition Day 2016. For freshmen, known on campus as knobs, Recognition Day marks the end of what many consider the toughest first year college military-training in the country. Each year, hundreds of people line the streets to cheer for the freshmen as they march, dressed in their brilliant, white uniforms, to attend "The Oath Renewal on The Citadel Green." The oath marks their transition to officially becoming members of the Corps. The green at Marion Square was the original parade ground for the college, when it was founded in 1842 in the structure that is now the Embassy Suites. The march follows three weeks of Transition to Recognition Training during which the knobs take classes examining student ethics and leadership skills and the honor code. They also undergo inspections and drills training. On Saturday at approximately 3 p.m., the marchers depart from The Citadel's main gate, down Moultrie St. and then turning right on King St. to Marion Square. The public is invited to cheer on the cadets along the route.
Published in: LowcountryBizSC.com
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Thursday
April 7, 2016
2. Endeavour: Crossing a Bridge
A blog series from on board the Australian National Maritime Museum's HMB Endeavour replica as it sails from Adelaide to Port Lincoln. See our Sail the Endeavour page to learn more about joining voyages like this. Growing up in Colorado Cordon Miller did not have much of a chance for maritime pursuits, his domain was mountains, rivers and trees. It was not until he was at The Citadel, a Military College in Charleston, South Carolina, that his interest in sailing was sparked. Friends, who were former Marines, helped "straighten him out" and give him some direction, something he lacked whilst a senior at High school. The idea of a regimented life appealed to Cordon and above all he could continue to play the pipes in the college band. It was one day, whilst crossing the Ashley River Bridge, he saw the ship Pride of Baltimore II berthed by the bridge. It is possible that this was when his maritime gene inherited from a Spanish ancestor on his father's side, one of the "Black Irish" who landed in Ireland around the time of the Armada, was activated. He immediately went down to the ship spoke to a crew member who was doing maintenance who set him straight about the fact that sailing ships still sailed the world. On graduating from The Citadel and Officer Candidate School and commissioning as a 2nd Lieutenant in the US Marine Corps he had a 10 month wait before he could enter The Basic School, the next step in his career. Cordon started working as a storeman but that soon palled and in an effort to find something more fulfilling he sent out his resume to various sailing ships, maritime gene working?
Published in: Australian National Maritime Museum
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Thursday
April 7, 2016
3. Heritage tickets help give back
You can feel good about buying a ticket to the RBC Heritage Presented by Boeing. All proceeds go to The Heritage Classic Foundation, the largest charitable foundation in Beaufort County. Since its inception in 1987, the foundation has distributed about $32 million to charity. It also gets high marks for efficiency. In 2014, it devoted 98.2 percent of its proceeds to charitable causes, according to the most recent data from the S.C. Secretary of State's Office. This year, the foundation will match 15 percent of donations to 93 local charities up to $22,500 each. Most of the beneficiaries are in Beaufort and Jasper counties and all are from South Carolina. Several ticket options are still available... Includes access to a private skybox on the 15th hole of the Harbour Town Golf Links Thursday through Sunday. Each badge includes Clubhouse access to the tournament Monday through Sunday. The skybox includes a daily lunch buffet including soft drinks, beer and wine. Spirits are available for purchase. The University of South Carolina, The Citadel, Lander University, Wofford College, University of Georgia and Georgia Southern University are all partners of the University Club.
Published in: The Island Packet
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Thursday
April 7, 2016
4. Suspended Citadel baseball players are off the team
The three baseball players that were suspended indefinitely by The Citadel last week have been removed from the program the school announced on Wednesday. Drew Ellis, Austin Mapes and Phillip Watcher were suspended last week for a violation of team rules. The school and head coach Fred Jordan would not provide any further comment on the decision. Ellis had started 24 games for the Bulldogs this season batting .244 with a team high 19 RBI and is tied for the team lead with 3 home runs. Mapes had started all 25 games before Wednesday batting .219 with 9 RBI. Watcher was hitting .262 with a homer and 7 RBI. He also pitched in 8 games this season, starting three, and is 0-1 with a 6.05 ERA.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Wednesday
April 6, 2016
1. Andy Beckwith, General Manager of The Citadel Bookstore, wins 2016 Campus Leadership Award
Citadel Bookstore general manager, Andy Beckwith, has received the 2016 Campus Leadership Award. Barnes & Noble annually recognizes an outstanding store manager from each of their 5 national territories. Beckwith has been with The Citadel since 2010.
Published in: YouTube.com
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Wednesday
April 6, 2016
2. Azalea Festival knows how to party
In addition to the blooms, pageantry and general genteelism, the N.C. Azalea Festival is also known for throwing a mean party -- although many of them are private affairs accessible only by sponsors and other select VIPs. Here's a rundown of all the galas and shindigs, with events open to the public noted individually. Airlie Luncheon Garden Party: Seersucker and bow ties, parasols and impressive hats. Nearly 2,500 area residents will shake out their finery for this unrivaled Friday afternoon affair, complete with a drill performance by the Summerall Guard. Sadly, this party isn't open to the public, but rumor has it tickets can be scrounged up on sites like Ebay and Craigslist.
Published in: Star News Online
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Wednesday
April 6, 2016
3. Back at The Joe: RiverDogs a perfect fit for former Citadel pitcher James Reeves
James Reeves' agent had advised him to go play a round of golf. He told Reeves that staring at the draft tracker on MLB.com waiting for his name to be called would be counterproductive and distracting. Reeves needed to get out and do something. But June 9, 2015 was a rainy day in Summerville, Reeves' hometown, so he drove to his best friend's house on James Island to watch "The Judge," starring Robert Downey Jr. and Robert Duvall, instead. It was there, in the middle of the movie, where Reeves got the news that the Yankees had selected him in the 10th round of the First Year Player Draft with the 303rd overall pick. The memories flooded back - as some of Reeves' earliest baseball recollections were from playing with his Summerville RiverDogs little league team and attending summer camp at The Joe. Now, all these years later, the former Citadel pitcher is beginning his professional career in the same place where it all began, when the RiverDogs open their season Thursday at Riley Park.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
April 6, 2016
4. Citadel grad James Reeves returns home to the RiverDogs this summer
James Reeves first became a RiverDog when he was 9 years old. His jersey has changed slightly since then. The cotton t-shirt with the RiverDogs' little league logo screen-printed on the front and a sponsor on the back has graduated into a polyester mesh uniform with the tackle twill blue and gold stitching of the New York Yankees' Single A affiliate. Playing pro ball has long been a dream for the 22-year-old left-handed pitcher from Summerville. Returning home this summer to start the season on the Charleston RiverDogs' Opening Day roster in the park he played his college ball, for Reeves, is a dream come true. "It's pretty surreal," Reeves said. "I went to the RiverDogs camps when I was a little guy. I played on the little league team. I still have the t-shirt. It was my first team. I remember going to games as a kid. I mean, I've already been a RiverDog for a while." Reeves came to The Citadel as a recruited walk-on after graduating from Ashley Ridge High School in 2011, in part, because it was his only Division I opportunity. He spent the next four years with the Bulldogs honing his game inside Joe Riley Park and by his senior season had gained nearly 50 pounds, grew three inches, and developed into the Southern Conference Pitcher of the Year.
Published in: Moultrie News
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Wednesday
April 6, 2016
5. CSU clobbers The Citadel, 18-1
Charleston Southern scored 10 first-inning runs and was never threatened in an 18-1 win over crosstown-rival The Citadel on Tuesday night at CSU Ballpark. The win is CSU's largest margin of victory in the 83-game series between the two teams. The Buccaneers took advantage of seven Bulldog errors - four in the first inning - to put an end to a five-game losing streak. CSU improves to 12-17 overall, while The Citadel falls to 12-18. The game was halted after seven innings. Five CSU pitchers combined to hold The Citadel to three hits, while the Bucs piled up 17 hits, nine in the first inning. The Bucs were 12-for-25 with runners in scoring position, including eight hits in the first. Every Buc starter had a hit, led by a 3-for-3 night from Cole German, who scored three times. Sly Edwards (2-for-4) had two hits in the first inning including an RBI triple, his fourth of the season. Chris Singleton (2-for-4) had a double in the first and Ryan Maksim (2-for-3) had a two-run single in the frame. CSU's Adam Andrew got out of a first-inning jam in his first career start, striking out two around a fly out to set up the Bucs' big first. Reliever Wil Hartsell (W, 1-0) worked two scoreless innings in his first appearance of the year. Dustin Lander, Tyler Pickard, and Kyle Dyson all worked a scoreless inning down the stretch. The Citadel used seven pitchers, surrendering nine unearned runs on the slew of errors. Right fielder Shy Phillips was 2-for-3 and had two of the Bulldogs' three hits.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Tuesday
April 5, 2016
1. Former Charleston Mayor Joseph P. Riley Jr. Named ULI Distinguished Visiting Fellow
Joseph P. Riley Jr., who led the highly successful revitalization of Charleston, South Carolina, during his 40-year tenure as mayor, has agreed to serve as ULI's first distinguished visiting fellow. Riley, who stepped down as mayor on January 8, is also working as a visiting professor at The Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina, serving as the first holder of the Joseph P. Riley Jr. Chair of American Government and Public Policy in the department of humanities and social sciences. His term at ULI, which began on March 1, will last one year. As a distinguished visiting fellow, Riley will offer expertise for several of the Institute's areas of focus, including affordable and workforce housing, sustainable development, improving overall community livability, and public sector leadership in land use decision making. Riley, the longest-serving mayor of a major U.S. city, was the first recipient of the ULI J.C. Nichols Prize for Visionaries in Urban Development, which recognizes a person whose career demonstrates a commitment to the highest standards of community building. He was awarded the prize in 2000 to honor his significant contribution to Charleston's renaissance and his national leadership on urban design and community revitalization issues.
Published in: Urban Land
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Tuesday
April 5, 2016
2. Natasha Trethewey to receive Troy University's Hall-Waters Prize
Former U.S. poet laureate Natasha Trethewey, author of several volumes of poetry and a nonfiction meditation on Hurricane Katrina, will receive the Hall-Waters Prize from Troy University in conjunction with the 11th annual Alabama Book Festival on April 23. The Hall-Waters Prize was endowed by late TROY alumnus Dr. Wade Hall, an author, former member of the faculty at the University of Florida and professor emeritus of English at Bellarmine University in Louisville, KY. Dr. Hall died in September. Dr. Hall, a native of Bullock County, endowed the prize as a memorial to his parents, Wade Hall Sr. and Sarah Elizabeth Waters Hall. The award is presented regularly to a person who has made significant contributions to Southern heritage and culture in history, literature or the arts. Past winners include Rep. John Lewis, Rick Bragg and Bobbie Ann Mason. Trethewey will present at the Festival from 3:30 p.m. to 4:15 p.m., discussing her career and the state of American letters with scholar Lauren Rule Maxwell, associate professor of English at the Citadel, who will include a chapter on Trethewey's work in an upcoming book. Trethewey is the recipient of fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Study Center, the National Endowment for the Arts and the Bunting Fellowship Program of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard. Her poems have appeared in such journals and anthologies as "American Poetry Review," "Callaloo," "Kenyon Review," "The Southern Review," "New England Review," "Gettysburg Review," and several volumes of "Best American Poetry. " At Emory University, she is the Robert W. Woodruff Professor of English and Creative Writing.
Published in: Troy University News Center
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Tuesday
April 5, 2016
3. "Everything turned red'" after getting hit with mortar fire
They are the men and women who came of age during the Great Depression. The "Greatest Generation" was tested on farms, in factories and on the battlefields of World War II. They are a generation whose lives often were difficult but also filled with purpose. Age and illness are eroding their numbers. Amidst those losses are bright islands where memories of adventures remain evergreen. These are the storytellers, who with wisdom and good humor, help us understand those demanding times... But if the highly prized score of 115 was achieved, the applicant would be sent to The Citadel, a military college in South Carolina.
Published in: The Hawk Eye
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Tuesday
April 5, 2016
4. RiverDogs' 2016 roster includes pitchers from The Citadel, Clemson
The RiverDogs announced their 2016 Opening Day Roster on Sunday, and with a pair of pitchers from colleges in South Carolina, fans can expect to see some familiar faces this season at The Joe. James Reeves of The Citadel and Brody Koerner of Clemson are both on the RiverDogs' opening day roster. Reeves is a southpaw out of Summerville and comes to the RiverDogs by way of the The Citadel, where he was the Southern Conference's pitcher of the year in 2015 as a redshirt junior. The Yankees selected him in the 10th round of the 2015 First-Year Player Draft with the 303rd overall pick. Reeves' decorated career with the Bulldogs includes tossing the sixth no-hitter in school history last March, when he fanned 14 Mercer batters for the first Citadel no-hitter in 13 years. He attended Ashley Ridge High School and left the Citadel with 227 career strikeouts, 115 of which came in 2015. Koerner is a right-handed pitcher out of Concord, N.C., though he was born in Winchester, Va. He suited up for Clemson for three seasons before he was drafted by the Yankees in the 17th round of the 2015 draft.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
April 5, 2016
5. James Durrell Huie Obituary
James Durrell Huie sadly passed away suddenly at home in Palm Beach Gardens, FL on Wednesday, March 30, 2016. He was born February 12, 1938 in Tampa, FL, and grew up in Haines City, FL and attended Haines City High School. Jim attended The Citadel, military college in Charleston, SC and from there joined the United States Air Force and served his military service at Homestead Air Force Base, FL. After his honorable discharge, Jim remained in Miami where he attended the University of Miami and Florida International University, receiving BBA and MS degrees. In addition, he received his JS, Doctor of Law, and LLM, Master of Laws, degrees there. Jim worked as a professional CPA for several large land corporations in Miami, before eventually opening his own law practice in Coral Gables, FL. Jim was an avid outdoorsman who enjoyed duck hunting with his friends, and rarely returned without his limit of ducks, as he was an excellent marksman, who excelled at skeet shooting. Jim was also an avid racing fan, enjoying dirt track racing, and especially NASCAR, where he attended innumerable races with Darlington being one of his favorite tracks, along with Homestead, of course.
Published in: The Ledger
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Monday
April 4, 2016
1. Happening for April 3, 2016 - Braddock's Defeat wins prize
'Braddock's Defeat' wins book prize - The New-York Historical Society and the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation announced last month that David Preston, a history professor at The Citadel, has been awarded the third annual Guggenheim-Lehrman Prize in Military History for his book, "Braddock's Defeat: The Battle of the Monongahela and the Road to Revolution." The $50,000 prize is bestowed annually in recognition of the best book in the field of military history published in English during the previous calendar year. The book recounts a significant British defeat in the 18th century when England and France were vying for territory in North America. On July 9, 1755, British regulars and American Colonial troops under the command of General Edward Braddock, commander in chief of the British Army in North America, were attacked by French and Native American forces shortly after crossing the Monongahela River. Within hours, a powerful British army was routed, its commander mortally wounded, and two-thirds of its forces suffered casualties in one the worst disasters in military history. More than 100 books were submitted for consideration by publishers in the U.S. and the U.K. for the prize.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
April 4, 2016
2. Dr. David Preston, Citadel professor, appears on C-SPAN
Guggenheim-Lehrman Prize Military History - Mr. Preston, Citadel professor, appears on C-SPAN. Click the link to watch the video.
Broadcast on: C-SPAN
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Monday
April 4, 2016
3. French seeking re-election as commissioner
Baldwin County District 2 Commissioner Tommy French is seeking re-election to another four-year term on the board of commissioners. The 49-year-old French, a former supervisory sergeant with the Georgia Department of Corrections and a former general trades craftsman at Central State Hospital, recently qualified to seek a second term in office. French is running on the Democratic ballot and faces a pair of political challengers in the May 24 primary. For more than three years now, French said he has working hard to help make Baldwin County a better place to live and work, as well as to bring people from different groups together to make things better in the various neighborhoods that he serves. French, a 1984 graduate of Baldwin High School where he was in the top 1 percent of his graduating class and served as president of student government, said he enjoys his job as a county commissioner because he enjoys helping people. "This position is not so much a powerful position; it is a position of trying to help people in a number of ways," said French, who attended The Citadel and played college football after his star prep football and track career. "I'm not so much a verbal person, but I like to make sure the job gets done. And it doesn't matter to me who takes the credit; who stands out and gives the grandstanding speech. I just want the job done, whether they do it behind the doors or out front on a stage."
Published in: The Union-Recorder
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Monday
April 4, 2016
4. Murray County residents hire attorney, form nonprofit group to fight proposed 'inland port'
A group of Murray County, Ga., residents don't want to see a bucolic 42-acre pasture on U.S. Highway 411 just north of the unincorporated community of Crandall turned into an "inland port" where shipping containers would be transferred from semi trucks to rail cars. So they've formed a nonprofit group, hired an attorney and will hold a public meeting a week from today to prepare for battle. And it's shaping up as a David versus Goliath meeting since the proposed Appalachian Regional Port has powerful backers, including Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal, the Georgia Ports Authority, Murray County Sole Commissioner Brittany Pittman and CSX Transportation, the largest railroad east of the Mississippi... Rogers, a graduate of The Citadel and a retired U.S. Marine Corps colonel, specializes in eminent domain. Jones thinks that is likely to be an issue. "Forty-two acres might be enough to get this started," Jones said. "But it's not going to be enough to go anywhere or expand. So they're going to have to condemn land and take it. I can almost guarantee that's where it's headed." Forty-two acres will be enough, and the Georgia Ports Authority won't use eminent domain, said John Trent, the authority's senior director of strategic operations and safety. "We're only using 26 or 27 acres of the 42-acre site," Trent said. "The long-range planning that we have that goes out 15 to 20 years, we won't ever need to go outside that [42 acres]." Trent said he spoke about a month ago with Rogers, who was a class ahead of Trent at The Citadel, which they both attended as undergraduates. Trent said he provided documents that Rogers sought through an open records request.
Published in: TimesFreePress.com
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Monday
April 4, 2016
5. RiverDogs Announce 2016 Opening Day Roster
With start of the season less than a week away, the New York Yankees have announced the Charleston RiverDogs' Opening Day roster for Charleston's inaugural contest against the Columbia Fireflies at Joseph P. Riley, Jr. Park on Thursday, April 7. Third-year RiverDogs skipper Luis Dorante will field a team that features five of the Yankees top 30 prospects according to MLB.com including right handed hurler Domingo Acevedo, who ranks as the fifth best prospect in the Yankees system according to Baseball America. The RiverDogs infield will include Korean teenage phenom Hoy Jun Park along with last year's 30th overall pick in the draft, shortstop Kyle Holder. A pair of former South Carolina collegiate products, James Reeves of The Citadel and Brody Koerner of Clemson, will also comprise the RiverDog's pitching staff... Ashley Ridge High School product and former Citadel standout James Reeves makes his return to The Joe and is one of two lefties on the Opening Day staff. The Southern Conference Pitcher of the Year and 10th round pick by the Yankees in 2015 made his pro debut in Staten Island last season where he accumulated a 1-1 record with a 3.08 ERA in 26.1 innings in relief. As a senior at The Citadel, Reeves ranked first in the SoCon in strikeouts (115), averaging nearly 11 K's per nine innings, good for 19th in the NCAA. Reeves already has plenty of fond memories at The Joe including tossing the sixth no-hitter in school history on March 21 against Mercer.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
April 4, 2016
6. From Brookings to Knoxville
The South Dakota State Jackrabbits play football less than 45 miles from Dakota State. After a year of student coaching at his alma mater, Conklin applied for a graduate assistant position under SDSU coach John Stiegelmeier. Before he knew it, the former Camel was coaching. Well, that and a lot more. "I tell you what, you start to have a great appreciation for all of the little things people do kind of behind the scenes," Conklin said. "You begin to understand there's a whole lot more to coaching than just walking out there and coaching guys on football." He worked away from the sidelines with video and recruiting, but soon climbed the ladder. By 2005, Conklin was coaching defensive backs and special teams. From there, the coach's career progressed rapidly. He moved on to Wofford College in South Carolina, where he grew to appreciate the students who were held to very high academic standards. Then, in 2010, he coached players planning on military careers at The Citadel in Charleston. That's where he filled his first defensive coordinator position - a little more than a decade after his high school graduation. At The Citadel, Johnson Hagood Stadium can seat 21,000 football fans. Conklin's next stop - for just one season coaching safeties - had a much bigger stadium.
Published in: Gilette News Record
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Monday
April 4, 2016
7a. The Citadel swept by Stetson
The Citadel baseball team dropped the third game of the series to Stetson on Sunday 11-5. The Citadel (12-17) recorded five hits in the contest, with three of them being doubles. Barrett Charpia knocked just the third double of his career in the seventh inning and then scampered home on Shy Phillips' first career double. Taylor Cothran recorded his second hit of the season in the ninth inning and eventually came around to score. Ben Peden, Bret Hines and Phillips recorded the three RBI in the game for the Bulldogs. Dylan Spence pitched 2.0 innings in relief, striking out two and allowing three hits. Zach Lavery finished his 13th game this season, working 1.1 innings and giving up just one hit. The Citadel ends its four-game road swing at Charleston Southern on Tuesday. The game, scheduled to begin at 6 p.m., will be played at CSU Ballpark. Live stats will be available at CitadelSports.com for the game.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
April 4, 2016
7b. The Citadel falls to Stetson 7-0
The Citadel baseball team dropped the second game of the series to Stetson on Saturday afternoon 7-0. Jacob Watcher recorded the first hit in the game for the Bulldogs (12-16) in the top of the third with two outs, knocking a single to left field and then advancing to third after the left fielder misplayed it, but Watcher was stranded there. Clay Martin recorded the only other hit for The Citadel. Thomas Byelick went 6.0 innings in his seventh start this season and struck out five. Bret Hines had five assists in the game including a spectacular diving stop on a line drive down the third base line in the seventh inning, throwing the runner out at first from his knees. The game was originally scheduled to begin at 11 a.m. but was delayed until 3 p.m. because of rain and thunderstorms in the area. The Bulldogs take on the Hatters (14-13) for the series finale Sunday at 1 p.m. Live stats and video will be available at CitadelSports.com for the game.
Published in: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
April 4, 2016
7c. The Citadel stopped by Stetson, 3-1
The Citadel baseball team dropped the first game of the series at Stetson on Friday evening 3-1. Ben Peden got the Bulldogs (12-15) out to a quick lead in the second inning, smacking his first career home run to right field to make it 1-0. The freshman finished the day two-for-three. Stetson (13-13) then evened things up in the third inning and took the lead for good in the sixth inning. JP Sears picked up right where he left off from his last start, striking out the side in the first inning and finishing with seven strikeouts to run his season total up to 54. Sears gave up three runs and did not allow a walk in 6.0 innings. The game was delayed for an hour in the top of the seventh inning with two outs due to a quick burst of heavy rain. The Bulldogs' series with Stetson continues with game two on Saturday at 11 a.m. The game, originally scheduled for 2 p.m., has been moved up due to forecasted inclement weather.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
April 4, 2016
8a. Winningest high school football coach in Pennsylvania dies
The Berwick community has lost its beloved football coach. George Curry, who guided the Northeastern Pennsylvania school to six PIAA Class 3A state championships, died Friday at 71. He had ALS, Lou Gehrig's disease, which had been diagnosed midway through last season. An undersize center and linebacker at Temple in the mid-1960s, Curry compiled a 455-102-5 record (.817 winning percentage) at three schools. He is the state's all-time winningest coach and ranks No. 5 in the nation. Curry's storied career ended in November with a 37-7 loss to Scranton Prep in the PIAA District 2 Class 3A final. He had submitted his letter of resignation to the school board before the season. In his first stint at Berwick, which lasted 35 years and ended in 2005, Curry earned state titles in 1988, '92, '94, '95, '96, and '97. He won USA Today Super 25 championships in 1983, '92, and '95. He retired in 2005 because he needed a break. In 2012, when the opportunity to return to Berwick arose, Curry, then a part-time driver's education instructor mixing in work as a local radio and television analyst, returned to his old post. At age 21, after serving as a freshman coach at Temple under George Makris, Curry began his head coaching career at Lake-Lehman. Known as a quarterbacks guru, Curry produced the likes of Bo Orlando (West Virginia), Jake Kelchner (Notre Dame, West Virginia), Ron Powlus (Notre Dame), and Dave Robbins (Boston College). Curry's only son, Cos, played fullback and middle guard at Berwick. A wishbone fullback at the Citadel, he is superintendent of the Stroudsburg Area School District.
Published in: Philly.com
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Monday
April 4, 2016
8b. Samuel S. 'Sam' Morton, 52, former pro wrestler and homicide detective with Richland County Sheriff's Department
Thunderstorms rumbled through the Midlands Friday, April 1, 2016, around 4 a.m. and great sheets of rain cleansed the earth. The heavens send rains to wash away the footprints of special people once they cross the great divide, and we lost an unforgettable man around 1 a.m. Samuel Steven Morton, a 'Renaissance man,' said his loving wife, Myra, left us. Sam, as we knew him, was a man of many talents, and he touched all who crossed his path. If you called this man your friend, you were blessed mightily. If you needed a good laugh to banish worries, you had no worries in the presence of this gentle giant. Myra is right. He was a Renaissance man. Consider the paths life took Sam Morton down... sheriff's deputy, public relations writer at USC's Medical School, corporate communications writer at Policy Management Systems Corporation and the USC School of Medicine, where he won Best of Show Addys for his work. Add the roles of wrestler, freelance writer, novelist, father and husband... the list goes on as you will see. Awards are nice, but being remembered for all the right things is better. We will remember Sam forever. Sam was one of those people who enter a room and immediately brighten it. He was a people person, and people loved to be in his presence. He filled a room with energy. To get to the point, he was fun to be around. And he had the soul of an artist. If Sam loved anything, even remotely approaching his great love for his wife and children, it was his love for the written word. Words brought Sam and me together, fastening us as glue binds a book, forever friends. 'I want to write,' said this burly, beaming fellow as he took his seat in a writing workshop I held at Midlands Tech's Harbison Campus many years ago. And write he did. A 1985 graduate of the Citadel, he earned a B.A. in English there and a masters in English from James Madison University. He put them to good use. He wrote four novels and co-authored six anthologies.
Published in: ColaDaily.com
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Friday
April 1, 2016
1. South Aiken alumni share life, college lessons with students
South Aiken High graduates Sarah Johnson and DeAndre Schoultz came home Monday to give back to the school that, they said, has given them so much. Johnson and Schoultz, who are both third-year student athletes at The Citadel, talked to ninth-graders and upperclassmen in separate assemblies about getting into college, paying for college and attending a military academy. Dressed in crisp gray slacks and navy blazers with The Citadel crest on the breast pocket, they also shared lessons they have learned about life during and after high school and how they are achieving their dreams. Their theme was "The Fire: Is It in You?" Johnson, a criminal justice major who will be going into the U.S. Army after graduation, is the track team captain. Her specialty is the 400-meter and relay events. Schoultz, a business administration major who will be going into the U.S. Air Force, plays football for the Bulldogs. A picture of the receiver celebrating The Citadel's 23-22 win over USC at Williams-Brice Stadium on Nov. 21, 2015, appeared in newspapers across South Carolina. Johnson said the No. 1 piece of advice she can give high school students is to think of their current friends as associates. "I say associates because, when you leave high school, the chances of your staying friends are slim to none," she said. "Always be ready for change."
Published in: Aiken Standard
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Friday
April 1, 2016
2. Bragbook for April 1
John Brunson of Alpharetta and John Hiles of Atlanta earned the title of Summerall Guard at The Citadel.
Published in: AJC.com
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Friday
April 1, 2016
3. A Wild Senior Trip
Captain Tigner proudly wears his award from the Charleston Maritime Association. The four young fishermen from Columbia congratulated themselves as they ate the fish they had caught and cooked at their Islamorado motel. Captain Tigner brought the praise to a stop, "Swabbies, our time on this island has run out. I just called Mom. She'll be here in two days to pick us up. What are we gonna do now?" "Let's go to Key West!" - "It's too far." "Let's go crabbing!" - "We don't have the equipment." "Let's tour this island!" - "We don't have a car, and we sure ain't gonna walk!" "Let"s check out those girls on the beach" - "They left yesterday!" That settled it. We did nothing. When Lee's mom arrived we packed up, loaded the boat on the trailer, and drove back to Columbia. That, my dear readers, was July 1957. Flash forward six decades... The four boys who celebrated high school graduation in the Florida Keys went off to college, established families and careers, and remained close and dear friends. Lee Tigner graduated from The Citadel, served in the U.S. Army, settled in Charleston and became a shipping executive. The Charleston Maritime Association honored him with the Beacon Award for 40 years of service when he retired.
Published in: The Columbia Star
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Friday
April 1, 2016
4. Former Wando High School star Brandon Eakins shines at Citadel pro day
Brandon Eakins' pass-catching stats from his senior season at The Citadel won't pop the eyes of NFL scouts. Playing in the Bulldogs' run-first triple-option offense, the Wando High School product caught 14 passes for 216 yards and two touchdowns in 2015. Those numbers were good enough to lead the team, but might amount to a good two-game total for a receiver in a pass-happy program. That's why The Citadel's pro day, held Thursday on the Bulldogs' practice field, was a big deal for Eakins and about 10 other small-school hopefuls who gathered to work out for NFL scouts. "That's the main difference between me and the other receivers coming out," said the 6-2, 205-pound Eakins. "The scouts haven't seen me catch a lot of balls on my highlight tape. There are some good blocking skills on my tape, and that's one of the good things about coming out of the triple option. I've shown that I can block, and I wanted to come out here today and show that I can run routes and catch balls." Catching balls from former Charleston Southern quarterback Austin Brown, Eakins showed his skills in front of scouts from the Kansas City Chiefs, Buffalo Bills and Cleveland Browns. After his workout, the Chiefs scout asked Eakins to hang around for a Human Resources Tactics (HRT) test, a personality test used by about half of NFL teams.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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