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About Today's News Clips
"Today's News Clips" is published into your e-mail box on normal Citadel business days, and contains links to recent news about The Citadel, the state of South Carolina, and other topics of interest to professionals working at institutes of higher education.
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The Citadel in the News: Archive

March 2016

PUBLISH DATE STORIES
Thursday
March 31, 2016
1. Citadel grad's graduation sword stolen from boyfriend's car in Charlotte
While many college graduates hold onto yearbooks, lanyards or class rings, a select group of Citadel graduates get a senior sword. A Citadel graduate who now lives in Charlotte said her senior sword was stolen from an apartment complex. The woman did not want to reveal her identity. She said the realization that it was gone was gut-wrenching. "I got that deer in headlights look on my face and I said, 'Brandon, my sword is gone,'" she said. According to a Charlotte-Mecklenburg police report, her sword along with stereo equipment was stolen from her boyfriend's car at a Charlotte apartment complex. The report states the thieves popped the lock. The woman said her sword was in his car because she was hoping to have it engraved. "I told myself I wasn't going to cry because it's silly to cry over something so simple, but it means a lot and I don't want them to have it," she said. Commander William Lind said a Citadel sword is more than an object, adding only select cadet officers wear the honor -- a marker of dedication and hard work. "It's symbolic of an accomplishment that they made during their time at The Citadel, which particularly to a young person is a very big deal," Lind said. Lind said swords like the one stolen can range anywhere from $400-$1,000, depending on its engravings. He said if the sword turns up online or at a pawn shop, it won't be hard to spot. "It's not like a sword an Army officer or a Naval officer will carry, it's not an antique," he said. "So I think it would be pretty distinctive."
Broadcast on: WCIV-TV Charleston, SC
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Thursday
March 31, 2016
2. Charleston Area Small Business Development Center named best in U.S.
The Small Business Administration named the Charleston Area Small Business Development Center the 2016 National SBDC Center of Excellence and Innovation, according to a news release. The Charleston SBDC won the award after being named the South Carolina state winner and the winner for SBA Region IV, which includes South Carolina, North Carolina, Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Tennessee and Kentucky. The Charleston SBDC is part of a statewide network of 21 centers, all of which provide free counseling to new and existing businesses. The centers aim to increase economic development in their communities. In 2015, the Charleston center met with 521 clients. The counselors assisted in the creation of 32 new businesses, the acquisition of $5.3 million in capital formation and the creation or retention of 255 jobs. The government procurement assistance consultants also helped SBDC clients win $1.4 billion in government contracts, the release said... Two centers serve the area – the main center located at 6296 Rivers Ave., Suite 300, in North Charleston and the satellite center located in room 256 of Bond Hall on The Citadel campus in downtown Charleston. The award will be presented during ceremonies May 1-2 in Washington during National Small Business Week. "We hope to expand our resources to help even more small business owners and entrepreneurs with new programs and workshops that meet the growing needs of our community," Darrell Jones, the center’s new manager, said in the release.
Published in: Charleston Regional Business Journal
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Thursday
March 31, 2016
3. Military Academy Day Set for April 2 in Loudoun County
Students, parents and guidance staff are invited to the 10th annual Congressional District Military Academy Day on Saturday, April 2 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. The free event will be held at the Loudoun County Public School Administration building, located at 21000 Education Court, Ashburn, according to an announcement by the office of Rep. Barbara Comstock. "To keep America's fighting force the best in the world our military service academies must recruit the finest young men and women to be our nation's future leaders," said Congresswoman Comstock. "The 10th Congressional District Military Academy Day will bring those students who have an interest in serving their country together to meet with these prestigious institutions as they embark on a journey of service to their country." Representatives from all of the service academies - Army, Navy, Air Force, Merchant Marine and Coast Guard- will be in attendance. Representatives from the Marine Corps ROTC program, the Virginia Army National Guard, Virginia Military Institute, the Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets and The Citadel have also been invited. Additionally, the American Legion and Randolph-Macon Academy will be represented.
Published in: Leesburg Patch
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Thursday
March 31, 2016
4. The Citadel suspends three baseball players indefinitely
One day after hitting a walkoff double to help The Citadel get an extra innings win over their cross town rivals Charleston Southern, Drew Ellis and two of his teammates, Austin Mapes and Phillip Watcher, have been suspended indefinitely a school official confirmed on Wednesday night. The suspension is due to a violation of team rules. The school would not elaborate on the specific violation. All three were out of the lineup for Wednesday night's game at Coastal Carolina. Ellis has started 24 games for the Bulldogs this season batting .244 with a team high 19 RBI and is tied for the team lead with 3 home runs. Mapes had started all 25 games before Wednesday batting .219 with 9 RBI. Watcher is hitting .262 with a homer and 7 RBI. He's also pitched in 8 games this season, starting three, and is 0-1 with a 6.05 ERA.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Thursday
March 31, 2016
5. Pitching again leads the way as Chanticleers knock off The Citadel
Coastal Carolina baseball coach Gary Gilmore wasn't pleased with his team's offensive performance Wednesday night or, for that matter, the defense. But fortunately the pitching was good enough to carry the Chanticleers in this one. Sophomore right-hander Zack Hopeck delivered his best outing of the season, going five scoreless innings, and the bullpen finished it off as Coastal Carolina got past The Citadel, 4-3. "It means a lot. It helps me get back on my feet a little bit," Hopeck said of his strong start. "I just try to focus on literally taking it one pitch at a time all the time, make sure I'm locked in all the time... I pitched pretty well, but when I did get in trouble my defense really picked me up, rolled a few double plays there and really helped me out." Hopeck lowered his earned-run average from 6.39 to 4.58 while allowing only three hits and a walk in his five innings of work. He did get the benefit of two double plays while evening his record at 1-1.
Published in: MyrtleBeachOnline.com
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Wednesday
March 30, 2016
1. Charleston Area SBDC is named National SBDC of the year
The Small Business Administration has named the Charleston Area Small Business Development Center the 2016 National SBDC Center of Excellence and Innovation as announced by SBA administrator Maria Contreras-Sweet. The award will be presented during ceremonies to be held May 1-2 in honor of National Small Business Week in Washington, D.C. "National Small Business Week is an important moment when we honor our nation's 28 million small businesses and renew our commitment to fostering the entrepreneurial spirit that is central to small business success. This year's recipients are educators and dynamic leaders in their respective small business fields. It is an honor to celebrate their hard work and success," Contreras-Sweet said. The Charleston SBDC won the award after being named the South Carolina state winner and the winner for SBA Region IV, which includes South Carolina, North Carolina, Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Tennessee and Kentucky. Two centers serve the Charleston area - the main center located at 6296 Rivers Ave., Suite 300 and the satellite center located in room 256 of Bond Hall on The Citadel campus. To set up an appointment, call 843.740.6160.
Published in: Moultrie News
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Wednesday
March 30, 2016
2. Anderson: Political science convention coming to FSC
About every six months or so, we're called upon by the profession to go out and "put up or shut up" - to reveal our original research to our peers, and to defend it, to the best of our ability. Fortunately, I've done my "duty" in this regard this year, having presented my own research at two different conferences in 2016: the Southern Association in San Juan, Puerto Rico, and The Citadel Symposium in Charleston. I've shown my empirical bona fides, once again demonstrated that my opinions are faintly backed up by "science." By all rights this should free me to prattle on, unchecked, about all sorts of things (as I am wont to do) until the next time my feet are held to the fire. But not this year. This spring - this Saturday, actually - the Florida Political Science Association makes its annual meeting place right here at my home institution, Florida Southern College, and the world will come to our door. Dr. Kelly McHugh, my colleague and partner in almost all we do at FSC, has done all the unbelievably hard work necessary to host the conference: making arrangements, reserving rooms and hotels, fixing the catered breakfast, arranging for panels to meet, endlessly emailing participants, and somehow continuing to teach her impossibly popular classes.
Published in: NewsChief.com
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Wednesday
March 30, 2016
3. Ellis' walk-off double lifts Citadel past Charleston Southern in 12th inning
The Citadel's Drew Ellis' RBI double with two outs in the 12th inning propelled the Bulldogs past Charleston Southern on Tuesday night at Riley Park, 4-3. Ellis yanked a controversial double down the right-field line to score Bret Hines with the game-winning run. The double was signaled fair after a slight hesitation by the first-base umpire, drawing a protest from the Buccaneers and their coaching staff as the game ended. The Citadel, which improves to 12-13, will face the Bucs (11-14) again next Tuesday at CSU Ballpark. CSU tied the game with a run in the ninth, the only run by either team since the fourth inning. Pitching dominated the game. The Citadel had 16 strikeouts, while CSU had 15 strikeouts. The Citadel's Zach Lavery (2-0) held CSU to a run over the final four innings, striking out five. Starter Philip Watcher didn’t factor into the decision, but struck out eight and held the Bucs to two earned runs. CSU freshmen Cody Maw and Jacob Childress combined for six scoreless innings and eight strikeouts. Maw worked four scoreless and had six strikeouts, both career highs.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
March 30, 2016
4. Mundy's Mill senior Kaelon Harris commits to play basketball at The Citadel
After a stellar senior season in which he averaged nearly 19 points per game on over 60 percent shooting from the field, Mundy's Mill forward Kaelon Harris has committed to The Citadel. Harris, who received interest from Cincinnati State, Iowa Central Community College, North Greenville University and Cowley Community College among others, decided that The Citadel was the place for him after a visit to Charleston. "The gym is amazing. The coaching staff and the players made me feel welcome, as if I were already part of the program," said Harris. "I feel like I'd come in and be an important piece right away." There's no reason Harris couldn't contribute as early as his freshman season. At 6-foot-3, 220 pounds, Harris is a load under the basket. While he can bully smaller opponents for easy baskets, Harris developed a soft mid-range shooting stroke in order to diversify his offensive arsenal. Publications across the state noticed Harris' abilities this season. He was a First Team All-County selection by the Clayton News and was named an Honorable Mention on the Class AAAAA All State Team by the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Harris was also named to the AJC's All-Southside Second Team.
Published in: Clayton News-Daily
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Tuesday
March 29, 2016
1. Citadel professor awarded $50,000 prize for book on Battle of the Monongahela
A professor at The Citadel was recently awarded the Guggenheim-Lehrman Prize in Military History for his book Braddock's Defeat, The Battle of the Monongahela and the Road to Revolution, according to a news release.The $50,000 prize was awarded to David Preston by the N.Y. Historical Society and the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation, the release said. Preston, a historian with an interest in war and peace among the French, British and Indian people of the 18th century, teaches U.S. military history and early American history at The Citadel, the news release said. "The success of the prize over the last two years has tautened the judges' antennae for extraordinary history writing," Andrew Roberts, chairman of the judging committee, said in the release. "Merely very, very good is not good enough. Braddock's Defeat, The Battle of the Monongahela and the Road to Revolution is exemplary." More than 100 books were submitted for consideration for the prize, the release said. "Our purpose in establishing this annual prize is to restore the serious pursuit of military history in research, scholarship and writing in recent times ignored by the American academic community," Josiah Bunting III, president of the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation, said in the release. "The historical illiteracy of the rising generations of college students current and recent is profoundly dangerous to their growth and participation as responsible citizens."
Published in: Charleston Regional Business Journal
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Tuesday
March 29, 2016
2. Fort Mill native receives rare, elite post at The Citadel
When Blaine Kuhn called the Fort Mill Times as a young sixth grader, he just wanted a job delivering papers. Much to his surprise, he was offered the chance to write a column instead. That was about 10 years ago, and the former "Blaine's Bulletin" writer was recently selected as the Commander of the 2017 Summerall Guards at The Citadel. (It) is the biggest honor I have ever received," said Kuhn, who turned 21 in February. Looking back, Kuhn said it was actually a story he wrote for the Times about a Navy sailor that first sparked his interest in the military. "The whole experience was a blessing in disguise," he said. "(It also) helped me develop my love for writing." Kuhn went on to graduate from Nation Ford High School and enrolled at The Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina, where he majors in political science, with a focus on international politics and military affairs. There he completed Bond Volunteer Aspirant Training, an intense four-month training and evaluation process where the Summerall Guards are chosen. BVAs shave their heads, are inspected in unannounced formations and are required to memorize facts and figures about the current Summerall Guards, including their feats and accomplishments throughout training.
Published in: The Herald
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Tuesday
March 29, 2016
3. Citadel grad heartbroken after thieves steal senior sword
If you know anything about The Citadel, you know it doesn't offer the typical college experience. Their cadets work hard. A Charlotte woman, who asked to remain anonymous, knows that firsthand. "That was the only application I ever put in for, and after that it was 'get your butt in shape,'" she said. The woman is in an exclusive club of female Citadel graduates. She took home the prestigious diploma in 2013, but she also received something else to commemorate her time there. "Even if it just becomes an ornament for your wall, it's a talking point, something you can be proud of whenever you have people over," she said. It's a senior sword she used in countless drills and exhibitions with the chapel color guard. A prized possession that's now gone. "I got that deer in the headlights look on my face, and I said, 'Brandon, my sword is gone,'" the woman said. According to a Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police report, the sword was stolen from her boyfriend's car Friday morning, along with his stereo equipment, in the parking lot of a northeast Charlotte apartment complex. According to the report, the thieves popped the lock.
Published in: WBTV Charlotte, NC
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Tuesday
March 29, 2016
4. Fallen Florence County Deputy Scholarship
The family of a fallen Florence County sheriff's deputy established a Citadel Foundation scholarship in his name on Friday. On Nov. 22, 2013, Deputy Joseph C. Antwine was responding to a call for backup from a fellow deputy when he was involved in a single-car accident. He died of his injuries a week later. He was 23 years old. Since his death, his mother and sister have been working to keep his legacy alive. They found inspiration in The Citadel, where Joseph graduated in 2012. His mother, Maibritt Tunstall, said The Citadel provided so many opportunities for Joseph and helped him become the man he was. "Joseph held the institution, what it stands for, and the values it instills in very high regard," Tunstall said. "We deduced that establishing a scholarship to help those in need, who have similar aspirations to his, would be the most beneficial way of aiding our endeavor."
Broadcast on: WPDE-TV Charleston, SC
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Tuesday
March 29, 2016
5. Historic Civil War flag finds home in LC
A historic flag that was in some of the worst fighting of the Civil War has found a local home with Malcolm Self of Lake Charles. The banner is a "First National" type Confederate flag, better known as the "Stars and Bars." It was the first flag adopted by the new Southern Republic in 1861, but due to its similarity to the U.S. flag, was later replaced by various versions of the more familiar St. Andrew's Cross style flag on a white background. The flag was the battle flag of the 15th South Carolina Heavy Artillery Battalion, "Lucas Artillery," Self said. "It's been in the same family since the war." Self, an avid collector of historic artifacts and owner of Southland Coins and Collectibles Inc., noted that the First National flags are not especially rare, but they are scarce... Major Lucas was a prominent Charleston businessman who attended the South Carolina Military Academy (The Citadel), and served three terms in the South Carolina Legislature. Prior to the war, he was a captain in the state militia, serving with the Palmetto Guards. He was an aide-de-camp to Governor Francis Pickens at the beginning of the war. He was then assigned to the heavy artillery guarding the city and on January 30, 1863, his battalion was noted for defeating the USS Isaac R. Smith, a Union blockading ship, in an artillery duel. Lucas' Battalion again distinguished itself in July 1864 by defeating an attack by Union ironclad warships and three enemy gunboats.
Published in: AmericanPress.com
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Tuesday
March 29, 2016
6. VitalPet Appoints Marty Stanford as Acquisitions Executive to the VitalPet Team
VitalPet, headquartered in Houston, Texas, announced today that it has appointed Marty Stanford to Acquisitions Executive effective immediately. Prior to joining VitalPet, Mr. Stanford was the Director of Sales and Marketing for AViD Laboratories, a private veterinary reference laboratory which sold to IDEXX Laboratories in October of 2015. Mr. Stanford's time there allowed him to develop a solid business acumen within the veterinary industry, as well as key relationships with many veterinary hospitals throughout the southeast. "Marty Stanford comes to VitalPet with over 20 years of business experience, primarily in the medical device and veterinary industry. He started his career managing territories for companies such as United States Surgical Corporation, Boston Scientific, and ALARIS Medical Systems," states Benjamin Thomas, CEO and Founder of VitalPet. "Over time, it is clear that Marty's leadership roles grew substantially and he developed an expertise in business development, sales management and revenue acceleration. We are honored that he has joined our acquisitions team here at VitalPet." Mr. Stanford will be based out of South Carolina, and is responsible for Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Arkansas, Tennessee, South Carolina, North Carolina and the southern counties of Virginia. A 1993 graduate of The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, Marty Stanford earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration. He has been married to his lovely wife, Marcie, for over 20 years. They have two children: Brooke and Ty.
Published in: Minyanville
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Tuesday
March 29, 2016
7. Greenville defeats Woodmont in eight innings
Will Williamson's two-out, pinch-hit single scored Tal Bakker from second base in the bottom of the eighth inning Monday night to give Greenville a 12-11 victory over Woodmont in a Region 1-AAAA baseball game at Grover Reid Field. Bakker walked with one out and moved to second on a bunt by Bruce Stephenson. After an intentional walk to Justin Bailey, Williamson dropped a fly ball in between the right fielder, center fielder and second baseman, all of whom converged but couldn't get to it. It put an end to a strange game that saw both teams have a chance to end it in the seventh, but each made an error that allowed the other to stay alive... After Woodmont scored three runs in the second, Firmstone hit a solo homer in the second, giving The Citadel recruit five home runs in his last six at-bats. Bailey, who had three hits and three RBIs, also had a solo homer, which gave Greenville a 9-8 lead in the fifth. Recus Lawson and John McGarity each had three hits for Woodmont (1-8, 0-7). "My hat's off to my kids," Woodmont coach Chris Gibson said. "They battled through it. They could have easily laid down in the first inning when it was 6-1. They fought back."
Published in: GreenvilleOnline.com
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Monday
March 28, 2016
1. The Citadel Student Research Conference 2016 results
The Citadel Student Research Conference was held on March 18 with over 70 student groups competing in four different areas including undergraduate science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) research; undergraduate humanities research; undergraduate design; graduate research. Nearly 20 Citadel faculty and staff members served as judges for the event held in Daniel Library. View the article to see the results from this year's conference.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Monday
March 28, 2016
2. Statewide Environmental Awareness Award nominations due by April 22
The state of South Carolina is seeking nominations for an award to recognize individuals who are doing extraordinary work for the natural environment. Nominations will be accepted through April 22. The S.C. Environmental Awareness Award, now in its 21th year, was established by S.C. General Assembly during the 1992 legislative session to recognize outstanding contributions made toward the protection, conservation, and improvement of South Carolina's natural resources. Nomination guidelines and application forms are available by e-mailing or calling Stacie Crowe, crowes@dnr.sc.gov, (843) 953-9092. Each year the public is invited to submit nominations that are then reviewed by an awards committee. In judging nominees, the committee considers excellence in innovation, leadership, and accomplishments that influence positive changes affecting the natural environment. Previous winners of the Environmental Awareness Award include: 2007 - Dr. Richard Porcher Jr., Professor Emeritus, The Citadel
Published in: The Berkeley Independent
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Monday
March 28, 2016
3. Nancy Mace became first woman to graduate from The Citadel
Nancy Mace didn't set out to make history. She merely wanted to succeed. "I was looking to go in quietly, do my thing," said Mace, a former Atlanta resident now living with her husband and two children in the Charleston, S.C., area, where she is from. High school had been a grind, and she ended up earning her diploma through a community college. The Citadel, her dad's alma mater, seemed appealing but had not yet admitted women. Then Shannon Faulkner became the first female cadet to enroll, in 1995. Faulkner soon left but had cracked the door open for the first woman to graduate from The Citadel. That woman was Mace, who graduated in 1999. She also holds a master's degree in journalism and mass communications from the University of Georgia. "She has written her name in lights in the history of The Citadel," the late Pat Conroy, a fellow graduate, said of Mace during a 2009 book tour stop in Atlanta. "I'm as proud of her as I can possibly be."
Published in: The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
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Monday
March 28, 2016
4. Bainbridge school district announces four finalists for superintendent position
Four finalists - including an internal candidate - have made the cut to be considered as the next superintendent of Bainbridge Island public schools. The Bainbridge Island School Board announced its final four of hopefuls to replace current Superintendent Faith Chapel, who announced late last year she will retire at the end of the school year. The finalists are: Peter Bang-Knudsen, assistant superintendent for administrative services for the Bainbridge Island School District; Molly Evans, assistant superintendent for educational services, Litchfield Elementary School District, Litchfield Park, Arizona; Steve Matthews, superintendent, Novi Community School District, Novi, Michigan; and Michael Tolley, associate superintendent for teaching and learning, Seattle Public Schools, Seattle. "After reviewing the qualifications of 24 applicants from across the nation, and even a few from overseas, we feel these candidates represent a rich variety of leadership experiences that would benefit our district," said School Board President Mev Hoberg. The finalists will meet with members of the school board and stakeholder groups, as well as district staff and community members, in early April. A community forum is planned for 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 12, at Bainbridge High. Tolley began his education career teaching marine biology and was an adjunct professor in the department of biology, College of Charleston. He was also a biotechnology education instructor at the Medical University of South Carolina. In addition to his role as associate superintendent for Seattle Public Schools, Tolley served the district as director of high schools and executive director of schools for the southeast region. He has also spent more than 17 years as a high school principal and central office administrator. Tolley has a bachelor's degree from the College of Charleston and a master's degree from The Citadel.
Published in: Bainbridge Island Review
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Monday
March 28, 2016
5. Peace Corps Mourns the Loss of Volunteer Andrew Farr
Peace Corps Director Carrie Hessler-Radelet is saddened to confirm the death of Peace Corps volunteer Andrew Jennings Farr. Andrew, 25, passed away in an automobile accident in Mozambique on March 25, 2016. "Andrew was passionate about learning as much as possible from his Mozambican community members and dedicated to making a difference in the lives of others," Director Hessler-Radelet said. "He was respected by his fellow teachers and a wonderful role model for his students. We are devastated by this tragic loss, and our thoughts and prayers are with the Farr family during this difficult time." A native of Irmo, South Carolina, Andrew served as an education volunteer in Mozambique, where he taught secondary school physics in the village of Chitima, Tete Province. In his Peace Corps application, Andrew wrote that in order to adapt to the Mozambican culture, he planned to "simply listen, observe and understand their way of life." He was excited to learn new teaching techniques from his Mozambican community members and looked forward to hearing their personal perspectives on "the geography of the country, history, demographics, and their future." Andrew received a bachelor's degree in physics from The College of Charleston and was accomplished in the field of physics. He presented at the American Physical Society March Meeting in 2013, worked with the ExCitAtIon (Experiments at The Citadel on Atoms and Ions) group in the Department of Physics at The Citadel as an undergraduate student and received the Sigma Pi Sigma Society of Physics Students Undergraduate Research Award in 2012. He also received an undergraduate research award from the NASA Space Grant Consortium in May 2010. Andrew's commitment to service began prior to serving as a Peace Corps volunteer. He was a physics and math tutor at The Citadel in Charleston and an Eagle Scout in Boy Scouts of America Troop 312. Andrew loved music and played the trumpet, guitar, drums, bass, and piano. He was also passionate about the outdoors, cooking, gardening, travel, and learning.
Published in: PeaceCorps.gov
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Monday
March 28, 2016
6a. College Baseball: The Citadel 4, VMI 2
Back-to-back home runs in the fifth inning propelled The Citadel baseball team to its first Southern Conference series win of the season with a 4-2 victory Sunday at VMI. The Bulldogs (11-13, 2-1 SoCon) won 10-2 on Friday and lost 8-3 on Saturday. VMI (14-13,1-2 SoCon) struck first in Sunday and held a 2-0 lead heading into the top of the fifth inning but The Citadel quickly answered with home runs by Clay Martin and Philip Watcher. Martin's homer was his second of the season, and Watcher’s home run was his first in 2016 and second of his career. Jacob Watcher tossed a career-high 6 innings of four-hit ball, fanning five in the process. Zach Lavery picked up his fifth save of the year after throwing striking out three in 2 scoreless innings. The Bulldogs return to Riley Park to host Charleston Southern on Tuesday and then travel to Conway, Wednesday to face Coastal Carolina.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
March 28, 2016
6b. The Citadel falls at VMI, 8-3
The Citadel baseball team dropped the second game of the series 8-3 to VMI on Saturday afternoon inside Gray-Minor Stadium. Thomas Byelick made his sixth start of the season on the mound for the Bulldogs, working 5.0 innings and striking out six. Jordan Buster pitched 2.2 innings of relief, allowing four hits and fanning two. Unlike Friday's game The Citadel struggled at the plate, tallying three hits. With the bases loaded in the ninth, the Bulldogs managed to push across three runs with Jason Smith, Philip Watcher and Barrett Charpia all coming home to score in the inning. The Bulldogs wrap up the series tomorrow at VMI with the deciding game set to start at 1 p.m. Live stats and video will be available at CitadelSports.com.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
March 28, 2016
6c. Sears Fans 19 in The Citadel's 10-2 Rout Over VMI
The Citadel baseball team took the first game of the series 10-2 over VMI in dominating fashion on Friday night inside Gray-Minor Stadium. JP Sears recorded 19 strikeouts, the most by a pitcher in the NCAA this season, and picked up the win in his sixth start of the year after fanning 19 of the 28 batters he faced. Sears struck out five of the first six outs for the Bulldogs and continued to mow down the Keydets en route to a new career-high 19 strikeouts, finishing just one shy of the school record. The 19-strikeout performance marks the first time since 1983, when Mark Cherry fanned as many against Augusta, that a Bulldog pitcher finished with 19 Ks. Beginning in the fourth inning Sears retired 15 straight Keydets, 13 of which were strikeouts, until giving up his lone run of the game in the eighth. Kyle Smith pitched 1.0 inning of relief and struck out two, pushing the Bulldogs' strikeout total to 21 to tie the single-game school record. VMI (13-12, 0-1 SoCon) tallied only four hits. The Bulldogs (10-12, 1-0 SoCon) jumped out to a quick 3-0 lead in the game and never looked back, scoring in the first five innings of the game. Stephen Windham, Mike Deese, Drew Ellis and Clay Martin all finished with two or more RBI and William Kinney led the team with four hits in five at bats.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
March 28, 2016
7. Kicker Cody Clark Joining The Citadel For 2016 Season
Cody Clark, a three-year starting kicker at Middle Tennessee State, is transferring to The Citadel and will be immediately eligible as a graduate transfer for the 2016 season. "We are excited about adding Cody to our team," head coach Brent Thompson said. "He has experience we were missing at the kicker position and has been successful competing at a high level. Cody has been an accurate kicker during his career and made many pressure-filled kicks to win games. When he contacted us about transferring to play his final season of eligibility, we felt he was a great fit for what our team needs in 2016." Clark ended his MTSU career 33-of-47 on field goal attempts and a perfect 148-of-148 on PATs for a total of 247 points scored. Clark left the Blue Raiders as the only kicker in program history with at least 50 PAT attempts without a miss in his career. He ranked fourth on the program's career PATs made list, fifth in career points scored by kicking and seventh in career made field goals. His career field goal percentage of 70.2 is the third-highest percentage in program history. Last season, Clark was 12-of-16 on field goals and 56-of-56 on PATs. He tied a single-game school record with 10 made extra points in the season-opening win against Jackson State and matched that total two weeks later in a win against Charlotte. He connected on a career-long 46-yard field goal in the third overtime for the winning points in a 27-24 victory at Marshall and also registered field goals at Alabama, at Illinois and against Vanderbilt in 2015.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
March 28, 2016
8. Playting tall: Johnson doesn't let 5-6 frame hold him back
Frankie Johnson is short - by basketball standards, anyway. Try telling the 5-foot-6 Darlington High School senior something he doesn't already know. Better yet, try calling him a name he hasn't been called. Never mind Johnson is one of the Pee Dee's most prolific 3-point shooters. So much so that he is All-Pee Dee, all-state and represented South Carolina in last weekend's Carolinas All-Star Basketball Classic against the best players from North Carolina. Yet, during pregame warmups, Johnson overheard someone in the stands call him a midget. At game's end, though, Johnson did not mind adding THIS name: South Carolina MVP after making four 3-pointers and finishing with 14 points in a 114-91 win. For every accolade Johnson receives, it's his way of saying, "I told you so." "I just felt like I had something to prove because I was the shortest one out there," said Johnson, who signed in November with The Citadel. "But I was there for a reason. I just had to prove it." During the 2014-15 campaign, as the Region 7-3A Player of the Year, Johnson averaged 19.5 points, 6.4 assists and four steals per game. This year, despite missing several games with a hand injury, Johnson averaged 17.6 points, 4.6 assists, 5.4 rebounds and 3.5 steals.
Published in: SCNow.com
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Monday
March 28, 2016
9. The Citadel Track and Field Travels to UNF
The Citadel men's and women's track and field programs are competing in the annual North Florida Spring Break Invitational on Friday and Saturday in Jacksonville, Florida. The Bulldogs enter their second weekend of the outdoor season after a successful trip to the Shamrock Invitational last week. North Florida's two-day event hosts competition for both collegiate and prep students. Friday's schedule features the majority of the collegiate events. Admission to the Spring Break Invitational is $7 for a single day and $10 for a two-day pass. Friday's events begin at 10 a.m. with the women's hammer throw while running events launch at noon with the 100-meter hurdles kicking things off. The opening day concludes with the men's and women's 5000-meter runs, which are set to begin at 7:45 p.m. The Citadel's weekend wraps up Saturday with men's discus and men's javelin competitions.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Friday
March 25, 2016
1. Upcoming News from The Citadel - April
Event include - "Turning Defeat Into Victory: George Washington, Commander in Chief of Continental Forces" with Dr. James Kirby Martin, South Carolina Business Development Center QuickBooks Level III Workshop, Quantum Computation: Breaking Codes and Simulating Molecules, Citadel Graduate College to host spring webinars for prospective graduate and evening students, Friend of the Daniel Library Lecture: Braddock's Defeat: The Battle of Monongahela and the Road to Revolution by Dr. David Preston, Guggenheim-Lehrman award winner, 7th Annual Citadel Directors' Institute and Symposium on Revolutionary War.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Friday
March 25, 2016
2. 50 Most Affordable Small Southern Colleges for a Sports Management Degree 2016
In this article, we highlight the 50 most affordable small Southern colleges for a Sports Management degree in 2016. For students with a passion for sports and a drive for business, earning a Bachelor's in Sports Management can be the first step toward pursuing your dream career. Recommended Sports Management programs are accredited by reputable governing bodies, offer quality courses and academic rigor, and allow students to hone their skills in particular areas of interest. The Citadel Military College of South Carolina, often called The Citadel or The Military College, is a public college in Charleston, South Carolina, located along the Ashley River. The school offers a classic military education for both men and women, although 90 percent of the students are male. The school ranks high with U.S. News and World Report. In fact, the 2016 edition of Best Colleges lists The Citadel as the #3 Best Regional University in the South. The school is also ranked #1 among the Top Public Schools and #5 among the Best Value Schools. The Department of Health, Exercise, and Sport Science offers an undergraduate degree with a Sports Management and Administration option for students with a passion for the sports industry. Internships and field experience are required for successful completion of the Bachelor's in Sport Management.
Published in: Sports Management Degree Guide
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Friday
March 25, 2016
3. Resident's fascination with numbers results in visit to 500 colleges
You might say Steve Lake, 67, has a thing for numbers. He completed a quest to visit 500 colleges in America. It took more than two decades to achieve. He reached No. 500 - Our Lady of the Lake University in San Antonio - in 2008. "I've been like this my whole life," he said. "I relate to numbers. There's a sense of 'I did it.'... I know I'm the only one who's done the combination of all these things." Lake has other numbers that drive him. "My current goals are to reach 50 ballparks; my count is 47," he said. "I am a serious bridge player and now have 470 master points. It takes 300 to attain the Life Master rank. My goal now is to reach 500 points. On the lighter side, my wife and I are avid moviegoers and can now say that we have been to every theater in town except for the United Artists Showcase Theater next to the MGM and the Galaxy Theater in Henderson. We have also been to every theater in town that was built or existed since 1970. Most likely, the Galaxy will complete our goal of having attended at least one movie in every current theater in Las Vegas and Henderson." He also "collects" airports, having flown in or out of 105 different ones. He started a list of Presidential Libraries; so far, he's up to seven. Lake also can lay claim to having slept in a motel or hotel in every state except Alaska. It doesn't count because he and wife slept on a cruise ship. But it is the 500 colleges and university visits of which he speaks the most. It's a feat that comes with a caveat. The list includes all the military schools - United States Military Academy at West Point, better known as West Point; the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md.; the Military College of South Carolina, commonly referred to simply as The Citadel, and others.
Published in: Las Vegas Review-Journal
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Friday
March 25, 2016
4. Ramblin' Rhodes: Since 1754, cartoonists have drawn signs of times
Political cartoons have been an art form in itself since the first one, Join Or Die, of a fragmented snake appeared in Benjamin Franklin's newspaper The Pennsylvania Gazette in Philadelphia on May 9, 1754. The parts of the snake were labeled indicating the existing British colonies and represented Franklin's view that the colonies were not united. For some reason, Franklin left out Georgia and Pennsylvania in the labeled parts of the snake and lumped the New England states into one part labeled "N.E." The Augusta Chronicle has had many staff political cartoonists through the years with one of the earliest best known being Augusta native Clifford Baldowski who attended Richmond Academy, the Georgia Military Academy and the Citadel in Charleston, S.C. He also studied with the Arts Student League of New York. Baldowski served in the U.S. Army Air Corps as a navigator-observer and intelligence officer and was awarded five battle stars and the Bronze Star for his actions during World War II.
Published in: The Augusta Chronicle
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Friday
March 25, 2016
5. Bulldogs Begin SoCon Play at VMI
The Citadel baseball team will travel to VMI for a three-game series beginning on Friday in Lexington, Virginia. The series marks the beginning of Southern Conference play for the Bulldogs. The Citadel (9-12) makes the trip up north after dropping its midweek contest to USC Upstate on Tuesday. Two Bulldogs, Taylor Cothran and Cole Buffington, recorded their first hits of the season against the Spartans. Junior Beau Strickland tossed a scoreless frame and struck out one in relief for The Citadel. VMI, having dropped both of its midweek games on the road, stands at 13-11 overall this season. First pitch Friday is slated for 6 p.m., Saturday's game will start at 4 p.m. and the series finale on Sunday will begin at 1 p.m. Live stats and video will be available at CitadelSports.com for all three games.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Friday
March 25, 2016
6. Tom Herman: Citadel loss did not derail South Carolina interest
According to Houston coach Tom Herman, South Carolina's loss to The Citadel did not cause a breakdown in negotiations to be the Gamecocks' new head coach. A February report in USA Today said Herman was in discussions to be South Carolina's head coach until the Gamecocks lost in November to the FCS school. Per the report, USC and Herman had made so much progress towards a deal "that the school's administration had essentially shut its search process down." Thursday on the Paul Finebaum Show, Herman said that report wasn't true. "Absolutely not true," Herman said. "I wish that reporter had actually asked me for my comment on that, I would have given him the truth just like I'm giving it to you Paul. I don't know you very well but I do respect you and your work and the truth is that report was false." Herman talked at length about "the truth" in coaching search reports in his interview. He also used that theme in an interview with a Houston radio show in January about reports surrounding Houston and former Texas A&M QB Kyle Allen, who transferred to Houston.
Published in: YahooSports.com
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Thursday
March 24, 2016
1. Brussels Shows The Limits Of Mass Surveillance - Again
The mass surveillance debate in Washington has long been framed as a tradeoff between liberty and security. The basic assumption is that in order to get greater security, we may have to give up some liberty. But the attack in Brussels Tuesday morning is just the latest reminder that sacrificing liberty doesn't come with any security promises - and may in fact make us less safe. As European and U.S. intelligence services have begun to rely heavily on surveillance and data analysis, the opportunity cost has been human intelligence. Entire neighborhoods have become black boxes to European security services, even as data and metadata are gobbled up, stored and analyzed by the gigaton. Meanwhile, terrorist networks have turned to burner phones and easily available encryption technology, leaving the big eye in the sky with nothing to see. Without eyes on the ground, Western governments have become blind. Sophisticated technology is no replacement for the painstaking cultivation of human intelligence sources. "In a world of increasingly sophisticated encryption and small, networked cells, nothing beats a human source. Period," said Carl Jensen, a former FBI official and director of the intelligence and security studies program at The Citadel, a Charleston, South Carolina-based college.
Published in: Huffington Post
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Thursday
March 24, 2016
2. Annual Beautiful Bulldog Contest
The Military College of South Carolina holds a beautiful bulldog contest each year. The Citadel is looking for a few good bulldogs. Bulldog beauty pageant held its sixth annual beautiful bulldogs contest over the weekend. The contest - in honor of the school's mascot - crowned Elliot as the winner, a 4 and a half year old male. In the category of overall best costume, a bulldog named Bandit took home top honors for his outfit based on famous painter, Bob Ross. The event is held every year by The Citadel Football Association to raise money to support the Bulldog's mascot program.
Broadcast on: KEYC-TV Mankato, MN
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Thursday
March 24, 2016
3. Two new lawsuits say The Citadel covered up Skip ReVille's sex abuse
Two new plaintiffs have filed lawsuits claiming that The Citadel "chose to conceal" the sexual misconduct of serial child molester Skip ReVille before he preyed on them in the late 2000s. ReVille served as a counselor at the public military school's now-defunct summer camp before going on to work with students as a coach and teacher at various athletic programs and schools in Summerville and Mount Pleasant. He pleaded guilty in June 2012 to molesting 23 boys over the course of a decade, although a circuit solicitor said the actual victim count may have been closer to 35. "As a proximate result of The Citadel's gross negligence and reckless indifference to the safety and well-being of others in failing to warn or report ReVille, the Plaintiff was sexually assaulted by ReVille on multiple occasions," read both lawsuits, which are largely similar and were both filed in a Charleston County court Monday. Both plaintiffs are currently under the age of 19, according to the lawsuits, which refer to the plaintiffs as John Doe C and John Doe D to protect their anonymity. Both received "athletic supervision" from ReVille in Mount Pleasant at some point after a former Citadel camper brought accusations about ReVille's sexual misconduct to the school in the summer of 2007. The school conducted an internal investigation after receiving the allegation in 2007 and eventually sought to give a $20,000 settlement to the camper's family, but it did not hand the case over to law enforcement.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
March 24, 2016
4. Citadel's Capers Williamson earns SoCon track and field honor
The Citadel senior Capers Williamson was named Southern Conference men's field athlete of the week, the league announced Wednesday. Williamson broke his own school record in the javelin last weekend, hitting a mark of 231 feet, 1 inch at the Shamrock Invitational at Coastal Carolina. Williamson's effort ranks first in the SoCon and 11th nationally this season, and broke his own record of 219-5 set last year. Williamson placed third overall at the Shamrock Invitational among a talented field that included 28 competitors. The senior has placed in the top five in eight of his last nine javelin events.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
March 24, 2016
5. Goose Creek basketball's Chris Ross commits to The Citadel
Guard Chris Ross of Goose Creek High School has committed to play basketball at The Citadel, Gators coach Blake Hall said Wednesday. Ross, a 6-2 senior, will join the Bulldogs next fall as a preferred walk-on, Hall said. "He's a high-motor kid who likes to play fast," Hall said. "So I think he will fit in well with what they do there. And he sees the big picture. His mom is in the military and he wants to go into engineering, so he sees the benefits of The Citadel after graduation, not just for basketball." Ross played just one season for the Gators after his family moved to Goose Creek. He averaged 11 points, six rebounds, two assists and two steals last season for the 17-8 Gators. Ross joins a group of at least five new players slated to join the Bulldogs next season for coach Duggar Baucom's second season. Ezekiel Balogun, a 6-6 forward from Nigeria who plays at Hamilton Heights Christian Academy in Chattanooga, has signed with the Bulldogs, along with 5-8 guard Frankie Johnson of Darlington.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
March 24, 2016
6. Darlington's Johnson signs with the Citadel
When choosing where play a sport in college finding the ideal system is an important consideration. That was one of the major reasons Darlington guard Frankie Johnson chose The Citadel. Johnson, a three-time all-state selection, signed with the Bulldogs Wednesday. He said it was clear during the recruiting process that the program was a good fit. "When I went on my visit I liked the way they practiced, the fast pace of the game," he said. "That's how we do it in Darlington, so that was more of my playing style." He also likes that it's close to home so his family and friends will have more opportunities to see him play. Johnson is the all-time leading scorer in Darlington High School history.
Broadcast on: WBTW-TV Myrtle Beach, SC
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Wednesday
March 23, 2016
1. More female students finding their place in engineering
Amber Mills came to The Citadel intent on majoring in political science. But an encounter with an alum changed her mind. "I told him I wanted to be a politician because I wanted to change the world," she recalls. "He laughed at me. He said if I really wanted to make a difference, I should go into engineering." Mills followed that alum's advice (he's now one of her mentors) and switched majors. "I love it," she said. Mills has found that in engineering she really is using math and science to make the world a better place and solve problems. And more young women are discovering what Mills has learned – that they can have an impact on a profession largely dominated by men. Female enrollment in undergraduate science and engineering programs increased between 2002 and 2012, according to the National Science Foundation. At The Citadel, demand for engineering programs - especially among women - is growing. The Citadel now has 34 females in engineering when it only had 10 in 2011 (a 240 percent increase). Within the last three years, The Citadel has hired its first three female faculty members and is expanding both undergraduate and graduate degrees in engineering.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
March 23, 2016
2. Local project to prepare for future flooding gets fuel from federal grant
For years, the scientific and anecdotal evidence has steadily grown that the Charleston area is becoming more vulnerable to flooding; not just during extreme weather events like the historic rain that wreaked havoc last October, but to smaller, more frequent flooding that tests infrastructure and makes it hard to get to work. Now, a group that includes university and government scientists has received over half a million dollars from a federal grant to fuel a three-year project to help officials in the public and private sector anticipate and prepare for future floods. In the first part of the project, the group will develop exhaustive models capable of identifying the areas most vulnerable to flooding street by street and parcel by parcel. The second part will get local governments and businesses involved to help them use the models and discuss how to prepare for future floods. "This grant really validates the approach we're taking and the scale at which we're working," said Dan Burger of the Department of Health and Environmental Control's office for Ocean and Coastal Resource Management. At the center of the project is an entity dubbed the Charleston Resilience Network, which includes The Citadel, the College of Charleston, the South Carolina Sea Grant Consortium, the City of Charleston and the Berkeley-Charleston-Dorchester Council of Government to name a few. Burger was involved in establishing the network in 2014 as a vessel to have big conversations about flooding and flood resiliency in the region.
Published in: Moultrie News
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Wednesday
March 23, 2016
3. Beautiful Bulldog Contest
Spring means The Citadel in South Carolina holds its annual search for the most beautiful bulldog. The military college does this every year, in honor of the school's mascot. This year the winner was Elliot the bulldog, but for costume "Bandit" took home top honors for his outfit based on famous PBS painter, Bob Ross.
Broadcast on: WEVV-TV Evansville, IN
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Wednesday
March 23, 2016
4. Students traveling abroad from local colleges: safe and accounted for
Officials do know a number of Americans were injured in the attack, but there is not an accurate figure right now. What we do know tonight is that all students traveling abroad from local colleges here in Charleston are safe and accounted for. The College of Charleston and The Citadel say they do have students traveling in Europe - none specifically in Brussels, and all of the students are fine.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Wednesday
March 23, 2016
5. Bat boy, equipment manager Will Small is Citadel's 'inspiration'
Will Small wears many hats at The Citadel - all of them extra large, according to his boss. "Will, what size do you wear, 8 1/4?" asks Kevin Yeager, the Bulldogs' director of athletic equipment. "You're not the BMOC, you're the BHOC - Big Head on Campus." Small, who works as bat boy for The Citadel's baseball team and for the football team on Yeager's equipment staff, merely smiles in reply. "These guys like to tease me a lot," said Small. "But I like to give it right back to them." Small, 21, is a constant presence around Citadel athletics. He's been a bat boy for the Bulldogs' since he was eight years old, and in recent years has been dubbed the "Director of Laundry Operations" by Yeager. Small helps process some 2,200 pounds of football laundry a week during spring practice, loading and unloading the giant washing and drying machines next to the equipment room, and keeping them in working order. He stocks bins for more than 100 players with practice gear and towels, cranking up a metal gate when it's time for the players to dress out, and helps set up for both baseball and football practice. But Small does much more for Citadel athletes and coaches than fold and dry. "Will is an inspiration to our athletes on this campus," said Citadel baseball coach Fred Jordan. "He instills a smile on their faces every time they see him."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
March 23, 2016
6. The Citadel Golf beats Wooster
The Citadel golf team edged Wooster College by six strokes in a head-to-head 18-hole dual at Patriots Points Links on Tuesday afternoon. The Bulldogs carded a team score of 333 to beat Wooster, who shot a 339. It was the second consecutive dual win for The Citadel. The Bulldogs last competed in a head-to-head format on March 9, 2014, when they prevailed over Dayton with a score of 331. Sophomore Cameron Little matched her season-best score to lead all competitors on Tuesday. She carded a 6-over-par 78 to top the field. It was her highest career finish and just the second time she has recorded a round in the 70s during the 2015-16 campaign. Senior Eraina Manor carded an 82 to lead the rest of the Bulldogs as The Citadel saw four cadet-athletes post sub-90 rounds. Junior Renata Sucha shot a 12-over-par 84 and freshman Marina Grimal carded a 17-over-par 89. The Bulldogs have the next two weeks off as they prepare for the Southern Conference Tournament, which takes place in Savannah, Georgia, from April 9-12. For more information on The Citadel golf team, follow @CitadelOlympic and stay tuned to CitadelSports.com.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Wednesday
March 23, 2016
7. Bulldogs crushed at USC Upstate
The Citadel baseball team dropped its midweek contest to USC Upstate on Tuesday at Harley Park 14-1. USC Upstate (10-12) jumped out to an early 3-0 lead in the game and The Citadel was unable to mount a rally in the game, tallying eight hits in the loss. Head coach Fred Jordan got 15 different players onto the field on Tuesday with two 'Dogs registering their first hits this season. Taylor Cothran hit a leadoff single to left field in seventh inning and then eventually came around to score the only run in the game for The Citadel (9-12) and Cole Buffington recorded his first collegiate hit in the eighth inning on a single to left field. Dylan Spence made his second start this season and tossed 2.0 innings, giving up four hits and fanning two. In his sixth appearance this season, Beau Strickland pitched 1.1 innings of scoreless ball and struck out one in relief. The Bulldogs will continue their road swing this weekend at VMI for the first Southern Conference series of the season. First pitch Friday is slated for 6 p.m. and live stats and video will be available at CitadelSports.com.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Tuesday
March 22, 2016
1. Fritz Hollings earns prestigious Krause Center leadership award
Citadel Class of 1942 graduate recognized for distinguished service, leadership and ethics - From The Citadel in the 1940s, to the battlefields of World War II, to the office of Governor of South Carolina, and then the U.S. Senate, Ernest Frederick (Fritz) Hollings, has embodied the definition of leadership. For his service to the United States of America, to his fellow citizens, his fellow soldiers and his alma mater, Fritz Hollings was named as the recipient of one of The Citadel's most prestigious awards, the Krause Center Award for Distinguished Service, Leadership, and Ethics, during the 9th Annual Principled Leadership Symposium on campus today. The award was accepted on his behalf by the Honorable Patrick Michael Duffy, The Citadel Class of 1965, Senior U.S. District Court Judge. Hollings provided a statement about the recognition. "This is a true honor and I am deeply grateful," Hollings said. "My years at The Citadel were formative and of crucial importance to my years of public service. I'm proud, as my late friend Pat Conroy said, to wear the ring." Hollings was nominated for the award by the Dean of The Citadel School of Humanities and Social Services, Winfred (Bo) Moore, Jr.
Published in: Moultrie News
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Tuesday
March 22, 2016
2. Things to Do Tuesday, March 22, 2016
Leah Suarez: 'Celebration of Women in Jazz' What: Leah Suarez, one of Charleston's premiere vocalists, will lead her jazz ensemble in "A Celebration of Women in Jazz," in honor of Women's History Month, paying homage to key women who have made significant contributions to the formation and progression of America's unique art form. Suarez will be accompanied by Mark Sterbank (reeds), Richard Harris White Jr. (piano), Tyler Ross (guitar), Jake Holwegner (bass), Ron Wiltrout (drums and percussion) and Gino Castillo (percussion). when: 6:30 p.m. where: Mark Clark Hall, The Citadel, 171 Moultrie St., downtown Charleston price: $5 general; free with Citadel ID; $45 VIP
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
March 22, 2016
3. Citadel trial in lawsuit by Skip ReVille victim delayed over lack of jurors
A trial against The Citadel after a lawsuit by a victim of convicted sex offender Skip ReVille has been delayed because a jury couldn't be seated Monday morning. Opening arguments were scheduled for Tuesday. Not enough jurors were available to commit to two weeks during spring break, defense attorney Gregg Meyers said. Circuit Judge Markley Dennis will set a new date. The suit is called Camper Doe 6 v. The Citadel and was filed Sept. 9, 2013. ReVille was a counselor at Citadel summer camps from 2001 to 2003. The former camper says he was repeatedly molested in 2003 after a supervisor saw ReVille acting inappropriately and didn't report him. The former camper also said he was later rebuffed when he tried to report the abuse to school officials. The suit claims school officials knew ReVille was abusing boys but refused to report him and then covered up his actions.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
March 22, 2016
4. Counting down the top-5 SEC upsets from the past decade
The NCAA tournament always produces plenty of upsets - it's what makes the first weekend so exciting and it was no different this year as a record number of double-digit seeds won, including 15-seed Middle Tennessee State taking down 2-seed Michigan State on Friday. In lieu of March Madness, we decided to rank the SEC's top-5 upsets in college football from the past decade. Honorable mention - The Citadel 23, South Carolina 22 (2015): In the latest SEC loss to an FCS opponent, the Gamecocks were embarrassed at home by their little brother.
Published in: ESPN.com
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Tuesday
March 22, 2016
5. The Citadel Golf to host Wooster Tuesday
The Citadel golf team is set to face off with Wooster College in a head-to-head dual at Patriots Point Links on Tuesday. With the Southern Conference Championships approaching on April 9-12, Tuesday will be the Bulldogs' final preparation before their last outing of the spring season. The dual match will feature one 18-hole round and all groups are slated to tee off at 1 p.m. The Bulldogs have not competed in a head-to-head dual since March 9, 2014, when they edged Dayton with a team score of 331. This is the first two-team event head coach Lori Bonacci has hosted during her tenure at The Citadel and the second total event hosted by the Bulldogs during the 2015-16 season. Full results will be available after every pairing has finished their respective rounds on CitadelSports.com. The Bulldogs are coming off an 18th place finish at the Low Country Intercollegiate in Hilton Head, South Carolina. Bonacci's squad carded a 669, led by a 16-over-par 160 shot by senior Eraina Manor. Manor has carded 18-hole scores in the 70s in four of her last six rounds.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Tuesday
March 22, 2016
6. The Citadel falls 5-2 to DePaul
The Citadel tennis team dropped a competitive match to DePaul by a 5-2 score Monday afternoon at the Earle Tennis Center. The Bulldogs (8-19) battled the Blue Demons (5-11) throughout the day, with five of the singles matches requiring three sets to determine a winner after DePaul won at No. 2 and No. 3 doubles to take the initial team point. "This was a tough one to lose with five three setters," head coach Chuck Kriese said. "They say that the night is darkest before the dawn. We have to stay tough and keep knocking on the door. The reason that I love coaching at The Citadel is that the players are tough to the core and do not quit. Our paradigm is shifting. Soon we will be comfortable with winning and it will be a whole new ballgame. Right now we have to suffer, continue to work hard and continue to stay tough." After winning the doubles point against a Division I opponent for the first time this season against Navy in the last match, Monday's contest marked the first time this season The Citadel won at No. 1 and No. 2 singles against a Division I opponent.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Monday
March 21, 2016
1a. Fritz Hollings earns prestigious Krause Center leadership award
From The Citadel in the 1940s, to the battlefields of World War II, to the office of Governor of South Carolina, and then the U.S. Senate, Ernest Frederick (Fritz) Hollings, has embodied the definition of leadership. For his service to the United States of America, to his fellow citizens, his fellow soldiers and his alma mater, Fritz Hollings was named as the recipient of one of The Citadel's most prestigious awards, the Krause Center Award for Distinguished Service, Leadership, and Ethics, during the 9th Annual Principled Leadership Symposium on campus. The award was accepted on his behalf by the Honorable Patrick Michael Duffy, The Citadel Class of 1965, Senior U.S. District Court Judge. Hollings provided a statement about the recognition. "This is a true honor and I am deeply grateful," Hollings said. "My years at The Citadel were formative and of crucial importance to my years of public service. I'm proud, as my late friend Pat Conroy said, to wear the ring." Hollings was nominated for the award by the Dean of The Citadel School of Humanities and Social Services, Winfred (Bo) Moore, Jr. "Senator Hollings has exemplified the courageous and principled leadership in service to others that the Krause Center for Leadership and Ethics seeks to make more common in American life," said Moore.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Monday
March 21, 2016
1b. The Citadel: Leadership Lessons through Tragedy
Former Charleston Mayor Joe Riley led a discussion at The Citadel's McAlister Field House. He and a panel of people who worked closely during the shooting at Emanuel AME offered insights, personal reflections and advice about how to lead during a crisis. Cadets, faculty and alumni listened to the different views about the group's experiences during the June 17 massacre that left nine people dead inside of that church. View the article to see more on the panel discussion.
Broadcast on: WCIV-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
March 21, 2016
2. Citadel alumnus pioneering stem cell treatment for ALS
Patrick Johnson, MD, is currently leading the world in stem cell research designed to help people with ALS, a devastating neurodegenerative disease that affects the brain and the spinal cord, causing the loss of voluntary muscles and invariably, death. His experience includes more than 7,000 surgical spine procedures. Johnson also developed innovative, computer- guided and minimally invasive surgical procedures for spinal disorders and has dedicated his entire career to researching and developing new methods of treating spinal illnesses, infections, congenital anomalies and deformities. He is the director of the Institute for Spinal Disorders, the director of Education, and the co-director of the Spine Stem Cell Research Program at Cedars Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, and he also holds an appointment with The Spine Center located at UC Davis Medical Center in Sacramento, California. Additionally, Johnson serves as the director for the California Association of Neurological Surgeons and the CEO and Chairman of the Board for the Spine Institute Foundation. Previously, he worked as the director of the UCLA Comprehensive Spine Center from 1993 - 2001. Johnson discussed his work, and his life, upon his induction into The Citadel Academy of Science and Mathematics in March of 2016.
Published in: TheDigitel.com
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Monday
March 21, 2016
3. 5th Annual Beautiful Bulldog Contest Scheduled for 3/14
Most dog owners think their pooch is the cutest and best canine in the world and for the fifth straight year The Citadel is giving them a chance to prove it. The 5th Annual Beautiful Bulldog Contest is set for Saturday, March 14th at Johnson Hagood Stadium. The event runs concurrently with The Citadel's spring football game. Award categories include Most Beautiful Bulldog, Best Costume, Best Physique, Best Coat/Markings, Best Smiler, and Miss Congeniality/Mr. Personality.
Published in: HolyCitySinner.com
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Monday
March 21, 2016
4. Trial to begin next week in lawsuit against Citadel by ReVille victim
Jury selection begins Monday in a lawsuit against The Citadel filed by a former camper once supervised by serial child molester Louis "Skip" ReVille. ReVille, a counselor at Citadel summer sports camps from 2001 to 2003, pleaded guilty in June 2012 to molesting 23 boys over several years. At least a half-dozen former campers have sued the military college on the grounds that the leadership knew about his offenses, did nothing to stop him and tried to cover up the problem. This is the first case to make it to trial, according to Gregg Meyers, attorney for the plaintiff, Camper Doe 6. The complaint was filed Sept. 9, 2013, and the camper alleges that ReVille sexually molested him on several occasions during the summer of 2003. It was ReVille's third summer as a counselor, and the suit claims that The Citadel's leadership knew he had sexually abused several other boys and should have fired him before he abused the camper. Furthermore, another counselor caught ReVille alone in a room rubbing ointment on the camper's leg, a policy violation that should also have resulted in ReVille's termination, according to the document.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
March 21, 2016
5a. Former President Bill Clinton talks about female Citadel graduate on C-SPAN
The young organizer for Hillary Diane, who made the digital pitch, she graduated from The Citadel in South Carolina. Now some of you may not know this, but it's a military school and it was the last bastion holdout against accepting women - so she is one tough, young woman who deserves our support.
Published in: C-SPAN
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Monday
March 21, 2016
5b. 3 Times Gender Equality was trivialized in the '90s
It's undeniable that the '90s can lay claim to some major advancements in gender equality. In 1993, the passing of the Family and Medical Leave Act gave men and women protected unpaid leave in the workplace to deal with family emergencies. In 1997, the Supreme Court ruled an equal number of men and women must participate in sports for schools to receive Title IX funding. But while moments like these were milestones, gender equality was also trivialized in the '90s, too. Despite the momentum gender equality was afforded by movements such as Third Wave Feminism, the decade wasn't all progress on the parity front. 1. Shannon Faulkner And The Citadel's Admission Policy - In 1993, a young woman from Powdersville, South Carolina applied for admission to the Citadel - one of the country's oldest, and historically all-male, military colleges. She was accepted, only to be rejected upon discovery of her gender. Following a successful lawsuit against the institution, she joined the otherwise all-male incoming corps of cadets in 1995. This was clearly a huge moment for gender equality. Unfortunately, though, not everyone viewed her acceptance as a victory - many people marginalized her admission, and some were downright hostile. A popular bumper sticker began circulating that snarked, "Save the Males, Shave the Whale." After only a week, Faulkner quietly resigned on the grounds of extreme emotional and psychological abuse. When she left, male cadets across campus openly celebrated. In 1996, however, the Supreme Court ruled that both Citadel and Virginia Military Institute must open admissions to women, so some good came out of the incident, too.
Published in: Bustle.com
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Monday
March 21, 2016
6a. Confederate flag does not belong in Citadel chapel
I am an African American member of the Take It Down Now Campaign. This noble effort was formed to bring the public's attention to the Confederate Naval Jack flag that currently hangs in Summerall Chapel, the house of worship at The Citadel the Military College of South Carolina. I am also a native son of the Palmetto State and a graduate of The Citadel, currently serving as an Episcopal priest in God's one, holy and catholic church. Like most of the world, I was deeply saddened by the nine murdered believers at Emanuel AME Church in Charleston last June. It is not happenstance that the perpetrator of this heinous act of terrorism has been pictured while adorned with the Confederate flag. I was similarly disturbed by the recent incident at The Citadel where underclassmen were pressed to array themselves with white hoods, invoking imagery resonant with the Ku Klux Klan. Given South Carolina's history one can reasonably infer that the Confederate Naval Jack was a symbol from which both of these incidents drew their twisted inspiration.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
March 21, 2016
6b. Letter: Medal of Honor Bowl a worthy game
For nearly a dozen years, people have tried to kill the idea of a Medal of Honor Bowl and to use it to advance political issues beyond our control. As a community-oriented 501(c)3 charity, we give free admission and honor to all members of the U.S. military - our veterans, wounded warriors, National Guard and our active duty military, who make sacrifices to protect our many freedoms. We also honor those precious few recipients (77) of the Medal of Honor. These are America's greatest living heroes, and the bowl game is the largest gathering of them outside of their annual national convention. Last year we provided more than $50,000 to help build a Medal of Honor museum here to inspire all Americans, especially schoolchildren. Volunteers promote this gallant effort. I volunteer my time, as well. We have no political agenda. Our mission is to benefit others. But we have become a pawn (some would say a hostage) as regards the Confederate Naval Jack in The Citadel's Summerall Chapel, even though we simply rent a stadium and practice fields. The economic impact of our game would likely exceed all others in the Charleston Area ($15-$22 million projection).
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
March 21, 2016
6c. William Moon leaving tangible legacy
William Moon III is leaving behind long-lasting symbols of his service to the Asheboro area. At just 18 years old, the Asheboro High School senior built a pergola for Mount Shepherd Retreat Center as his Eagle Scout project. For his senior project at AHS, he learned to weld and created a comet mascot from scrap metal to donate to his school. William is a National Honor Society student, served as a junior marshal last year, is a member of the AHS Marching and Jazz bands, and competes on the wrestling and lacrosse teams. Last summer he attended the American Legion Tar Heel Boys' State at Catawba College and the summer before went to a National Youth Leadership Forum at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. William said he and his father, Billy Moon, were inspired by the pergola near Asheboro City Hall for his Eagle project. In his spare time, William is an active Freemason. He said Jerry Grazier, a friend of the family, piqued his interest in the Masons. "We got it worked out and I joined last fall," William said. William is the only child of Billy and Sonya Moon. His grandparents are Hilda Rush Williams and Warner B. Williams, Frances Taliaferro and the late Bill Moon. He has been accepted at The Citadel Military College in Charleston, S.C., where he plans to prepare for a possible career in the Army.
Published in: The Courier-Tribune
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Monday
March 21, 2016
7a. The Citadel holds spring game under Thompson
The Citadel didn't wait until the end of spring practices to see its hard work paying off. The Bulldogs held their annual spring game Saturday in Charleston, South Carolina, as part of offseason preparations under first-year coach Brent Thompson. Their practices wrap up Thursday. Scoring was not kept at Johnson Hagood Stadium as the scrimmage lasted about an hour and a half. Redshirt freshman quarterback Jordan Black took the majority of snaps with the first and second units while returning starter Dominique Allen played a limited role. The Bulldogs coaching staff came away pleased by the defensive performance. The Citadel went 9-4 last season, earning a share of the Southern Conference title with a win over South Carolina to end the regular season. The Bulldogs were 13th in the final STATS FCS Top 25. Thompson was elevated from offensive coordinator to head coach after Mike Houston left to become James Madison's coach. Thompson's offense will return its top four rushers from a triple option set that ranked second in the FCS in rushing yards per game.
Published in: Fox Sports
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Monday
March 21, 2016
7b. Citadel football 'turns a corner' in spring practice
The Citadel offense had a hard time getting in the end zone in Saturday’s spring game, but new coach Brent Thompson said the Bulldogs turned a corner in spring practice in the last week. The first-team offense managed only a 32-yard field goal in the Blue-White spring game at Johnson Hagood Stadium, with starting quarterback Dominique Allen and the rest of the first-team offense and defense taking most of the second half off. Third-team QB Jalen Lampkin provided the only touchdown of the scrimmage on a 48-yard scamper against the third-team defense. "Little disappointed we didn't get in the end zone a little more often," said Thompson, who took over in January for departed coach Mike Houston. "But it was the 12th practice they've had to prepare for, and it's always tough in the spring game. We drove the ball at times and played a little bit of field position, which is kind of what we do, anyway." Nevertheless, Thompson said the Bulldogs turned a corner in the last week, from the 2015 squad that went 9-4 and won a share of the Southern Conference championship to the 2016 squad that faces a whole new slate of challenges.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
March 21, 2016
8a. The Citadel Clinches Series with 7-2 Win over Presbyterian
The Citadel baseball team took the weekend series from Presbyterian on Sunday with a 7-2 victory inside Joe Riley Park. Jacob Watcher got the start on the mound for the Bulldogs and worked a career-long 5.1 innings with four strikeouts to improve to 3-1 this season. The sophomore gave up a hit to the second batter in the game, and then retired 12 straight before allowing another hit in the fifth inning. Watcher's previous longest stint on the mound was 4.0 innings. Jordan Buster pitched 2.2 innings in relief and got The Citadel (9-11) out of two bases-loaded jams in consecutive innings. In the top of the sixth, the sophomore induced two fly outs to end the Blue Hose (11-8) scoring threat and then he ended the seventh by fanning the last batter. The staff combined for six strikeouts. Mike Deese recorded his first career triple in the contest in a two-for-five effort, plating two RBI and scoring a run. The contest also marked the sixth multiple-hit game this season for the senior. Austin Mapes recorded his second consecutive multi-hit game, going two-for-three with an RBI. Philip Watcher and Drew Ellis accounted for the other RBI, with Ellis launching his second home run this season in the bottom of the sixth. Jason Smith was called on to pinch run after Ben Peden reached base in the eighth inning and proceeded to steal second and third. With two bases swiped in the game, Smith is now a perfect five-for-five on stolen base attempts this season. The Bulldogs now hit the road for four straight away contests. The Citadel travels to USC Upstate on Tuesday at 6 p.m. and heads to VMI to open Southern Conference play Friday.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
March 21, 2016
8b. Bulldogs' Comeback Falls Short against Presbyterian
The Citadel baseball team's comeback attempt fell short to Presbyterian on Saturday as the Bulldogs dropped the second game of the series 7-6. The Citadel (8-11) had a chance to tie or win the game with runners on second and third and one out in the bottom of the ninth but two straight groundouts by the Bulldogs handed the Blue Hose (11-7) the win. Austin Mapes was a force at the plate for The Citadel going three-for-five with two doubles, two RBI and a run scored. William Kinney also had a stellar outing with the bat for the 'Dogs, going three-for-four with two RBI. The sophomore plated the last run the Bulldogs would score in the game on a double down the left field line with runners on first and third. Unlike the previous day's game, both teams combined for 24 hits with the Bulldogs tallying 11. Mike Deese scored two runs in the contest. Thomas Byelick tossed 6.0 innings in his fifth start of the season, striking out three and allowing eight hits. Philip Watcher was saddled with his first loss this year in 1.1 innings of work. The Bulldogs square off with the Blue Hose for the final game of the series at 1 p.m. on Sunday at Joe Riley Park.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
March 21, 2016
8c. The Citadel Takes 2-1 Pitching Duel over Presbyterian
The Citadel baseball team defeated Presbyterian 2-1 on Friday evening inside Joe Riley Park in a game that featured just seven hits between the two teams. JP Sears made his fifth start of the season on the mound for the Bulldogs and tossed a season-best 7.0 innings while giving up three hits. The three hits allowed are the second-fewest the sophomore righty has permitted this year and the fewest since March 4 when Sears held the College of Charleston to three. Zach Lavery finished off the game on the mound for The Citadel, throwing 2.0 perfect innings and facing six batters. The senior collected his fourth save of the season in the win. Offensively Mike Deese, Austin Mapes, Drew Ellis and Bret Hines recorded hits for the Bulldogs (8-10) who earned the game-winning run on a bases-loaded walk by Philip Watcher in the bottom of the seventh. The only others runs scored in the game came in the second inning when Steven Hansen hit a long fly ball to right field for a sacrifice fly and after Presbyterian hit a home run in the top of the inning. The 2-1 game was the second-lowest scoring contest of the season for the 'Dogs. The Citadel handed Presbyterian's Brian Kehner his first loss of the season in 6.1 innings of work.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
March 21, 2016
9. College signings: The Citadel
Other signings from Midlands athletes in recent weeks: -Swansea athlete Quaveon Cannon signed to play football at Bluefield College in Virginia. Cannon was fourth in the Midlands in rushing with 1,525 yards and nine touchdowns. -Brookland-Cayce defensive end Keyshawn James signed with The Citadel. James led B-C with 120 tackles and four sacks.
Published in: The State
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Friday
March 18, 2016
1. Haley on tragedies of last year: 'I look at 2015 as a year of faith'
Leadership in the face of unspeakable tragedies calls for a delicate balance of courage, compassion, and faith, South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley told The Citadel's Corps of Cadets on Thursday. As part of the military college's leadership series called Greater Issues, Haley touched on the shooting of Walter Scott, the killing of nine Emanuel AME Church members at a Bible study, the takedown of the Confederate flag, and the historic flooding of October that forced thousands from their homes and claimed the lives of more than a dozen people. "I have learned as a person that while most people look at 2015 as a year of tragedy, I look at 2015 as a year of faith. There is nothing that can prepare you for the tragedies we saw last year," she said. After the shooting death of Walter Scott, a black man, by a white North Charleston police officer during a traffic stop, Haley said what followed could have been a wildly different story of South Carolina. There had already been a number of other deadly interactions around the country between white police officers and black men that had sparked protests and even riots.
Broadcast on: WCIV-TV Charleston, SC
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Friday
March 18, 2016
2. Haley talks leadership, courage in vulnerable speech to Citadel
South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley revealed some of her most vulnerable leadership moments of 2015 Thursday morning. 2015 brought two very public shootings, the first, of motorist Walter Scott in April and the second, of nine parishioners at Mother Emanuel AME Church in June; as well as a thousand year flood in October. Each one tested the governor. "South Carolina didn't show one time. They didn't show two times. They showed three times what the heart and soul of this state looks like," she said at The Citadel's annual Principled Leadership Symposium. Haley said she relied on her husband the days leading up to the Confederate flag coming down at the State House in Columbia. At a Q&A portion of her address, cadets asked her to bring down another historic flag. "How do you feel about the Confederate Naval Jack hanging in Summerall chapel?" one cadet said. "Truthfully that flag belongs in your museum," Haley said in a response. "It can get the respect it deserves and everything that it needs if it's in a museum." Gun rights have also been a hot topic over the last year. Austin Lee asked Haley to change the conceal carry policy on campus and was met with applause. "Gen. Rosa and I discussed what the situation was for the cadets," Haley said. "I would suggest that y'all sit down and talk with him. I think what you'll find is a welcome ear listening to what you have to say," she said.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Friday
March 18, 2016
3. Citadel cadets ask Gov. Nikki Haley for help in loosening gun rules on campus
What was billed as a leadership speech by Gov. Nikki Haley at The Citadel quickly turned into a platform for cadets who want to keep guns in their cars. A school senior went right to the top Thursday, asking Haley to help change the campus policy that prohibits cadets with concealed-weapons permits from storing guns in their vehicles. The issue surfaced during a question-and-answer portion of the governor’s address. Cadet Austin Lee took to the microphone and told Haley that more than 1,100 students had signed a petition supporting the shift. According to Lee, Citadel policy conflicted with the state's permissible carry law. "My question for you is: Will you support our advocacy for this much-needed change?" Lee said to Haley as the assembled Corps of Cadets immediately erupted into whoops and clapping inside McAlister Field House. Haley noticed the uproar. There are "a lot of CWP owners here in the house, which is always a good thing," she answered. She said she'd had a conversation with school President Lt. Gen John Rosa earlier in the day about the gun question. If the cadets took their concerns to him, she said, they would have a "welcome ear." Haley was at The Citadel for the ninth-annual Principled Leadership Symposium. At issue is a wording conflict between the school's "Blue Book" conduct regulations and the state's gun laws. According to the school code, "regardless of possession of a concealed weapons permit," at no time may any personal firearm be stored in a personal vehicle parked anywhere on campus. Any weapons a cadet brings to school during the semester can be kept in school storage.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Friday
March 18, 2016
4. Lakeland students win Distinguished Delegation Award at Model NATOc
Eight Lakeland students traveled to Washington, D.C., to participate in the 31st annual International Model North Atlantic Treaty Organization Conference that was held in February. The Model NATO is a role-playing simulation of debates of the 28 members of NATO. This year marked Lakeland's 13th appearance at the conference. Twenty-two schools from North America and Europe participated and included: Northeastern University; L'Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium; University of Birmingham (United Kingdom); The Citadel, Military College of South Carolina; Royal Military College of Canada; Université Laval, Quebec; Universite du Quebec, Montreal; United States Air Force Academy; and the University of Texas at Austin. As in years past, Lakeland was the only community/two-year college represented. This year, Lakeland students represented the country of Latvia. Dr. Christopher Skubby, professor of political science, led students through a tour and meeting at the Latvian embassy where the Latvian deputy chief of mission and the defense counselor briefed them. Student delegates in attendance were Marissa Beller, Ryan Campbell, Grace Kalman, Ryan Merkel, Kyle Phillips, Dan Smith, Joseph Wittman and Krieg Wissinger. Six of the students received awards for their performances during the debates.
Published in: The News-Herald
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Friday
March 18, 2016
5. Dr. Mary Walker: The Only Woman to Win the Congressional Medal of Honor, Ahead of Her Time
One-hundred-thirty years to the day after Dr. Mary Walker was released from a Confederate prison, 19-year-old Shannon Faulkner was told by the U.S. 4th Circuit Court of Appeals that her quest to become the first female cadet at The Citadel, South Carolina's state supported military academy, would be delayed. It was a hurdle Walker would have recognized. She tried to crack the gender barrier of the United States Army, offering her skills as a physician at the outbreak of the Civil War. She followed a torturous path before acceptance came to her as the first and only woman to be awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor. And yet, late in her life, the medal was officially rescinded by an act of Congress. To her contemporaries, Walker was an eccentric: a woman who went to medical school, refused to take her husband's name when she was married and wore bloomers and pants her entire adult life. Walker attended the Syracuse Medical College in New York State, a two-year old school with nine local physicians on the faculty. The medical profession was still young in those days and medical schools varied widely in their educational practices and requirements for graduation. She completed the necessary three terms at Syracuse and graduated in 1855.
Published in: Fox & Hounds
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Friday
March 18, 2016
6. The Citadel to host spring game Saturday
The Citadel football team hosts its annual spring game on Saturday at 1 p.m. inside Johnson Hagood Stadium. The defending Southern Conference co-champions began spring practice on Feb. 23 and have been working through their NCAA-allotted 15 practices for the spring. The Bulldogs have two practices left after the spring game and will conclude spring ball on Thursday, March 24 prior to the college's spring break. Saturday's game is the first chance for fans to reserve their 2016 season tickets, and this year The Citadel has a commemorative item for those purchasing season tickets. The item will be unveiled for the first time at the spring game. For more information on season tickets, call The Citadel Athletic Ticket Office at 843-953-DOGS (3647). Admission to the spring game is free, and all fans in attendance will be provided a 2016 football schedule poster in addition to other giveaways.
Published in: Moultrie News
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Friday
March 18, 2016
7. Former Citadel, Clemson baseball player denies drug charges
A former Citadel and Clemson baseball player has pleaded not guilty to federal drug charges. Multiple media outlets reported that 26-year-old Bradley Lewis Felder entered the plea Tuesday in federal court in Columbia. Felder had been charged with conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute 50 grams or more of marijuana and the drug known as "molly." "Molly" is also referred to as MDMA and is a controlled substance. Felder was initially indicted last July and released on bond until a court found he was texting threats to a co-defendant. Felder's bond was revoked last month. Court records state that federal agents have seized more than $1.7 million from Felder. Felder is a Bowman native who played three years for The Citadel before transferring to Clemson for the 2012 season.
Published in: The Herald
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Thursday
March 17, 2016
1. The 2016 Citadel Palmetto Medal Awards
One of the highest awards presented by The Citadel will be given to three people who embody the college's definition of principled leaders. The Palmetto Medal Awards will be given to the following leaders during the 11a.m. dress parade on Saturday, March 19, as part of the festivities for this year's Corps Day Weekend. It is with great pride that The Citadel Board of Visitors will award the 2016 Palmetto Medal to Emmett Davis, Jr., Ph.D., Cadet Lt. Col. James McManus, and Cadet Lt. Col. Spencer Lukas. Read the article to learn more about this year's recipients.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Thursday
March 17, 2016
2. Changing the World - J. Patrick Johnson, MD, neurosurgeon
A member of The Citadel Class of 1978 and The Citadel Academy of Science and Mathematics - Patrick Johnson, MD, is currently leading the world in stem cell research designed to help people with ALS, a progressive and devastating neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord, causing the loss of voluntary muscles and invariably, death. His experience includes more than 7,000 surgical spine procedures. Johnson also developed innovative, computer-guided and minimally invasive surgical procedures for spinal disorders and has dedicated his entire career to researching and developing new methods of treating spinal illnesses, infections, congenital anomalies and deformities. He is the director of the Institute for Spinal Disorders, the director of Education, and the co-director of the Spine Stem Cell Research Program at Cedars Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, and he also holds an appointment with The Spine Center located at UC Davis Medical Center in Sacramento, California. Additionally, Johnson serves as the director for the California Association of Neurological Surgeons and the CEO and Chairman of the Board for the Spine Institute Foundation. Previously, he worked as the director of the UCLA Comprehensive Spine Center from 1993 - 2001. Johnson discussed his work, and his life, upon his induction into The Citadel Academy of Science and Mathematics in March of 2016.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Thursday
March 17, 2016
3a. Citadel cadets ask Gov. Haley for help in loosening gun rules on campus
A Citadel cadet used an appearance by Gov. Nikki Haley to advocate that school rules be loosened and that students be allowed to have their private guns on campus. Senior Austen Lee, during a question-and-answer period with the governor, spoke of a petition with a 1,000 cadets signatures on it seeking a change in campus rules regarding personal weapons. The concealed weapons rules at The Citadel are stricter that state law, Lee told the governor in front of an audience of several thousand, and that some cadets want that to change. Private guns currently have to be stored in the school's armory when students return, a cadet spokeswoman said. Haley was the guest speaker today at the school's Principled Leadership Symposium.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
March 17, 2016
3b. Marine Corps National Silent Drill team perform at The Citadel - Lt. Col. Tim Smith interviewed
Citadel cadets got a break from the daily grind. The U.S. Marine Corps put on a special performance at Summerall Field on The Citadel's campus. Photojournalist Dan Mission brings us some of the sights and sounds... "Being able to provide an example of the precision of fantastic marching and amazing drill is priceless to me for the Regimental Band and Pipes and our own drill team here at The Citadel," said Lt. Col. Timothy Smith, director of music. Click the article to view the entire interview and catch parts of the performance.
Broadcast on: WCIV-TV Charleston, SC
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Thursday
March 17, 2016
4. The Citadel Announces Edon Cadet Samuel Santa Rita As Class Of 2017 Summerall Guard
Earning the title Summerall Guard is one of the highest honors that can be achieved by a member of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets at The Citadel. Each winter, cadets who are juniors endure weeks of rigorous physical training and drilling in an attempt to be named a member of the famous platoon for their senior year. Consisting of 61 members, all of the Summerall Guards were chosen for their physical stamina and drill proficiency. The platoon's purpose is to exemplify, through a unique series of movements based on the old German close-order drill, the exactness and thoroughness with which a cadet is trained. The drill, which has never been written down, is performed to a silent count. Each year's platoon takes responsibility for teaching the precise drill to the upcoming unit. Samuel Santa Rita of Edon, Ohio, was among 60 other cadets selected to the Class of 2017 Summerall Guards. Membership is considered a high honor at the military college. Created in 1932, this unit has performed nationally at Disney World, the Cherry Blossom Festival in Washington, D.C., Mardi Gras in New Orleans and St. Patrick's Day in Savannah, Ga. The platoon is named for General Charles P. Summerall, former Chief of Staff of the U.S. Army and Citadel president from 1931 until 1953.
Published in: The Village Reporter
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Thursday
March 17, 2016
5. Regardless Who Wins In November, Freedom And Liberty Both Lose
Let us be clear. We are living, right now, in a time of emotional fear, hysterical anger, illogical demands, and dangerous temptations. In other words, liberty and prosperity are at risk. A decent and tolerant society is threatened. Common principles of humanity are being undermined. All of this is concentrated and has been brought to a head in the rhetorical clamor and campaign conflagrations of a presidential election year. To try to understand what is going on, a mountain of words have been spoken by serious think tank scholars, by Sunday morning talk show pundits, or by evening television news 15-second "in-depth" interpreters, as well as miles of written commentaries that have been offered in hardcopy or on the online media and blog sites. Pandering and Plundering Politicians, Left and Right - On the Democrat Party side, how can a corrupt, manipulative, lying, life-long power-lusting insider like Hillary Clinton be taken seriously and to be, seemingly, riding high to her party's presidential candidate? How can a self-proclaimed "democratic" socialist, who has praised and apologized for communist dictatorships in Latin America and who chose to honeymoon with his bride in the former Soviet Union, arouse the mass enthusiasm of millions who see him as the deliverer of a ransformative "political revolution" in America? Dr. Richard M. Ebeling is the BB&T Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel in Charleston, SC.
Published in: EpicTimes.com
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Thursday
March 17, 2016
6. Literary Festival begins Friday
9:30-9:50 a..m. - Mark Powell Powell is the author of four novels, most recently The Sheltering, the bronze medalist in the International Publishers Awards and the Florida Book Awards. He has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Breadloaf and Sewanee Writers' Conferences, and in 2014 was a Fulbright Fellow to Slovakia. A graduate of The Citadel, the University of South Carolina, and Yale Divinity School, he is an associate professor and the Heman fellow at Stetson University where he directs the Low-Residency MFA Program.
Published in: The Union Times
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Thursday
March 17, 2016
7. Bulldogs rally comes up short against Tigers, 5-4
One night after getting embarrassed on its home field, The Citadel gave Clemson everything the Tigers could handle at Riley Park, and then some. It was just the kind of bounce-back performance that Citadel coach Fred Jordan was looking for after Tuesday's 11-run loss. Clemson's Weston Wilson smacked a two-run single in the ninth inning to break a 3-3 tie, pushing the Tigers past The Citadel, 5-4, before a crowd of 4,689 at Riley Park. "We pitched tonight and we didn't pitch last night, and that will hurt you," Jordan said. "We got a couple of timely hits. I'm proud of the guys. These guys have showed up every day and are playing as hard as they can every game." It was exactly the kind of effort that Clemson coach Monte Lee has come to expect from the Bulldogs (7-10). Lee had seen enough gritty effort from The Citadel while he was the College of Charleston head coach.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
March 17, 2016
8. Covey signs Letter of Intent with The Citadel
Gunner Covey, a member of the Pickens High School football squad, has signed a National Letter of Intent to continue his playing career with the Bulldogs of The Citadel. Covey signed on March 11 with friends, family, coaches and faculty on hand to help celebrate. Covey, a leader out of the offensive backfield for the Blue Flame in the 2015 campaign, said he is excited to be joining a program such as The Citadel considering its success the last few years. The Citadel has made a run into the NCAA FCS Playoffs and had a crowning victory over the University of South Carolina Gamecocks last season. "We beat USC this season and play UNC this season and face Clemson the following year. The program gets an opportunity to play some great competition, but not only play, actually compete as well," Covey said. "Not only that, we play Western Carolina as well, which is the team my uncle coaches, so I'm looking forward to that. Hopefully we will be playing past Thanksgiving this coming season and making another run in the playoffs, just further this time." Football wasn't Covey's only consideration for accepting the offer from The Citadel, just one of many. Academics and school tradition also played a part in his decision making process. "I've heard people associated with the school say and use the slogan, '4 for 40', which means work and struggle for four years and there will be success for the next 40," Covey said. "When you graduate and get that ring, it's like a brotherhood and they take care of each other."
Published in: The Easley Progress
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Thursday
March 17, 2016
9. Ex-Citadel, Clemson baseball star facing federal drug charge
A former Citadel and Clemson outfielder who hit 25 home runs through his collegiate baseball career has been indicted on federal drug charges. Bowman native Bradley Felder, 26, pleaded not guilty in federal court Tuesday to the charge of conspiracy to distribute marijuana and the drug known as "Molly," according to court records. Felder was initially indicted in July 2015, but was indicted again on March 1. Court documents say federal agents seized nearly $1.8 million from Felder. Felder was out on $100,000 bond on the initial charge until a court found in February that he was sending threatening text messages to co-defendant Everett "Rhett" Berry, calling Berry a "rat." His bond was revoked earlier this year. He is now being held in the Lexington County Detention Center on a federal detainer.
Published in: The Times and Democrat
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Wednesday
March 16, 2016
1. The Marine Corps National Silent Drill team perform at The Citadel
The Marine Corps National Silent Drill Team Drum and Bugle Corps and Color Guard will be performing for the public at 11 a.m. today at Summerall Field at The Citadel.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Wednesday
March 16, 2016
2. New engineering graduate degrees will help shape local future
The Charleston area has more than its share of big thinkers. They have helped make this the country's No. 1 tourist destination - Vanity Fair's "America's Paris." We have watched with pride as people have recognized our community for the rare and beautiful gem that it is. In recent years, though, the Charleston area has attracted not only tourists, it has captured the attention of big business and industry. In fact, our community has become the manufacturing hotbed for dozens of domestic and foreign companies in advanced security, biomedical, transportation, aerospace, energy systems and advanced materials. At the same time, the Charleston area has quickly grown to become a leader in the tech growth field. With more than 200 tech companies, Charleston's tech economy is growing 26 percent faster than the national average - just as quickly as Silicon Valley... We need all hands on deck to solve this one. Clemson University, The Citadel, the College of Charleston, the Lowcountry Graduate Center, Charleston Southern University and the University of South Carolina have come together through collaboration to strengthen our graduate engineering and computer science degree and certificate programs.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
March 16, 2016
3. Mapping the floods
A new computer model of flooding will be able to show just how storm and tidal floods swamp individual properties, storm drains and sewer lines - and how it worsens as properties develop. The idea is to get people, businesses and governments to plan for it. That's no small thing in an area vulnerable to storm surge, expected to grow from more than 660,000 residents to more than 870,000 by 2040, and at a time when problem flooding days are increasing - from four per year to 23 since 1963 so far, according to a release from the S.C. Sea Grant Consortium. "We want to work with people at the local level on how they are going to address changes we're going to see in flooding in the next 20 years," said Rick DeVoe, Sea Grant Consortium director. The model will first be presented at stakeholder meetings involving interested groups, he said. It will be designed with a $510,319 National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration grant announced last week. Researchers from the College of Charleston, The Citadel and the University of South Carolina will take part, along with the Charleston Resilience Network and the consortium, according to the release. The network includes local, state, federal and various non-profit planning groups.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
March 16, 2016
4. SC high schools may shift to 10-point grade scale
The South Carolina department of education is considering bumping the current seven-point grading scale to a ten-point grading scale for next school year. The potential change is an effort to level the playing field with other students and student athletes competing for scholarships. Some students say they make the same grades as those in other states, but South Carolina's current seven-point scale is why they're missing out on scholarships. "My GPA sits at about a 3.5 right now," said Sawyer Bridges, a Summerville High School baseball player committed to the University of South Carolina next year. "It's so competitive, everybody is fighting for those scholarships." Bridges says a shift to a ten-point grading scale would have made a big difference for him. "I know if I was on a ten point scale, some of my B's would have been A's, some of my C's would have been B's, so I could have had almost a 4.0 which completely changes things when you talk about scholarships," he said. Bridges teammate, Bo Goban is committed to play baseball for The Citadel. He feels he was beat out for some scholarship opportunities because of the current seven-point GPA scale.
Broadcast on: WCIV-TV Charleston, SC
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Wednesday
March 16, 2016
5. Lawyer: Lawsuit over segregated monument shouldn't proceed
Some American Legion members in South Carolina who went to court to right an old racial wrong shouldn't be allowed to press their case, a lawyer for a top state political leader said Tuesday. In the small city of Greenwood, a World War I memorial erected decades ago still lists the community's fallen soldiers separately, as "colored" and "white." The mayor wanted to change that and list them alphabetically, but he couldn't because of a state law, passed in 2000 amid furor over removing the Confederate flag from the Statehouse dome. The law requires two-thirds approval of the General Assembly to change any historical monument in the state. Last year, five American Legion members went to court to challenge that law. But at a hearing Tuesday in Greenwood, an attorney for House Speaker Jay Lucas said the groups shouldn't be allowed to overturn the law commonly referred to as the Heritage Act simply because they don't have the political power to get a bill through the Legislature. Derfner also said the Legislature has become a bottleneck, pointing out it would not allow the Citadel to take down a Confederate flag from a chapel even through the board running the military college voted to move it. The American Legion members filed their lawsuit after South Carolina's Legislature voted last summer to remove the Confederate flag from the Statehouse grounds entirely. The lawmakers' move had two-thirds support, required under the Heritage Act.
Published in: The Seattle Times
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Wednesday
March 16, 2016
6. Clemson, Monte Lee make victorious return in 12-1 win at Citadel
The last time Clemson played The Citadel in Charleston, Tigers baseball coach Monte Lee was barely a teenager, and Riley Park was hardly a gleam in Joe Riley's eye. Playing at The Citadel for the first time since 1990 - and against the Bulldogs at Riley Park for the first time - Clemson took a 12-1 victory over the Bulldogs before a largely orange-clad crowd of 5,524 on Tuesday night. Weston Wilson drove in four runs and Andrew Cox blasted a three-run home run to back the pitching of Clemson starter Jake Higginbotham as the Tigers improved to 12-3. The Citadel (7-9) will host Clemson again at 6 p.m. Wednesday. "Monte's got a very good ball club," said Citadel coach Fred Jordan, whose team could manage just three hits. "They are very sound defensively. We didn't throw enough strikes, and they took advantage of it. The middle of their lineup is very impressive."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
March 16, 2016
The Citadel Hosts Navy Wednesday
The Citadel tennis team returns home to host Navy on Wednesday after splitting two road matchups Sunday. The Bulldogs (8-17) earned an 8-1 victory over Oglethorpe in Atlanta and dropped a 6-1 decision at Alabama on Sunday. The win at Oglethorpe gave The Citadel eight wins this season, which are tied for the most in a season for the Bulldogs since 2008. Artemie Amari enters Wednesday's contest on a three-match winning streak that was extended with his 3-6, 7-5, 1-0 (9) win at No. 2 against the Crimson Tide. Amari's victory was the first individual win for a Bulldog over an SEC opponent since 2010 and the first at No. 1 or No. 2 singles since 2007. The sophomore from New York, New York, leads the team with 10 doubles victories and is tied for second among Bulldogs with nine singles wins. Freshman Michael Anzalone leads the team with 10 singles victories courtesy of five wins at No. 5 and five at No. 6 in the lineup. Fellow freshmen Matthew Henson and Roy Hobson each have nine wins in singles play, with seven of Henson's victories coming at the No. 3 position. Sophomore Nicholas Bradley has appeared in all but one match this season, playing exclusively at No. 1 and No. 2 in the singles lineup, and has collected eight victories.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Tuesday
March 15, 2016
1. Inside the Black Market for Fake Green Cards
Finding a fake green card isn't difficult. I know this because after a half-hour of looking online, I was already emailing with someone who said they could make one for me. The response came in seconds from a Gmail account. "Yes, we are capable of providing you with the green card, but the cost will depend on how soon you will need the green card." The email described two tiers of service: I could get the counterfeit green card in four days for $180 plus $55 in postage. If I wanted rush service-a two-day guarantee-I'd have to pay $280. Both prices seemed like a steal compared to my legitimate green card (I'm Australian, married to an American), which cost me more than $1,500 and weeks of DIY paperwork to avoid expensive legal fees, which can easily run into the thousands. For some people, it takes months or years to achieve permanent resident status. And what do you win once you get that coveted green ID card? The ability to legally work anywhere that will hire you, freedom to travel across US borders, and the option of applying for some types of government aid-all benefits citizens take for granted, but is incredibly important for immigrants trying to live in the US... The counterfeit green card market exploded in 1986, when Congress passed the Immigration Reform and Control Act, which made it illegal to hire those who don't have work permission in the US, according to Roy Fenoff, an assistant professor at the Department of Criminal Justice at the Citadel, South Carolina. "At that time, the [real] cards were not that high-quality," Fenoff said, which made for an easy counterfeiting job.
Published in: VICE.com
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Tuesday
March 15, 2016
2. Things to Do Tuesday, March 15, 2016
Healthcare Management & Community Wellness Open House What: This open house will offer suggestions on how to advance your career with a graduate certificate or master's degree with classes at the Lowcountry Graduate Center, as well as an opportunity to visit with representatives from MUSC, The Citadel, College of Charleston, USC and South Carolina State University. When: 5-7 p.m. Where: Lowcountry Graduate Center, 3800 Paramount Drive, North Charleston Price: Free
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
March 15, 2016
3. Military Academy Day set for April 2 in Ashburn
The 10th annual Congressional District Military Academy Day will be held on Saturday, April 2 from 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. at the Loudoun County Public School Administration building, located at 21000 Education Court, Ashburn, according to an announcement by the office of Rep. Barbara Comstock. The event is free and open to all students, parents and guidance staff who are interested in learning more about the nation's service academies. "To keep America's fighting force the best in the world our military service academies must recruit the finest young men and women to be our nation's future leaders," said Congresswoman Comstock. "The 10th Congressional District Military Academy Day will bring those students who have an interest in serving their country together to meet with these prestigious institutions as they embark on a journey of service to their country." Representatives from all of the service academies - Army, Navy, Air Force, Merchant Marine and Coast Guard - will be in attendance. Representatives from the Marine Corps ROTC program, the Virginia Army National Guard, Virginia Military Institute, the Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets and The Citadel have also been invited. Additionally, the American Legion and Randolph-Macon Academy will be represented.
Published in: Ashburn Patch
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Tuesday
March 15, 2016
4. Clemson's Chase Pinder provides power atop Tigers' lineup
Chase Pinder is not fitting his job description as expected. "Batting leadoff, you've got to take pitches, you've got to let other people see the balls and what this (pitcher) has," said Clemson's sophomore center fielder. "It's a little different, but it's working out." What's a little different is the most diminutive Tiger in coach Monte Lee's lineup is brutalizing baseballs to the tune of five home runs through 14 games. The 5-10, 185-pound Pinder sent three pitches flying out of Doug Kingsmore Stadium in his first four games - including back-to-back at-bats Feb. 26 in a win over James Madison - then took a slow jog around the diamond last weekend vs. South Carolina in Greenville and another Friday at Wake Forest. "He is a pull hitter. He can catch up to a good fastball," Lee said. "If you throw the ball middle, middle-in, he can get the head out and pull it, and so far he's run a few balls out of the park.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
March 14, 2016
1. Attacks on The Citadel's Confederate flag misplaced
If you saw that crazy story out of The Citadel last week, you might have thought it was from a Pat Conroy novel. The military college reported that campus police had arrested a man trying to get into Summerall Chapel late at night to - what else? - tear down the Confederate flag. Torrence Forney, class of '93, led public safety on a rousing chase across campus before he was nabbed. They charged him with failure to stop for a blue light, reckless driving and disorderly conduct. If that wasn't enough, as they were taking Forney away, he told the officers to "tell Gen. Rosa to come see me and take it down now." And therein lies the problem - one The Citadel does not need, nor deserve. There is a lot of hand-wringing over that Confederate flag in The Citadel's chapel, and has been for years. The part that some folks, including Forney, apparently miss is that this is not The Citadel's call. Gen. John Rosa, The Citadel Board of Visitors and the school's alumni group all want the flag removed. The City Council voted Tuesday in support their position. Well, you might ask, what's stopping The Citadel from just going ahead and doing what Forney was attempting? The state Legislature.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
March 14, 2016
2. Former college football player turns to opera for a career change
Morris Robinson went into corporate sales after playing college football, but that wasn't where he was meant to be. He discovered opera in his late 20s, and even with no formal training, he decided it wasn't too late to start a new career. TODAY's Craig Melvin reports.
Published in: Today.com
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Monday
March 14, 2016
3a. Carpenter, professor collaborate on erosion control experiment
A carpenter and a Citadel professor have teamed up to test a novel way to protect beachfront property. Deron Nettles of Mount Pleasant had the notion for a plastic wall that absorbed wave energy but allowed water and sand to pass through. The concept came to him while he was pondering a solution to erosion at his parents' Sullivan's Island home. "I just like working with my hands and came up with this idea. It's definitely more aesthetically pleasing than sand bags," he said. Nettles consulted Dr. Timothy Mays, an earthquake engineer at The Citadel. They collaborated on a flexible "wave energy dissipation system" being tested at four locations. "The results have been really good," Mays said. South Carolina bans hard erosion-control structures, such as concrete seawalls. Renourishment projects that pump sand from the sea back to the shore often cost millions of dollars and involve a lengthy permitting process. Sandbags may be used in emergency situations, but the experimental wave wall could be another option for beachfront homeowners if environmental regulators approve it.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
March 14, 2016
3b. Requiem for a Gangster
Sam "Beyah" Christian died last Sunday without so much as a single headline to note his passing. Two weeks shy of age 77, he had been in declining health and was living in a local nursing home. He happened to be one of the most feared gangsters in the history of Philadelphia. Christian was the founder of the city's notorious Black Mafia, and under his leadership in the mid-1960s through the '70s, its members operated a complex criminal enterprise wholly separate from the Italian Mob: numbers-running, drug trafficking, extortion and prostitution. Later, they'd develop high-level moneymaking schemes, tapping politicians for a cut of the windfall of federal funds pouring into impoverished areas. In consolidating power, Christian and his followers left a bloody trail of more than 40 bodies, including the decapitated head of a noncompliant drug dealer outside a North Philadelphia bar and the sawed-off hands of another dope peddler. Sean Patrick Griffin is the head of the Department of Criminal Justice at the Citadel in Charleston, S.C., and the author of Black Brothers, Inc.: The Violent Rise and Fall of Philadelphia's Black Mafia.
Published in: PhillyMag.com
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Monday
March 14, 2016
5b. Visalia educator recalls late author Pat Conroy as Citadel classmate
Friends of Visalia resident Frank Linik have been giving him newspaper clippings of obituaries about Pat Conroy, author of "Prince of Tides" and "The Great Santini." "We were classmates at The Citadel," Linik said. The Citadel is a military college in South Carolina. Linik, a retired educator, said they were in different battalions so they weren't close friends, but knew each other because it was a small school. "What I remember most about him is basketball," Linik said. "We'd go to watch the game to get out of study hall. I remember watching him and enjoying watching him play." Conroy played a position that today would be called point guard, under a coach who was ahead of his time and foresaw how the position would grow in importance, he said. Classmates knew Conroy was destined for a career in words. "Everybody there said, 'Someday Pat's going to be a writer,'" Linik said. Conroy famously wrote a poem for the school magazine that disparaged upperclassmen. Linik remembers it well.
Published in: The Fresno Bee
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Monday
March 14, 2016
9a. Bulldogs Dominate in Series-Opening Win over Elon
The Citadel baseball team breezed past Elon on Friday afternoon in Elon, North Carolina, for the 13-8 win. The Bulldogs (7-6) exploded for seven runs in the seventh inning to blow the contest wide open and take the first game of the series behind 10 hits. Elon (6-8) jumped out to an early 2-0 lead in the first inning but Stephen Windham helped the 'Dogs take their first lead of the game with a three-run bomb to center field. The Phoenix then scored three runs in the next two innings to take a 5-3 lead into the fifth but that was the last time Elon would lead in the game as the Bulldogs rallied for 10 runs in the last five innings of the game. The home runs in the third and seventh innings were the first of the season for both Windham and Clay Martin. The Bulldogs left just six runners on base compared to Elon's 14, tallied four doubles in the game and drew nine walks. JP Sears got the start on the mound for the Bulldogs and struck out six in 5.0 innings of work. Ryan Stamler picked up his first win of the season, working a hitless frame in the sixth inning. Kyle Smith and Zach Lavery also pitched for the Bulldogs, finishing with nine Ks as a staff.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
March 14, 2016
9b. The Citadel falls 5-3 to Elon on Saturday
The Citadel baseball team dropped the second game of its three-game series at Elon on Saturday afternoon 5-3. Thanks to three consecutive singles in the fifth inning, Elon (7-8) struck first and took a 3-0 lead but the Bulldogs answered quickly with a run in the sixth and two in the seventh inning to tie the game up at 3-3. The Phoenix then tacked on two more runs in the eighth inning to take the lead for good. The Bulldogs (7-7) had once last chance to send the game to extra innings with runners on the corners in the top of ninth thanks to a double by William Kinney and a single by Clay Martin, but The Citadel was unable to push the runs across and dropped the second game of the series. Jordan Buster was dealt his first loss of the season. Bret Hines led the Bulldogs with three hits including two doubles and Austin Mapes recorded two hits of his own. As a team, the 'Dogs had 10 hits in the contest and continue to do their damage in the latter half of the game with 39 of their 68 total runs this season coming in the sixth, seventh and eighth innings.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Friday
March 11, 2016
3c. Riley to start work at CofC this summer
Former Charleston Mayor Joe Riley is joining the College of Charleston staff on July 1, according to a news release. He will serve as executive in residence at the Joseph P. Riley Jr. Center for Livable Communities, which was named for the mayor in 2001. Riley will assist with the development of an advisory board, work with the college to engage with the community on sustainability issues, work with student ambassadors, guest lecture to classes and serve as an adviser on outreach projects, the release said. "Having devoted much of my professional life to issues such as historic preservation, urban design and city planning, I'm thankful for this opportunity to share some of the lessons I've learned along the way," Riley said in the release. "I'm especially grateful that I'll be able to discuss topics about which I am passionate while standing on a campus that exemplifies Charleston's national reputation for historic preservation." The College of Charleston's Addlestone Library and Special Collections are working with the city to archive Riley's papers, which are expected to be stored in the new Gaillard Center, the release said. In addition to working at the College of Charleston, Riley is guest lecturing in several political science courses at The Citadel. As an endowed chair of American government and public policy at the military college, he is also mentoring students, writing his memoir, being interviewed for an oral history of his life and career and helping arrange guest lectures.
Published in: Charleston Regional Business Journal - online
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Friday
March 11, 2016
4a. Who will take the crown from Brutus Miller in the 2016 Beautiful Bulldog Contest?
Showcasing their unique beauty, the 6th Annual Beautiful Bulldog contest will be held Saturday, March 19 at Johnson Hagood Football Stadium during The Citadel's Corps Day weekend springst-patricks-day-beautiful-bulldog-2015 football game In 2016 Brutis Miller took the crown, and soon dozens of bulldogs will be primping and preening as they compete for the top spot in the Beautiful Bulldog Contest. Inspired by The Citadel's beloved mascots, General Robert P. Carson and Boo X, the contest was started by The Citadel Football Association as a way to unite bulldog lovers from around the South, and raise money for the college's mascot program which is solely funded by donations. The contest and the game are both free to attend and open to the public. The schedule for the contest is as follows: -11:30 a.m. Check-in at the concourse under the home side stands -Noon Judging -1:00 p.m. Complimentary lunch for dog owners -1:30 p.m. Beauty pageant and winners crowned during halftime of the Blue-White spring football game beautiful-bulldog-2015 This year's categories are Best Smiler, Best Coat and Markings, Best Physique, Best Costume, Miss Congeniality, Mr. Personality, and Most Beautiful Bulldog. Citadel Football Association sponsors the event each year and also applies some of the funds raised to its scholarship program. Dogs must be registered online in advance here in order to compete. The registration fee is $50 and the event is limited to 40 bulldogs. Check in begins at 11:30 a.m. and the full schedule is here.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom - Website
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Friday
March 11, 2016
4b. The Citadel Corps Day at Johnson Hagood Stadium, March 19
The Citadel is preparing for its 173rd Corps Day and once again, it includes the Spring Football Game, showcasing the 6th Annual Beautiful Bulldog Contest. Admission is Free for both events and visitors are welcomed. The beautiful bulldog contest will be held at 12 noon and the football game starts at 1pm. The highest award provided will be Most Beautiful Bulldog and also winners in the following other categories that include Best Smiler, Best Coat/Markings, Best Physique and Miss Congeniality/Mr. Personality. A separate contest for Best Costume is also held.
Published in: Baret News Wire - online
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Friday
March 11, 2016
4c. It could take the luck of the Irish to beat Brutus at the Beautiful Bulldog Contest
Register now for The Citadel's 6th Annual Beautiful Bulldog Contest to try to beat last year's winners. The fun family event attracts hundreds of people who enjoy visiting with the friendly, and sometimes colorfully costumed, bulldog contenders. The contest is part of The Citadel Bulldogs spring football game, sponsored by The Citadel Football Association in conjunction with Corps Day Weekend. The 2015 winner was Brutus Miller (not pictured). The game and the contest are free and all are welcome to enjoy the festivities at Johnson Hagood Stadium. There is a fee to register a bulldog to compete for one of many titles which include: -Best Smile -Best Coat/Markings -Best Physique -Miss & Mr. Congeniality -Best Costume -Most Beautiful Bulldog Check-in for contestants begins at 11:30 at the concourse under the stadium. The judging begins at noon. Kickoff for the game is at 1p.m. The winning contestants will be announced and will take the field during halftime of the Blue-White spring Bulldogs football game. Proceeds go toward scholarships.
Published in: The Digitel - website
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Friday
March 11, 2016
5a. Pat Conroy's funeral was both a time of mourning and reunion
Long before Pat Conroy was a giant of letters, whose words landed on the page as gracefully as Spanish moss drapes live oaks in the Lowcountry, he was a bare-headed lad enduring Hell Week and other delights of knob year at The Citadel. Then, he was a cadet with a priceless piece of gold on his hand. Conroy died Friday at 70, not long after revealing he had pancreatic cancer. Hundreds attended a visitation Monday night, including his longtime editor, Nan A. Talese, who said he was more than 150 pages into a new novel that someday will be published. Another capacity crowd attended his funeral Tuesday, and prime real estate in St. Peter's Catholic Church, right behind family members, was allotted to a special group of Citadel graduates.
Published in: Atlanta Journal-Constitution - online
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Friday
March 11, 2016
6. Citadel names Griles to Summerall Guards
Andrew Griles, of Keysville, was among 60 cadets selected to the Class of 2017 Summerall Guards at The Citadel. Earning the title Summerall Guard is one of the highest honors that can be achieved by a member of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets at The Citadel. Each winter, cadets who are juniors endure weeks of rigorous physical training and drilling in an attempt to be named a member of the famous platoon for their senior year. Consisting of 61 members, all of the Summerall Guards were chosen for their physical stamina and drill proficiency. The platoon's purpose is to exemplify, through a unique series of movements based on the old German close-order drill, the exactness and thoroughness with which a cadet is trained. The drill, which has never been written down, is performed to a silent count. Membership is considered a high honor at the military college. Created in 1932, this unit has performed nationally at Disney World, the Cherry Blossom Festival in Washington, D.C., Mardi Gras in New Orleans and St. Patrick's Day in Savannah, Ga. The platoon is named for Gen. Charles P. Summerall, former chief of staff of the U.S. Army and Citadel president from 1931 until 1953.
Published in: The Farmville Herald - online
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Friday
March 11, 2016
7a. Litchfield Co., Deercreek announce partnership
Royce King is coming home. The president and owner of Litchfield Company Real Estate LLC, the Summerton native is bringing his business to Clarendon County. Litchfield and Deercreek at Wyboo announced Tuesday that the companies have reached a sales and marketing agreement, along with the opening of a sales center in the Wyboo community. "We're going to be providing the sales and marketing expertise for Deer Creek," said King. "We have now opened an office there, and Beth Hinson Phillips will be the sales manager in this location. With our sales team in place to support the efforts there, we will try to help them market the homes at Deer Creek." He said the Deercreek at Wyboo Sales Center will operate as the Wyboo Community Satellite Office of The Litchfield Company, which will also offer its real estate services to homeowners in the Wyboo community from this sales center, 2538 Players Course Drive in Manning. King will serve as the broker-in-charge for the Wyboo Community Satellite Office. After high school graduation, King attended The Citadel, and then received a master's degree in business administration from the University of Toledo. He served in the U.S. Marine Corps, becoming a Vietnam veteran, as a hospital corpsman. As president and owner of The Litchfield Company - which was founded in 1956 - Royce provides "team building leadership for the sales executives and staff," he said, a role he has carried for 21 years. His management efforts have positioned the company as an industry leader with offices in Pawleys Island, Murrells Inlet and Charleston. The company takes its name from its first development in the Pawleys Island area.
Published in: Manning Live - online
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Friday
March 11, 2016
7b. Military news
Thomas Lang and Nicolas Noga have made the 2017 Summerall Guard at The Citadel in South Carolina. Earning this title is one of the highest honors that can be achieved by a cadet. Each winter, cadets who are juniors endure weeks of physical training and drilling in an attempt to be named a member of the famous platoon for their senior year. The competitions for the newest guards were completed Feb. 24. Consisting of 61 members, all of the Summerall Guards were chosen for their physical stamina and drill proficiency. The platoon's purpose is to exemplify, through a unique series of movements based on the old German close-order drill, the exactness and thoroughness with which a cadet is trained. The drill, which has never been written down, is performed to a silent count. Each year's platoon takes responsibility for teaching the precise drill to the upcoming unit. The guards will perform publicly together for the first time on Corps Day, March 19.
Published in: New Milford Spectrum - online
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Friday
March 11, 2016
8. Charleston RiverDogs to add 6,000-square-foot, $3 million club level at Riley Park
With the start of their 20th anniversary season at Riley Park just a few weeks away, the Charleston RiverDogs are planning a significant addition to the ballpark the minor league baseball team shares with The Citadel. A new 6,000-square foot, $3 million club level will be available for fans during games and for banquets, weddings and other events year-round beginning in February of 2017. "It will give us the feel and impression of a more modern facility," RiverDogs President and General Manager Dave Echols said. "Venues being built now are including something like this. It will just enhance the beautiful aspects of our ballpark. I'm real excited. We think the event use will be off the charts." The Goldklang Group, which owns the RiverDogs and three other minor league baseball teams, will finance the addition, after reworking the next 10-years of a lease with the City of Charleston. The Goldklang Group also plans to work with the city on construction of a boardwalk to completely circle Riley Park, including views from above the outfield fences. While groups can buy access to the club level for games, season ticket holders that pay for a premium package will be able to take advantage of the daily buffet prepared by top Charleston caterers, Echols said. The current suite level will remain. Echols expects the club level to open for 100 non-baseball events throughout the year. The Citadel is not part of the club level development plan. "We will work out an arrangement with the Citadel," Goldklang said. "How it will work, we're not sure yet."
Published in: The Post and Courier - online
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Thursday
March 10, 2016
1. Former FBI special agent to lead Intelligence and Security Studies at The Citadel
One of the nation's leading security experts and a former FBI special agent is the director of the new intelligence and security studies program at The Citadel. Carl J. Jensen, III, Ph.D., will lead the new master's program which will be housed under the Department of Criminal Justice in the School of Humanities and Social Sciences. Jensen, a 1978 graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy, served in the Navy for five years before graduating from FBI New Agent Training and serving as a field agent in Atlanta, Monterey, California and Youngstown, Ohio. Throughout his career with the FBI, Jensen served as a racketeering records examiner and reported to the Behavioral Science Unit in Quantico, Virginia, where he instructed senior police officials, conducted research and provided consultation for cases. Upon his retirement in 2006, Jensen joined the RAND Corporation as a senior behavioral scientist and in 2007, he joined the University of Mississippi, where he served as an associate professor and director of the Center for Intelligence and Security Studies. "Dr. Jensen has already made significant contributions to the intelligence and security studies program at The Citadel," said Bo Moore, Dean of Humanities and Social Sciences. "His over 20 years of experience in the FBI and as founding director of the Intelligence Community Center of Academic Excellence at the University of Mississippi are proving invaluable to our students as they take the next step in furthering their career with an advanced degree."
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Thursday
March 10, 2016
2a. Coastal Flood Resiliency to be bolstered by NOAA award to S.C. Sea Grant
Citadel professors W. Jeff Davis and Simon Ghanat to be co-principal investigators for grant. A grant awarded to the S.C. Sea Grant Consortium (Consortium) on behalf of the Charleston Resilience Network (CRN) will help community leaders plan for and adapt to the area's increasing flood challenges. The $510,319 Regional Coastal Resilience Grant from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to the Consortium "will support the development of more robust and localized flooding models that can be used to plan infrastructure improvements in the Charleston, S.C. region," according to Rick DeVoe, executive director of the Consortium and program manager of the award. Researchers from College of Charleston, University of South Carolina and The Citadel will partner with the CRN and the Consortium on the three-year project. The non-federal match of $255,569 brings the total grant award to $765,887. The mapping will focus down to the individual parcel level to examine the ability of the fast-growing, low-lying community to absorb flood impacts and build resiliency to flooding. This is important as people flock to the area as the Charleston economy builds on its expanding tourism, research, technology and manufacturing sectors.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Thursday
March 10, 2016
2b. Grant will help Charleston area plan for sea level rise
A federal grant of more than a half-million dollars will help the Charleston area better prepare for the effects of sea level rise. Rick DeVoe, the executive director of the South Carolina Sea Grant Consortium, said in a release the grant comes from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It will help develop better flooding models so area governments can plan future infrastructure improvements while accounting for rising sea levels. A local match to the grant means that more than $750,000 will be spent on the three-year project. Researchers from the University of South Carolina, The Citadel and the College of Charleston are working with the consortium and the Charleston Resilience Network on the effort. The Resilience Network is a private-public partnership started in 2014.
Published in: The News & Observer
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Thursday
March 10, 2016
3. Citadel releases video of grad's pursuit across campus
The Citadel today released a video of the pursuit and arrest of a graduate early Friday on charges he led police on a chase through campus. Torrence Dwyle Forney, 44, of Hashem Drive in Charlotte was charged with failure to stop for a blue light, reckless driving and disorderly conduct. He was booked into the Charleston County jail and released on $1,774 bail. Forney, a 1993 graduate and former football team captain, said he was opposed to a Confederate flag in the school's Summerall Chapel. According to the incident report from Citadel Public Safety, officers were notified around 2:15 a.m. that a man playing loud music in his vehicle was asking questions about the campus and appeared to be intoxicated. An officer found the man, later identified as Forney, in front of Summerall Chapel and pulled in behind him. Forney jumped back in his vehicle and took off.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
March 10, 2016
4. Citadel 'Take It Down Now' campaign targets Medal of Honor Bowl over Confederate flag
As pressure grows for The Citadel to remove the Confederate naval jack hanging in Summerall Chapel on the military school's campus, a group of Citadel alumni is targeting the Medal of Honor Bowl. Members of the "Take It Down Now" campaign have written a letter to NCAA president Mark Emmert, requesting that the NCAA "withdraw any support for the proposed Medal of Honor Bowl until the Confederate Naval Jack flag is removed from Summerall Chapel." The removal of the Confederate flag from Statehouse grounds in Columbia last year cleared the way for the NCAA to lift its ban on pre-determined events in South Carolina. In turn, the Medal of Honor Bowl announced its intention to switch from a college football all-star game to a standard bowl game pitting two NCAA FBS teams. But members of the "Take It Down Now" group, which includes many former Citadel athletes, say that the Confederate flag in Summerall Chapel must come down, as well. The Citadel's Board of Visitors has voted to remove the flag, but the state's Heritage Act prevents its removal without approval from the state legislature.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
March 10, 2016
5. The most unusual thing about Mike Bloomberg's shuttered campaign preparations
Mike Bloomberg's presidential campaign-that-never-was had put together a few dozen strategists and staffers. It had set up campaign offices in two states. It had produced television ads calling the former New York mayor and financial media titan "no nonsense, non-ideological, centrist, results-oriented." The New York Times reported it all following Bloomberg's announcement that he would not run because of the risk it created of Donald Trump being elected. But the most interesting detail about the billionaire's preparations was who Bloomberg was reportedly going to ask to be his running mate...Had Bloomberg entered the campaign, and had Mullen been on the ticket, he would have had few peers. While many running mates have been veterans of the armed forces, only two other candidates for vice president in the modern, post-World War II era have been generals, admirals or other career military leaders. And they both ran as independents. The most recent was U.S. Navy vice admiral James Stockdale, who was Ross Perot's running mate in 1992. He had retired from the Navy in 1979 and then worked at Stanford University's Hoover Institution, a conservative think tank. He was a Vietnam War hero who was tortured -- the highest-ranking naval officer held as a prisoner of war in North Vietnam; he had also been president of the Naval War College and briefly, The Citadel. Readers of leadership guru Jim Collins will recall his description of the "Stockdale Paradox," the concept of combining realism with optimism to survive extraordinary difficulty.
Published in: Washington Post
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Thursday
March 10, 2016
6. Trident Technical College president Mary Thornley headlines speaker series
In recognition of National Women's History Month, the College of Charleston's Office of Institutional Diversity will host Trident Technical College President Mary Thornley for a keynote presentation on March 18, 2016. Part of the Office of Institutional Diversity and Inclusion Signature Speaker Series, the event takes place at 6 p.m. in the School of Education, Health, and Human Performance's Alumni Center, located at 86 Wentworth St. The event is free and open to the public. Thornley has been president of Trident Technical College since 1991. She holds associate and bachelor's degrees from Mars Hill College, a master's of teaching degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a doctorate of education in curriculum and instruction from the University of South Carolina. She was awarded an honorary degree from the College of Charleston in 2013... Among the many awards and recognitions Thornley has received are the Service and Leadership Award for Promoting Access and Equity in Higher Education from the South Carolina Commission on Higher Education; the Southeast Region Chief Executive Officer Award from the Association of Community College Trustees; the Trident United Way Women’s Leadership Award; The Citadel's School of Business Leadership of Principal Award; the Charleston Regional Business Journal's Influential Women in Business Award; the Free Enterprise Foundation Ethics and Civics Responsibility Award; the Joseph P. Riley, Jr. Vision Award; Septima P. Clark Charleston Branch NAACP Education Award; and the Shirley B. Gordon Award of Distinction from Phi Theta Kappa.
Published in: Moultrie News
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Thursday
March 10, 2016
7. The Citadel Tops Richmond 6-2
The Citadel baseball team topped Richmond 6-2 on Wednesday night inside Joe Riley Park. The Bulldogs exploded for four runs in the bottom of the second inning and never looked back, adding two runs to their lead in the eighth inning en route to the victory. Philip Watcher, Mike Deese and Bret Hines all went two-for-four in the contest and as a team The Citadel collected nine hits. Clay Martin and Hines led the team with two RBI each. Freshman Alex Bialakis got his first career start and worked three strong innings, allowing just four hits and giving up two runs. Jacob Watcher came in and picked up his second win of the season after scattering three hits over three innings of work. Kyle Smith continued to get strikeouts in clutch situations for the Bulldogs, striking the last two batters of the eighth inning with runners on first and third to preserve The Citadel's 4-2 lead. The Citadel will hit the road for its first away series of the season when they travel to Elon. First pitch on Friday is set for 4 p.m. Live stats will be available for all three games at CitadelSports.com. For tickets, call 843-953-DOGS (3647) or visit CitadelSports.com/tickets.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Thursday
March 10, 2016
8. Partridge hire already paying off for UM
Mike McCray saw Chris Partridge inside Schembechler Hall last fall, yet didn't initially recognize the new staff member. After all, with Jim Harbaugh taking over as head coach of the Michigan football team, the linebacker had quickly figured out that he was going to see a lot of new faces in the UM football complex. Partridge fit somewhere in the pecking order, as part of Harbaugh's support staff. But not among the coaching staff, a place where McCray would have everyday interaction with him. But when McCray met with the linebackers just before UM's bowl game in December, he had his first interaction with Partridge, who had been named interim linebackers coach earlier in the month. He knew Partridge had been a successful high school coach but at that point, McCray not only found out who Partridge was, but realized that Partridge knew what he was doing... Partridge isn't necessarily new to the college game, either. He was a defensive line coach and assistant to the special teams at The Citadel in Charleston, S.C., and was the secondary coach at Lafayette College in Easton, Pa. Yet Partridge compared his recent rapid ascension from high school coach to Division I assistant to going to a coaching clinic on a daily basis. "I could carry a notebook around and write something new I learned every single day," he said.
Published in: The Blade
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Wednesday
March 9, 2016
1a. Remembering Pat Conroy
Beaufort author Pat Conroy was laid to rest Tuesday. Conroy, a New York Times bestselling author passed away last week after a brief fight with pancreatic cancer. Among the crowds were family, friends, and even some who didn't know Conroy personally. Hundreds of people said their final goodbyes at the St. Peter's Catholic Church on Lady's Island. Among the huge crowd are dozens of people from the Citadel who say Conroy personally invited them here to celebrate his life. "He invited the class of 2001. He likes to leave a gift for all the folks he gives a commencement address to for, and our gift was to come to his funeral and to access the funeral, all we have to do is show our ring, let them see the year, of 2001, and say I wear the ring," said Russ Touchberry, Citadel Alumni. Like Conroy's bestselling books, his ability to captivate an audience left a great impression on The Citadel's Class of 2001. Fifteen years later, the class came to Beaufort to honor Conroy's request that they take part and attend his funeral. "Pat's a very special guy to The Citadel family. It was a great honor, the gift he gave us, to be a part of his funeral, but really what a lot about during his speech was how short time was," said Touchberry. Life is short, but folks who knew Conroy best say he spent his time on earth living life to the fullest, while touching the lives of many others through his work. "It really is a story of life, 70-years-old, nobody thinks about passing that early. We thought Pat would go many, many years and continue his writing but God has a plan for all of us and Pat was taken in our opinion much too early," said Lt. Gen. John Rosa, president of The Citadel. "I think Pat really was the Lowcountry. If you look at his writing, like many of us have, it was all about the Lowcountry. He loved Beaufort, he loved Charleston, and he just loved the Lowcountry." Conroy was buried in an undisclosed cemetery during a private ceremony for his family and friends.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Wednesday
March 9, 2016
1b. conroy
conroy
Broadcast on: WSFA-TV Montgomery, AL
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Wednesday
March 9, 2016
1c. conroy
conroy
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
March 9, 2016
1d. conroy
conroy
Published in: The State
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Wednesday
March 9, 2016
1e. conroy
conroy
Broadcast on: WSAV-TV Savannah, GA
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Wednesday
March 9, 2016
2. Suspect calling for removal of Confederate flag allegedly leads campus chase
A man claiming to be part of an effort to remove the Confederate Naval Jack from The Citadel's Summerall Chapel was arrested by campus police following a chase late Friday evening. An incident report from The Citadel Police Department details the arrest of Torrence Dwyle Forney, 44, of Charlotte who was found standing outside the school chapel, which was locked at the time. Around 2:15 a.m. that evening, an officer was notified of loud music coming from a vehicle on campus and a driver who appeared intoxicated, according to the report. As Forney was approached by the officer, he allegedly jumped back inside his vehicle and sped off. After speeding though several stop signs, the suspect was finally blocked in by another officer's vehicle. The chase ended as Forney exited his vehicle and was taken into custody. An incident report states that Forney displayed erratic behavior, saying that he was a graduate of The Citadel and was part of the "take it down movement," which is dedicated to the removal of the Confederate flag from Summerall Chapel.
Published in: Charleston City Paper
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Wednesday
March 9, 2016
3. City faces continued controversy over Confederate naval jack on Citadel campus
Controversy over the Confederate naval jack continued to ricochet around Charleston over the past week. A 1993 Citadel graduate opposed to a Confederate flag in the school's Summerall Chapel was arrested in the early morning hours Friday for leading police on a chase through campus. And Charleston City Council on Tuesday voted unanimously to support The Citadel's president and Board of Visitors in their efforts to remove the rebel banner from the chapel at the military college. Torrence Dwyle Forney, 44, of Hashem Drive in Charlotte was charged Friday with failure to stop for a blue light, reckless driving and disorderly conduct. He was booked into the Charleston County jail and released on $1,774 bail. According to the incident report from Citadel Public Safety, officers were notified around 2:15 a.m. that a man playing loud music in his vehicle was asking questions about the campus and appeared to be intoxicated. An officer found the man, later identified as Forney, in front of Summerall Chapel and pulled in behind him. Forney jumped back in his vehicle and took off.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
March 9, 2016
4. South Carolina amputee and Citadel cadet thriving with prosthetic technology
After a summer 2014 workplace accident resulted in the loss of his right arm, Greenville resident Cameron Massengale, who was a rising sophomore at military college The Citadel, was determined not to give up on his dream of being a Citadel cadet. Now, with the help of custom-designed prosthetic technology, including the bebionic hand, Massengale is back at The Citadel and recently made history by becoming the first amputee to earn the title of Summerall Guard, one of the highest honors that can be achieved by a cadet.
Published in: Bloomberg Business
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Wednesday
March 9, 2016
5. Local student earns Dean's List at The Citadel
Cadet Christopher Thorsen of Edison took top honors at The Citadel, Charleston, S.C., in fall 2015 Dean's List.
Published in: The Sentinel
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Wednesday
March 9, 2016
6. 1st. Lt. Ward Abbett awarded Silver Star and 3 Bronze Stars with Vs in first 4 months fighting in Vietnam War
When 1st Lt. Ward Abbett arrived in Vietnam aboard a purple Braniff Airline he was a well-educated, seasoned soldier. He was a graduate of The Citadel in Charleston, S.C. He also spent his first year in the Army stateside as the executive officer of a headquarters company, but he wanted to see action in Vietnam. "We flew into Bien Hoa and I was taken by helicopter to my unit, the 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment," he said 50 years later. "I replaced a platoon leader who had been killed. I wondered what I was getting myself into. "I was in command of eight Armored Cavalry Assault Vehicles. Each one had four people-two gunners on either side, a man with an M-79 grenade launcher in the back and a driver. I was responsible for 32 people. Each vehicle was armed with a .50-caliber machine-gun and two M-60 machine-guns on either side." The 11th Cav was a hot outfit that could strike the enemy by air or in armored vehicles. They were in demand. Their regimental commander, Col. George S. Patton, Jr., was the son of the legendary World War II tank commander. "To put it mildly, I was very disappointed in Col. Patton. Instead of softening up a target with artillery or air strikes, he'd call in the infantry and we'd experience a lot more casualties. I had the feeling he was trying to glorify himself. I have very little respect for him," Abbett said.
Published in: Don Moore's War Tales
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Wednesday
March 9, 2016
7. U.S. Sen. Tim Scott charges up the crowd at Palmetto Boys State
The first time that U.S. Sen. Tim Scott was at Palmetto Boys State, he was a nervous high school student. It was 1982 and he was learning how to excel in class, rather than drift along and fail. "I think I may be the only United States senator who failed civics in high school," Scott said. "I did not have the passion and curiosity for success. I was drifting. You never drift towards anything." Along the way, adults who cared stepped in, he said. He was mentored by John Moniz, the owner of a Chick-fil-A in North Charleston, where Scott grew up. And by the time he was 16 years old, Scott's grades were improving, and he was able to attend Palmetto Boys State, then held at The Citadel, in Charleston. "This place, Palmetto Boys State, it develops leaders," Scott said. "In a week, you have so many ideas. You learn how to lead and how to work as a team." Scott told his story to more than 1,100 high school boys from across South Carolina who packed the Henderson Auditorium at Anderson University's Rainey Fine Arts Center Monday. When he walked out on the stage Monday, the boys jumped from their seats and cheered. Responding to their enthusiasm, Scott chanted with them, saying, "We are" and the boys responded, "Boys State." Enrollment for the weeklong program, now its 75th year, is at a record-high this year, according to one of its organizers, the Rev. Sinclair Lewis.
Published in: Anderson Independent Mail
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Wednesday
March 9, 2016
8. Bulldogs Fall to Spartans, 7-1
The Citadel baseball team fell to USC Upstate on Tuesday 7-1 inside Joe Riley Park. The Citadel jumped out to an early 1-0 lead in the first frame behind Drew Ellis' RBI double but the Bulldogs, who connected for five hits in the game, were unable to push across any more runs. With the RBI tonight, Ellis now has 14 this season. Mike Deese was two-for-four in the contest. Austin Mapes and Jacob Watcher accounted for the other Bulldog hits. Starter Philip Watcher pitched 5 strong innings and accounted for all but one of the Bulldogs' pitching staff's five strikeouts. The Citadel used five pitchers in the contest and Ryan Stamler was handed his first loss of the season. Kyle Smith, who pitched a scoreless frame in the eighth and made his fifth appearance this season, kept the Spartans (8-5) from tacking on even more runs with a strikeout to end the USC Upstate scoring threat. Today's games marks the second time this season that The Citadel and its opponent have played errorless ball with the first game coming on opening day against Virginia Tech. Wednesday's game against the Richmond Spiders will start at 6 p.m. and live stats and video will be available for the game at CitadelSports.com. For tickets, call 843-953-DOGS (3647) or visit CitadelSports.com/tickets.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Tuesday
March 8, 2016
1. Paul Glasser of Elgin among Class of 2017 Summerall Guards at The Citadel
Paul Glasser of Elgin was among 60 cadets selected to the Class of 2017 Summerall Guards. Earning the title Summerall Guard is one of the highest honors that can be achieved by a member of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets at The Citadel. Each winter, cadets who are juniors endure weeks of rigorous physical training and drilling in an attempt to be named a member of the famous platoon for their senior year. Consisting of 61 members, all of the Summerall Guards were chosen for their physical stamina and drill proficiency. The platoon's purpose is to exemplify, through a unique series of movements based on the old German close-order drill, the exactness and thoroughness with which a cadet is trained. The drill, which has never been written down, is performed to a silent count. Each year's platoon takes responsibility for teaching the precise drill to the upcoming unit. Membership is considered a high honor at the military college. Created in 1932, this unit has performed nationally at Disney World, the Cherry Blossom Festival in Washington, D.C., Mardi Gras in New Orleans and St. Patrick's Day in Savannah, Ga. The platoon is named for General Charles P. Summerall, former Chief of Staff of the U.S. Army and Citadel president from 1931 until 1953.
Published in: Chronicle-Independent
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Tuesday
March 8, 2016
2. Summerall Guards 2016: Marcus Harbol of Bothell
Summerall Guards: Marcus Harbol of Bothell was among 60 other cadets selected to the class of 2017 Summerall Guards at The Citadel in South Carolina. Each winter, cadets who are juniors endure weeks of rigorous physical training and drilling in an attempt to be named a member of the famous platoon for their senior year. Membership is considered a high honor at the military college.
Published in: The Woodinville Weekly
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Tuesday
March 8, 2016
3. Charleston City Council to vote on resolution supporting removal of Citadel Confederate Naval Jack
Charleston City Council will vote on a resolution in support of a senator's bill to remove the Confederate Naval Jack from The Citadel's chapel and allow leaders of the state's colleges and universities to vote to remove flags representing the War Between the States, including the Confederate flag, from their places of worship. Democrat Senator Marlon Kimpson filed a bill in February to remove the Confederate Naval Jack flag from the Citadel's Summerall Chapel. The bill, if approved, would also authorize the board of directors of public institutions of higher learning to remove flags of the Civil War from chapels and other structures having a religious purpose. The South Carolina General Assembly voted to remove the flag from Statehouse grounds in July 2015 after law enforcement officials said suspected Emanuel AME Church shooter Dylann Roof displayed it in promotion of white supremacy, the resolution states. A two-thirds majority in the General Assembly is needed to pass the bill.
Broadcast on: WFXG-TV Augusta, GA
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Tuesday
March 8, 2016
4. Upcountry Literary Festival March 18-19
Saturday, March 19: 9:30-9:50 a..m. - Mark Powell - Powell is the author of four novels, most recently The Sheltering, the bronze medalist in the International Publishers Awards and the Florida Book Awards. He has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Breadloaf and Sewanee Writers' Conferences, and in 2014 was a Fulbright Fellow to Slovakia. A graduate of The Citadel, the University of South Carolina, and Yale Divinity School, he is an associate professor and the Heman fellow at Stetson University where he directs the Low-Residency MFA Program.
Published in: The Union Times
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Tuesday
March 8, 2016
5. NBAA Thanks NATA's Tom Hendricks, GA Champion
National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) President and CEO Ed Bolen today issued the statement below following news that National Air Transportation Association (NATA) President and CEO Tom Hendricks would step down from his post later this year. "Tom has been a tireless champion for general aviation, with an unyielding commitment to protecting and promoting the industry while at NATA. He brought a sterling reputation and strong leadership skills to NATA, and over his four-year tenure the association has made a number of strategic decisions that today position NATA on solid ground as it moves into its eighth decade. Tom has been a good friend to NBAA and the entire general aviation community. We wish him the best as he begins this next chapter in his life." Hendricks is a retired Air Force Reserve colonel and career fighter pilot. He also served on active duty as a U.S. Navy officer on the USS MIDWAY (CV-41), and as an instructor pilot at the United States Navy Fighter Weapons School. A native of Fairfield, OH, Hendricks graduated from The Citadel in Charleston, S.C., with a Bachelor of Arts in mathematics, with secondary emphasis in business administration.
Published in: AviationPros.com
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Tuesday
March 8, 2016
6. The Citadel's season opener moved to Sept. 1
The Citadel football team's 2016 season opener at Mercer has been moved to Thursday, Sept. 1, it was announced Monday. The defending Southern Conference co-champions were originally scheduled to begin their title defense on Saturday, Sept. 3, but both schools worked together for the Thursday night opener. The game is set to be broadcast on ESPN3, and the kickoff time will be announced at a later date. The Bulldogs lead the all-time series 8-4-1, including a 2-0 mark in Macon, and have won both games since Mercer reinstated its program and the series resumed in 2014. Last season, The Citadel earned a 21-19 victory in Charleston as part of a perfect October that helped clinch a share of the Southern Conference crown for the Bulldogs. The Citadel's home opener is set for Sept. 10 against Furman. Season tickets go on sale March 19 at the Bulldogs' spring game. For more information on season tickets, call The Citadel Athletic Ticket Office at 843-953-DOGS (3647).
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
March 7, 2016
1a. The literary legacy of Pat Conroy
Professionally, Pat Conroy was a lucky man, and he knew it. He began his adult life as a grunt at The Citadel, shooting hoops and dreaming of a writer's career. He knew he loved good stories, and he knew he could spin a tale. But books? Books that people wanted to buy? Well, he would try. He wrote and self-published "The Boo," a collection of anecdotes about life at the military college in Charleston. Books, it seemed, would not pay the bills. So Conroy became a teacher. And he got in trouble. He was always getting in trouble. Trouble shaped him, informed his work, his world view, his politics. As a teacher, he worked in the isolated Gullah-Geechie community on Daufuskie Island, teaching poor black kids in a one-room schoolhouse. He loved those kids. He insisted on kindness. He hated their poverty. He didn't much care for the callousness of school administrators. He understood the forces at work and protested. After a year, his supervisors told him he would have to go. So Conroy did what he had to do: he wrote another book, "The Water Is Wide." It captured some attention. It was made into a movie. Conroy was finding his voice. Maybe this writing thing could work after all. He turned his attention to a new project, a huge, burdensome task. He would write a semi-autobiographical novel about his abusive father and the terrorism he inflicted on the Conroy family. He would write "The Great Santini." Pat Conroy knew he was risking his fledgling career and the love and support of his family. What would his six siblings think? Was this honest portrayal or selfish betrayal?
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
March 7, 2016
1b. Pat Conroy
pat conroy
Published in: Washington Post
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Monday
March 7, 2016
1c. Pat Conroy
pat conroy
Published in: Seattle Times
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Monday
March 7, 2016
1d. Pat Conroy
pat conroy
Published in: Syracuse.com
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Monday
March 7, 2016
1e. Pat Conroy
pat conroy
Published in: Hilton Head Island Packet
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Monday
March 7, 2016
2. Locals named to Summerall Guard
Earning the title Summerall Guard is one of the highest honors that can be achieved by a member of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets at The Citadel. Each winter, cadets who are juniors endure weeks of rigorous physical training and drilling in an attempt to be named a member of the platoon for their senior year. The competitions for the newest guards were completed Feb. 24. Consisting of 61 members, all of the Summerall Guards were chosen for their physical stamina and drill proficiency. The platoon's purpose is to exemplify, through a unique series of movements based on the old German close-order drill, the exactness and thoroughness with which a cadet is trained. The drill, which has never been written down, is performed to a silent count. Each year's platoon takes responsibility for teaching the precise drill to the upcoming unit. Local members of the Summerall Guard include: James Blocker of Summerville and Nicholas Gee of Summerville. Created in 1932, the Summerall Guards have performed nationally at Disney World, the Cherry Blossom Festival in Washington, D.C., Mardi Gras in New Orleans and St. Patrick's Day in Savannah, Georgia. The platoon is named for General Charles P. Summerall, former Chief of Staff of the U.S. Army and Citadel president from 1931 until 1953. In 2005, the Summerall Guards made their fourth appearance at a presidential inaugural parade. The Guards also participated in the inaugurations of Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1953, Ronald Reagan in 1985 and George H.W. Bush in 1989.
Published in: The Summerville Journal Scene
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Monday
March 7, 2016
3. Kanaly graduates from The Citadel
Cadet Nicholas Kanaly of Bowling Green was among 36 cadets, veterans and active duty students to graduate in December from The Citadel. Kanaly earned his bachelor's degree in political science.
Published in: Bowling Green Daily News
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Monday
March 7, 2016
4. The winners of the sixth annual Storm The Citadel trebuchet competition
The STEM Center of Excellence at The Citadel hosted the sixth annual 2016 Storm the Citadel Trebuchet Competition, and more than 100 teams, comprised of more than 700 participants, took part on Saturday, February 13. Elementary school students competed in the Hoplite Division. For Design, the St. Andrews School of Math and Science took first palce. Boulder Bluff Elementary took second, followed by LCHEA Launchers. For Spirit, first place went to Girl Scout Troop 352, followed by Murray LaSaine Elementary, and St. Andrews School of Math and Science. For Accuracy, Heathwood Hall Team 5 earned the top slot, the St. Andrews School of Math and Science were second with the Porter-Gaud Team 4 in third. In the Centurion Division for middle schoolers, Thomas Cario Middle School won for Design. For Accuracy, DuBose Middle School won, Boy Scout Troop 759 took second, and Hartsville Home Educators came in third place. In the Centurion Division for high school students, West Ashley High School had the top Design. For Accuracy, it was West Ashley High School in first, Boy Scout Troop 759 in second and Clover High School in third. For Spirit, Stratford High School won for the third year running, followed by BSA Troop 759 for the second year in a row, and Timberland High School for third.
Published in: Moultrie News
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Monday
March 7, 2016
5. Soldier commanded armored assault vehicles in Vietnam
When 1st Lt. Ward Abbett, now of Englewood, arrived in Vietnam he was a well-educated, seasoned soldier. A graduate of The Citadel in Charleston, S.C., he spent his first year in the Army stateside as the executive officer of a headquarters company, but he wanted to see action in Vietnam. "We flew into Bien Hoa and I was taken by helicopter to my unit, the 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment," he said. "I replaced a platoon leader who had been killed. I wondered what I was getting myself into." Abbett was in command of eight Armored Cavalry Assault Vehicles. Each had four aboard - two gunners on either side, a man with an M-79 grenade launcher and a driver. "I was responsible for 32 people. Each vehicle was armed with a .50-caliber machine gun and two M-60 machine guns on either side," he said. The 11th Cav was a hot outfit that could strike the enemy by air or in armored vehicles. They were in demand. Their regimental commander, Col. George S. Patton Jr., was the son of the legendary World War II tank commander. "I was very disappointed in Colonel Patton. Instead of softening up a target with artillery or air strikes, he'd call in the infantry and we'd experience a lot more casualties. I had the feeling he was trying to glorify himself. I have very little respect for him," Abbett said. During his first four months, Abbett received a Silver Star and three Bronze Stars with Combat-Vs for Valor.
Broadcast on: WFTV North Port, FL
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Monday
March 7, 2016
6. More Aspen High School students considering military academies
When many high school seniors think about college, they may fantasize at the freedom and independence that come with living away from home for the first time. What most teenagers don't have in mind when they envision life after high school is waking up at 5 a.m. to run circles around a track, sweeping barracks, marching to meals and shining their belt and shoes a minimum of two times every day. But for a minority of young men and women across the country, and for an increasing number of students at Aspen High School, such a lifestyle is not only an honor and privilege - it is also their dream. "Going to a normal school was never even a consideration of mine," Aspen High School alumnus Taggart Solomon said. Solomon said he only applied to military academies and selected The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina, where he is currently a freshman with a contract to the U.S. Army. "It's a good feeling knowing that everyone else my age is sleeping when I'm up at 5:30 working out and getting yelled at," Solomon said. "I am, after all, taking the road less traveled."
Published in: The Aspen Times
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Monday
March 7, 2016
7a. College of Charleston finishes off sweep of The Citadel
College of Charleston won pitching duels in the first two games of its rivalry series with The Citadel. And the Cougars swept the series on Sunday in something less than a pitching duel. It took four hours, a combined 17 pitchers and a total of 412 pitches before Charleston finished off a 12-9 win at Riley Park to sweep the Bulldogs for the second season in a row. "At least we know we can win both ways," said Cougars coach Matt Heath. The game left the Cougars (7-4) with four straight wins, the Bulldogs (5-5) with four straight losses - and coaches of both baseball teams with question marks about a Sunday starter in their pitching rotations. "They've got a good club," Citadel coach Fred Jordan said of the Cougars. "Their Friday and Saturday guys are very, very good, and we think ours are going to be OK as we go on. But we've got to find a Sunday guy."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
March 7, 2016
7b. CofC Baseball Nearly No-Hits The Citadel; Wins 1-0
Sophomore Bailey Ober pitched 7.2 innings of hitless baseball as the College of Charleston baseball team edged The Citadel, 1-0, at Patriots Point on Saturday. Ober (1-1) struck out nine batters and allowed just one base runner, a hit batsman to start the second inning. The right-hander was lifted after reaching the 90-pitch plateau. It was Ober's first win on the mound since May 31, 2014 - a 6-3 decision over Long Beach State in the NCAA Gainesville Regional. The Citadel's (5-4) only hit came with two outs in the ninth. Reliever Carter Love struck out the first two batters of the inning before Bulldogs leadoff hitter Jason Smith looped a single to right. Love closed out the game to earn his second save of the season. The game's lone run came with two outs in the second inning on an RBI single from Luke Manzo. It was the third two-out RBI single for Manzo in the last two games. Erven Roper was the only Cougar to finish the game with multiple hits; he was 2-for-4 with a double.
Broadcast on: WCSC-Tv Charleston, SC
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Monday
March 7, 2016
7c. Helvey Tosses Complete Game as Cougars Defeat The Citadel
Nathan Helvey was nearly unhittable as the senior went the distance and leading College of Charleston to a 5-1 victory over The Citadel at Joe Riley Park on Friday. Helvey (2-0) didn't allow a base hit until the fifth inning and struck out six batters while walking none in the complete game effort. The Fort Mill, S.C., product had pitched 20 consecutive scoreless innings dating back to last season before The Bulldogs plated a run with one out in the ninth inning. It marks the first complete game of Helvey's career. Offensively, Luke Manzo got the Cougars on the board with an RBI single in the second inning and doubled the team's lead with a RBI base hit in the sixth; Danny Wondrack scored both runs. Bradley Dixon was the only other Cougar to finish the game with multiple hits, he was 2-for-5 and scored a run. Jake Maziar drove home a pair of runs with a pinch-hit single in the seventh. Bradley Jones picked up an RBI double in the eighth.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
March 7, 2016
8a. Mercer ends The Citadel's season, 71-69
The Citadel's men's basketball team was eliminated from the Southern Conference tournament with a 71-69 loss to Mercer in Friday's opening round. Senior Derrick Henry led the Bulldogs with 16 points and finished his career one point shy of the 1000-career point club. Freshman Quayson Williams added 14 points and made 4-of-5 from three-point range. The efforts from Williams and Henry allowed The Citadel to shoot 41.1 percent from the floor and 47.4 percent from beyond the arc. Freshman Zane Najdawi added nine points and seven rebounds in 21 minutes of action. Head coach Duggar Baucom's squad led 38-33 halftime and had a chance to force overtime late, but ultimately fell in a tight battle. The Bulldogs played stout zone defense throughout the game and held Mercer to just 38 percent shooting in the opening half (2-of-13 from deep). Both teams traded baskets early and were knotted at 22-22 with less than eight minutes remaining in the first frame. The Citadel finally found separation and pushed in front, using a 16-8 run powered by an inside-outside attack.
Published in: WCBD-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
March 7, 2016
8b. The Citadel's Boutte Dismissed From Program
Less than an hour before The Citadel began play in the Southern Conference Tournament against Mercer, the school announced that starting point guard PJ Boutte had been dismissed from the program for a violation of team rules. "It's a privilege to get the chance to play at The Citadel and be a part of the culture we maintain here." Head Coach Duggar Baucom said in a statement from the school. "We take that very seriously and that privilege comes with high expectations and standards that must be upheld. In this case, he failed to meet those expectations.” Boutte led the Southern Conference in assists this season averaging 5.6 per game. He was also tied for 2nd on the team averaging over 4 rebounds per game and added almost 8 points per game. The Citadel's was Boutte's 3rd team having started his collegiate career at Detroit and transferring to IUPUI after 2 seasons.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
March 7, 2016
9. Citadel football does some spring shuffling
With his coaching staff set, new Citadel football coach Brent Thompson has turned his attention to his players. As the Bulldogs hit the field for their first scrimmage of the spring on Saturday, some new names appeared in some new places. Most of the shuffling is among reserve players; the most prominent move is sophomore Jalen Lampkin's switch from slotback to quarterback, where he is third on the depth chart behind starter Dominique Allen and backup Jordan Black. The Bulldogs have lost two reserve quarterbacks - Shon Belton and A.J. Vandiver - since last season ended. Lampkin, 5-10 and 191 pounds, was a standout QB at Westside High School in Augusta, Ga. "Jalen came in as a quarterback, so that's not a huge surprise," Thompson said. "We had some depth issues there, so we've plugged Jalen in back there, and it's a pretty easy transition for him. He's a very talented young man, so if we can get him caught up there, I think we'll be fine."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Friday
March 4, 2016
1. The Best of ABET's Accredited Programs 2016: The Citadel
The Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina, has a reputation for producing principled leaders. The college is also known for its engineering program, which is the fifth oldest engineering program in the nation and is consistently ranked among the top 25 undergraduate engineering programs in the nation for institutions where the highest degree is a master's degree. The Citadel School of Engineering boasts two ABET accredited undergraduate degrees-civil and electrical engineering. A third undergraduate engineering degree, mechanical engineering, is new this year to the engineering curriculum and will be eligible to apply for accreditation after the first student from the program graduates. Additionally, there are four engineering master's degree programs-civil, electrical, mechanical and project management, and there are a number of certificate programs as well. The Bachelor of Science in Computer Science in the School of Science and Mathematics is accredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission of ABET. With the rise of cyber-related crimes, the college began offering an additional graduate certificate in cyber-security. The Citadel also offers a master's degree in computer science in conjunction with the College of Charleston.
Published in: Newsweek
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Friday
March 4, 2016
2. The Citadel announces Bothell resident as a member of the Class of 2017 Summerall Guards
Marcus Harbol of Bothell is among 60 other cadets selected to the Class of 2017 Summerall Guards. Earning the title Summerall Guard is one of the highest honors that can be achieved by a member of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets at The Citadel. Each winter, cadets who are juniors endure weeks of rigorous physical training and drilling in an attempt to be named a member of the famous platoon for their senior year. Consisting of 61 members, all of the Summerall Guards were chosen for their physical stamina and drill proficiency. The platoon's purpose is to exemplify, through a unique series of movements based on the old German close-order drill, the exactness and thoroughness with which a cadet is trained. The drill, which has never been written down, is performed to a silent count. Each year's platoon takes responsibility for teaching the precise drill to the upcoming unit.
Published in: Bothell-Reporter
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Friday
March 4, 2016
3. Wildflowers Of The Carolina Lowcountry
The Kiawah Island Garden Club were guests of the Kiawah Island Nature Conservancy for a fun and informative talk by Dr. Richard Dwight Porcher, retired biology professor at the Citadel and author of several books. He was the author of "A Guide to Wildflowers of South Carolina" and is working on Wildflowers of the Carolina Lowcountry, with Dr. Joel Gramling. Dr. Porcher mentioned that much of the land in the Nature Conservancy is where he explores and takes his digital photography. Since he wrote a book on the Lowcountry wildflowers years ago, which is now out of print, so much of the nomenclature has changed and he's thankful that Dr. Gramling, who took over his professorship at the Citadel, is researching that aspect of the book. Dr. Gramling runs the Herbarium at the Citadel also. There is incredible natural diversity of the Carolina Lowcountry, a natural transition stretching from Cape Fear to Florida, with over 2000 plants in the plain alone. Some plants are contained in remnant communities from when the glaciers receded, such as Beech trees (a mountain species) along creeks. The Waccamaw River and Sugarloaf Mountain areas contain remnant communities, as do native shell deposits. Two million years ago the coastline reached far inland, to near Columbia, and the deposits laid down then form the limestone and marl formations over which our land stretches, and on which many calcium loving plants thrive. The ancient sand hills in the Upstate are the old shore line. The Maritime grassland thrives because freshwater is lighter than saltwater and sits atop sand, and it is there that the Common Marsh Pink grows.
Published in: The Island Connection
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Friday
March 4, 2016
4. From The Citadel's barracks to Dachau's ovens, Jewish man recalls WWII
Bernard Warshaw grew up, the small-town son of a Jewish businessman, with dreams of going to The Citadel. He couldn't tell you why exactly, then or now, but the military college intrigued him. He harbored no visions of wartime heroism. After all, it was 1937, a moment of calm. And it wasn't as if he dreamed of defending his faith, or saving his fellow Jews. He couldn't have imagined the need. As the teen suited up for his knob year, he had no inkling that a second world war was about to explode, one that would end with the deaths of 6 million Jews and leave him to open the still-warm ovens of the Dachau concentration camp. Instead, in the mostly Christian Walterboro, his Jewish heritage simply was. For a time. The Citadel years: Warshaw was not a top high school student nor was his school especially strong. His enrollment at The Citadel looked a bit unlikely. However, his direct appeal to Gen. Charles P. Summerall, the school's president, opened the military college’s doors to him. A sprinkling of fellow Jewish cadets joined him, but if ill will lurked in its corridors or barracks, Warshaw never felt it. "There was no anti-Semitism I was aware of at The Citadel at that time," he says. Instead, he met fellow cadets named Fritz Hollings, John West and James Grimsley Jr. and forged a lifelong network of friends. When the war began, he was in ROTC. He knew he'd be going.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Friday
March 4, 2016
5. Second candidate announces in Indian Land state House race
A second candidate is jumping into the race to succeed Deborah Long in S.C. House District 45. Tyler Mitchell, a Lancaster native and graduate of The Citadel, announced he would run as a Democrat for the seat that covers much of Indian Land and parts of Fort Mill. Mitchell is seeking his first elected office. He previously worked for U.S. Sen. Kay Hagan, D-N.C., who represented North Carolina in Washington from 2008 to 2014. "I grew up here and want nothing more than to see this place strive, so I'm going to work tirelessly to earn the vote of every person in our district and to make our state a better place in which to live, work and call home," Mitchell said in a news release announcing his campaign. Mitchell says he wants to focus on education, health care and veterans' issues. His entry into the race sets up an interesting generational clash with Brandon Newton, the chairman of the Lancaster County GOP who previously announced his plans to replace Long as a Republican S.C. House member. Mitchell, a 23-year-old law student who commutes to Chapel Hill during the week, is challenging the 21-year-old Newton, who is finishing his undergraduate degree at USC Lancaster. "It's kind of a weird race where the 23-year-old is the older one, and arguably the one with more government experience," Mitchell said.
Published in: The Herald
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Friday
March 4, 2016
6. Professional Builder's 2016 40 Under 40 Awards
The Great Recession left some scars but must also have produced much wisdom because more than a dozen of home building's superstars, named as 40 Under 40 winners by the editors of Professional Builder, cite surviving the economic slump as one of their greatest career accomplishments. These young leaders also played key roles in growing their companies by replacing a legacy system, expanding into new markets, and mastering many other tasks. Their back stories are interesting, too: from a bishop shepherding a congregation of 400 members, to a professional wakeboarder, to a college dropout, to the many other professionals in this altruistic bunch who have bettered their communities and the world beyond by going on mission trips, starting a foundation, fundraising for charities, or doing free remodeling for the needy. We proudly present our 40 Under 40 Class for 2016. Will Herring: President of Hunter Quinn Homes in Mt. Pleasant, S.C. Education: B.S., Business Administration, College of Charleston; MBA, The Citadel; Construction Management, Trident Technical College
Published in: ProBuilder.com
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Friday
March 4, 2016
7. College of Charleston, The Citadel to square off in weekend rivalry series
The College of Charleston and The Citadel in a three-game crosstown rivarly series beginning Friday at 6 p.m. at Joe Riley Park. Saturday's game will be played at Patriots Point at 2:30 p.m. and the teams will return to Joe Riley Park for the series finale on Sunday at 1 p.m. The Cougars (4-4) are coming off a 9-4 victory over No. 18 Coastal Carolina on Wednesday while the Bulldogs (5-2) had a three-game winning streak snapped by No. 13 South Carolina on Tuesday. CofC has won the last five matchups between the schools. The Bulldogs were narrowly defeated by the Cougars in all three games of the series last season, losing 8-7, 6-4 and 4-3. The Citadel tallied exactly seven hits in each game. Of the 11 pitchers the Bulldogs used last year against the College of Charleston only two, JP Sears and Zach Lavery, are still on the team. Saturday's game at Patriots Point will be The Citadel's first road game of the season.
Published in: Moultrie News
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Friday
March 4, 2016
8. Longtime Citadel baseball coach expects big season from USC
The Citadel coach Fred Jordan has seen South Carolina baseball teams for more than two decades. He is in his 25th year running the Bulldogs' program. Jordan said after facing the Gamecocks Tuesday that this USC team looks reminiscent of past ones that made noise in the postseason. USC beat The Citadel 6-3 in Charleston, pounding out 15 hits in the win to improve to 9-0. The Gamecocks missed the NCAA tournament last year for the first time since 1999, but Jordan doesn't expect that to happen this season. "They've retooled. They look like a South Carolina team that's going to make a deep run in the NCAAs to me," Jordan said. "They're very, very impressive. We were fortunate to keep it as close as we did... They're very, very good." Jordan was particularly impressed with Carolina's newcomers, including left fielder Dom Thompson-Williams, DH John Jones, catcher Chris Cullen and outfielder Danny Blair. "Their left fielder is a very good player. John Jones is an outstanding hitter. Cullen, the freshman catcher, he's about as good as I've ever seen as a freshman. Blair, their centerfielder, his feet did not touch the ground when he runs," Jordan said.
Published in: The State
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Thursday
March 3, 2016
1. Pi Sigma Alpha recognizes 2016 inductees
The Citadel's Beta Iota Rho chapter of The National Political Science Honor Society of Pi Sigma Alpha inducted seven new cadet members into the select group. Chairman of the Department of Political Science, DuBose Kapeluck, Ph.D., noted the outstanding honor the cadets have earned. "These cadets exmplify the standards and values that have classified Pi Sigma Alpha as an upper division and specialized honor society. Only the top 30 percent of juniors and seniors are eligible for membership," said Kapeluck. "This year's inductees will make excellent contributions to the society." The Citadel's Beta Iota Rho chapter of Pi Sigma Alpha was chartered in May 1951. The new members are: Neil Bultman of Walker, Michigan, Jonathan DeVore of Honea Path, South Carolina, Joseph Draper of Port Gibson, Mississippi, Cody Ford of Saluda, South Carolina, Brian Lapchak of North Charleston, South Carolina, Lauren Seedor of Wayne, Pennsylvania and Bret Seidler of Tiburon, California.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Thursday
March 3, 2016
2. Citadel Foundation's executive officer receives doctoral degree
John P. (Jay) Dowd III, the CEO of The Citadel Foundation, recently completed his studies at the University of South Carolina with his Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D) in Educational Administration as well as a cognate in Public Administration. In December 2015, the university hosted a formal ceremony located at the Koger Center for the Arts. Dowd attended, and officials conferred his degree and doctoral hood on him. His doctoral thesis, "Understanding Generosity at Military Colleges and Universities: Characteristics and Motivations of Major Donors at the Federal Service Academies and Senior Military Colleges," analyzed leading benefactors and their philanthropic motives. He specifically looked at benefactors of federal service academies, senior military universities, or senior military colleges based in the U.S. The results of his study will be used to help institutions understand and work with their alumni. He attended Winthrop University for his bachelor of arts degree and graduated from there in 1989. He also attended the University of South Carolina for his master of education degree, graduating in 1993. Today, Dowd works as the CEO at The Citadel Foundation and as the VP of Institutional Advancement at The Citadel, located in Charleston.
Published in: Palmetto Business Daily
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Thursday
March 3, 2016
3. Former Myers lieutenant to seek solicitor's seat
A challenger has emerged to take on embattled 11th Circuit Solicitor Donnie Myers. Larry Wedekind of Lexington, who worked under Myers for 12 years, said he plans to run for the solicitor's post Myers has held virtually unchallenged for 40 years. Myers was arrested and charged with DUI in Lexington last week, his second DUI and third alcohol-related incident since 2005. Since then, calls have intensified for him to resign, or at least step down when his current term expires later this year. So far, Myers has not publicly addressed the incident or his future plans. Wedekind, who is Republican, said he had planned to run against Myers before the arrest, but that the incident sped up his decision to publicly announce his candidacy. "I think 40 years of his service has been enough," Wedekind told a local television station. "I bring a depth of experience," added Wedekind, who boasts 18 years of criminal prosecution experience. "I have experience in state, local and military courts with overseas experience working with different levels of government." The official filing period for candidates begins March 16. Given Myers' legal predicament and the public sentiment rising against him, Wedekind said he anticipated others will likely seek to run as well. Wedekind worked under Myers for 12 years before he started working in the S.C. Attorney General's Office as a prosecutor for the State Grand Jury. After two years in that position, he resigned last Thursday in order to qualify as a candidate for the solicitor's post. Wedekind is a Baltimore native, but has lived in South Carolina since becoming a student at The Citadel. After graduating from The Citadel in 1985, he was in active duty for nine years in both the Marine Corps and the Navy. He then went to law school at the University of South Carolina in 1997 and got his first job in the S.C. Attorney General's Office as an assistant attorney general for two years. He also worked in the Fifth Judicial Circuit for Richland County for three years prior to going to work in the 11th Judicial Circuit. He joined the National Guard and served in Afghanistan in 2009 and 2013.
Published in: Lexington County Chronicle
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Thursday
March 3, 2016
4. Hanahan's Bret Hines continues the Hines' Citadel baseball tradition
If Lee "Bunkie" Hines were to write a book about his family's athletic accomplishments, he could title it "My Three Sons" or, perhaps, "Father Knows Best." Hines played baseball for The Citadel back in the 1980s and went from performer to parent as three of his sons played for the Bulldogs: Bryce, Ryan and Bret. Bryce and Ryan graduated a while back, but Bret is still playing the sport that provided a family bond - and a scholarship to the military college. Now, the curtain is about to fall on this talented generation's time at the school. All three Hines also excelled on the diamond at Hanahan High School. "When I was a freshman, being a senior was something that was so far away you wouldn't give it much thought," Bret said. "The last four years have passed by so quickly. It's kind of like I'm a top dog now. But it wasn't always that way." Hines cherishes the springs, summers and falls that he tagged along with his older brothers to pursue the game of baseball. Although they were older and better, Bret would somehow make his way on the field and prove that he had potential even if it was just a practice session.
Published in: The Daniel Island News
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Thursday
March 3, 2016
5. Nathan Deal: Colleges should focus on education rather than guns. But aren't they related?
To some the answer to campus crime - however mythical it may be - is a gun. And not just one gun, but many, concealed in backpacks, purses, and under coats by the "well-regulated militia" the Second Amendment honors. And as any "campus carry" supporter will remind you, one does not argue with a person aiming a gun at you. To rightly answer an armed robber, one must forgo "talking them out of it" and take them out. In this theory, guns trump arguments, the Second Amendment over the First. To supporters of the campus carry bill, House Bill 859, words are only powerless weapons against violence, hopeless to stop anything. In short, you don't bring rhetoric to a gun fight. The great teachers at my institution understand this. This is why they teach not toward certain outcomes but how to respond to difference. I work at a "senior military college" - part of a group that includes The Citadel, Texas A&M, and the site of the most deadly college campus shooting, Virginia Tech. The teachers of our cadets teach leadership, including how to deescalate violence, not encourage it. And they produce heroes like those gun-less veterans who stopped a gunman on that train to Paris.
Published in: The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
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Thursday
March 3, 2016
6. Emory & Henry Football Tabs Dick Hopkins As Defensive Coordinator
Emory & Henry College Head Football Coach Curt Newsome is pleased to announce the hiring of Dick Hopkins as the program's Defensive Coordinator. Hopkins will also be charged with working directly with the Wasps' defensive backfield in addition to the oversight of the defense as a whole. "He's a great person that brings a wealth of experience, having worked with the defensive secondary for over 30 years," commented Newsome. "When I broke into college football, I coached with him for a year on the defensive side of the ball at James Madison before moving to offense. We're fortunate to get him here at Emory & Henry." A 30-year coaching veteran, Hopkins brings 20 years of experience as a defensive coordinator at the NCAA Division I level including stops at Duke University, Vanderbilt University, Tulane University, The Citadel and James Madison University. He has coached under multiple hall-of-fame caliber coaches including Bobby Bowden, Watson Brown, Tommy Bowden, Mickey Matthews, Jerry Schmitt and Howard Schnellenberger.
Broadcast on: WJHL-TV Johnson City, TN
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Wednesday
March 2, 2016
1. Charleston Women in Tech brings coding classes to the East Side
Charleston Women in Tech has a new project, and it's geared toward education. The group is launching CodeON, also known as Coding for Our Neighborhoods. It's a free program that is taking computer science to those less fortunate. On March 2, the group will bring in computers and teachers to Laundry Matters, a laundromat and community center on the East Side's Reid Street. Carolyn Finch, executive director of Charleston Women in Tech said CodeON is a "community effort to provide Internet access, computers and other computer science resources in the form of inspiration and great leaders in the tech industry to teach, mentor these young students who wouldn't typically have access to computers and Internet at home or at school." "It sounds great in theory to set up an awesome code shop here, which eventually we could do," she said. But there's a downside. "We're not going to be able to access the students that we want to access," she said. The "logistics" around starting an operation in a place like King Street wouldn't work, she said. "We wouldn't penetrate the audience that we're looking to help," Finch said. Charleston Women in Tech plans for the sessions to be weekly, and might expand the program to other locations in the area. Local technology firms are also involved. PeopleMatter, a software firm on King Street, is providing the computers. BoomTown, another software firm based on Rutledge Avenue, is providing the Wi-Fi. Students at The Citadel will teach the classes.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
March 2, 2016
2. Dr. Scott Buchanan interviewed live on Fox 24 News on Super Tuesday results
Interview with Dr. Scott Buchanan, associate professor of political science at The Citadel and the executive director of The Citadel Symposium on Southern Politics. Q: Any surprises this evening? A: Not particularly. I guess the biggest surprise is how poorly Marco Rubio has performed... that's the biggest single surprise I've seen tonight. Q: I was looking through the numbers and very few precincts are 100 percent reported and in looking at those numbers he's pretty much third in every one of those states. A: Absolutely and that makes it hard for Rubio to continue to lay claim to being a candidate who can challenge Donald Trump. Q: Well Ted Cruz isn't doing a whole lot better. He's certainly won his home state of Texas, and they pulled through for him, but he's still falling behind. A: He is although he can say that he has won Oklahoma as well so that makes him at least 3 states. Q: Going forward what do you think is going to happen in terms of who the frontrunner is really going to truly be? A: On the Republican side, I find it very hard to stop Trump at this point. He has so much momentum going forward. Please view the article to see the entire interview.
Broadcast on: WTAT-TV Charleston, SC
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Wednesday
March 2, 2016
3. Wilhelm Ropke: The Economist Who Stood Up To Hitler
Sometimes there are men of principle who live their values and not merely speak or write about them. People who stand up to political evil at their own risk, and then go on to say and do things that help to remake their country in the aftermath of war and destruction. One such individual was the German, free-market economist, Wilhelm Ropke. Born on October 10, 1899, Wilhelm Ropke died half a century ago on February 12, 1966. It seems appropriate to mark the fifty-year passing of one of the great European economists and advocates of freedom during the last one hundreds years. In the dark days immediately following the rise to power of Adolf Hitler and his Nazi movement in Germany in January 1933, Ropke refused to remain silent. He proceeded to deliver a public address in which warned his audience that Germany was in the grip of a "revolt against reason, freedom and humanity." Dr. Richard M. Ebeling is the BB&T Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel in Charleston, SC.
Published in: EpicTimes.com
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Wednesday
March 2, 2016
4. Mark Kipphut announces candidacy for McLendon-Chisholm City Council Place 2
Mark Kipphut has announced he will be a candidate for the McLendon-Chisholm City Council Place 2. Current Place 2 Councilman Jack Pullen recently decided he will not seek re-election after faithfully serving the community for more than 30 years. The politically-conservative Kipphut has lived in McLendon-Chisholm since January 2014 after making Rockwall County his home since 2010. Kipphut served honorably in the United States Air Force for 26 years, retiring in the rank of colonel in 2005. A decorated war veteran, he has devoted his life to serving the nation and its citizens. From 2006 to 2013 he was a senior executive for the Raytheon Company, a Fortune 500 Aerospace and Defense Company. He first served as the director responsible for the strategic planning and investments guiding a major company portfolio in Arizona before moving to Texas to run three major programs providing critical capabilities to fight the war on terrorism. Kipphut has been married to Lorna Kipphut for 29 years, and they were blessed with one adult daughter who resides in Dallas. Kipphut graduated from The Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina, with a bachelor of arts degree and from Embry-Riddle University with a masters in business management degree.
Published in: Rockwall County Herald Banner
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Wednesday
March 2, 2016
5. A Bulldog in Paris: Citadel's Alex Glover to play football in France
Paris, the City of Lights, is known for food, fashion and ... football? That's where former Citadel wide receiver Alex Glover is headed to begin his professional football career, as a member of the "Paris Mousquetaires," one of many teams playing American football in Europe. And it is football and not soccer that Glover will be playing. "I made sure of that," laughed Glover, who departed Tuesday after a whirlwind courtship with the Musketeers. The former Wando High School standout typed his name into a website called europlayers.com, which serves as a data bank for athletes interested in playing American football in Europe. He set up a profile, uploaded some video, and started getting responses immediately. "Last Thursday, the offensive coordinator from the team in Paris called me and said he liked my film," said Glover, a 6-3, 227-pounder who was a three-year starter for the Bulldogs and caught eight passes for 136 yards and a touchdown last season. "He said, 'Can you be here in five days?' I've got nothing else going on, so I said sure."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
March 2, 2016
6. Citadel's Derrick Henry, Zane Najdawi named to all-SoCon teams
Citadel guard Derrick Henry and forward Zane Najdawi have been named to all-Southern Conference basketball teams in voting by the league's media. Henry, a graduate-student transfer from Winthrop, was named to the third-team all-SoCon squad, while the 6-7 Najdawi made the all-freshman team. Henry, a 6-3, 190-pounder from Covington, Ga., has averaged 16.2 points per game in his only season as a Bulldog, scoring more points this season (501) than in three seasons combined at Winthrop (482). Najdawi, from Midlothian, Va., averaged 7.2 points and 4.4 rebounds per game, and set a school freshman record for blocked shots with 60 thus far. Furman guard Stephen Croone was named player of the year by both coaches and media, and both groups chose Chattanooga's Matt McCall as coach of the year. The Citadel faces Mercer in the SoCon Tournament at 7:30 p.m. Friday in Asheville, N.C.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
March 2, 2016
7. USC baseball stays perfect with road win over The Citadel
South Carolina passed its first road test of the season Tuesday night, topping The Citadel 6-3 at Riley Park. Freshman right-hander Adam Hill was once again fantastic, striking out eight batters in five innings of work to earn the win. The Anderson native is 2-0 on the year and has yet to allow a run. Hill has 19 strikeouts in 11 innings pitched. "I'm just doing what the coaches tell me and putting pitches where they need to be," Hill said. "I'm just doing what I do and throwing my game. I guess that's what's allowed me to be successful." The Gamecocks (9-0) jumped out to a 5-0 lead, scoring four in the third inning as Alex Destino, Chris Cullen, DC Arendas and Marcus Mooney recorded RBIs. USC added a run in the fifth on an RBI double to left by Danny Blair before things got dicey. Sophomore Tyler Johnson came on in relief in the sixth and allowed three batters to reach before The Citadel's Drew Ellis doubled off the wall in left field to clear the bases and cut the lead to 5-3. Brandon Murray replaced Johnson and got out of the inning without allowing any further damage.
Published in: The State
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Tuesday
March 1, 2016
1. Women's History Month: Celebrating 20 years of women in the South Carolina Corps of Cadets
Women have been a part of The Citadel since its inception in 1842. They served in supportive roles as staff, nurses, mothers, sisters, girlfriends, company sponsors, and mentors, eventually becoming faculty and graduate students in the 1960s, and then members of the South Carolina Corp of Cadets in the 1990s. Read about some of the college's alumnae, take a look at a slideshow with photos, old and new; a video showing the current roles of female cadets, and a timeline of events as we explore the evolution of women at The Citadel. View the site to explore the timeline, featured women, featured events, news about Citadel women and a photo slideshow.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Tuesday
March 1, 2016
2. Upcoming News from The Citadel - March
Events include - 2nd Annual Boeing Women's Leadership Day: Understanding the Place of Women in Industry, Friends of the Daniel Library Lecture: Celebrating Women's History Month with Provost Connie Ledoux Book, Greater Issues Series presentation with Governor Nikki Haley, Leah Suarez: A Celebration of Women in Jazz, Citadel Graduate College to host spring open house, Symposium on Southern Politics, The Annual Massing of the Colors, 9th Annual Principled Leadership Symposium and Corps Day Weekend, 8th Annual Citadel Academy of Science and Mathematics Awards Banquet, Scholarship at Its Best: An Evening with the authors and editors of The Gold Star Journal, Citadel Student Research Conference, 6th Annual Beautiful Bulldog Contest and 7th Annual Citadel Directors' Institute.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Tuesday
March 1, 2016
3. At The Citadel, hoping to outrun history, NCAA tournament drought
There are 351 teams playing Division I basketball, 160 of which have been in the NCAA's top tier since it was formed before the 1948-49 season. Of those original members, five - Army, The Citadel, Northwestern, St. Francis of Brooklyn and William and Mary - have never played in its signature event, the NCAA tournament. For five weeks leading up to the conference tournaments, The Washington Post has examined each of them. On a small coffee table next to the window in Duggar Baucom's office sits a single book: Pat Conroy's "My Losing Season," which chronicles Conroy's senior year as point guard and captain for The Citadel, when the Bulldogs went 8-17 in 1966-67. Baucom keeps the book visible because Conroy, a best-selling novelist, is one of the school's best-known graduates, but also because it reminds him why he was hired in spring 2015 as the 30th men's basketball coach at the South Carolina military college. "They hired me to change that," Baucom said with a smile. "Since I took the job, people have said to me, 'Duggar, they've never really come close to making the NCAA tournament.' My answer to that is, 'That's why I'm here.'"
Published in: Washington Post
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Tuesday
March 1, 2016
4. Corps Day Weekend 2016
Corps Day at The Citadel began with an annual celebration of the college's birthday and the cutting of a giant cake that cadets shared. It has since grown to become one of the most highly attended weekend events at The Military College of South Carolina. The college will celebrate the 173rd birthday of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets with a series of events held March 18 - 19. Attractions on campus will include a dress parade, awards presentations, cadet military performances and athletics events, all preceeded by The Principled Leadership Symposium. Please view the article for the full 2016 Corps Day Schedule of events.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Tuesday
March 1, 2016
5. Presenting the Class of 2017 Summerall Guards
Earning the title Summerall Guard is one of the highest honors that can be achieved by a member of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets at The Citadel. Each winter, cadets who are juniors endure weeks of rigorous physical training and drilling in an attempt to be named a member of the platoon for their senior year. The competitions for the newest guards were completed Feb. 24, and amoung the competitors was Cameron Massengale, who earned a place in the group, despite having lost his hand his freshman year. Consisting of 61 members, all of the Summerall Guards were chosen for their physical stamina and drill proficiency. The platoon's purpose is to exemplify, through a unique series of movements based on the old German close-order drill, the exactness and thoroughness with which a cadet is trained. The drill, which has never been written down, is performed to a silent count. Each year's platoon takes responsibility for teaching the precise drill to the upcoming unit. Massengale, who is from Greenville, South Carolina, lost his hand in an accident at a butcher shop where he worked during the summer of 2014. He was a rising sophomore at The Citadel then. Now, as a junior, he has learned to hunt and fly-fish one-handed, but the Summerall Guard rifle drills required something more. Hanger Clinic, a nationally-known prosthetics provider, worked closely with Massengale on a series of specially developed prosthetic devices designed to help him twirl and manuever a drill rifle, making competing for the Summerall Guards a possibility.
Published in: Moultrie News
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Tuesday
March 1, 2016
6. Citadel Foundation executive earns doctoral degree
The Citadel Foundation proudly announces that Chief Executive Officer John P. (Jay) Dowd III, has earned the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree in Educational Administration, with a cognate in Public Administration, from the University of South Carolina. Dowd currently serves as the CEO of The Citadel Foundation and Vice President for Institutional Advancement at The Citadel in Charleston. Previously he served as Vice President for Development and Executive Director of the Francis Marion University Education Foundation. He earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in history from Winthrop University in 1989 and a Master of Education degree from USC in 1993. Dowd's degree and doctoral hood were conferred upon him during a ceremony at the Koger Center for the Arts on the campus of USC in December 2015. His doctoral thesis, titled Understanding Generosity at Military Colleges and Universities: Characteristics and Motivations of Major.
Published in: LowcountryBizSC.com
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Tuesday
March 1, 2016
7. Who's the Best Republican Candidate With a Gun?
Donald Trump holds up a replica flintlock rifle awarded to him by cadets during the Republican Society Patriot Dinner at The Citadel Military College in Charleston, South Carolina, on February 22, 2015. He has said nobody loves the Second Amendment more than his family members. It's no surprise that the five remaining Republican candidates vow to overturn President Obama's recent executive actions on gun control and tout their love of the Second Amendment. But which of them is really the best shot? Short of having them compete in competition, it's a pretty good bet that the mild-mannered Ben Carson might be the best since he actually had some military training in the ROTC, while the rest are amateur shooters. Of course, gun-control advocates often take up arms, too. Bill Clinton, John Kerry and others have gone on hunting trips, all the better to show that their beef is not with hunting, but with the easy accessibility of handguns and semi-automatic weapons. None of the current GOP candidates grew up in a rural environment where hunting was a part of daily life, although John Kasich's upbringing in western Pennsylvania is closer to that than Rubio's Miami or Trump’s Queens. So here's what we know about the would-be commanders-in-chief.
Published in: Newsweek
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Tuesday
March 1, 2016
8. Different kind of home game awaits T.J. Hopkins as Gamecocks meet The Citadel
T.J. Hopkins learned from his father to keep an even-keeled demeanor. But taking the field before 7,000 spectators as a freshman on South Carolina's opening day was one of those moments he couldn't help but let sink in. "I'm going to remember it for the rest of my life," said the Summerville High School graduate. "...I knew from coming to games (here) that there are a lot of people, and it gets real loud. But it was still overwhelming." The Gamecocks outfielder could face a similar moment Tuesday in a different kind of home game - this one at Riley Park where USC meets The Citadel at 7 p.m. It's the only contest in Charleston this season for Hopkins, part of a class of newcomers that has revamped South Carolina (8-0) off to an unbeaten start. The former Green Wave star is off to a promising start of his own, tying the school record with two outfield assists in his first game and smashing a three-run homer against Winthrop. While he faces the same adjustment to college pitching as every freshman, he's started six games and is tied for fourth on the team with five RBIs.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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