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About Today's News Clips
"Today's News Clips" is published into your e-mail box on normal Citadel business days, and contains links to recent news about The Citadel, the state of South Carolina, and other topics of interest to professionals working at institutes of higher education.
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The Citadel in the News: Archive

February 2016

PUBLISH DATE STORIES
Monday
February 29, 2016
1. Cadet Cameron Massengale earns place with Citadel's Summerall Guards
Citadel cadet with prosthetic hand earns slot on elite drill platoon. In 2014, we caught up with Cameron Massengale. You may remember him from earlier this year as he was training to become a member of the prestigious Summerall Guards. We've learned tonight, that he did it. Massengale is a member of that elite drill platoon now and being a member of the Summerall Guards is one of the highest honors one can achieve at The Citadel. Congratulations Cameron as well as to upstate natives Brett Alberston, Nathan Chew, Anthony Crosby, William Ferguson, Mason Garrett, Avery Hyatt, Michael Newton, and Cory Taylor.
Broadcast on: WYFF-TV Greenville, SC
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Monday
February 29, 2016
2. Former Charleston Mayor Joseph Riley on Palmetto Primary, Church Shootings and the Clintons
Former Mayor Joseph Riley of Charleston previews South Carolina's Democratic primary and discusses the church shootings and the Clintons on "With All Due Respect." Click the article to view the video.
Broadcast on: Bloomberg.com
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Monday
February 29, 2016
3. Madison, Chatham, Florham Park college students earn degrees, honors
Cadet Patrick Zimmerman of Madison was named to the Dean's List for the fall 2015 semester at the Citadel in Charleston, S.C.
Published in: Madison Eagle
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Monday
February 29, 2016
4a. Attorney: Experience, energy make him ideal candidate for 11th Circuit solicitor
One attorney has stepped forward to say he will file for the head prosecutor position for the 11th Circuit this election cycle. Larry Wedekind, of Lexington, said it's time for change in the 11th Judicial Circuit solicitor's office, and he thinks he brings the "experience and energy" needed. "I bring a depth of experience," Wedekind said, adding he has 18 years of practicing law exclusively on the prosecution end. "I have experience in state, local and military courts with overseas experience working with different levels of government." Wedekind worked under current 11th Circuit Solicitor Donnie Myers for 12 years before he started working in the S.C. Attorney General's Office as a prosecutor for the State Grand Jury. After two years in that position, he resigned Thursday in order to be a qualified candidate for the solicitor's job... Wedekind is a Baltimore native, but has lived in South Carolina since becoming a student at The Citadel. After graduating from The Citadel in 1985, he was in active duty for nine years in both the Marine Corp and the Navy. He then went to law school at the University of South Carolina in 1997 and got his first job in the S.C. Attorney General's Office as an assistant attorney general for two years. He also worked in the Fifth Judicial Circuit for Richland County for three years prior to going to work in the 11th Judicial Circuit.
Broadcast on: WIS-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
February 29, 2016
4b. 'A Thousand Naked Strangers' a wild, winding ride
In the summer of 1997, Kevin Hazzard was leading a Jet Ski tour when he heard two riders collide. Thud. He zipped toward the wreckage, unsure of what to expect, and found the riders floating in red water. One looked surprised. The other was missing his mouth. Hazzard, then a teenager, had never witnessed such gore. He didn't stay calm. He didn't swiftly summon help. He did, instead, what bystanders are asked not to do in an emergency: He panicked. A Thousand Naked Strangers, his memoir of 10 years as a paramedic in accident-prone Atlanta, is a wild, winding ride toward redemption. The author makes up for his inaction that day... Hazzard, a graduate of The Citadel, a military college in South Carolina, watches his college buddies deploy to Iraq. They're off risking their lives, testing their manhood. He chose to follow his writing passion and became a journalist, often stuck in snoozy city council meetings, still haunted by the Jet Ski crash.
Published in: Concord Monitor
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Monday
February 29, 2016
5a. The Citadel Sweeps Siena with 6-4 win
Fueled by a five-run eighth inning, the Bulldogs completed the sweep of Siena on Sunday with a 6-4 victory. With the win, this is the first time in six years that the Bulldogs have started the season 5-1. Drew Ellis delivered for The Citadel in the bottom of the eighth, crushing a ball to right center field to score the runners on first and third and tie the game at 3-3. It was just the second triple of the sophomore's career. Ellis then plated the go-ahead run after an error by the left fielder allowed him to give the Bulldogs the lead for good. Ellis finished the day with three RBI and went two-for-two. Jacob Watcher and Jason Smith also recorded two hits for the Bulldogs. The Citadel used eight pitchers in the contest including three freshmen hurlers and five upperclassmen. Philip Watcher made his first start of the season on the mound and went three innings, giving up three hits and allowing just one run to score while fanning three. Kyle Smith picked up his first win of the season in relief, striking out two of the four batters he faced, and Zach Lavery earned his third save of the season. As a staff, the Bulldogs struck out 10 batters.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
February 29, 2016
5b. Bulldogs Rally for 3-2 Win over Siena
The Citadel baseball team rallied for a 3-2 win over Siena on Saturday afternoon at Joe Riley Park. Jason Smith's walk off RBI single in the bottom of the ninth capped off a three-run rally over the final two innings for the Bulldogs (4-1). Philip Watcher got things started for the Bulldogs in the ninth with a leadoff walk and then advanced to second on a sacrifice bunt by William Kinney. That would bring Jacob Watcher to the plate who singled to right and advanced to second on an errant thrown by the right fielder. Philip Watcher advanced to third on the same play and then scampered home for the tying run after the throwing error. That would bring Smith to the plate who singled down the right field line and plated Watcher from second base giving the Bulldogs their best start to a season since 2013. Smith finished the contest two-for-three and Mike Deese had another strong day at the plate, collecting three hits. Thomas Byelick got the start on the bump for The Citadel and pitched a career-high eight innings, allowing just two runs and fanning four. Zach Lavery picked up the win for the Bulldogs in relief.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
February 29, 2016
5c. Bulldogs Cruise to Series-Opening Win
The Citadel baseball team opened the weekend series with a dominant 14-2 win over Siena on Friday. For the first time since May 22, 2015, every starter recorded a hit for the Bulldogs (3-1) en route to the victory. Phillip Watcher, Mike Deese, Stephen Windham and William Kinney all recorded multiple hits for The Citadel. Windham also collected three RBI in the contest and is batting .429 this season. The Bulldogs had no trouble connecting with any of the three Saints' pitchers as eight of the nine starters tallied a run in the game. JP Sears picked up his second win of the season, allowing just two runs and scattering six hits in 6.2 innings. Jacob Watcher closed things out for the Bulldogs, striking out a season-best four batters and allowing just one hit in two innings of work. The Citadel returns to the field on Saturday for the second game of the series against Siena (0-6) at 2 p.m. Following the game, players will be available for autographs and posters will be provided.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
February 29, 2016
6. VMI Beats The Citadel 111-95
The Citadel basketball team (10-21, 3-15) dropped a road contest at VMI 111-95 on Saturday afternoon at Cameron Hall. Junior Brian White posted a season-high 23 points and grabbed seven rebounds to lead five Bulldogs in double figures. White went 7-of-9 from the field and poured in 41 combined points in two games this week. VMI shot 55.6 percent from the floor as a team on the Keydets' senior day to race out to a lead and earn the win. VMI's Q.J. Peterson led all scorers with 26 points and added 11 rebounds to secure a double-double. The Bulldogs forced just eight turnovers on Saturday, well under their season average of 17.4 per outing. Senior point guard P.J. Boutte tallied 10 points and seven assists in the losing effort. He now has 175 assists on the season, which ranks second all-time in The Citadel history for a single campaign. Boutte needs just five more assists to break the record. Senior Derrick Henry scored 15 points on Saturday and is 17 points shy of joining the 1000-point club entering the Southern Conference tournament. Freshman Matt Frierson and junior Warren Sledge added 10 points each. Sledge hit back-to-back three-pointers to help the Bulldogs open the game with a bang. The two teams traded buckets early as VMI held a slim 14-13 lead at the 13:50 mark. The Keydets, fueled by a raucous home crowd, distanced themselves with a game-changing 15-4 run. Following a trey by Julian Eleby, VMI led 29-17 and maintained that edge despite White's ability to score inside and out. The junior made three three-pointers in the first half to keep the Bulldogs in it and had 11 points by halftime. VMI took a 55-46 advantage into the break.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
February 29, 2016
7. Citadel ready to loosen reins on QB Dominique Allen
This time last year, the quarterback position at The Citadel was somewhat less than certain. Dominique Allen was the front-runner to win the starting job before injuring his knee during spring practice. That forced Cam Jackson to move over from slotback to quarterback. And then Shon Belton blurred the picture even further with a standout performance in the spring game. One year later, the situation is a tad clearer. Allen beat out Jackson last fall to earn the starting job and led the Bulldogs to a 9-4 record, a Southern Conference title and playoff victory, and an upset of SEC member South Carolina. Needless to say, Allen is firmly entrenched as the starting quarterback as the Bulldogs begin spring practice this week. The main questions: How can the 6-1, 214-pound junior improve over a standout sophomore season? And what is the situation behind him?
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
February 29, 2016
8. Mitjans Hired As The Citadel's Cornerbacks Coach
Orlando Mitjans Jr., who has more than 30 years of experience coaching defensive backs, has been hired as The Citadel's cornerbacks coach, head coach Brent Thompson announced Friday. "I am excited that we are able to bring Coach Mitjans to our staff," Coach Thompson said. "As we went through the process of identifying the best person to come in and help us build on the championship standard we have established, his qualifications immediately stood out to me. He has experience at the FCS level and at a military institution and has had a great deal of success in both environments." Coach Mitjans joins The Citadel from Army, where he spent two seasons at West Point coaching the Black Knights' cornerbacks. His previous FCS coaching spots include Georgia Southern, Eastern Kentucky and Tennessee State, where he coached Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie, an All-American and the 16th overall pick in the 2008 NFL Draft, and Anthony Levine. Rodgers-Cromartie played in Super Bowl XLIII and Super Bowl XLVIII and has twice been selected to the Pro Bowl during the first eight seasons of his NFL career. Levine signed with the Green Bay Packers as an undrafted free agent and is a two-time Super Bowl champion, having won Super Bowl XLV as a member of the Packers and Super Bowl XLVII with the Baltimore Ravens. "I am thrilled for this opportunity to join Coach Thompson's staff," Coach Mitjans said. "The last six years with Coach Jeff Monken at Georgia Southern and Army have been wonderful for me as I have learned from a fantastic leader who is a tremendous builder of men. I have always had a deep respect for the individuals at The Citadel, and I remember how tough our games against them were when I was in the conference. I have seen the amount of dedication it takes to be successful on the field, in the classroom and within the Corps of Cadets at a military institution, and I'm looking forward to bringing my abilities to help continue developing leaders on and off the field."
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Friday
February 26, 2016
1. Presenting the Class of 2017 Summerall Guards
Earning the title Summerall Guard is one of the highest honors that can be achieved by a member of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets at The Citadel. Each winter, cadets who are juniors endure weeks of rigorous physical training and drilling in an attempt to be named a member of the platoon for their senior year. The competitions for the newest guards were completed Feb. 24, and amoung the competitors was Cameron Massengale, who earned a place on the elite platoon, despite having lost his hand his freshman year. Consisting of 61 members, all the Summerall Guards were chosen for their physical stamina and drill proficiency. The platoon's purpose is to exemplify, through a unique series of movements based on the old German close-order drill, the exactness and thoroughness with which a cadet is trained. The drill, which has never been written down, is performed to a silent count. Each year's platoon takes responsibility for teaching the precise drill to the upcoming unit. Massengale, who is from Greenville, South Carolina, lost his hand in an accident at a butcher shop where he worked during the summer of 2014. He was a rising sophomore at The Citadel then. Now, as a junior, he has learned to and fly-fish one-handed, but the Summerall Guard rifle drills required something more. Please view the article to see the list of the Class of 2017 Summerall Guards.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Friday
February 26, 2016
2. What Road For America - Liberty Or Political Plunder?
Presidential election years, more than many others, focuses our attention on politics, those running for political office, and the promises the competing candidates make to sway our allegiance and votes toward one or some of them in comparison to others. They want us to give them political power by promising to use that power to benefit some of us in ways that can only come at the expense of others in society. This fundamental truth about the reality of modern-day politics gets blurred in the hoopla of whose ahead in the public opinion polls, which candidate has the most charm or cunning, and what forms do their attacks on each other take. We need to step back and look at things in terms of "first principles" if the entire process and its consequences are to be put into focus and perspective. Otherwise, we get lost in all the minutia of daily media news spins, and forget what it is really all about. Dr. Richard M. Ebeling is the BB&T Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel in Charleston, SC.
Published in: EpicTimes.com
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Friday
February 26, 2016
3. Dawn Bennett Interviews Richard Ebeling, professor at The Citadel
DAWN BENNETT: Richard Ebeling is the BB&T distinguished professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina. He is also the author of hundreds of articles on free market policy themes, including on the dangers of inflation and the benefits of the gold backed money and monetary freedom. He has testified before the House of Representatives Subcommittee on Monetary Policy. On February 3rd of this year, Ebeling wrote an article about the Federal Reserve for the National Center for Policy Analysis. Richard, welcome to Financial Myth Busting. EBELING: Thank you for having me on. It's a pleasure to be with you today. BENNETT: You recently authored a study on the behalf of the National Center for Policy Analysis that argues that the monetary uncertainty created by the Federal Reserve could be easily fixed through a return the gold standard. And you argue that the central bank itself is a form of socialism. Since we have a central bank, are you therefore arguing our monetary system is socialist? EBELING: Well, in the traditional way, socialism was always defined as the government ownership, control, and directing of the means of production. In this case, through the central bank, which is a chartered agency of the U.S. congress, now a little over a hundred years old, the Federal Reserve has control over the amount of money in the economy, what can be used as money in the economy, can influence changes in the quantity of money in the economy. And therefore, by changing the supply of something, can determine its value or price in the marketplace; that is, what each dollar in our pocket can buy over goods and services. And because of its oversight responsibility for the banking system of the United States, it has an ability to influence interest rates and the direction that investment and other types of borrowing are going on in the United States. As a consequence, it is not too much of an exaggeration to refer to our monetary system as a socialist-like monetary regime.
Published in: ReleaseWire.com
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Friday
February 26, 2016
4. UNC Greensboro beats The Citadel 92-63
Francis Alonso was 5 of 8 from 3-point range with 21 points, Marvin Smith had 18 points and 16 rebounds and UNC Greensboro beat The Citadel 92-63 on Thursday night. Diante Baldwin added 15 for the Spartans (13-17, 9-8 Southern Conference), who led the entire way to a fourth straight win. Brian White had 18 points and Derrick Henry scored 13 for The Citadel (10-20, 3-14), which dropped its eighth straight. Alonso's 3-pointer with 11:43 left in the first half capped a 25-10 start for UNCG. The Bulldogs got no closer than 13 the rest of the way and the Spartans led by as many as 35. The Spartans shot 50.8 percent from the field, including 44 percent from 3-point range (11 of 25). The Citadel shot 27.0 percent and just 10 of 39 on 3-point range.
Published in: CBSSports.com
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Friday
February 26, 2016
5. Former Jacket reaches national rifle championship
Lee County High School graduate Morgan Long, now a sophomore at The Citadel, won a state championship, finished second in another event and earned a berth into the USA Shooting Rifle and Pistol National Junior Olympic Championships at the North Carolina State Junior Olympic Championships. Long won the men's air rifle title and finished runner-up in the men's 3-P smallbore rifle at the N.C. State Junior Olympic Championships, held at The Citadel in December, earning his place to the national championships in both events.
Published in: The Sanford Herald
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Friday
February 26, 2016
6. The Citadel Opens Home Schedule Saturday
The Citadel tennis team hosts its first home match of 2016 on Saturday against Appalachian State. The Bulldogs (7-9) have already earned their highest win total in a season since 2008. The Citadel's six-match winning streak, the program's longest since at least 2001, was stopped at No. 25 Florida State last weekend. Sophomore Nicholas Bradley and freshmen Michael Anzalone and Matthew Henson are tied for the team lead with seven singles victories. Bradley has two wins at No. 1 and five at No. 2, while Henson has two victories at No. 2 and five at No. 3 and Anzalone, who earned wins last weekend against Florida State and Florida A&M, has three wins at No. 5 and four at No. 6. Sophomore Artemie Amari has played No. 1 singles in each of his matches so far this season and is 6-6 against the opponents' top player. Amari has teamed up with Bradley to be the Bulldogs' best doubles duo with a record of 6-5 at No. 1. Freshman Roy Hobson also has six singles victories courtesy of a 4-0 mark at No. 4 and two wins at No. 5 in the lineup. Appalachian State (5-3) enters Saturday's match on a three-match winning streak. The Mountaineers' winning streak started after a 6-1 loss at ETSU in their only other competition against a Southern Conference opponent so far this season. The Bulldogs and Mountaineers are set for a 1 p.m. first serve at the Earle Tennis Center. Admission is free.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Friday
February 26, 2016
7. Battle commits to the University of Tulsa
Abbeville High School basketball player Joseph Battle committed to the University of Tulsa on Thursday night. The senior announced on Twitter that he would join the Golden Hurricane program. The decision comes a day after Tulsa head coach Frank Haith attended Abbeville's 84-59 victory against Blacksburg on Wednesday at Erskine College. Battle had 13 college offers, including Coastal Carolina, South Carolina St. and The Citadel. The Class AA player of the year is averaging 31.3 points and 6.9 rebounds per game. Abbeville's next game is 3:30 p.m. Saturday at the Bon Secours Wellness Arena in Greenville, where the Panthers will play Keenan in the AA Upper State Class final.
Published in: Index-Journal
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Thursday
February 25, 2016
1a. Joe Riley brings lessons from City Hall to The Citadel and the College of Charleston
Former Charleston Mayor Joe Riley could coast after leading the city for 40 years, but his job at The Citadel, speaking engagements and fundraising for the International African American Museum have kept him pedaling. Riley, 73, said he took his family out to lunch after John Tecklenburg's inauguration Jan. 11, then he went to work at The Citadel that afternoon. And since then, he has been serving as the military college's first occupant of the Joseph P. Riley Jr. Endowed Chair of American Government and Public Policy. Riley graduated from the state's military college in 1964. Riley said later in January, he took a week off, and he and his wife Charlotte had a vacation in Jamaica. That's where they spent their honeymoon, more than 49 years ago. And unlike when he was mayor, he has more free evenings and weekends now. He walks more and gets to the gym more often than he used to, he said. "I don't take my health for granted." "I'm very busy," Riley said, "although not as busy as I was at City Hall." He's proud the people of Charleston kept him in office so long, he said. And he misses many of the wonderful people he worked with at the city. "But I'm happy," he said. He also said that many people sent him notes and cards when he stepped down, but he hasn't had time to acknowledge them all. "I don't have the staff I used to have," he said. At The Citadel, Riley so far played a key role in scheduling a Greater Issues Address with internationally acclaimed author and speaker David McCullough, and he has been a guest lecturer in several political science courses.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
February 25, 2016
1b. Things To Do Thursday, February 25, 2016: 'The Mayor'
'The Mayor' What: Former Charleston mayor Joe Riley, now a professor of American government and public policy with The Citadel, will join author and Post & Courier columnist Brian Hicks to discuss Hicks' new book, "The Mayor: Joe Riley and the Rise of Charleston." When: 6:45 p.m. Feb. 25 Where: Holliday Alumni Center, The Citadel, 171 Moultrie St., downtown Charleston Price: Free and open to the public More Info: 843-324-9505
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
February 25, 2016
2. SC Cyber consortium to educate, tackle cyber threats
Several South Carolina leaders announced their plan to combat cybercrime Wednesday, a problem state residents are all too familiar with. University of South Carolina President Harris Pastides said the newly created SC Cyber consortium will educate students, government officials and businesses on cyber-security skills that will create and attract jobs in the growing technology industry to the state. "SC Cyber will provide something we don't do well enough in South Carolina or anywhere in the United States and that's to link technology with better policy and law," Pastides said. "Our nation will be better prepared to address threats of today and those we can't foresee tomorrow." Pastides wouldn't weigh in on the current encryption debate between Apple and the Federal Bureau of Investigation over unlocking one of the San Bernadino terrorists' cell phones, but cited it as an example that the USC School of Law would analyze in its role with SC Cyber. Cybercrime hits close to home for South Carolinians. In 2012, the state Department of Revenue was breached, compromising the personal information of 3.8 million taxpayers, nearly 2 million dependents and 700,000 businesses. Gov. Nikki Haley said the breach keeps cyber-security on her mind... Large and small technology companies IBM and Wave Science are partnering with USC along with USC Aiken, the College of Charleston, The Citadel, and state technical colleges. Business owners, executives and government workers will also be able to train on combating cyber threats alongside students when courses start this summer.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
February 25, 2016
3. South Carolina Cyber Security Initiative
South Carolina launches new cyber security initiative. "What are the newest and latest ways that they are trying to hack? What are the vulnerabilities that we need to be watching for? How can we educate the private sector so that they know how to protect themselves? Are we training our newest students on what cybersecurity is and how they need to be thinking going into this next era," Gov. Nikki Haley. The program is housed at the University of South Carolina but also involves the National Guard, Chamber of Commerce, Clemson, The Citadel and College of Charleston. Training will be important because hackers try to get employees to respond to emails that look legitimate.
Broadcast on: WCBD-TV Charleston, SC
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Thursday
February 25, 2016
4. Hartsville homeschool students 'Storm the Citadel'
Ten students from Hartsville Home Educators' Physical Science class attended the 6th annual "Storm the Citadel" competition at The Citadel in Charleston recently and earned third place for accuracy. Led by Dr. John C. Ropp III and Amie McIntosh, the team, dubbed HART Attack, took on the S.T.E.M. Trebuchet Competition challenge as an extra project to enhance their physics education. Working since the beginning of the year, the students used an original design to build a medieval throwing weapon called a trebuchet. Students constructed the wood and metal device from scratch to meet contest specifications, which required teams to launch a rubber ball a distance somewhere between 50 and 200 feet. As the exact distance from the target would not be revealed until the day of the contest, the students tested and adjusted their machine over the last several weeks to be ready for any given distance. The team members were also required to submit a design report and graphs that showed their engineering ability. They competed in a field of 22 middle-school teams, most hailing from counties around the Charleston area, but all from South Carolina. This year's distance was 135 feet, and the HART Attack team bested five other teams in a first heat to make it to the final round of six teams. "We are really proud of our students' ability and performance! It was an exciting day to see their hard work come to bear fruit," said McIntosh.
Published in: SCNow.com
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Thursday
February 25, 2016
5. Effort to bring back Holy City Bike Co-op is due to need for low-cost repairs, bikes
I think it's safe to say that Charleston is a dynamic place to live. Things come and go. Some die. Some grow. And while of a lot of that has to do with the area's growing population and economy, some of it is due to the ebb and flow of young adults coming to town for an education at the College of Charleston, The Citadel and the Medical University of South Carolina. The Holy City Bike Co-op is an example of that. It started in 2008 as a grassroots local cycling group, organizing social rides and volunteer bike maintenance. It basically faded away four years later as founding members either moved from the area or moved on with their adult lives. (You know the formula: marriage-careers-kids, not necessarily in that order.) But Sylvie Baele, the sister of one of those founding members, Cedric Baele, is trying to revive it and will be part of the third annual Charleston DIY Festival, 1-4 p.m. Saturday at the Charleston County Library's main branch on Calhoun Street. The festival is a community-led event bringing an array of organizations together to provide knowledge and networking for "doing it yourself" and will be one of the signs of HCBC's reincarnation. "Holy City Bike Co-op fell apart when several of the founding members moved away from Charleston. The torch was not adequately passed to the remaining members and then they lost their (operations) space," says Baele, who works as bicycle advisor and event coordinator for Trek Bicycle Store of Mount Pleasant.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
February 25, 2016
6. Sapakoff: Miffed with 10-19 Citadel record? Sledge says 'Believe'
Warren Sledge was in The Citadel basketball locker room last March when he found out Duggar Baucom was coming from VMI to take over as Bulldogs head coach. He and teammates, having faced the Keydets three times last season, knew what to expect from Baucom's signature barrage of 3-point shots. They were excited. "It was a life-changer, to say the least," said Sledge, a 6-3 junior guard. Almost a year later, The Citadel is not better off on paper. "Duggarball" has boosted the points per game output from 64.0 in Chuck Driesell's sluggish system to 87.1. That's the fun part. But the Bulldogs are giving up 92.7 points per game, up from 68.6 last season. That's frequently annoying. Going into a Thursday night game at UNC-Greensboro, The Citadel is 10-19 overall and 3-13 in the Southern Conference. Driesell was fired last March after going 11-19 (6-12 in the SoCon). Sledge is still excited, and has thrived with a green light to shoot 3s and open space to make layups (10.3 points per game, team-leading 38 percent from 3-point range). If you're a Citadel basketball fan, he wants you to continue to embrace the pace. "They just have to believe in us," Sledge said Wednesday. "We believe in ourselves. We'll be fine. We just need the fans to believe in us, too."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
February 25, 2016
7. Citadel baseball: Friday's Game Moved to 4 p.m.
The Citadel baseball team's contest against Siena on Friday, Feb. 26th, has been moved up to 4 p.m. The game, originally scheduled for 5 p.m., has been moved up an hour due to colder weather in the forecast. The schedule for the rest of the weekend remains the same with Saturday's game starting at 2 p.m. and first pitch Sunday set for 1 p.m. Meet the Bulldog sponsored by Substation will also be held after the conclusion of Saturday's game. Posters will be provided for fans and players will be available for autographs. Live stats and video will be available for all three games in the series at CitadelSports.com. For tickets, call 843-953-DOGS (3647) or visit CitadelSports.com/tickets.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Thursday
February 25, 2016
8. Mic'd Up: Coach Thompson
The Citadel football head coach Brent Thompson wore a microphone to give fans an inside look at his first spring practice held Tuesday afternoon. The defending co-Southern Conference champion Bulldogs are back on the practice field Thursday afternoon and continue spring practices through March 24. The spring game is scheduled for March 19 at 1 p.m. inside Johnson Hagood Stadium.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Wednesday
February 24, 2016
1. Riley giving guest lectures at The Citadel
Two hours after leaving his post in January as mayor of Charleston, Joe Riley arrived at The Citadel to start work as an endowed chair of American government and public policy, according to a news release from the military college. Since transitioning, he has been a guest lecturer in several political science courses, and he played a key role in scheduling two-time Pulitzer Prize winner David McCullough to speak to cadets this month, the news release said. "Mayor Riley is widely considered to be one of the most influential mayors in American history," Citadel cadet Wilson Hope, a political science major, said in the news release. "The entire corps is excited to have such a well-known and respected leader on campus." In March, Riley will be a panelist in a discussion on the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church shooting and the Charleston Strong movement during the 2016 Principled Leadership Symposium. He will also deliver the keynote address at The Citadel's Symposium on Southern Politics. "I am so pleased to have the opportunity to share my experiences over the last 40 years with cadets and students at The Citadel, especially as I used to sit in one of those seats," Riley said in the news release. "I will continue to serve the city of Charleston by teaching these young leaders who will one day go out into our community and serve across many different sectors."
Published in: Charleston Regional Business Journal
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Wednesday
February 24, 2016
2. Citadel alumni Marvin G. Carder
Marvin G. Carder has been selected for promotion to the rank of major in the Air Force. Carder is currently serving as Chief, Next Generation GPS Control System Block 1, with Global Positioning Systems Directorate, Los Angeles Air Force Base, CA. He has served in the military for nine years. Carder is the son of Deborah Williams of Columbia, and Marvin G. Carder of Myrtle Beach, and the brother of Charles Carder of Lexington. He is the son-in-law of Dede Burton of Annapolis, MD, and John Burton of Pawley's Island. He is a 2002 graduate of Dutch Fork High School, Irmo. He earned a bachelor's degree in 2006 from The Citadel, Charleston.
Published in: The Northeast News
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Wednesday
February 24, 2016
3. Birthday of Carl Menger, Founder of the Austrian School of Economics
Today is Austrian Economist, Carl Menger's birthday, Born on February 23, 1840, he died on February 26, 1921. In an article that appears today on the website of the Future of Freedom Foundation, I offer an appreciation and explanation of Menger's contributions to economics, both as a developer of the theory of marginal utility and as founder of the Austrian School of Economics. With Menger's "Principles of Economics" (1871) the fundamental ideas of the Austrian School were formulated; individualism, subjectivism, and a market process approach that emphasized the elements of causality, time and uncertainty in the very conception of human action and choice. In addition, Menger offered a theory of social "spontaneous order" that highlighted the origin and evolution of human institutions including language and law, money and markets, custom and tradition, and many others, outside and independent of government decrees and commands. Dr. Richard M. Ebeling is the BB & T Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina, He was formerly professor of Economics at Northwood University. Was formerly president of The Foundation for Economic Education (FEE), was the Ludwig von Mises Professor of Economics at Hillsdale College in Hillsdale, Michigan, and served as president of academic affairs for The Future of Freedom Foundation (FFF).
Published in: NassauInstitute.org
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Wednesday
February 24, 2016
4. Democrats' Dilemma and America's Worst Nightmare
The crown of entitlement sits comfortably upon the former First Lady’s coiffure. That Faustian bargain was made in the last millennia when her Royal Hillaryness "stood by her man." Hillary Clinton will take S.C. over Bernie Sanders. In a completely predictable move, Rep. Jim Clyburn, U.S. House Minority Whip, pledged to support Clinton. He played coy for a short while, undoubtedly to work a deal before committing, but his support was inevitable. If Jim Webb had stayed long enough in the race, I would have liked to have seen him meet with S.C. Democrats and offer a reasonable alternative to Clinton. It is too bad that Democrats did not give Martin O'Malley a chance, either. Although not the strongest governor's record for the foundation of a presidential campaign, he doesn't have the corrupt baggage of the Clintons, and he is not a socialist. Bernie Sanders is an interesting alternative, but he won't draw the votes needed in S.C. The state party holds a strict allegiance to the party machine, and that means they will support Clinton in this cycle. S.C. Democrats have a strong grassroots organization that is well entrenched. However, in the past two years or so significant cracks in the Democrats' political structure have widened quietly. Paige Lewis is an adjunct history professor and freelance writer in Charleston, S.C. She graduated Queens College in Charlotte, N.C. with a B.A. in history and drama, with a minor in political science. She earned her master's degree in American history from the University of Charleston and The Citadel joint graduate studies program.
Published in: TownHall.com
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Wednesday
February 24, 2016
5. As Brent Thompson era begins, same plan for Citadel football
Citadel football underwent big changes in the offseason, with new names in the key positions of head coach, offensive coordinator and defensive coordinator. But as spring practice began Tuesday under new head coach Brent Thompson, things didn't look much different. Even the familiar no-see-um bugs were out to greet the Bulldogs on a warm, sunny day. "We're going to do what we do," is how senior linebacker Tevin Floyd put it. "We're just going to do it better." That's the game plan set out by Thompson, who was promoted from offensive coordinator to replace Mike Houston, who left after just two seasons at The Citadel for James Madison. A team that went 9-4 in 2015, won a share of the Southern Conference title and a playoff game and upset SEC member South Carolina is not in need of an overhaul, but some fine-tuning, the thinking goes. "We are going to work on some things that we may not have been so good at during the course of last season," Thompson said. At a team meeting earlier Tuesday, Thompson laid out those problem areas. "There were some deficiencies last year," said Thompson, whose triple-option offense led the SoCon in rushing offense (347 yards per game) and was second in scoring offense (30.8 points per game) in 2015.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
February 24, 2016
6. Ex-Citadel great Everette Sands hired by Texas-San Antonio
Former Citadel great and ex-South Carolina assistant coach Everette Sands has been named running backs coach at the University of Texas-San Antonio, the Conference USA school announced Tuesday. Sands will work for UTSA coach Frank Wilson, a former LSU assistant who was named the Roadrunners' new head coach in January. UTSA was 3-9 last season under former coach Larry Coker. "Adding a coach the caliber of Everette Sands to our staff is a coup for UTSA," Wilson said. "He is a veteran coach who has a history of developing NFL-caliber running backs. He has a wealth of knowledge and expertise and I can't wait to see him get to work with his position group with the return of 1,000-yard back Jarveon Williams and a host of quality depth." Sands, an All-America fullback while at The Citadel, where he graduated in 1993, spent the last four seasons as running backs coach at South Carolina. "I am looking forward to joining Coach Wilson and helping him and the staff build something really special at UTSA," Sands said. "The pieces are starting to come together and we have the right man in Coach Wilson leading the way. San Antonio is a great city and I am eager to help lead these young men on the pathway to success here at UTSA."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
February 24, 2016
7. Q & A With Michael Sweeney Training - MST Philosophy - February 24th, 2016
Q: Please tell the #Divamoms what sets you apart from all the different trainers out there A: After many years in the fitness industry, I became dissatisfied with the 'No Pain, No Gain' mentality that has hijacked much of gym and fitness culture. The amount of injuries were disturbing to me and I set out to find a better way. About a decade ago, my search for discovering a better way was dramatically influenced by studying the world's 'Blue Zones', a series of books and initiatives backed by National Geographic and author Dan Buettner based on the habits of the longest-lived cultures on earth. After studying the 'Blue Zones', I began my quest to combine safe and moderate exercise techniques with whole-food nutrition and an outlook on lifestyle and longevity that stems from the knowledge gleaned as to what makes people live long and healthy lives... Q: Can you tell us about your training and background, we want to know all! A: I'm a very well-traveled Air Force brat, so I grew up everywhere around the country and even overseas. I played basketball at The Citadel, a military college in Charleston, SC. I discovered, at a young age, in both the military and basketball, that becoming and staying fit is a result of discipline, motivation, consistency, and hard work. Those principles were ingrained in me in my youth and as I found my footing as a young trainer, they have served me well. My training expertise revolves around endurance, flexibility, core stabilization, strength, and whole food nutrition, while my focus is to help my clients reach their fitness goals. I earned my CPT certification through the American Council on Exercise (ACE), one of only a handful of certifying agencies accredited by the National Commission for Certifying Agencies (NCCA). I have a wonderful partner, Dana, who is an amazing chef with her own catering business and we have two lovable pets, a cat named Naomi and a dog named Ollie. We love traveling; Italy is our favorite place as it was Dana's home for nearly a decade.
Published in: DivaMoms.com
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Wednesday
February 24, 2016
8. Midweek Matchup Postponed
The Citadel baseball team's midweek matchup at Winthrop has been postponed due to the inclement weather forecasted on Tuesday. The game has tentatively been rescheduled for April 12 at 6 p.m. The Citadel returns to action on Friday when it hosts Siena for the first game of a three-game home series. Friday's game is set to begin at 5 p.m. Live stats and video will be available for all three games in the series. For tickets, call 843-953-DOGS (3647) or visit CitadelSports.com/tickets.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Tuesday
February 23, 2016
1. Phi Kappa Phi recognizes 2016 inductees
The Citadel's Chapter of The National Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi is celebrating its 36th anniversary in 2016 by inducting 50 new members, including three accomplished faculty and 47 cadets and students. Chapter President Elizabeth Connor noted that an invitation to Phi Kappa Phi is not easily earned. "Each year, students who excel academically and maintain integrity and high ethical standards are invited to join this prestigious honor society. Only the top 7.5 percent of juniors and the top 10 percent of seniors and graduate students are eligible for membership," said Connor. "Faculty, administrators, professional staff, and alumni who have achieved scholarly distinction also qualify for membership. This year's inductees embody the Society's motto: "Let the love of learning rule humanity." Phi Kappa Phi is the nation's oldest and most selective honor society for all academic disciplines. View the article to see the new members.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Tuesday
February 23, 2016
2. The problems with plastics in S.C. waters
Seven tons. That's how much plastic a study from The Citadel estimates is breaking down in Charleston Harbor right now. It's bad enough that so much trash is littering a body of water so important to local commerce, recreation and ecology. But according to The Citadel researchers, natural processes may be turning those tons of plastic into a serious health risk to marine animals - and potentially humans too. Sun, waves and other processes break down larger pieces of plastic into smaller bits, some of which are too small to be seen by the naked eye. Those tiny pieces, which are broadly referred to as microplastics, can be eaten by animals like shrimp or periwinkles and make their way up the food chain. Aside from the obvious dangers to marine animals that ingest microplastics, their presence in shrimp, fish and other sources of food poses an unknown risk to human health. Tackling one source of the problem, the federal government banned plastic microbeads earlier this month. The tiny beads had been used as abrasives in face washes, toothpastes and other cosmetic and hygiene products, but trillions of them end up in rivers, lakes and coastal waters each year. Banning microbeads was unquestionably the right move, but it's not likely to make a big dent in the larger problem of plastics clogging the planet's waters. And the problem is very large. A recent, widely-publicized study from the Ellen MacArthur Foundation, a non-profit promoting sustainable economic practice, and the World Economic Forum estimates that at least 8 million metric tons of plastics are dumped into earth's oceans every year.
Published in: The Times and Democrat
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Tuesday
February 23, 2016
3. A job for a jack of all trades - UI welcomes new assistant vice president for Auxiliary Services
After spending almost four years as the Executive Director of Auxiliary Enterprises at The Citadel, a military college in South Carolina, Alan Coker decided it was time for a change. "When this position opened up, I saw the opportunity as a step up from a smaller school to a flagship and research university," Coker said. "As a career move, it was a really great change." Coker started his job as the assistant vice president for Auxiliary Services Feb. 16. In this position, most of his responsibilities will be to oversee the UI Golf Course, Housing and Residence Life, Vandal Dining and the VandalStore. Coker replaced former vice president for Auxiliary Services Tyrone Brooks, who left UI about nine months ago. In that period, two UI faculty members served as interim assistant vice president to keep auxiliary services afloat. Coker replaced former vice president for Auxiliary Services Tyrone Brooks, who left UI about nine months ago. In that period, two UI faculty members served as interim assistant vice president to keep auxiliary services afloat. Coker said working in Auxiliary Services is much like running a corporation - there are several different departments that need attention on a day-to-day basis. "In auxiliaries, you are actually running a business and trying to make a profit for the institution," Coker said. "You really have to be a jack of all trades."
Published in: The Argonaut
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Tuesday
February 23, 2016
4. Duggar Baucom Took The Hardest Job In College Basketball, On Purpose
For the first time in his life, Duggar Baucom saw palm trees when he looked out his window. The 55-year-old had just been named the men's basketball coach at The Citadel, and as he sat in his new office last March, he contemplated the strange scenario that had brought him to Charleston. Most coaches leave a school because it is the natural next step in their careers; others depart after accepting offers too lucrative to turn down. This isn't how it went for Baucom, who had coached at VMI for a decade and had a pair of contract extensions that would have kept him at the Big South program through 2019. He was on a trajectory that seemed likely to end with his signature on the court of the Keydets' Cameron Hall. And then he decided he didn't want it anymore. In one of the most seemingly bizarre decisions in recent Division I coaching memory, Baucom decided to go from one military academy to another to another. This is something stranger than a lateral move. Military academies are notoriously difficult win at-name a coach without the last name of Knight or Krzyzewski who has done so in the modern era-and Baucom didn't even leave VMI's conference. Both teams play in the Southern conference, and unsurprisingly share a fierce rivalry. "I don't know why only working at military schools is my niche," says Baucom. "But this change is refreshing."
Published in: VICE Sports
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Tuesday
February 23, 2016
5. The Citadel's J.P. Sears named SoCon pitcher of the week
Citadel sophomore J.P. Sears has been named the Southern Conference pitcher of the week for his dominant performance against Virginia Tech in the Bulldogs' baseball season-opener last week. Sears struck out a career-best 12 of the 19 batters he faced, allowing just two hits and one walk in five innings of a 4-2 victory on Friday. Sears, from Sumter, was named to the all-SoCon preseason second team. His first weekly pitching award is the 63rd for The Citadel, the most in the SoCon. The Bulldogs will travel to Winthrop on Tuesday for a 4 p.m. non-conference contest and then return home for a three-game homestand against Siena beginning at 5 p.m. Friday. Sears is scheduled to take the mound for the series opener.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
February 23, 2016
6. Richard Wieters, BJ McKie headline SC Athletic HOF List
Barnwell's Troy Brown, who collected three Super Bowl rings with the New England Patriots, Clemson's Greg Bucker, who spent 11 seasons in the NBA, and South Carolina basketball standouts Art Whisnant, B.J. McKie and Martha Parker Hester highlight the South Carolina Athletic Hall of Fame's Class of 2016. The Class of 2016 also consists of Citadel baseball great Richard Wieters, legendary coach and administrator Buddy Sasser and former Clemson and major league pitcher Flint Rhem. Rhem will be enshrined posthumously... RICHARD WIETERS: A four-year baseball letterman at The Citadel who was an All-South Carolina performer, native Charlestonian Richard Wieters was twice named South Carolina Player of the Year at two different positions and was a third-team All-American as a designated hitter. Wieters earned Academic All-America citations and was twice named the Southern Conference's Player of the Year. He led The Citadel in hitting three consecutive years, paced the team in wins two straight seasons and captured the Senior Class Sportsmanship Award in 1977. At the plate, Wieters had a .343 career batting average that spanned 117 games, 431 at bats with 11 homers, 84 RBI and a .391 on-base percentage. On the mound, he pitched in 35 career games, started 28, marked an 18-10 record with two saves and 15 complete games, three shutouts, and a 2.10 ERA with 176 strikeouts to 85 walks. Wieters played minor league ball for the Atlanta Braves and Chicago White Sox organizations, and was inducted into The Citadel Athletic Hall of Fame in 1985 and the Charleston Baseball Hall of Fame in 2008. His coach, Chal Port, a member of the SCAHOF, stated that Wieters "was the best player I ever coached." Currently a CPA in Charleston, Wieters' son, Matt, is the All-Star catcher for the Baltimore Orioles.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
February 22, 2016
1. Letter: Never litter
I grew up in a family of six children with a mother who was an environmentalist well before it was politically correct. Her mantra was never litter and always leave a place better than you found it. We live in one of the most beautiful, biologically diverse and fragile places in the country, and it is our duty to make sure it stays this way. I commend The Post and Courier for its editorial on Feb. 15 endorsing the harbor plastics study. In the meantime, we all can do something to address the problem right now. When you drive the roads of Charleston County, do you wonder where litter on the roadsides and waterways comes from? The answer is you. If you have a pickup truck, secure any loose trash or supplies in the bed. Even that Mountain Dew bottle or scrap of plastic sheeting that seems so small will eventually end up in our waterways. When you’re in your boat, the same goes, secure it. When you’re buzzing down the creek you may not notice that fishing line blowing out but it will eventually end up with all the other plastic clogging up the creeks. It’s easy to use reusable grocery bags, and many times a bag is not even needed. I’ve used these bags for 25 years, and they have become second nature for me. But if you must use plastic, dispose of them responsibly or better yet recycle them. All the grocers have a recycle bin. I await The Citadel report on the state of our harbor, but we all share the blame and responsibility. Do your part to make our world cleaner for generations to come.
Published in: The Post and Courier - online
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Monday
February 22, 2016
1. Trump rolls to huge win in South Carolina
The political newcomer’s success has befuddled political insiders, who predicted early in the campaign that Trump would peak and fall. Instead, Trump led polls in South Carolina since late July, winning all but two polls since entering the race. South Carolina puts Trump on a two-state winning streak, after his victory in New Hampshire. Trump finished second in Iowa behind Cruz. Nevada Republicans will choose their favorite GOP candidate Tuesday. Trump’s S.C. victory is expected to give him momentum heading into Super Tuesday on March 1, when the nominating contest spreads quickly across the South and West. History has shown that the Republican who wins New Hampshire and South Carolina goes on to win the nomination, said Scott Buchanan, a political scientist at The Citadel. “Trump's certainly going to have history on his side in that regard,” Buchanan said. Trump’s early focus on immigration issues – pledging to build a wall on the border and force Mexico to pay for it – paid off, exit polls show. According to MSNBC, 47 percent of Trump’s backers listed immigration as their top issue, followed by the economy, terrorism and government spending. A CNN exit poll found 45 percent of Trump supporters said undocumented immigrants working in the United States should be deported to their home country.
Published in: The Star-Telegram - website
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Monday
February 22, 2016
1.1 The sharp-edged politics that make South Carolina unique
It's a common refrain for GOP candidates in this year's race: "South Carolina picks presidents." The Palmetto State has chosen the eventual Republican nominee in nearly every election since 1980, and this year's contenders are embracing the sharp-edged politics that make the state unique. Political director Lisa Desjardins reports on the final push for support in the battle for South Carolina. Please watch the video to view Desjardins' interview with Dr. DuBose Kapeluck, political science professor at The Citadel.
Published in: PBS.org
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Monday
February 22, 2016
1.2 Donald Trump’s National Campaign
Think about South Carolina for a minute. It is a specific place, made by the collision between gentility and brutality. The state is religious and poor by national standards, but not by Southern ones—the hard hill edges are softened by the prosperous country. Its racial history is especially violent. Its conservatism is fixed, and the distinguishing strain is military: the long obsession with the Confederate flag, the Citadel. Laid over all of this is the fantastical experience of the state’s great city, Charleston—to walk through it is, as the native-son novelist Pat Conroy once wrote, “like walking through gauze or inhaling damaged silk.” You would not describe Nevada like this; the phrase doesn’t summon New Hampshire.
Published in: The New Yorker - online
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Monday
February 22, 2016
1.3 Carson draws crowds, but not much respect, in S.C. (photo at The Citadel included)
Former neurosurgeon Ben Carson’s town hall here on Friday did not feel like an event for a failing campaign. Hundreds of people packed the Florence Civic Center to hear Carson speak. And yet, though he’s able to draw a crowd, Carson is in last place in many polls of the major candidates in South Carolina’s Republican primary, which will take place on Saturday. In a brief conversation after the event, Yahoo News asked Carson about his chances. The discussion also touched on a secret meeting he had with Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, to discuss alleged dirty tricks on the campaign trail. Carson has been critical of the media throughout his campaign, which briefly attained near-frontrunner status in polls ahead of the Iowa caucuses. He kept up that criticism when Yahoo News asked if he feels he’s being “underestimated.” “Not so much underestimated as it is ignored, because, you know, you’re not one of the chosen ones. But, you know, we’re fighting through that, because when the people hear us they know better,” Carson said.
Published in: Yahoo! Politics - online
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Monday
February 22, 2016
2. Village from childhood survives challenges, now a model city (written by retired Spanish professor at The Citadel)
I once lived in a lovely village on a hill. I moved away a long time ago, but that place returns to me like a never- ending movie of countless images. The village stood on the top of a steep bluff and offered long views of the area below. At the summit, the Catholic church resembled a small cathedral and its services were devoutly well-attended. The school and the rectory boasted well-kept lawns and the schoolyard was happily noisy. A short walk took us to the path leading down to the river, and a stately bridge, designed especially for pedestrian traffic, connected our village to a larger one with department stores and scurrying shoppers. In the heat of summer, teenagers climbed on the girders of the bridge and jumped into the water. Swimming dangerously close to the oncoming ferries and other boats only added to the fun. The snowy weather transformed the streets into a winter wonderland as we skated and sledded the days away.
Published in: The Post and Courier - online
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Monday
February 22, 2016
3. Lipscomb names College of Business dean
Lipscomb University announced today that Ray Eldridge has been appointed dean of the LU College of Business. Eldridge, senior associate dean and professor of management in the college, has served as interim dean of the College of Business since May 31, 2014, according to a release. He succeeds Turney Stevens, dean emeritus of the LU College of Business. “Under Dr. Eldridge’s leadership, the College of Business has become one of the fastest-growing graduate business schools in Tennessee and has been recognized nationally,” LU Provost W. Craig Bledsoe said in the release. “Ray possesses an authentic approach to leadership that engenders the best efforts from his faculty and supports innovative programming that has opened our program to new markets. I look forward to seeing the many ways the college will continue to flourish under his leadership.” Eldridge holds a doctorate, two master’s degrees and a diploma from the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, and an undergraduate degree from The Citadel.
Published in: Nashville Post - online
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Monday
February 22, 2016
Citadel puts on a good show, but loses to Western Carolina
The Citadel put on an entertaining basketball show Saturday afternoon. A season-best crowd of 4,424 almost packed the Mac, with the Corps of Cadets turned out in battle fatigues. At halftime, football players flung cheerleaders into the air -- and didn’t fumble them when they came back down. The Bulldogs did their part, too, engaging Western Carolina in a back-and-forth tilt that saw the score tied 10 times and the lead change hands 17 times. But when the 3-pointers stopped going in for The Citadel, the show ground to a halt. The Bulldogs missed 15 straight 3-point shots down the stretch, and Western Carolina pulled away for a 102-97 win at McAlister Field House. “We always have about four or five minutes where we go flat and the ball doesn’t go in,” said Citadel coach Duggar Baucom, whose team lost its seventh straight to fall to 10-18 overall and 3-13 in the Southern Conference. “And then that affects our defense. Good teams, that doesn’t happen to.”
Published in: The Post and Courier - online
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Monday
February 22, 2016
Citadel senior Quinton Marshall aims for athletic director’s office
Citadel senior Quinton Marshall will play his final home college basketball game Saturday, but doesn’t plan on leaving the gym anytime soon. Marshall, a 6-5 swingman averaging 11.9 points this season, is aiming for a career in sports — not in the coach’s spot on the bench, but in the athletic director’s office. “I want to be an athletic director one day,” said Marshall. “So whatever I need to do to make that happen, that’s what I’m going to do.” The physical education major from Raleigh, N.C., will graduate in May, and already has lined up internships with the Southern Conference and with the NCAA. At The Citadel, he’s worked in the ticket office, for the Brigadier Foundation and at the SoCon baseball tournament.
Published in: The Post and Courier - online
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Monday
February 22, 2016
Coach Jordan Earns 800th Career WIn
The Citadel baseball team clinched its season-opening series and earned head coach Fred Jordan his 800th career win on Saturday afternoon. The win marks the second time in as many years that the Bulldogs have taken their opening series. With the victory, Coach Jordan is the first coach in Southern Conference history and one of 27 active Division I head coaches with 800 career wins. The Bulldogs (2-0) defeated Virginia Tech (0-2) in thrilling fashion inside Joe Riley Park as senior Zach Lavery fanned the Hokies' four and five batters with the bases loaded in the top of the ninth to earn his second save of the season. Jacob Watcher earned the win after striking out two in 1.0 inning of work, and starter Thomas Byelick only allowed one earned run in 6.0 innings of work. The Citadel's young pitching staff has fared well so far this season, totaling 30 strikeouts in the opening weekend and a 2.50 ERA. Starters JP Sears and Byelick have given up one earned run in a combined 11 innings of work.
Published in: Citadel Sports - online
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Monday
February 22, 2016
Sapakoff: Vasectomy Night, Nobody Night among Top 20 moments at The Joe
While the Citadel baseball team spent this week on sparkling Bermuda Grass preparing for its season-opening weekend series against Virginia Tech, Charleston RiverDogs employees were elsewhere at Joseph P. Riley Jr. Park, busy in their zaniness laboratory coming up with new ideas for 2016. It’s hard to top ‘Go Back to Ohio Night’ or ‘National Laundry Day’ at a ballpark that has changed Charleston culture by the turnstile turn since it opened in 1997. The RiverDogs shattered the franchise attendance record that first year, drawing 234,840 fans, and set a new record at 292,661 in 2015. There were a lot of Thirsty Thursdays in between. The Citadel has won five Southern Conference Tournament titles in the friendly confines along the Ashley River. A 20-year anniversary seems like a good time for a top 20 list of baseball — and baseball-related — highlights at The Joe.
Published in: The Post and Courier - online
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Monday
February 22, 2016
Sears, Citadel too much for Virginia Tech in baseball opener
The Citadel baseball team kicked off the season with a 4-2 win over Virginia Tech on Friday night at Riley Park. JP Sears got the start on the bump for the Bulldogs and dominated for five innings, striking out 12 of the 19 batters he faced while not allowing a run on his way to the victory. The 12 strikeouts are a new career high for the sophomore, breaking his previous mark of 10 set last year against Mercer, which was the last time a Bulldogs pitcher recorded 10 strikeouts in a game. Zach Lavery allowed no runs and one hit over the final two innings to earn the save. As a whole, The Citadel pitching staff punched out 17 Hokies and allowed five hits.
Published in: The Post and Courier - online
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Monday
February 22, 2016
Swiper the fox runs onto field during Citadel-Virginia Tech game at The Joe
The Virginia Tech baseball team met Swiper the fox Saturday at Joseph P. Riley, Jr. Park. The Hokies were playing The Citadel when the fox, affectionately known as Swiper, ran onto the field and eventually made its way into the visiting team's dugout. A couple of the Hokies players can be scene leaping out of the way. This isn't the fox's first appearance. It ran onto the field during a Gamecocks-Bulldogs game last year.
Published in: WCIV-TV 4 (Charleston) - online
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Monday
February 22, 2016
Tennis Hosts Speicher Family for Military Appreciation Matches
The Florida State tennis programs will host a pair of military schools Saturday morning for the 2nd Annual Military Appreciation Day. The women will face Navy and the men face The Citadel at 11 a.m. Both matches will begin after a brief opening ceremony that will be attended by the family of Navy Capt. Scott Speicher, the first casualty of the Gulf War. The tennis center at Florida State bears the name of Capt. Speicher, who’s plane was shot down in the early stages of the Gulf War 25 years ago last month. Five members of Speicher’s family, including his daughter and widow, will be in attendance for the first time since the courts opened in 1993.
Published in: Seminoles.com - website
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Monday
February 22, 2016
The Citadel Drops Senior Day Match To No. 14 UNC
The Citadel wrestling team was defeated 33-12 by 14th-ranked North Carolina on Sunday inside McAlister Field House. Junior Aaron Walker completed a perfect dual-match season at 157 pounds with a pin at the 4:32 mark of his match. The San Antonio, Texas, native finishes the 2015-16 season with a 15-0 record in dual matches and is a team-best 26-5 overall this season. Walker, who was 14-0 in duals as a freshman, now has gone through two of his three seasons with a perfect record in dual matches. Freshman Patrick Kearney also pinned his opponent in the 125-pound weight class, giving The Citadel an early 6-0 lead 3:37 into the contest. The pin was Kearney's first in a dual match this season and second of his career. Prior to the match, the Bulldogs recognized seniors Matt Frisch and Marshall Haas, who were making their final appearance in McAlister Field House. Frisch wrapped up his dual-match career with 39 victories in 49 matches, while Haas produced 33 wins in 51 contests.
Published in: Citadel Sports - website
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Monday
February 22, 2016
Virginia Tech 12, The Citadel 0
The Citadel was shut out by Virginia Tech in the last game of the series at Riley Park. After earning a 4-2 win on Friday and a 5-4 win on Saturday to start the series, the Bulldogs (2-1) used a school-record 10 pitchers in the loss. Kyle Smith worked two innings of scoreless relief, allowing just two hits and fanning three. Nine of the 10 pitchers who took the field for The Citadel were making their collegiate debut. Morgan Foulks took the loss. Kit Scheetz earned the win for the Hokies (1-2), going 62/3 scoreless innings, allowing two hits and one walk while striking out six. Jacob Watcher, Mike Deese and Clay Martin collected hits — all singles — for the Bulldogs. The Citadel returns to action on Tuesday when it makes its first road trip of the season to Rock Hill to take on Winthrop. After the midweek matchup, the Bulldogs return home for a three-game homestand against Siena beginning Friday.
Published in: The Post and Courier - online
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Friday
February 19, 2016
1. Greater Issues Series with David McCullough happpening today
Internationally acclaimed author and speaker, David G. McCullough, will deliver a Greater Issues Address to the South Carolina Corps of Cadets at 2:15 p.m., on Friday, Feb. 19, at McAlister Field House. His 10 books include: The Path Between the Seas; Mornings on Horseback; Truman; John Adams; 1776; and most recently, The Wright Brothers. Among the 15 historical documentaries McCullough has presented or narrated are: The Civil War (Ken Burns); Huey Long; D-Day Remembered; The Statue of Liberty; and American Experience. His numerous awards include two Pulitzer Prizes, two National Book Awards, the National Book Foundation's lifetime Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters, as well as the Presidential Medal of Freedom. McCullough has earned 52 honorary degrees, and has been widely praised as one of America's greatest historians. A citation from Yale, his alma mater, stated that he "paints with words, giving us pictures of the American people that live, breathe, and above all, confront the fundamental issues of courage, achievement, and moral character" and that, collectively, have "led a renaissance of interest in American History."
Published in: Moultrie News
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Friday
February 19, 2016
2. Former U.S. commander in Afghanistan to address The Citadel Class of 2016
A transformational leader with a remarkable record of achievement, Gen. Stanley A. McChrystal, will provide the last address The Citadel Class of 2016 hears before heading away from campus and into the world. McChrystal is a retired U.S. Army four-star general and was the commanding general of international and U.S. forces in Afghanistan, as well as the former commander of the military counter-terrorism force, Joint Special Operations Command (JSOC). McChrystal is credited with creating a revolution in warfare through a comprehensive counter-terrorism organization that fused intelligence with operations. He was called "one of America's greatest warriors" by Secretary of Defense Robert Gates. McChrystal graduated from West Point in 1976 and joined the infantry. The son of Maj. Gen. Herbert Joseph McChrystal, he began as a platoon commander in the 82nd Airborne Division, earning leadership positions in the Army Special Forces, Army Rangers, 82nd Airborne Division, the XVIII Army Airborne Corps and the Joint Chiefs of Staff. McChrystal is a graduate of the U.S. Naval War College and has completed fellowships at Harvard (1997) and at the Council on Foreign Relations (2000).
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Friday
February 19, 2016
3. Electorate Representation Index: Which States Most Closely Resemble the U.S.? with DuBose Kapeluck
Ask the Experts: DuBose Kapeluck, Profesor and Chairman of the Department of Political Science at The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina Q: What issues are most important to voters in South Carolina? What campaign strategies prove particularly effective in the state? A: I am embarrassed to say that SC politics tend to be fairly white-knuckle. For some historical reason, negative campaigning resonates with SC voters. Part of this may be due to the perception among candidates that it works here, thus it is self-perpetuating. Alternatively, this may be a residual aspect of SC politics tracing back to the Civil Rights Era and likely further in the past to attempts by Bourbon Democrats (more affluent Lowcountry politicians) to coopt the black vote in order to counter the white Upstate Democrats that represented poorer whites. These poorer whites were more likely to be in direct economic competition with black South Carolinians. Therefore, Upstate Democratic candidates, during this time, were often overtly racist in their appeals for support... Read the article for more insight from Dr. Kapeluck on the upcoming SC primary.
Published in: WalletHub.com
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Friday
February 19, 2016
4. Electorate Representation Index: Which States Most Closely Resemble the U.S.? with Scott Buchanan
Ask the Experts: Scott Buchanan, Associate Professor of Political Science and Executive Director of the Symposium on Southern Politics at The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina Q: What issues are most important to voters in South Carolina? What campaign strategies prove particularly effective in the state? A: For SC Democrats, the biggest issue is which candidate is best poised to continue (and even expand) policies from the Obama years. The problem for Democrats is that they are in a distinct minority among voters in the state. The Republicans have a solid base of around 55% of the state's voters. For Republicans, most important issue is which Republican has the best chance of getting elected in 2016. SC is a very deep red Republican state, so that is by far the biggest issue. Other issues like gun control, religion, opposition to the Supreme Court ruling on same sex marriage funnel into the first issue of capturing the White House. Now that we are beyond Iowa and NH, TV and internet ads will begin to take center stage. Read the article for more insight from Dr. Buchanan on the upcoming SC primary.
Published in: WalletHub.com
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Friday
February 19, 2016
5a. Dean's List at The Citadel
The following Central Jersey residents at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina, were named to the fall dean's list: Christopher Vanacore, Antonio Cuccaro of Ringoes, Bertus Shelters of Old Bridge, Christopher Thorsen of Edison, Robert Waldrop of South Plainfield, Joseph Vicci of Cranford, Robert Waldrop of South Plainfield, Michael Subach of Hillsborough. Students must achieve a grade-point average of 3.2 or higher.
Published in: MyCentralJersey.com
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Friday
February 19, 2016
5b. Bragbook for Feb. 19
Zachary Young of Bremen and Victoria Holland of Kennesaw graduated from The Citadel Corps of Cadet.
Published in: AJC.com
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Friday
February 19, 2016
6. The One Our Founding Fathers Warned Us About
My friend, the time has come for an intervention. This relationship you are in is toxic. He isn't rough around the edges and blunt. He is verbally abusive. He tells you what you want to hear, but then he tells you that you are a fat, ugly, and a stupid loser. He woos you with grandiose ideas, but never provides details. He brags about how much money he has and how successful he is, but he won't explain why he filed for bankruptcy four times. You don't need to know the details, he says, because he doesn't want to lie to you like all the others do. Other suitors are stupid liars, he says. They will lie to you about anything. He is the only one who cares about you. He is the only one who can make you happy. Trust him, he says, he will take care of everything. He's the best! He tells you that you are really great, he really likes you, but you're just not that pretty. Paige Lewis is an adjunct history professor and freelance writer in Charleston, S.C. She graduated Queens College in Charlotte, N.C. with a B.A. in history and drama, with a minor in political science. She earned her master's degree in American history from the University of Charleston and The Citadel joint graduate studies program.
Published in: TownHall.com
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Friday
February 19, 2016
7. Randy Smith: Larry Ward - A True Hall of Famer
Earlier this week, my good friend Larry Ward received perhaps his greatest honor. He was selected to the Southern League Hall of Fame, becoming just the fifth Chattanooga Lookout to ever be inducted. Now, I'm sure that Larry was a pretty good player in his day but the honor had nothing to do with his athletic ability. He was selected as a Hall of Famer due to his broadcasting abilities. He's been the "Voice" of the Lookouts for a grand total of 34 years, with the last 28 years consecutively in Chattanooga. He's going into the Hall of Fame for his baseball announcing duties, but he has been so much more diverse... Larry spent a few years away from Chattanooga as the "Voice" of The Citadel Bulldogs in Charleston, South Carolina. As part of his duties with the Military College of the South, he had to wear a light blue blazer to all of the Bulldogs' games. Not only did Larry have to wear these powder blue sport coats, but so did his entire radio crew. Three or four of these guys, all dressed alike in these awful looking blazers; blazers that made them all look like student managers on a Dean Smith basketball team at North Carolina. When he returned to Chattanooga to begin his current stint as the "Voice" of the Lookouts, I asked him if he still had that light blue blazer from The Citadel. He just gave me one of those looks... you know a look like, "Come on man. Give me a break."
Published in: The Chattanoogan
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Friday
February 19, 2016
8. ETSU pulls away from The Citadel, 67-51
Despite everything - missing 25 of 30 3-point shots, turning the ball over 17 times, getting crushed on the boards - The Citadel had chances to pull off a Southern Conference upset against East Tennessee State on Thursday night. Three times in the second half, the Bulldogs had the ball with a chance to cut ETSU's lead to three points or fewer. Each time, they blew the opportunity with a turnover, and the Bucs pulled away in the final minutes for a 67-51 win over The Citadel before 1,389 fans at McAlister Field House. The loss was the sixth straight for the Bulldogs (10-18, 3-12 SoCon) and was the aesthetic opposite of their 101-92 overtime loss at ETSU last month. In scoring its fewest points of the season - some 37 points below its Division I-leading average - The Citadel shot a season-worst 16.7 percent from 3-point range, making just 5 of 30 from distance. It was the fewest points by a Duggar Baucom-coached team since his VMI squad lost by 63-49 to Gardner-Webb in 2013. "A very ugly game," said the Bulldogs' Baucom, whose VMI teams led the nation in scoring six times in 10 years. "But credit ETSU. They hammered us on the boards and dictated their will, pushed us off the 3-point line. And when we had open shots, we couldn't make them."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Friday
February 19, 2016
9. H.S. Football: Cal-Mum's Roides inks letter to kick at The Citadel
Three LCAA student-athletes recently signed letters of intent to compete collegiately this coming fall. Bath's Mackenzie Smith (Clemson), Wayland-Cohocton's Ashlee Schumacher (West Virginia Weleyan) and CalMum's Josh Roides (The Citadel) all inked their letters during national signing day Feb. 3. While Smith and Schumacher will both play soccer, Roides will be a placekicker for the football team. Roides, who has only played high school football for two years, transferring from the soccer field to the football gridiron, is excited about competing for a spot on the Bulldogs' roster. The Citadel finished the 2015 season ranked 15th in the final FCS Coaches' poll, finishing the season 9-4 which included its first conference championship since 1992 while advancing to the second round of the NCAA FCS Playoffs. "My expectations playing football moving forward is to make a name for myself and hopefully start as the field goal specialist next year as we face off against Clemson," said Roides. "I picked The Citadel not only for its great football but for the school's history, huge alumni base and massive pride and tradition. I'd like to thank all those people who supported me to get to this point. "I'd also like to thank Caledonia-Mumford as a whole because there is nothing like 'Friday Night Lights' and small town football. 'For none can rank above thee, Caledonia, our dear school.'"
Published in: The Daily News
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Thursday
February 18, 2016
1. South Carolina's Key Role in the Presidential Race
The first presidential nominating contests are over, and they led to plenty of fallout. First, Iowa split its delegates among many of the Republicans, with Ted Cruz, Donald Trump and Marco Rubio at the front of the GOP pack. On the Democratic side, Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders finished neck-and-neck. New Hampshire's primaries followed a week later, with Trump taking the Republican contest in a landslide and John Kasich surging to a second-place finish. Sanders won easily to emerge as the victor for the Democrats. South Carolina has a long military history and is home to a number of military installations, including the 6,900-acre Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort, basic training hub Fort Jackson in Columbia, and a Department of Defense joint base, Joint Base Charleston. It's also home to The Citadel, one of the nation's most renowned military schools. The state's share of residents who are veterans is 25 percent higher than the U.S. share overall. The military in South Carolina plays a role both culturally and economically. A recent study estimated the annual economic impact of the military community on the state at $19.3 billion, with its eight major military installations responsible for over 100,000 jobs. Accordingly, military issues - including the treatment of U.S. veterans, military spending and the handling of the Islamic State group - are all potential factors in the state.
Published in: U.S. News & World Report
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Thursday
February 18, 2016
2. South Carolina sees itself as testing ground for national campaigns
In South Carolina, conservative evangelical Republicans dominate the manufacturing-rich Upstate region, as the state's fast-growing northwest is called. The tourism hot spots along the coast are magnets for affluent new residents, some libertarian-leaning. Meanwhile, the state's rural, majority-black Democratic counties are shrinking, reminders of a now-depressed agricultural economy that once flourished. Palmetto State Republicans and Democrats both have something at stake in the February presidential primaries, the Republicans on Saturday and the Democrats on Feb. 27. Both dates were set by the national parties to accommodate different views about whether it would be better to vote at the same time or after the Nevada caucuses, which also take place on different days, Saturday for the Democrats and next Tuesday for the Republicans. Republicans are hoping to recover the state's vaunted status as the GOP bellwether, predicting the party's eventual presidential nominee. Flawless since the state's first GOP primary in 1980, that reputation was tarnished in 2012, when Newt Gingrich - not Mitt Romney - won the South Carolina primary. If South Carolina Republicans go rogue again, picking an outlier, the state's political prominence likely will fade as it "blends into the woodwork of other Southern states," said Scott Buchanan, a political scientist at The Citadel, South Carolina's state-supported military academy.
Published in: The State
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Thursday
February 18, 2016
3. Things To Do Thursday, February 18, 2016
The SouthCoast Symphony What: Charleston's community symphony orchestra, The SouthCoast Symphony, is looking for new musicians, especially string players, and meets on Thursday nights in preparation for public family-friendly classical concert performances. When: 7 p.m. Where: The Citadel, 171 Moultrie St., downtown Charleston Price: Free More Info: http://www.southcoastsymphony.com
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
February 18, 2016
4. Despite struggles, Citadel's Duggar Baucom still embraces the pace
True to his word, Citadel coach Duggar Baucom has his team playing fast this season. With more than 83 possessions per game, Baucom's Bulldogs play at the quickest tempo in Division I basketball. Victories, however, have been slower in coming than either Baucom or Citadel fans would like. Heading into Thursday night's game against East Tennessee State at McAlister Field House, the Bulldogs have lost five straight games and seven of eight to fall to 10-17 overall and 3-11 in the Southern Conference. Despite the struggles, Baucom still "embraces the pace," to borrow the term used by Citadel sports marketing. "I still believe in the system," said Baucom, who developed his pressing, 3-point happy style during 10 seasons at VMI. "But I would say that it has to be recruited too. At VMI, it really paid dividends in our third year running it." Indeed, after going 14-19 and 14-15 in his first two seasons of high-octane "Duggarball" at VMI, the Keydets broke through for a 24-8 record in 2008-09, including an epic 111-103 upset of Kentucky at storied Rupp Arena. In Baucom's six seasons after that, VMI won at least 17 games three times, including a 22-13 mark in 2013-14.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
February 17, 2016
1. The Citadel and Google's 2016 Storm The Citadel results
Distance, accuracy, design and spirit awards were presented to students for their achievements during the 2016 Storm The Citadel Trebuchet Competition on Saturday. Co-hosted by Google and The Citadel's School of Engineering, along with the STEM Center of Excellence, the Zucker Family School of Education and School of Science and Mathematics, sixth annual Storm The Citadel brought teams from across the southeast to the campus' Summerall Field to test their medieval launching devices, known as trebuchets. Competitors spent weeks designing, building and testing their trebuchets. View the article to see the results of this year's competition.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Wednesday
February 17, 2016
2. Storm the Citadel: Teams build modern trebuchets for annual event
Trebuchet teams from local high schools, Boy Scout troops and several other organizations competed Saturday in The Centurion division at the Storm the Citadel event Saturday in Charleston. Teams competed for accuracy and distance with most teams throwing a standard lacrosse ball about 100 feet at a target. DuBose Middle School took first place in the Centurian Middle School Accuracy division. Boy Scout troop 759, based in Summerville, took second place in both the Centurian Middle School Accuracy division and the Centurian High School Accuracy division and second place in the Centurian Spirit division.
Published in: The Summerville Journal Scene
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Wednesday
February 17, 2016
3. On Campus: The Citadel
Christopher Bellanova of Allentown has been named to the dean's list and has been awarded gold stars for the 2015 fall semester by The Citadel, Charleston, South Carolina.
Published in: Examiner
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Wednesday
February 17, 2016
4. Pat Conroy, Author of "The Prince of Tides," Diagnosed with Pancreatic Cancer
Pat Conroy, the bestselling author of The Prince of Tides and The Great Santini, has been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, his publisher said Monday. "Pat is currently undergoing treatment at M.D. Anderson [Cancer Center], where he is receiving excellent care and support from his doctors," Doubleday publishers said in a statement. "The Conroy family asks for privacy at this time as Pat fights this challenging illness with the same spirit of courage that has forged his writing career. Pat and his family are enormously grateful to all of his readers for their prayers and good wishes." Like The Great Santini and The Prince of Tides, most of Conroy's 10 books have been novels, many closely or loosely based on his own life, but he also wrote the memoir My Losing Season, in which he revisited his basketball team's losing season (1966-67) at The Citadel, a military college in Charleston, South Carolina.
Broadcast on: KVLC-FM El Paso, Texas
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Wednesday
February 17, 2016
5. Bush, Carson make final pitch to area before primary
For the third time in two days, area voters had a chance to familiarize themselves with the candidates seeking their vote in Saturday's South Carolina Republican primary. Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush and retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson took part in Tuesday's Last Word in the South presidential forum at the University of South Carolina Aiken Convocation Center, which was well-attended by their supporters, with a few Donald Trump, Ted Cruz and John Kasich believers peppered throughout the stands. The event was moderated by U.S. Sen. Joe Wilson, state Attorney General Alan Wilson and state Republican Party Chair­man Matt Moore. It began with remarks from political satirist Eric Golub and U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham, who endorsed Bush... He spoke of meeting with cadets at The Citadel, telling them that he intends to support the nation's military by being a "commander-in-chief, not an agitator-in-chief." He also talked about bringing "Veto Corleone" - a nickname he earned while governor for his tendency to veto legislation - to Washington, adding that he believes he will be the candidate to bring a "steady hand" to the office. When asked about President Obama's proposal to halt construction at Savannah River Site's mixed-oxide fuel fabrication facility, a project that would turn weapons-grade plutonium into fuel for commercial nuclear reactors, Bush said he would advise against any shutdown without an alternate plan to honor the country's 2000 agreement with Russia to dispose of 34 metric tons of plutonium.
Published in: The Augusta Chronicle
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Tuesday
February 16, 2016
1. Catholic church, Citadel cadets replace decapitated Jesus statue on Upper King
With a little help from some Citadel engineering students, Sacred Heart Catholic Church in downtown Charleston has replaced a statue of Jesus Christ that a vandal decapitated in 2014. While the initial image of the damaged statue was disturbing, the Rev. Dennis Willey said his parishioners waited patiently for a year and a half as church leaders negotiated with insurance companies and statue makers. The original concrete statue was a gift from Our Lady of Good Counsel on Folly Beach. According to Willey, parishioners there thought the statue of Jesus with a visible Sacred Heart - symbolic of his love for mankind - ought to be displayed at a church named after the Sacred Heart. In June 2014, Charleston police arrested a man shortly after two Jesus statues on the property had their heads knocked off. The man, who reportedly still had a sledgehammer in his backpack, told officers he had destroyed the statues "because the Second or First Commandment states to not make an image of a male or female to be on display to the public." Cadets in The Citadel's American Society of Civil Engineers chapter took an interest in renovations at the historic church around the time of the statue incident, but the scope of their work went far beyond the front lawn.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
February 16, 2016
2. The Sixth Annual Storm The Citadel
The sixth annual Storm The Citadel trebuchet competition kicked off this morning. A record 100 teams and 700 competitors competed. People of all ages gathered on Summerall Field launching their trebuchets; testing their science, technology, engineering and math skills. "It's a challenge to make math, science and engineering engaging and fun in the effort to breed more interest in those fields and to make sure kids know that there's more to engineering than to just doing boring equations and trying to figure out which way a train went and how fast. This is actually where engineering is fun and engaging, and we're just having a blast out here today," said Jeff Stevenson. The event was co-hosted and co-founded by Google and The Citadel School of Engineering. It reinforces the importance of STEM education.
Broadcast on: WCIV-TV Charleston, SC
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Tuesday
February 16, 2016
3. Storm The Citadel with over 100 schools registered
More than 100 schools gathered for the annual Storm The Citadel trebuchet competition. For those who don't know what that is, it's similar to a catapult. As you can see in the video, students from these schools competed to see who could build the best one. The event was sponsored by Google and The Citadel School of Engineering to help encourage kids to consider careers in science, technology, engineering and math. "We're out here to show folks that science and math can be fun and it's not just sitting around doing equations. It's actually building things, having fun and enjoying a wonderful day out here in the sun," said Jeff Stevenson. Google was also live-streaming the entire event on YouTube for those who couldn't make it out there in person.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Tuesday
February 16, 2016
4a. A discussion with the Mayor and the Author
The Mayor: Joe Riley and the Rise of Charleston 6:45p.m. Thursday, Feb. 25 Holliday Alumni Center; 69 Hagood Avenue Free; open to the public. The public is invited to attend a talk by author and columnist, Brian Hicks, on his most recent book, The Mayor: Joe Riley and the Rise of Charleston. Former Mayor Joe Riley (now a professor of American government & public policy at The Citadel) will also be in attendance to make brief remarks and answer questions. Hicks has co-authored eight books and is a senior writer and metro columnist for The Post and Courier. Autographed copies of the book will be available for sale at the center before and after the remarks. The program is jointly sponsored by The Citadel School of Humanities and Social Sciences, the Department of Political Science, and the Department of History.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Tuesday
February 16, 2016
4b. mayor discussion
mayor
Published in: LowcountryBizSC.com
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Tuesday
February 16, 2016
5. Yielding Returns To The Citadel As Assistant Coach
Scott Yielding, who holds two degrees from The Citadel, is returning to the Bulldogs' staff and will serve as the program's recruiting coordinator and coach the defensive line, head coach Brent Thompson announced Monday. "I am extremely happy to be able to add Scott Yielding to our coaching staff," Coach Thompson said. "He is a tremendous evaluator who understands the fit that will allow our cadet-athletes to be successful at The Citadel. He will be a valuable asset to our coaches and team with his knowledge and experiences here as a cadet, graduate student and coach and I'm excited to have him as a resource." Coach Yielding returns to The Citadel, where he earned his bachelor's degree in history in 1993 and a master's degree in secondary education in 1998. He served as tight ends coach and academic coordinator for the Bulldogs during the 2012 and 2013 seasons. During his time as a graduate student, Yielding worked in The Citadel office of admissions and served as the NCAA and academic liaison to the football program. "My family and I are blessed to have the opportunity to return to The Citadel and join Coach Thompson's staff," Coach Yielding said. "I had the chance to work with Coach Thompson briefly in spring of 2014, and I was impressed with his football knowledge and willingness to get to know and appreciate The Citadel culture. I'm looking forward to helping continue the on-field success of the football program while also playing a role in developing the next generation of leaders off the field."
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Tuesday
February 16, 2016
6. Hit hard by MLB draft, Citadel must rebuild pitching staff
By the numbers, The Citadel had the best pitching staff in the Southern Conference last season, leading the league in ERA and strikeouts. Major League Baseball took notice, picking three of the Bulldogs' draft-eligible juniors - James Reeves, Skylar Hunter and Austin Mason - in the draft. That trio left 14 wins, 13 saves and 201 innings pitched for coach Fred Jordan to replace this season. "Put those three guys on this club and I'm feeling very, very confident," said Jordan, who enters his 25th season two victories shy of 800 career wins. "But we've got some talented young freshmen who are going to get their feet wet early. That's the reason they chose The Citadel. We'll weather the storm, and once they develop a little bit, I think we'll have a good, solid ball club." Even with the SoCon's No. 1 pitching staff last year, the Bulldogs could manage only a 28-30 record, finishing 10-14 in the league, good for eighth place. Since The Citadel's regular season and tournament titles in 2010, the Bulldogs have posted just one winning season and finished higher than eighth in the league only once (a fourth-place finish in 2013). The key to exceeding expectations this season (league coaches picked the Bulldogs to finish tied for seventh), Jordan said, lies in playing solid defense behind a developing pitching staff. Last season, The Citadel was the worst-fielding club in the SoCon with a league-high 103 errors and a .953 fielding percentage. The Bulldogs turned a league-low 29 double plays and allowed a league-high 83 unearned runs.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
February 15, 2016
1a. One of America's longest-serving mayors returns to his roots
After spending 40 years as Charleston's mayor, Joseph P. Riley, Jr., reported to The Citadel just two hours after his last day in office ready and eager to begin the next chapter of his life. Riley, The Citadel Class of 1964, is the first occupant of the Joseph P. Riley, Jr. Endowed Chair of American Government and Public Policy. Cadets are buzzing about having a nationally-renowned politician and alumnus on campus and enjoy running into him in the halls. "Mayor Riley is widely considered to be one of the most influential mayors in American history," said Cadet Wilson Hope, political science major. "The entire Corps is excited to have such a well-known and respected leader on campus." Riley retired from office in January 2016, and though he's only been at The Citadel for a month he has already managed to make a large impact. He played a key role in scheduling a Greater Issues Address with internationally acclaimed author and speaker, David McCullough and is guest lecturing in several political science courses. He will also appear as a panelist for a discussion on the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church shooting and the Charleston Strong movement during the 2016 Principled Leadership Symposium in March.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Monday
February 15, 2016
1b. mayor riley
mayor riley
Published in: Goose Creek Gazette
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February 15, 2016
1c. mayor riley
mayor riley
Broadcast on: WIS-TV Columbia, SC
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February 15, 2016
1d. mayor riley
mayor riley
Broadcast on: WDAM-TV Hattiesburg, MS
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February 15, 2016
1e. mayor riley
mayor riley
Published in: The Tribune San Luis Obispo, CA
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February 15, 2016
1f. mayor riley
mayor riley
Published in: Fort Worth, TX Star Telegram
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Monday
February 15, 2016
2a. Thousands attend annual "Storm The Citadel" trebuchet competition
West Ashley High School senior Anthony Brown and his five teammates worked for months to construct a medieval-style trebuchet out of lumber and metal. They lingered after classes to practice launching the contraption, and made adjustments along the way to perfect its release ahead of the sixth annual "Storm The Citadel" competition. Their efforts paid off as they hurled balls through the air on a windy Saturday, intent on striking a box perched on The Citadel's Summerall Field. The boys placed first in their division for accuracy - one of the toughest of the day's contests - and took home a trophy. But for the team, the day was less about winning as it was having fun. "We're all really good friends," Brown said, his teammates nodding in agreement, "so this was a way for us to hang out together and do something we all love to do." Roughly 3,000 people crowded The Citadel's grounds to watch 123 teams compete in the annual competition. Teams, comprised mostly of students elementary through college-aged, traveled from across the Lowcountry, as well as Richland, Sumter, Darlington and York counties, to attend the annual competition. The trebuchets are the most popular contest and are judged in multiple categories including design, accuracy and spirit. Robotics, rockets and bridge-building teams are also showcased in other activities. The event, which falls within National Engineers Week, was founded in 2011 by Google and The Citadel's School of Engineering. The aim is to reinforce the disciplines of science, technology, engineering and math, said Jeff Stevenson, a senior program manager with Google and one of the event's organizers.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
February 15, 2016
3. A persistant plastic menace
Seven tons. That's how much plastic a study from The Citadel estimates is breaking down in Charleston Harbor right now. It's bad enough that so much trash is littering a body of water so important to local commerce, recreation and ecology. But according to The Citadel researchers, natural processes may be turning those tons of plastic into a serious health risk to marine animals - and potentially humans too. Sun, waves and other processes break down larger pieces of plastic into smaller bits, some of which are too small to be seen by the naked eye. Those tiny pieces, which are broadly referred to as microplastics, can be eaten by animals like shrimp or periwinkles and make their way up the food chain. Aside from the obvious dangers to marine animals that ingest microplastics, their presence in shrimp, fish and other sources of food poses an unknown risk to human health. Tackling one source of the problem, the federal government banned plastic microbeads earlier this month. The tiny beads had been used as abrasives in face washes, toothpastes and other cosmetic and hygiene products, but trillions of them end up in rivers, lakes and coastal waters each year.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
February 15, 2016
4. Viewers' Guide: GOP hopefuls spar in South Carolina
Serious issues are facing the Republican presidential candidate in their debate Saturday night in South Carolina. The state has a deep-rooted military culture and is still reeling from the shooting deaths of nine black parishioners at a Charleston church in June. But style is going to beg for attention alongside pressing matters of policy. Foremost, how will Marco Rubio do after his disastrous turn on the stage in New Hampshire? And will Donald Trump and Ted Cruz, after carping at each other bitterly from a distance, do it face to face? Can Ben Carson finally make a mark? The Greenville, South Carolina, debate is hosted by CBS News... OH, THOSE ISSUES - There's not a lot of daylight among the GOP rivals on gun rights, but the moderators might try to tease out some differences on the subject. As well, expect questions relevant to the military-minded voters of South Carolina, home to The Citadel military college, Shaw Air Force Base and other important defense installations. The Republicans have tripped over themselves promising an expensive expansion or modernization of the armed forces. And Rubio, for one, has expressed support for allowing women to serve in combat while saying he opposes forcing them to do so by making them eligible for any future military draft.
Published in: Daily Herald
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Monday
February 15, 2016
5. Pat Conroy, Author of 'Prince of Tides,' Diagnosed With Pancreatic Cancer
Pat Conroy, the bestselling author of "The Prince of Tides" and "The Great Santini," has been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, his publisher said today. "Pat is currently undergoing treatment at M.D. Anderson, where he is receiving excellent care and support from his doctors," Doubleday publishers said in a statement. "The Conroy family asks for privacy at this time as Pat fights this challenging illness with the same spirit of courage that has forged his writing career. Pat and his family are enormously grateful to all of his readers for their prayers and good wishes." Like "The Great Santini" and "The Prince of Tides," most of Conroy's 11 books have been novels, many closely or loosely based on his own life, but he also wrote the memoir "My Losing Season," in which he revisited his basketball team's losing season (1966-67) at The Citadel, a military college in Charleston, S.C. In an interview on "Good Morning America" when the book came out, Conroy said he remembers his team's losing season as the happiest year of his life. Being part of a dysfunctional team, he recalled, was a welcome respite from The Citadel's typical plebe-system routine. In another memoir "The Death of Santini," he examined his difficult relationship with his father, and told "GMA" anchor Charlie Gibson that his focus on the family he grew up in "might be my great weakness as a writer... Or my great strength."
Broadcast on: ABC News
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Monday
February 15, 2016
6. A visit from Gene Sperling and Mayor Joseph P. Riley, Jr.
I assumed it would be an uneventful Thursday afternoon ─ finish my last class, macroeconomics with the fantastic Dr. Sykes Wilford, and then move on with my day. I was quite wrong in my assumption. Instead, former Charleston Mayor Joe Riley (who is an esteemed member of our faculty now and a Citadel alumnus), came into the room and introduced Gene Sperling, the former National Economic Council Director for Presidents Clinton and Obama. An internationally respected mayor dropping by my classroom along with his friend who used to have an office right above the Oval Office? This was certainly an "only at The Citadel" moment. I've been incredibly lucky during my time here to witness some very special speeches, from Medal of Honor winners to senators to mayors. This, however, was a different story. We wouldn't be together as the entire South Carolina Corps of Cadets listening to a speech. Instead, the classroom held a mix of about 25 students and a few very powerful people. Mr. Sperling spent about an hour speaking to us. He told us about his beginnings with the Michael Dukakis presidential campaign, working for Governor Mario Cuomo and his involvement with President Clinton's first campaign for president. He spoke more specifically about the restructuring of how economic policies were created, once President Clinton reached the White House, and the formation of the National Economic Council (NEC). Mr. Sperling served as deputy director and director of the NEC during his time under President Clinton.
Published in: The Charleston Digitel
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Monday
February 15, 2016
7. Fort Ticonderoga to host annual War College event
Registration is now open for Fort Ticonderoga's Twenty-First Annual War College of the Seven Years' War, May 20 to May 22 in the Deborah Clarke Mars Education Center. This annual seminar focuses on the French and Indian War in North America (1754-1763), bringing together a panel of distinguished historians from across the United States. This is open to the public; pre-registration is required. Begun in 1996, the session has become nationally recognized as the premier seminar on the French and Indian War, a conflict that spread across the globe and set the stage for the American Revolution. The War College features a mix of new and established scholars in an informal setting for a weekend of presentations related to the military, social, and cultural history of the war. Speakers include: Carl J. Anderson, III, researcher and author, "John Goffe, Jacob Bailey, and the New Hampshire Regiment." Kathleen Baker, Massachusetts Historical Society, "Ursuline Nuns and the French & Indian War." Katherine Grandjean, Wellesley College, "Publishing Terror: War and Communication on the New England Frontier." James M. McManus, independent historian, "Sir William Johnson: British Colonial Politics during the French and Indian War." John-Eric Nelson, independent historian, "'No Real Dependence is to be Had': Connecticut Provincials in the 1758 Campaign." David Preston, The Citadel, "Braddock's Defeat: The Battle of the Monongahela and the Road to Revolution."
Published in: The Sun Community News
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Monday
February 15, 2016
8a. Citadel rally falls short at Wofford in 99-89 loss
A furious second-half rally was not enough to make up for a disappointing first half, and The Citadel ended up a 99-89 loser at Wofford on Saturday night. The Bulldogs gave up 52 points in the first half and scored 52 in the second, but lost its fifth straight game to slide to 10-17 overall and 3-11 in the Southern Conference. "We can't dig a 15-point hole and then start playing hard," said Citadel coach Duggar Baucom, whose team trailed by 52-37 at the break. "Play hard when it's even. "We certainly played like warriors in the second half. We could win if we play like that all the time. That's what is so frustrating." Spencer Collins scored 23 points to lead Wofford (14-13, 10-4), which shot 58 percent from the field and owned an 18-point lead in the second half. The Bulldogs, led by 23 points from Derrick Henry, whittled that lead down to 80-74 with 7:40 left in the game. But The Citadel could get no closer in the final minutes of a game that featured four technical fouls, 50 personal fouls and 59 free throws.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
February 15, 2016
8b. Loss to The Citadel reportedly cost South Carolina shot at hiring Tom Herman
Will Muschamp is South Carolina's head coach. The how's and why's of the previous sentence are no longer relevant, all that matters is what is. But, in the event Muschamp's second head coaching job goes the way of his first, many in the garnet and black will look back on the events that led Muschamp to Columbia. Then they'll remember the Gamecocks' loss to The Citadel on Nov. 21, 2015, and then they'll find themselves with a violent and urgent need to stick their heads in the nearest trash can. In his look at the Muschamp era at South Carolina, USA Today's Dan Wolken detailed how it nearly didn't happen: South Carolina, in fact, first targeted Houston's Tom Herman and was so far down the road toward an agreement, according to two people familiar with the process, that the school's administration had essentially shut its search process down. Those same people, who spoke to USA Today Sports on the condition of anonymity, said Herman's mind changed after South Carolina lost to The Citadel on Nov. 21 and it became clear the next coach would have a massive rebuilding job on his hands. Herman decided to stay at Houston for a deal worth nearly $3 million per year and, presumably, wait for a more high-profile situation.
Broadcast on: NBC Sports
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Monday
February 15, 2016
8c. The Citadel's Harrell Promoted To Defensive Coordinator
Blake Harrell has been promoted to defensive coordinator, The Citadel head coach Brent Thompson announced Friday. "Blake Harrell is one of the best defensive minds I have ever worked with," Coach Thompson said. "We have been together on the same staff since 2010, and he has proven to be a fantastic coach. Coach Harrell played a major role in exceptional defenses here at The Citadel and at Lenoir-Rhyne. His promotion provides stability for our coaching staff and cadet-athletes in a system they have had success running and are comfortable within." Harrell came to The Citadel in 2014 as the Bulldogs' inside linebackers coach and special teams coordinator. He will continue to coach inside linebackers in addition to his defensive coordinator responsibilities. A-Backs coach J.P. Gunter is taking over special teams coordinator duties. "I am excited to be named defensive coordinator at The Citadel," Coach Harrell said. "Coach Thompson and I have worked together for many years, and I'm looking forward to continuing to build on the championship foundation we set last season. The Citadel produces fantastic cadet-athletes, and I appreciate the opportunity to be part of developing them on and off the field."
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
February 15, 2016
8d. Bulldogs Sweep Friday Competition
The Citadel tennis team won both of its Friday matches at the USC Sumter Spring Tennis Classic. The Bulldogs (5-6) opened the day by defeating Benedict College 8-1 in the morning match. They returned to the courts Friday evening and earned a 7-2 victory over Coker College. The Citadel pushed its winning streak to four in a row with the two victories Friday. Against Benedict, The Citadel claimed straight-set victories at the top five singles positions. Jackson Pride earned a dominating 6-0, 6-1 win at No. 4, while Nicholas Bradley took a 6-2, 6-0 win at No. 2 and Matthew Henson won 6-2, 6-1 at No. 3. Roy Hobson took a 6-3, 6-2 win at No. 5 and Artemie Amari won 6-3, 6-4 at No. 1. In doubles, the Bulldogs dominated as Pride and Connor Grady won 8-0 at the No. 3 position, Henson and Michael Anzalone won 8-2 at No. 2 and Amari and Bradley won 8-6 at No. 1. In the Coker match, The Citadel won five singles matches and two doubles contests for the team victory. Pride earned a 6-3, 6-0 win at No. 4 singles, and Henson took a 6-3, 6-1 victory at No. 3. Bradley and Anzalone each claimed 6-3, 6-3 wins at No. 2 and No. 6 singles, respectively, and Amari won at No. 1 when his opponent retired due to injury. Amari and Bradley earned an 8-4 win at No. 1 doubles and Grady and Pride took an 8-5 victory at No. 3.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Monday
February 15, 2016
9. W.H. 'Billy' Rhame Jr. Obituary
Wilton Henry Rhame Jr. of Holly Hill, known as Billy to his friends, Daddy to his children and Poppop to his grands, was born Nov. 30, 1926, and died Friday, Feb. 12, 2016, after a life well lived and enjoyed. He was proud to have been born on the same day as the great Winston Churchill. A third generation resident of Holly Hill, Billy Rhame was especially proud of his family, the town of Holly Hill, First Baptist Church of Holly Hill, and his alma mater, The Citadel, from which he graduated in 1948 after serving in the Merchant Marine in the waning months of World War II. His wife of 67 years is Juanita Way Rhame, with whom he shared love of food, travel, enjoyment of friends, and the building of their home on Camden Road. His children are daughter Syd and her husband Don Janney of Atlanta, and son Wilton Henry "Hank" Rhame III and his wife Donna of Cameron. Grandchildren are Taylor and Camden Janney and Savannah, Will, and Madison Rhame. Faithful employees L.D. Clark and Jannie Mae Gillard are like family.
Published in: The Times and Democrat
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Friday
February 12, 2016
1. Scientists making global impact to be honored at The Citadel
The Citadel Academy of Science and Mathematics awards banquet will be held March 17, 2016, at the Francis Marion Hotel in Charleston. The academy will honor four professionals who have demonstrated exemplary leadership through their work. The four inductees for 2016 include Dr. J. Patrick Johnson, Class of '78, Dr. William H. Bowers, Class of '60, Rick DeVoe, and Professor Dena Garner. "It will be a great honor to recognize these innovators in the enviromental, health, and medical science fields," said Dean of The Citadel School of Science and Metematics, Lok C. Lew Yan Voon. Johnson is an internationally recognized neurosurgeon holding appointments at Cedars Sinai in Los Angeles and University of California-Davis, in Sacramento. He is currently establishing the first human clinical trials in stem cell transplantation for spinal cord repair in patients with ALS (Lou Gehrig's Disease). Johnson graduated from The Citadel in 1978 with a degree in chemistry. Bowers is a physican, educator, decorated veteran, mentor, and board member of The Citadel School of Science and Mathematics. He is a distinguished hand surgeon and received the Combat Medical Badge and Bronze Star with Valor, among other medals, for his work as a flight surgeon in Viet Nam. He graduated from The Citadel in 1960 with a degree in chemistry. DeVoe is executive director of the South Carolina Sea Grant Consortium. He is a coastal policy expert, educator, and conservationist. Under his leadership, the consortium is one of the most respected sea grant programs in the nation.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Friday
February 12, 2016
2. Thousands Prep for Google/The Citadel's Lowcountry STEM event
A record number of teams across South Carolina are preparing for the Sixth Annual Storm The Citadel Trebuchet Competition. The word has spread since 2011 when a dozen teams competed. On Feb. 13, more than 100 teams and 700 competitors will arrive in the Lowcountry as more than 3,000 spectators watch their engineering skills come to life. This year's event will feature teams from across the Lowcountry and several teams visiting from Richland, Sumter, Darlington and York counties as well as a team from Clemson University. Each year, teams of K-12, college students, and corporate adult teams gather on Summerall Field to launch their trebuchets. The medieval devices are judged for accuracy, distance, spirit and design. Co-hosted and co-founded by Google and The Citadel's School of Engineering, the event reinforces the importance of science technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education. "This event creates a smart, family oriented and fun filled learning environment around STEM education," said Google's Jeff Stevenson, a Citadel graduate who founded the event. "STEM education is crucial in today's job market. We are working to ensure that South Carolina students are prepared to meet the growing needs of tech-based companies, and Storm The Citadel is a great way to encourage students to learn and develop their skills."
Published in: Moultrie News
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Friday
February 12, 2016
3. One-on-one with GOP presidential candidate Jeb Bush
2016 presidential candidate Jeb Bush declared his campaign ready for victory in the Palmetto State in a rally in Columbia Thursday night. Even after his fourth place finish in the New Hampshire primary, Bush said the race is just getting started and he's hopeful for pulling out a win in the February 20th South Carolina Republican primary. A cheering crowd welcomed the former Florida governor with a rendition of "Happy Birthday" for his birthday. Bush's former opponent in the presidential race, South Carolina U.S. Senator Lindsey Graham, introduced him exclaiming, "Isn't it time to have somebody behind the oval office that knows what the hell they're doing? This guy's ready folks." In his remarks, Bush declared his intention to strengthen America's military and recalled his own remarks to cadets at The Citadel. "Yes, I will have their back," he said. "Yes, I will be a commander in chief that respects the military. Yes, we will eliminate the sequester and rebuild our military so it is the strongest by far, by far, in the world."
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Friday
February 12, 2016
4. Local couple develops fitness routine that combines MMA and dance
Erin Mansour was a professional dancer and fitness instructor. Her husband, Chris McNally, was a former professional mixed martial arts fighter. The parents of four children, Mansour and McNally were finding it difficult to balance their busy lifestyles, while at the same time trying to stay in shape and spend time together. "We've got four kids and three under the age of 10, so getting to spend time just with each other was next to impossible," McNally said. "When we did get a chance to work out, we really worked out separately. I'm a MMA guy, she's a dancer, so it was hard to find something that we both liked to do that we could do together." What the couple decided to do was develop their own fitness routine that would combine both their passions. After some research, planning, a lot of experimenting and tons of sweat, STRYKE Fight Dance Fitness was born. STRYKE combines moves from the mixed martial arts with dancing. The result is a workout that is simple enough for a beginner to learn and intense enough to make a professional athlete declare no mas. Mansour and McNally will offer a free STRYKE class Thursday at 6 p.m. at ECO Fitness in Mount Pleasant. Classes normally last 45 minutes to an hour and can burn up to 1,000 calories. "It incorporates all the strikes of mixed martial arts," said McNally, who earned degrees in Exercise Science and Chemistry from The Citadel. "The punches, kicks, elbows, all the strikes that fans of MMA are familiar with and then Erin brought in the dance fitness aspect of the workout. Dance fitness is huge right now and it's not just hip hop. It's other dance moves as well."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Friday
February 12, 2016
5. Martin Frederick Schnibben, Jr., '43
Born on February 4, 1922, to Mrs. Leah Martha Stooks Schnibben and Mr. Martin Frederick Schnibben, in Florence, South Carolina, Martin F. "Jack" Schnibben, Jr., attended the Florence city schools and graduated from Riverside Military Academy of Gainesville, Georgia and Hollywood, Florida. He entered The Citadel at Charleston, South Carolina in 1939 where he was a member of Cadet Company "B" his freshman year, "C" his sophomore year, and "A" his junior and senior years. He played on the football team his first two years, and was a member of the International Relations Club his final two years at the college. During his senior year, he held the rank of Cadet 2nd Lieutenant his senior year and graduated May 28, 1943 with a Bachelor's degree in Political Science. In May 1943, he enlisted in the U.S. Army. On July 1, while on leave prior to attending Officer Candidates School, he married Ms. Bonnie Hayes McCubbins of Florence. He received his commission that fall at Fort Benning, Georgia. He was then stationed at Fort Blanding, Florida, for several months before being transferred to Fort Meade, Maryland, from where he went overseas.
Published in: The Citadel Memorial Europe
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Friday
February 12, 2016
6. The Citadel falls at Furman 95-75
The Citadel basketball team fell on the road to Furman 95-75 at Timmons Arena on Thursday night. The Bulldogs dropped to 10-16 (3-10) on the season while the Paladins grabbed their seventh win in eight outings. During the loss, The Citadel set a pair of new program records. Center Zane Najdawi recorded his 47th blocked shot of the current campaign, which is now the most by any freshman in Bulldogs history in a single season. Additionally, with 75 points on Thursday, The Citadel has racked up a program-best 2,289 total points in 2015-16. The Bulldogs have at least six more games left to pad that record. Senior point guard P.J. Boutte collected 15 points, four rebounds and three assists to steer The Citadel. The speedster matched his career-high with three treys as the Bulldogs made 10 or more three-pointers for the 18th time this season. Freshman Connor Schroeder contributed a career-high 17 points and four rebounds off the bench and junior Warren Sledge added 11 points, three assists and three rebounds. Leading 31-26, Furman swung the momentum late in the first half with a game-defining 11-0 run. After Sledge made a driving layup with 4:19 remaining in the opening frame, the Paladins made four of their next five shots and held The Citadel without a field goal for the rest of the half. The 11 unanswered points handed Furman a 42-26 halftime advantage.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Friday
February 12, 2016
7. Citadel baseball picked to finish 7th in SoCon
The Citadel has been picked to finish tied for seventh in the Southern Conference by league coaches, and two Bulldogs made the preseason all-SoCon team. Sophomore pitcher J.P. Sears and junior outfielder Austin Mapes were picked by the coaches for the preseason second team. The coaches picked Samford to win the league this season, while the media went with defending regular-season and tournament champion Mercer. Mercer's Kyle Lewis was named the preseason player of the year, and Wofford's Matthew Milburn the player of the year. Sears, from Sumter, was 5-5 with a 4.28 earned-run average last season. Mapes, from Travelers Rest, batted .308, scored 45 runs and 10 stolen bases. In the preseason SoCon coaches' poll, The Citadel was selected to finish seventh and was voted to finish eighth by media members.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Friday
February 12, 2016
8. Wrestling Mocs at The Citadel, Virginia
The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga wrestling team will log a lot of miles this weekend while closing out the regular season. The Mocs (10-4) left Thursday for tonight's Southern Conference dual with The Citadel (5-8) in Charleston, S.C. and they'll travel to Charlottesville, Va., for a nonconference match with No. 19 Virginia (6-5) on Sunday before coming home. "It's not that bad," UTC coach Heath Eslinger said. "We do two-match weekends all the time, and we're on a (charter) bus." They'll travel approximately seven hours for each leg of their trip, but the most important items on the four-day agenda are rebounding from last Saturday's loss to Appalachian State with a win tonight and closing out the schedule with a victory against the Cavaliers, who have been ranked as high as No. 16 this season.
Published in: TimesFreePress.com
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Thursday
February 11, 2016
1. Celebrate Black History Month: Events in the Lowcountry
The Citadel: An African-American Bazaar will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 17, in the Mark Clark Hall Reception Room. The bazaar will feature live reggae music from "Equal Rights," free sampling of various soul foods, and artwork and displays from area vendors. Admission is free. A panel discussion on law and justice, to include practicing attorneys and officers from the Charleston Police Department, will be held at 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 22, in Bond Hall, Room 165. Attorney Craig Burgess, a 1987 graduate of The Citadel, will moderate. Admission is free and the public is invited to participate. A Black History Quiz Bowl will be held Wednesday, Feb. 28, at 7 p.m. in Mark Clark Hall Auditorium. Students from The Citadel, College of Charleston, Charleston Southern University, and Trident Technical College will compete. Admission is free.
Published in: The Daniel Island News
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Thursday
February 11, 2016
2. Things To Do Thursday, February 11, 2016
Darwin Week: 'Origins' What: The theme for this year's Darwin Week is "Origins" - the origin of the universe, life, complex adaptations and controversy. The Charleston chapter of Sigma Xi, the scientific research organization, will present Dr. Nicholas Hud, the director of the center of chemical evolution with Georgia Tech. Hud's seminar, "Darwin's Warm Little Pond: Searching for the Chemical Origins of Life," will discuss his research on the origins of life. When: 4:30 p.m. (CofC); 7 p.m. (The Citadel) Where: School of Sciences and Math Auditorium, College of Charleston, 202 Calhoun St., downtown Charleston; 117 Grimsley Hall, The Citadel, 171 Moultrie St., downtown Charleston Price: Free
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
February 11, 2016
3. Hillsborough: College students make the grades for dean's lists
Cadet Michael Subach of Hillsborough earned academic honors on the fall semester dean's list at The Citadel in Charleston, S.C. He is a 2012 Hillsborough High School graduate. Recognition is given to cadets registered for 12 or more semester hours and whose grade point average is 3.2 or higher with no grade below a C for the semester's work.
Published in: CentralJersey.com
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Thursday
February 11, 2016
4. America's National Debt Bomb Was Caused by the Welfare State
The news is filled with the everyday zigzags of those competing against each other for the Democrat and Republican Party nominations to run for the presidency of the United States. But one of the most important issues receiving little or no attention in this circus of political power lusting is the long-term danger from the huge and rising Federal government debt. The Federal debt has now crossed the $19 trillion mark. When George W. Bush entered the White House in 2001, Uncle Sam's debt stood at $5 trillion. When President Bush left office in January of 2009, it had increased to $10 trillion. Now into seven years of Barack Obama's presidency, the Federal debt has almost doubled again. And it is going to get much worse, according to the Congressional Budget Office. On January 26, 2016, the CBO released it latest "Budget and Economic Outlook" analysis for the next ten years, from 2016 to 2026. Dr. Richard M. Ebeling is the BB&T Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel in Charleston, SC.
Published in: EpicTimes.com
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Thursday
February 11, 2016
5. Bishop England's Leask earns soccer scholarship to The Citadel
Logan Leask totally understands the student-athlete concept. The Bishop England soccer player is a senior who is ready for her final go-round on the high school soccer pitch. And, what a ride it has been for Leask, who earned All-Lowcountry and all-state honors the past two seasons for one of the best teams in the Lowcountry. Here's the student part of her profile. She takes all AP classes and makes straight A's. "I love math, but even it is hard because the AP classes are hard work," said Leask, who proved last week that National Signing Day isn't for football players only. "I strive to succeed." Leask signed a scholarship to play soccer for The Citadel, which is the next step in her life. After that, expect Leask to join the U.S. Navy and work aboard a submarine. Leask said she's been inspired to join the Navy because both of her parents, Lisa and Noah, served in the Navy and told their daughter about their experiences and success. The scholarship The Citadel offered was the final part of the trifecta Leask was searching for as she takes the next step in life. "It's so crazy, but I wanted to attend a military school to further my career, and I wanted to play Division I soccer," Leask said. "And not only that, I wanted to stay local. It's great the way things worked out."
Published in: The Daniel Island News
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Thursday
February 11, 2016
6. Furman hosts rival The Citadel
After avenging one road loss from earlier this season on Monday, the Furman men's basketball team will look to do so again Thursday when the Paladins host rival The Citadel at 7 p.m. On Monday, Stephen Croone scored 17 points to lead Furman to a 79-72 win over UNC Greensboro. That extended the Paladins' home winning streak to eight consecutive games. Kris Acox had 15 points and eight rebounds while freshman Matt Rafferty totaled 11 points and eight boards as Furman (15-11, 9-4 Southern Conference) split the season series with the Spartans and moved back into third place in the league standings. The Citadel (10-15, 3-9) is coming off a 95-86 loss to Samford in Charleston Monday. The Bulldogs led 70-66 with less than six minutes to play before Samford scored 29 points over the final 5:52 to rally for the win. Citadel leads all of Division I in scoring with an average of 88.6 points per game. Furman leads the SoCon in scoring defense allowing just 64.2 points per game. On Jan. 16 in Charleston, Citadel put up the most points Furman has allowed all season in an 89-86 win for the Bulldogs. Citadel led that game 87-77 with 36 seconds left before the Paladins nearly pulled off a miracle. A pair of Devin Sibley free throws cut the lead to 87-86 with 4.9 seconds left. After two free throws by the Bulldogs, Croone's desperation 3-pointer bounced off the rim as time expired.
Published in: The Greenville News
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Wednesday
February 10, 2016
1. Proposal would allow removal of Confederate flag from Citadel chapel
The Citadel could remove a Confederate flag from its campus chapel if a proposal filed by state Sen. Marlon Kimpson, D-Charleston, becomes law. The bill would allow flags from the Civil War to be removed from religious chapels and structures on the school's campus, placing them in another historic location at the public institution or in a museum. Removal would require approval from the school's board of directors. Kimpson said The Citadel's board and president both want the flag removed. The proposal faces a difficult route to passage. After lawmakers removed the Confederate flag from the State House grounds last summer, S.C. House Speaker Jay Lucas, R-Darlington, said no other symbols would be up for debate. Kimpson said that declaration does not deter him.
Published in: The State
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Wednesday
February 10, 2016
2. Sen. Marlon Kimpson introduces bill to remove Confederate flag from Citadel chapel
Charleston senator filed a bill Tuesday to remove the Confederate battle flag from The Citadel's Summerall Chapel. The bill by Democrat Sen. Marlon Kimpson would amend the controversial South Carolina Heritage Act to allow for the removal of Civil War-era battle flags displayed in religious structures or chapels on the campus of an institution of higher learning. The bill, if approved, would require a vote by the institution's board of directors to move the flag. Currently a two-thirds majority in the General Assembly is needed - the same as was required to remove the rebel banner from Statehouse grounds last summer. Kimpson said his bill reflects the desire of most of The Citadel's board and school leadership. "The majority of the board voted to request the General Assembly to exempt the gift from the yacht club (the Confederate flag) from their Heritage Act," Kimpson said. "The legislation is narrowly tailored to achieve what the president, board and community all want: to remove that symbol of division from a place of worship on a campus so that the school can move forward into the 21st Century."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
February 10, 2016
3. After N.H., Kasich vaults to GOP prominence
"When I am president of the United States..." The cheers interrupted John Kasich's victory speech Tuesday. True, he hadn't won the New Hampshire primary. But he had come in second, the best possible result for the Ohio governor, lending credence to the notion that he can emerge as the GOP alternative to Donald Trump and Ted Cruz. New Hampshire voters handed a victory to Trump, as polls had predicted they would. But with the nod to Kasich, they signaled their endorsement of his plainspoken style, moderate stances, message of unity and voter-by-voter strategy of holding 100-plus town hall meetings... Kasich has said he'd seek to balance the budget without cutting money spent on national defense, but he talks frequently about wanting to reform the Pentagon and its bureaucracy. As a congressman, he fought large-scale production of the B-2 bomber, which he viewed as largely unnecessary in the nuclear age. He also supported a process that closed some obsolete military bases around the country. Kasich says the process prevented "pork-barrel spending." South Carolina has multiple military bases, plus The Citadel military college. Kasich's supporters take heart from John McCain's nomination in 2008, when he took South Carolina following a New Hampshire victory even though he lacked money and a strong early ground game.
Published in: USA Today
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Wednesday
February 10, 2016
4. Quigley Nominates Students for Admission to U.S. Service Academies
U.S. Representative Mike Quigley (IL-05) has nominated students from the Fifth Congressional District for admission to the U.S. Service Academies for the graduating class of 2020. The admissions departments of the academies will make the final decision on acceptance. "I am extremely proud to nominate these motivated, passionate and successful young men and women for admission to our prestigious service academies," said Rep. Quigley. "To be nominated to one of our nation's service academies is a great honor and a substantial accomplishment. I thank all of the young men and women who want to serve and wish them all the best in their future endeavors." The Fifth District nominees are: U.S. Naval Academy: William Borrows II, of Elmhurst, York Community High School; David Cooney, of Chicago, St. Ignatius College Prep; Michael Ducey, of Elmhurst, York Community High School; Shane Hughes, of Chicago, St. Ignatius College Prep; Emmet Jenkins, of Chicago, Fenwick High School; Alex Kania, of Rosemont, Christian Liberty Academy; Erik Luthringshausen, of Hinsdale, Fenwick High School; Daniel Malarski, of Chicago, The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina; Gerard Rux, of Chicago, Loyola Academy; Aidan Smith, of Hinsdale, Nazareth Academy.
Published in: Congressman Mike Quigley
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Wednesday
February 10, 2016
5. Tales of Valor - Phil Minges, The Honorable Mayor
As has been stated many times before, we sure have some wonderful, accomplished people living here with us at The Palms. Phil Minges was born Dec. 1, 1923, which makes him one of our "younger residents." He had the good fortune of being born just 2 1/2 blocks from the Battery. Most of us here are in the "senior citizen" category and had a much slower paced and enjoyable childhood. There were no televisions, I-pads, cell phones and electronic games to entertain us or computers to keep us from learning how to count and spell. Our entertainment was "home-made." One of the most fun things they did (as did I) was to cut a pair of skates in half, put the front half of the skate on a board, an orange crate on top and the other half of the skate on the back. It was a home made "scooter." They were fun. They had races between kids with on their scooters. They rode bikes or scooters for transportation and had "choose up" games of baseball, football, and soccer. Each took pride in being picked early for a game... The war was over. Phil "served with distinction" and got several awards of recognition-the "Purple Heart," (for his injury) the Bronze Star (for the Battle of the Bulge) and his treasured "Combat Infantry Badge." He went to England and then to New York on a British hospital ship. Back in the U.S., during the next 3 months, he was shipped to Tuscaloosa, Alabama, Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia and then out of the military as a sergeant. For 6 months, he was in the 52/20 Club ($20 a week for 52 weeks) for jobless military veterans. He was awaiting his admission to the Citadel. Phil graduated in 1948.
Published in: Moultrie News
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Wednesday
February 10, 2016
6. The Sweeney Todds of Washington
If the Democrats had shut out a female candidate like the GOP did in Saturday's debate in New Hampshire, the whole party and the candidate herself would have screamed accusations of sexism. Carly Fiorina could have taken that tactic, but she didn't, because she knew that her sex was not the issue and she knew that fake victimhood would not win her votes or women more respect. Fiorina is not a woman who relies on her feminity as a crutch for her failures or successes. She is too strong and independent to make excuses. Instead, Fiorina argued that she deserved to be in the debate because of her voter support and polling performance, which ranked higher than Chris Christie's or John Kasich's, both of whom appeared in the debate. Like Rand Paul in the Charleston debate, Fiorina was shut out under the pretense of low polling, and the media was complicit. Speaking of prostituting the democratic process, Madeleine Albright is stumping for Hillary Clinton and charging Democrat women with satanic sexism if they don't support Clinton over Bernie Sanders. Albright goes as far as saying that Sanders' voters are going to Hell for supporting an old, white man over an old, white woman. Written by Paige Lewis, an adjunct history professor and freelance writer in Charleston, S.C. She graduated Queens College in Charlotte, N.C. with a B.A. in history and drama, with a minor in political science. She earned her master's degree in American history from the University of Charleston and The Citadel joint graduate studies program.
Published in: TownHall.com
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Wednesday
February 10, 2016
7. Marchant Named Assistant Coach
Jack Marchant has been named assistant coach of The Citadel women's soccer team, head coach Ciaran Traquair announced on Friday. Coach Marchant comes to The Citadel after spending one year at Anderson University as the goalkeepers coach for both the men's and women's programs. "Jack is an excellent addition to our staff and he will impact every aspect of the program," Coach Traquair said. "It was important for us to have someone with a passion for the game and an ability to develop our cadet-athletes. Jack brings experience from several different divisions and is a quality goalkeeper coach. Jack has made a tremendous impact on the goalkeepers at Anderson and was invested in their development on and off the field. He will be an asset in the office and with our recruitment efforts moving forward. This is a big step in moving our program to the next level." While at Anderson, Marchant assisted Coach Traquair to a program-record 14 wins in 2015 and a No. 8 ranking in the final NSCAA Southeast Region poll. The Trojans finished the season in the South Atlantic Conference Championship semifinal round with a 14-4-1 overall record and produced five All-SAC performers, the most in program history. Under Marchant's direction, Anderson's Abby Helm finished the season fifth in the South Atlantic Conference with a 0.95 goals-against average. Marchant was also involved in the Clemson Anderson Soccer Alliance where he held the position of Director of Goalkeeper/Coach. In that role, Marchant oversaw the development of the club's goalkeepers and developed players based on USSF coaching.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Tuesday
February 9, 2016
1. Gov. Haley and Pulitzer prize winner will speak at Citadel
Two Greater Issues Series presentations will be held in coming weeks at The Citadel. The first will feature two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize, author David McCullough. The presenter for the second address will be Governor Nikki Haley. Both speeches will be attended by the South Carolina Corps of Cadets and are also open to the public with limited seating available. This is the 62nd year the Greater Issues Series will present nationally and globally-known thought-leaders. Internationally acclaimed author and speaker, David G. McCullough, will deliver a Greater Issues Address to the South Carolina Corps of Cadets at 2:15 p.m., on Friday, Feb. 19, at McAlister Field House. His 11 books include: The Path Between the Seas; Mornings on Horseback; Truman; John Adams; 1776; and most recently, The Wright Brothers. Among the 15 historical documentaries McCullough has presented or narrated are: The Civil War (Ken Burns); Huey Long; D-Day Remembered; The Statue of Liberty; and American Experience. His numerous awards include two Pulitzer Prizes, two National Book Awards, the National Book Foundation's lifetime Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters, as well as the Presidential Medal of Freedom.
Published in: Moultrie News
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Tuesday
February 9, 2016
2a. Storm The Citadel only days away as Upstate competition prepares for Lowcountry event
A group of Clemson students are hoping to bring home a different kind of trophy this month. They are designing and building a trebuchet and taking it to the Lowcountry for the annual Storm the Citadel competition on Saturday, February 13th. Clemson junior Caleb Dennis took part in the engineering event while at Berkeley High School and is the lead designer of the Tiger team’s current trebuchet design. "Storm The Citadel is a great event to get people interested in engineering. I know that it helped to get me in the path toward engineering as a future," said Dennis. Co-hosted and co-founded by Google, the event reinforces the importance of science technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education. Storm The Citadel 2016 is expected to attract more than 700 participants and 3,000 spectators. Each year, The Citadel’s School of Engineering host the trebuchet competition and judges rate teams on accuracy, distance, spirit and design. This year, more than 100 teams are registered, making it the largest field since the competition began in 2011.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Tuesday
February 9, 2016
2b. Storm The Citadel
STC 2016
Published in: The Digitel
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Tuesday
February 9, 2016
3. Judge dismisses ReVille victim lawsuits against Citadel officials
A federal judge on Monday dismissed a pair of lawsuits filed against Citadel President Lt. Gen. John Rosa, an attorney for the school and others accused of enabling serial molester Louis "Skip" ReVille to further victimize children by "covering up" prior allegations of sexual abuse. Named defendants in both federal suits were Rosa; Jennifer Garrott, a former director at a now-defunct summer camp where ReVille served as a counselor; school attorney Mark Brandenburg; and Joseph Trez, a former executive assistant to Rosa. They each were accused of covering up a 2007 complaint concerning sexually inappropriate behavior by ReVille with multiple children, and failing to implement policies that called for the termination of any camp counselor caught alone with a minor behind closed doors. The defendants sought the dismissals in December by filing motions for summary judgment in the cases, which were brought in 2014 by two ReVille victims identified in court documents only as John Doe A of North Carolina and John Doe 4 of Dorchester County. U.S. District Judge Richard Gergel heard arguments from attorneys on both sides Thursday. The judge concluded the hearing without disclosing a decision in either case. An order later filed in federal court stated that Gergel ultimately ruled in the defendants' favor.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
February 9, 2016
4. In The New Hampshire Primary, Sanders Has More At Stake Than Just Delegates
The implications of the nation's first presidential primary extend far beyond the borders of New Hampshire, and results here will set the stage for key votes in South Carolina, Nevada and beyond. Audio for this story will be posted by approximately 11 a.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 9. Susan Thanos has seen Bernie Sanders on TV and listened to him in the debates, and she's intrigued enough by what she's heard to have driven 90 minutes on a snowy Monday morning to a century-old theater in downtown Manchester, New Hampshire... Scott Buchanan, an associate professor of political science at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina, serves as executive director of the Citadel Symposium on Southern Politics. Buchanan says Sanders' photo-finish with Clinton in Iowa turned heads in South Carolina. "You know, she's still ahead, but I suspect that gap has narrowed somewhat in the last few days," Buchanan says. Polls indicate that Clinton continues to wield substantial advantage with voters of color, who will make up far greater proportions of the electorate in states like South Carolina than they do in Iowa or New Hampshire. But Buchanan says Sanders has picked up some key endorsements of late. Ben Jealous, the former head of the NAACP, came out for Sanders last week, for example. And Buchanan says that if Sanders can earn the kind of double-digit margin of victory in New Hampshire that polls are predicting now, then it might make waves down South. "I still think that when all is said and done, in South Carolina, at least, he will be fighting an uphill battle. But if he does very well in New Hampshire, I think he makes it respectable in South Carolina," Buchanan says.
Published in: Vermont's NPR
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Tuesday
February 9, 2016
5. Names in the news: The Citadel
Daniel Yu of Gainesville earned the distinction of Dean's List at The Citadel for fall 2015. Yu was also awarded Gold Stars by The Citadel for earning a grade point ratio of 3.7 or higher. To earn a spot on the list, cadets must have a GPA of 3.2 or higher, be registered for 12 or more semester hours, and have no grades below a C for the previous semester. Brandon Hickey of Triangle and Jeremy McCathern of Dumfries earned the distinction of Dean's List at The Citadel for fall 2015. To earn a spot on the list, cadets must have a GPA of 3.2 or higher, be registered for 12 or more semester hours, and have no grades below a C for the previous semester.
Published in: Prince William Times
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Tuesday
February 9, 2016
6. The Citadel Memorial Europe: Thomas Hutson Martin, Jr., Class of 1940
Thomas Hutson Martin, Jr. was that unusual combination of talents: soldier, engineer, leader, and musician. His father, a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons, was a native of South Carolina, as was his mother whose Scotch name of Mclnnes showed their affiliation to the Scotch Presbyterian Church. His preparation for West Point included the Charleston High School in Charleston, South Carolina, and three years at The Citadel where he rose to the rank of cadet lieutenant. With that background, it was a foregone conclusion that Hut would rise, as he did, to Second Class corporal, First Class lieutenant and Company Commander of C Company, 2d Regiment. These soldierly virtues combined with a class rank under one hundred to give Hut the berth as a Lieutenant of Engineers which he so desired. It was not only those of us who played in the cadet orchestra who got to know the musician, for Hut was a pianist whose talents rivaled those of Teddy Wilson and Bob Zurkc. He could play from music, play by ear, and play on sight any strange accompaniment placed in front of him. A first string standout in the orchestra, he also wrote and arranged music for the 100th Night Shows. In those halcyon days when music was music, orchestrating for a large band took real skill; Hut had it. For all these reasons he was made leader of the orchestra our First Class year; he sang in the choir as well.
Published in: The Citadel Memorial Europe
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Tuesday
February 9, 2016
7. Local business calendar
QuickBooks: The Small Business Development Center, The Citadel and Software Training Consultants Inc. hold a "QuickBooks Level II" bookkeeping and accounting software workshop. 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Bastin Lab in The Citadel's Bond Hall, 171 Moultrie St. Cost:: $139. Register: www.citadel.edu/bastinlab
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
February 9, 2016
8. Citadel drops third straight, 95-86 to Samford
A home game against a team that had lost six straight and nine of 10 seemed just what The Citadel needed Monday night to get its own basketball season back on track. And with a 4-point lead with just over six minutes to play, the Bulldogs seemed to have that victory within its grasp. But a pair of Samford freshmen sizzled down the stretch, pacing their team to 29 points in the final six minutes and a 95-86 win before 1,742 fans at McAlister Field House. Wyatt Walker, a 6-9 freshman, scored 10 of his team-high 22 points during that final run, and 6-7 rookie Matt Rose totaled nine of his 17 as Samford scored on 13 of its final 14 possessions. Walker and Rose combined to make 17 of 25 shots from the field as Samford shot 58 percent for the game. "We basically got beat by two freshmen," said Citadel coach Duggar Baucom, whose team lost its third straight to fall to 10-15 overall and 3-9 in the Southern Conference. "And that's the frustrating part. Walker had his way with us in there, we never would wall up against him. And the ones their guards did miss, he'd clean up. "It's definitely disappointing, because that's a team we need to beat, for the standings and because they came in here struggling."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
February 9, 2016
9. Postponed once, signing ceremony goes on
Timberland High School football coach and athletic director Art Craig has been on both ends of the Berkeley County athletic scholarship signing ceremony. He's seen dozens of THS student-athletes sign national letters of intent over the last 18 years, including two of his own sons. Of all the county athletic directors, Craig has served the longest... Cane Bay had five student-athletes honored and Stratford four. One of the Knights, baseball player J.D. Davis, made it to Div. I and signed with The Citadel. "This is big for them," SHS athletic director John Chalus said. "We always say athletics can get you a better education to help better your life." "It shows the kids that if you have the ability and the academics, you can make it to the next level," Cane Bay athletic director Tim McDowell said. Two of the other more notable signings included Goose Creek High School football player Dijon Profit to The Citadel and Cross High School football player Malcolm Garrett to South Carolina State.
Published in: The Gazette
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Monday
February 8, 2016
1. FBI's Hands-off Strategy in Oregon Follows Lessons Learned
Federal officials have allowed the armed occupation of an Oregon wildlife refuge to drag on for more than a month as part of a strategy learned from past standoffs in Texas and Idaho that ended in bloodshed and spurred more government mistrust, experts say. Critics say the wait-it-out strategy sends a mixed message and can embolden others to lead takeovers. The decision to monitor from a distance the Oregon occupiers opposing federal land policy has not changed since Jan. 2, but U.S. officials are stepping up the pressure outside the refuge and in the courtroom. Authorities arrested leader Ammon Bundy and others on a remote road when they left Malheur National Wildlife Refuge for a community meeting. The confrontation on Jan. 26 also led to the shooting death of an occupier, who the FBI says was reaching for a gun... Authorities have set up checkpoints around the refuge but have not forced out the occupiers. "Their approach is - time is on their side," said Carl Jensen, a former FBI supervisory special agent who is director of the Intelligence and Security Studies program at the Citadel military college. "The first priority is to end it peacefully and not light a match to set it off."
Published in: ABC News
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Monday
February 8, 2016
2. The Citadel Hosting Black History Month Bazaar Saturday - Feb. 6
The annual bazaar features music, food and exhibits and attracts visitors to campus from across the Lowcountry. The feature for 2016 will be the Mu Alpha Chapter of Omega Psi Phi High School Quiz Bowl final round. Charleston's own reggae band, Urban Roots will perform for attendees and the Tut-Tut Kemetic Group will host a special exhibit. The Center for Heirs Property will host an informative seminar to educate heirs on the rights, risks and responsibilities of owning heirs' property. The event will take place Saturday, Feb. 6, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Buyer Auditorium, Mark Clark Hall. The event is free and open to the public.
Broadcast on: WCBD-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
February 8, 2016
3. Achievements: Area students honored (Feb. 7)
Stark City, Mo. - Cadet Marlan Campbell, of Stark City, was recognized for outstanding academic achievement and earned dean's list recognition for the fall 2015 semester at The Citadel South Carolina Corps of Cadets. Dean's list recognition is given to cadets whose grade point average is 3.2 or higher with no grade below a C for the previous semester's work. Campbell also was awarded Gold Stars by The Citadel for earning a grade point ratio of 3.7 or higher during the 2015 fall semester. Students that achieve Gold Star recognition also are placed on The Citadel's Dean's List. The Citadel, founded in 1842, is a public, coeducational military college in Charleston, South Carolina, that offers a classic military education for men and women.
Published in: The Jolpin Globe
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Monday
February 8, 2016
4. Letter: Learn about equality at The Citadel
A Jan. 27 editorial was titled "Citadel steps up with honor." The 14 cadets in white hoods and robes sent a terrible message to our community, especially after the tragedy at Mother Emanuel AME Church. Charlestonians and the thousands of visitors have come together to repair a damaged community. I am certain if these cadets were aware of the major contribution of African Americans they would be more mindful of their behavior. The Citadel offers several positive approaches and remedies toward a better understanding of bridging the gap and educating those who are unaware of the contribution of African Americans. Professor Marcus Cox has designed a course which encourages the appreciation of people of African descent. I would encourage everyone to come out to The Citadel's annual Black History Month Bazaar celebration on Feb. 6 between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Come see the largest mobile museum display in South Carolina on Ancient Egyptians, by Tut-Tut Kemetic Group and area historians. Join the community and be a part of a positive educational experience. Our future depends on strong men and women to promote freedom and equality. The United States is a cultural blend of citizens who defend that very freedom.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
February 8, 2016
5. Former downtown Morris Sokol Furniture building sells for $22.5 million
The Upper King Street showroom that used to house Morris Sokol Furniture has sold for $22.5 million, according to real estate records. The building was purchased by a Delaware limited liability company called Vanderking 510, LLC. The Sokol family's furniture business was a fixture in Charleston for 94 years before its owner, Joe Sokol, announced his retirement last summer. Sokol's father founded the Furniture company in 1921. Joe Sokol worked at the King Street store since graduating from The Citadel in the early 1950s. Reflecting on his then-upcoming retirement last July, Sokol said Upper King Street had grown with new bars and restaurants that brought new foot traffic to the area, something he said the city needed for a long time. The documents do not reveal what the 47,000 square-foot space will become.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
February 8, 2016
6a. Mercer Defeats The Citadel 88-72
Mercer rode an early lead to an 88-72 victory over The Citadel on Saturday in front of a record crowd at Hawkins Arena. Senior Quinton Marshall reached double figures for the 17th time this season and led the Bulldogs with 18 points. Mercer shot 48.5 percent from the field to earn the win and improve to 11-0 at home while The Citadel dropped to 10-14 overall and 3-8 in Southern Conference play. Freshman Quayson Williams and junior Warren Sledge both returned from injury and scored 12 points and 10 points, respectively. In the paint, Zane Najdawi grabbed seven rebounds for the second consecutive outing and collected two blocks to pull within five swats of setting the program record for blocks in a season by a freshman. The Bears set the tone from the jump and took a 14-2 lead after the first six minutes of the game. Senior point guard P.J. Boutte assisted on back-to-back buckets on the next two Bulldog possessions to stop the bleeding and prevent the deficit from swelling. Boutte finished with seven assists, six points and five rebounds on Saturday despite dealing with first-half foul trouble. Mercer extended its lead to 31-15 at the 7:54 mark and used an advantage down low to take a 43-30 edge into halftime. The Bears scored 54 total points in the paint to outduel the Bulldogs.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
February 8, 2016
6b. For Citadel foe Mercer, real life punctures 'basketball bubble'
Citadel coach Duggar Baucom calls it the "basketball bubble," the whirl of practice, games and travel that college teams get caught up in at this time of year. At Mercer University, and to a far lesser extent The Citadel, real life punctured that bubble in the most tragic way this week. The Mercer Bears, The Citadel's opponent in a 4:30 p.m. game Saturday, are mourning the death of one of their own, graduate-student player Jibri Bryan. Bryan, 23, was shot and killed Tuesday in downtown Macon, Ga. One suspect has been arrested and Georgia police are searching for a second suspect in the killing. Funeral services are set for next Tuesday in Savannah, Ga., for Bryan, who is survived by a 2-year-old son. Bryan's teammates, including sophomores Demetre Rivers of Stratford High School and Tyre Moore of Academic Magnet, took part in a candlelight vigil on Wednesday night. After some internal debate, Mercer officials decided to go ahead with Saturday's game. It's sure to be an emotional scene at Hawkins Arena when the Bulldogs and Bears take the floor for the first game since Bryan's death.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
February 8, 2016
7a. SoCon Preview: Inching Closer to Asheville
On Saturday, we will be one month away from the SoCon Tournament semifinals. We are starting to get close to Asheville, the most important four days in the conference season. Every game as we get closer to the tournament takes on added importance as each team tried to best position themselves for a long run. The top six teams in the conference have created some separation for the six byes. UNCG is up by two games on Western Carolina and The Citadel for the sixth spot with just eight games to play. Wofford is up a game on UNCG, and ETSU, Mercer and Furman each have one loss less than Wofford. Chattanooga has two losses less than that trio of teams. The races are interesting, but takes on less importance with the byes in such good shape. Let's look at some storylines for Saturday - Mercer Without Jibri Bryan - Bryan was shot this past week. The tragedy has sent shockwaves throughout the conference. The Bears will be playing their first game since then. It is a home game against The Citadel. The arena will probably be full of emotion from the team and fans alike in the pregame, and it will be one of the scenes of the weekend. The game starts at 4:30 on ESPN3. It's worth checking out. Turning things back to the court, how will Mercer perform on the floor? Will they be distracted and unable to play with the proper intensity? Will they be united and determined? That will go a long way to deciding what happens on the floor not just on Saturday, but for the remainder of the season.
Published in: SB Nation
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Monday
February 8, 2016
7b. Meet the Bulldogs Set for Feb. 14
The Citadel's annual baseball team Meet the Bulldogs will be held Sunday, Feb. 14th at Joe Riley Park located at 360 Fishburne Street. The event will begin at 11:30 a.m. with the baseball and tennis teams available for autographs on the field. 2016 posters will be available for fans. Then at 1 p.m. the 2016 baseball squad will hit the field for the Blue and White scrimmage. Hot dogs, chips and a drink will be provided by the Charleston RiverDogs for all attendees. The 2016 season begins Feb. 19-21 against Virginia Tech for Opening Weekend presented by Charleston Crab House. Game times are 5 p.m. Friday, 3:30 p.m. Saturday and 1p.m. Sunday. Live video from Friday's game will be available at CitadelSports.com and Saturday's game will be joined in progress following the conclusion of the basketball game against Western Carolina. There will be no live video of Sunday's game due to wrestling senior day that same afternoon.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Monday
February 8, 2016
8a. The Citadel defeats Davidson 28-16
The Citadel wrestling team defeated Southern Conference member Davidson on Sunday 28-16 in Davidson, North Carolina. With the victory, the Bulldogs improve to 5-9 overall and 2-4 in the SoCon. The Bulldogs jumped out to a quick 9-0 lead behind a pin by Marshall Haas at 197 pounds and an 11-4 decision by Joe Bexley (13-12, 3-3 SoCon). Haas (22-9, 6-0) picked up his fourth pin this season over Davidson's Michael Moore in 1:26. The Wildcats got back into the mix at 125 after winning by pin and then by a 5-3 sudden-victory decision at 133 pounds tying the score at 9-9. Ty Bucksio (18-11, 5-0) put The Citadel back on top at 141 pounds after pinning Billy McClelland in 4:11 to make the score 15-9 with five weight classes remaining. Senior Matt Frisch added to the Bulldogs' lead at 149 after defeating Aidan Conroy by a 9-0 major decision. Frisch is now 19-8 overall and 4-2 in SoCon duals. At 157 pounds, Aaron Walker continued to dominate as he defeated Tony Palumbo by fall in 3:50. The junior has not lost since Jan. 2nd and has the best record on the team at 23-5. With the pin, the Bulldogs extended their lead to 25-9.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Monday
February 8, 2016
8b. Grading the Midlands' signing day class
Midlands Class of 2016 Report Card: Overall: A great signing class for Midlands football, with 60 players inking an LOI to continue their education and careers at the next level. More than half of those were to Division I programs. Position of Strength: Offensive Linemen. Twelve big uglies from the offensive side of the ball signed with college programs. Second to the big guys were the defensive backs, where we had eight players sign. Position with little attention: Linebackers. Only four linebackers inked the dotted line this year from the Midlands. There were a couple of "athlete" or combo "RB/LBs" that signed, but only four who were true linebackers. Recruiting award for South Carolina: Which school recruited the best in the Midlands area? While The Citadel, Presbyterian and Charleston Southern all hit the Midlands fairly well, I think Charleston Southern probably did better on the whole for their group, landing Shrine Bowl safety Nick Graves and all-state running back Slade Carroll from Lexington, athlete Josh Bell of Fairfield Central, as well as linebacker Jonathan Earle of Airport. Biggest fish landed: While T.J. Brunson to South Carolina was a good catch, I believe East Carolina got the best steal when they landed Blythewood TE/WR Eric Weber. Biggest sleeper in class: Quarterback Logan Bailey of Chapin is easily the biggest sleeper in the class. I think The Citadel got the best athlete in the Midlands on this pick up, and a guy who can impact their offense, should they remain in the option scheme with the new head coach and staff.
Published in: The State
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Monday
February 8, 2016
8c. Bulldogs Continue Non-Conference Slate
The Citadel men's tennis team will continue its non-conference road swing this weekend as it plays three matches in two days. In the first match of the weekend, the Bulldogs will face Georgia Gwinnett at 10 a.m. The reigning NAIA National Champions will face USC-Aiken on Friday for their spring season opener before facing the Bulldogs at the GGC Tennis Facility. The Grizzlies' lead the all-time series between the schools 1-0. Georgia Gwinnett finished the 2015 season with a 16-2 record and a 10-0 mark at home. In the afternoon match, the Bulldogs will take on Point University in a neutral site contest. The Skyhawks finished the season with a 13-10 mark last season. The match is set to begin at 4 p.m. The Citadel wraps up the busy weekend with a 1 p.m. contest at Brevard. This will be just the second contest of the season for the Tornadoes who completed the 2015 spring slate with a 4-13 record. First-year head coach Evan Schreiner's squad will have limited experience as four of the six athletes on the team are freshmen.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Monday
February 8, 2016
9. George Hooper Obituary
Lt. Col. George T. Hooper, USA, Ret., of Bisbee, Sierra Vista, Phoenix and Snowflake, passed away on Saturday, Jan. 30, 2016. A chapel service and inurnment will take place at 2 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 11, at the Southern Arizona Veteran's Memorial Cemetery, 1300 Buffalo Soldier Trail in Sierra Vista. He enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps in 1946, serving in the corps for three years. After discharge from the USMC, he enrolled in The Citadel Military College of South Carolina. He then entered the U.S. Army, serving for 30 years in various assignments throughout the U.S., Korea, Hawaii, Vietnam, Germany and Turkey. Colonel Hooper was a graduate of the Army Command and General Staff College at Ft. Leavenworth, Kan. He received a master's degree in August 1989 from Drury College at Springfield, Mo. His military decorations included the Bronze Star, Legion of Merit, Meritorious Service Medal with Oak Leaf Cluster, Army Commendation Medal with two Oak Leaf Clusters, Meritorious Unit Citation, World War II Victory Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Korean Service Medal, Vietnam Service Medal, Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm, United Nations Service Medal Vietnam Campaign, Commendation Ribbon with Metal Pendant, Presidential Unit Citation Badge and the General Staff Identification Badge.
Published in: Arizona Journal
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Friday
February 5, 2016
1. 100 teams set to compete in trebuchet competition
A record number of teams across South Carolina are preparing for the sixth annual Storm The Citadel Trebuchet Competition. The word has spread since 2011 when a dozen teams competed. On Feb. 13, more than 100 teams and 700 competitors will arrive in the Lowcountry as more than 3,000 spectators watch their engineering skills come to life. This year's event will feature teams from across the Lowcountry and several teams visiting from Richland, Sumter, Darlington and York counties as well as a team from Clemson University. Each year, teams of K-12, college students and corporate adult teams gather on Summerall Field to launch their trebuchets. The medieval devices are judged for accuracy, distance, spirit and design. Co-hosted and co-founded by Google and The Citadel's School of Engineering, the event reinforces the importance of science technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education. "This event creates a smart, family-oriented and fun-filled learning environment around STEM education," said Google's Jeff Stevenson, a Citadel graduate who founded the event. "STEM education is crucial in today's job market. We are working to ensure that South Carolina students are prepared to meet the growing needs of tech-based companies, and Storm The Citadel is a great way to encourage students to learn and develop their skills."
Published in: Moultrie News
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Friday
February 5, 2016
2. Annual Black History Bowl Tournament to be held in Charleston on Saturday
The Mu Alpha Chapter of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc. will hold its annual Black History Bowl Tournament in the Lowcountry to celebrate Black History Month. The tournament will take place from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. on Saturday, February 6 the campus of The Citadel Military College, Grimsley Hall. We're told the event will feature student teams from various schools across the tri-county area. The winning team from the competition will represent the Mu Alpha Chapter and then compete against various teams from across the state for an opportunity to compete against the winning team from the state of North Carolina to determine the district champion, from the Sixth District of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc. Organizers say the quiz bowl is an opportunity to promote and enhance the educational experience of our students and promote diversity and cultural awareness.
Broadcast on: WCBD-TV Charleston, SC
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Friday
February 5, 2016
3. FBI's hands-off strategy in Oregon follows lessons learned
Federal officials have allowed the armed occupation of an Oregon wildlife refuge to drag on for more than a month as part of a strategy learned from past standoffs in Texas and Idaho that ended in bloodshed and spurred more government mistrust, experts say. Critics say the wait-it-out strategy sends a mixed message and can embolden others to lead takeovers. The decision to monitor from a distance the Oregon occupiers opposing federal land policy has not changed since Jan. 2, but U.S. officials are stepping up the pressure outside the refuge and in the courtroom. Authorities arrested leader Ammon Bundy and others on a remote road when they left Malheur National Wildlife Refuge for a community meeting. The confrontation on Jan. 26 also led to the shooting death of an occupier, who the FBI says was reaching for a gun... Authorities have set up checkpoints around the refuge but have not forced out the occupiers. "Their approach is - time is on their side," said Carl Jensen, a former FBI supervisory special agent who is director of the Intelligence and Security Studies program at The Citadel military college. "The first priority is to end it peacefully and not light a match to set it off."
Published in: Yahoo News
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Friday
February 5, 2016
4. Panthers assistant enjoys return to Super Bowl for first time since being a Citadel cadet
One of the men in the coaches box for the Carolina Panthers on Sunday will be someone who is making a return to the Super Bowl a bit earlier than he expected. Sitting beside offensive coordinator Mike Shula will be assistant wide receivers coach Cam Turner, a Citadel grad, former quarterback and coach. And making trips to the Super Bowl is something of a family tradition for Turner. "He told me to treat it like a normal game week, bye week, when you get there enjoy it. Enjoy everything about it because you never know when you'll get back," Turner said of advice from his father. "So I have taken his advice, enjoyed it, a lot of hard work but been good." Turner's father should know. Ron Turner is the former Bears offensive coordinator and was in a Super Bowl game in 2007. In fact, that's the same year Cam Turner was a knob at The Citadel. "I can't really explain it. It hasn't hit me yet. I've watched every year since I can remember," Cam Turner said.
Broadcast on: WCIV-TV Charleston, SC
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Friday
February 5, 2016
5. Maurice Drayton leaves Citadel for NFL; Lou Conte named offensive coordinator
Thursday began with Citadel defensive coordinator Maurice Drayton telling Bulldog players he was leaving his alma mater for a job in the NFL. The day ended with new Citadel coach Brent Thompson hiring an offensive coordinator, Lou Conte. And the transformation of the Bulldogs' coaching staff in the wake of Mike Houston's departure is still not complete. Thompson must replace Drayton, a 1998 Citadel graduate whose much-improved defense was key to the Bulldogs' Southern Conference championship season in 2015. Drayton and Thompson, who was The Citadel's offensive coordinator, were the two finalists for the head coaching job when Houston bolted to James Madison after just two seasons. Thompson was the choice of athletic director Jim Senter, hired on Jan. 19, and Drayton was promoted to assistant head coach as well as defensive coordinator. But that arrangement lasted less than two weeks, and just one day after The Citadel signed 17 new players on National Signing Day, Drayton accepted a job offer from the Indianapolis Colts. He'll work as an assistant under special teams coordinator Tom McMahon. "This is a bittersweet day for me," said Drayton, who as a player and assistant coach has spent 16 years at The Citadel. "I love The Citadel because of what it stands for and because of my experiences here. I know firsthand the type of quality individual that is produced at The Citadel, and I attribute much of my success to lessons learned here. It has long been a goal of mine to coach in the NFL, and this opportunity was one I couldn't pass up."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Friday
February 5, 2016
6. Conte Returns to The Citadel As Offensive Coordinator
Lou Conte has been hired as The Citadel's offensive coordinator and quarterbacks/B-Backs coach, head coach Brent Thompson announced Thursday. "Lou is a valuable addition to our coaching staff," Coach Thompson said. "He and I have worked together for four years, and he understands how we want to operate on offense. He is a good coach who is familiar with our program and the cadet-athletes we have on offense after coaching here our first season. I am looking forward to seeing our offense continue to evolve and improve under the direction of Coach Conte." Coach Conte returns to The Citadel, where he spent the 2014 season coaching A-Backs after three seasons at Lenoir-Rhyne working with Coach Thompson. Last season, Coach Conte served as quarterbacks coach at his alma mater, Springfield College. "I'm excited about returning to The Citadel and working for Coach Thompson," Coach Conte said. "His knowledge of the triple option and ability to create strong bonds within the team made me confident that the program is going to continue to be successful. The Citadel's reputation is second to none, and I can't wait to get started building on the foundation of last season's Southern Conference championship."
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Friday
February 5, 2016
7. Jackets' Lambert signs with The Citadel
Buford High School senior kicker Wade Lambert will be getting his future kicks at The Citadel. Lambert, a football, soccer and basketball letterman for the Jackets, made it official Wednesday morning, signing with the Bulldogs of the Southern Conference in the BHS media center. Lambert signed his national letter of intent in front of family, friends and BHS coaches. He has a special link to the Charleston military school since his grandfather, the late Dr. Fred Lambert, graduated at The Citadel. "The Citadel is a good school with a strong reputation," Wade Lambert said. "When I visited there, I liked the campus and I was also impressed with the football program. "The Citadel has a new coach and I feel it's a program on the rise," he said. "They won the conference championship last season, went to the playoffs and beat South Carolina." Lambert played a key role in the Jackets' season, which included a 6-5 record and a Class AA Upper State playoff berth last season. Buford's 6-5 mark was its first winning season since the 2009 campaign. "Wade worked hard to be able to contribute and play a key role in our success last season," BHS coach Tripp Watts said. "If he keeps up that work, he's going to make an impact at The Citadel. "He did an outstanding job for us and I look for him to continue that at the next level." Lambert, in his BHS football career, hit 15-22 field goals, with his longest a 38-yarder. He made 69 of 76 extra points.
Published in: The Lancaster News
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Friday
February 5, 2016
8. Grapplers Travel to Gardner-Webb, Davidson
The Citadel wrestling team continues its road-swing on Friday when it takes on Gardner-Webb at 6 p.m. and then Davidson on Sunday at 1 p.m. Gardner-Webb is 6-5 and 4-1 in the SoCon entering Friday's dual. Last week the Runnin' Bulldogs upset No. 25 Appalachian State in a SoCon dual, 22-18, to take a share of second place in the conference. The Runnin' Bulldogs are coming off a 19-18 win against No. 24 Duke on Wednesday night and hold a three-match win streak. Friday's match will be held in Paul Porter Arena where Gardner-Webb holds a 3-0 record this season. The Citadel took the only meeting between the two schools last year 20-15. Davidson has yet to win a SoCon contest this season and holds a 4-11 overall record. On Wednesday, Davidson fell to VMI 37-0 and are in last place in the SoCon standings. The Bulldogs took care of the Wildcats easily last year, taking a 36-9 victory inside McAlister Field House. The Bulldogs head into the week's contests after a stellar showing at the All Academy Championships last weekend. Seven grapplers finished in the top four of their respective weight classes and Matt Frisch, Aaron Walker and Joe Bexley all took home first place honors.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Thursday
February 4, 2016
1. Upcoming News from The Citadel - additional February events
Events include - Summerall Guards return to New Orleans for world famous Mardi Gras festival, Black History Month Bazaar, The Zucker Family School of Education celebrates Black History Month with Authors in Schools Initiative, Dr. Peter Skerry discussion: "Muslim Immigration Today: Facts and Context", Dr. Peter Skerry discussion: "Immigration from Mexico in the Early 21st Century: Trends and Context", Southeastern Wildlife Expo Artist Lecture with Ryan Kirby, Discussion with Angela W. Williams on her book: Hush Now, Baby, Southeastern Wildlife Expo Artist Lecture with Paul Puckett, 2016 Republican Society's Patriot Dinner, Storm The Citadel 2016, South Carolina Business Development Center QuickBooks Level II Workshop, "The Man Who Wouldn't Be King: George Washington, an Exceptional Revolutionary Leader" with Dr. James Kirby Martin, School of Engineering banquet and awards, Friends of the Daniel Library present Celebrating Black History Month: Requiem for Rice dialogue, Greater Issues Series with David McCullough, Black History Quiz Bowl, Phi Kappa Phi Induction Ceremony, 2016 Leverett Lecture on Hydrology and Psychology in Uganda, Discussion with Dr. Marcus Cox on the contributions to African American history by those who served in domestic roles, South Carolina Association of Accounting Educators Conference, 2016 Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day, Registration for 6th Annual Beautiful Bulldog Contest, and 6th Annual Citadel Directors' Institute.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Thursday
February 4, 2016
2a. School News - The Citadel
Cadets take top honors at The Citadel in fall 2015 - Dean's List recognition is given to cadets registered for 12 or more semester hours and whose grade point average is 3.2 or higher with no grade below a C for the previous semester's work. Andrew Aiken of Fleming Island made the Dean's List and was also awarded Gold Stars for earning a grade point ratio of 3.7 or higher during the 2015 fall semester Rachel Keefer of Orange Park was also named to the Dean's List. The Citadel offers a classic military college education for young men and women profoundly focused on leadership excellence and academic distinction. Graduates are not required to serve in the military but about 30 percent of each class commission as officers in every branch of U.S. military service.
Published in: Clay Today
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Thursday
February 4, 2016
2b. F.C. Residents Earn Academic Honors Across the Nation
Several Falls Church residents recently earned academic honors from colleges, universities and other academic institutions across the nation. Jason Dixon graduated from the Georgia Institute of Technology with a Doctor of Philosophy degree in electrical & computer engineering. Takumi Nemec, a cadet at The Citadel, made the dean's list at the school, where students must earn at least a 3.2 grade point average with no grade below a C for the previous semester's work in order to make the list. Nemec also earned a Gold Star at The Citadel for earning a grade point average of 3.7 or higher.
Published in: Falls Church News-Press
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Thursday
February 4, 2016
3a. The Federal Reserve and Sound Money
We are living in a time of monetary chaos. The U.S. Federal Reserve has manipulated key interest rates down to practically zero for the last six years, and expanded the money supply in the banking system by $4 trillion over that period. And with the true mentality of the monetary central planner, the Fed Board of Governors now plans to manipulate key interest rates in an upward direction that they deem more desirable. Interest Rate Manipulation and Monetary Expansion. The European Central Bank (ECB) has instituted a conscious policy of "negative" interest rates and planned an additional monetary expansion of well over a trillion Euros over the next year. Plus, the head of the ECB assured the public and financial markets that there is "no limit" to the amount of paper money that will be produced to push the European economies in the direction that monetary central planners consider best. Remember, the Federal Reserve undertook a similar monetary expansion and policy of interest rate manipulation earlier in the 21st century which, in conjunction with federal subsidies that distorted the housing market, set the stage for the severe and prolonged "great recession" that began in 2008-2009. Richard Ebeling is the BB&T Distinguished Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina.
Published in: National Center for Policy Analysis
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Thursday
February 4, 2016
3b. Edwin Cannan: A Voice for Free Markets and Global Posperity
Today is British economist, Edwin Cannan's, birthday. Born on February 3, 1861, Cannan died on April 8, 1935. A professor at the London School of Economics from 1895 to 1926, he influenced an entire generation of British economists to be critical of any unreflective advocacy of socialism, nationalism and interventionism. While not an advocate of laissez-faire, he strongly emphasized the importance and superiority of the competitive, free market, and drew attention to the power of markets to bring about a global system of peace and prosperity. Cannan was a master of the history of economic thought. His two major works, "A History of the Theories of Production and Distribution in English Political Economy from 1776 to 1848" (1898) and "A Review of Economic Theory" (1929) have long been considered penetrating critical studies of, especially, the "classical" labor theory of value and its conclusions, from Adam Smith through John Stuart Mill. His 1904 edition of Adam Smith's "Wealth of Nations" has long been considered to be an outstanding version of that work for the interested and scholarly reader. Richard Ebeling is the BB&T Distinguished Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina.
Published in: Economic Policy Journal
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Thursday
February 4, 2016
4. How you can help the American Red Cross maintain blood supply
The American Red Cross urges eligible donors to help ensure a sufficient blood supply for patients by giving blood this February. During the winter months, inclement winter weather and seasonal illnesses can keep regular donors from giving blood. Healthy donors of all blood types are needed to help maintain an adequate blood supply for patients in their own communities as well as areas where donors were unable to give due to severe winter weather. Individuals with types O, AB, B negative and A negative blood are especially needed. Donor Loretta Brandon knows how important it is to have a readily available blood supply. Her late husband required transfusions from generous strangers multiple times for health conditions. She gives blood as often as she can. "Every time I give blood, I am filled with a sense of gratitude for all I have and for the fact that I can share with others," she said. Charleston County - 2/17/2016: 9 a.m. - 5 p.m., The Citadel, 171 Moultrie St.
Broadcast on: WCBD-TV Charleston, SC
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Thursday
February 4, 2016
5. The Citadel announces 2016 signing class
The Citadel head football coach Brent Thompson announced his first signing class Wednesday. The class included 17 signees from six states. Each member of the signing class appeared in the postseason during their high school career and three won state championships. Signees include: Logan Bailey (QB) from Chapin, South Carolina; Phil Barrett (DB) from Columbia, South Carolina; Sean Dumas (DB) from New Orleans, Louisiana; Jacob Godek (K/P) from Longwood, Florida; Prince Howard-Whitaker (OL) from Columbia, South Carolina; Josh LeBlanc (WR) from Houston, Texas; Drew McEntyre (OL) from Calhoun, Georgia; Dijon Profit (WR) from Goose Creek, South Carolina; Brandon Rainey (QB) from Acworth, Georgia; Joseph Randolph II (DE) from Jefferson, Georgia; Rashad Riley (WR) from St. Matthews, South Carolina; Jeremy Samuels (LB) from Winter Garden, Florida; Chance Steverson (DB) from Houston, Texas; A.J. Stokes (DL) from Athens, Georgia; Mark Weakland (OL) from State College, Pennsylvania; Raleigh Webb (LB) from Acworth, Georgia and Denzel Wright (LB) from Lawrenceville, Georgia.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC

Thursday
February 4, 2016
6a. Chapin QB Logan Bailey, Mr. Football finalist, chooses The Citadel
When Brent Thompson took over for Mike Houston as The Citadel's football coach on Jan. 19, he had two main priorities - to keep his coaching staff together, and to keep the Bulldogs' recruiting class together. Accomplishing the first goal - only one assistant coach has followed Houston to James Madison - helped Thompson accomplish the second, as he announced a recruiting class of 17 players on National Signing Day Wednesday. The class was highlighted by state Mr. Football finalist Logan Bailey, a quarterback from Chapin High School, and Lowcountry product Dijon Profit, a wide receiver from Goose Creek. Bailey, 6-0 and 195 pounds, put up eye-popping numbers for Class AAA Chapin last season, accounting for 66 touchdowns and 4,290 total yards for the 11-2 Eagles. With starting QB Dominique Allen back for his junior season in 2016, Bailey will begin his Citadel career at quarterback, but could play slotback or receiver. "He's a great young man, an excellent playmaker and I think he's a winner on the field," Thompson said of Bailey. "And it always helps to have a finalist for Mr. Football in South Carolina in your class."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
February 4, 2016
6b. Monsignor Donovan's AJ Stokes signs with The Citadel
Monsignor Donovan senior AJ Stokes played nearly every position on the field for the Rams. On Wednesday, he signed with The Citadel during a ceremony at Monsignor Donovan. "He was our leader," first-year Monsignor Donovan coach Evan Cooper said. "He played almost every position on the field, on both sides of the ball. We didn't have a lot of success (this season), but without him we would have been less successful than we were." Stokes considered a few other schools, including Temple and Mars Hill. But Citadel stood out. "It came down to a couple of schools," Stokes said. "I looked at life after college and what degree would take me the furthest and Citadel just happened to be that."
Published in: Athens Banner-Herald
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Thursday
February 4, 2016
6c. Allatoona pair stretch bond on to The Citadel
Allatoona teammates Brandon Rainey and Raleigh Webb have been teammates since they were 5-year-olds, with Webb hiking the ball to Rainey. After leading the Buccaneers to the Class AAAAA state championship last fall, the two lifelong friends will continue their bond on the next level. Both signed to play at The Citadel on National Signing Day. Rainey will continue playing quarterback at the military college in Charleston, South Carolina, while Webb will be in the defensive secondary. "We've played football together since we were 5 and kind of grown up together, so to get to finish off our careers together is something special," Rainey said. "It's going to be tough (at The Citadel), so there will be time where we have to lean on each other. Being close friends will provide a lot of security for us." Added Webb: "It's great to be there with a friend you've known since we were little. It will be a great experience for both of us to go through." Rainey flourished in his only year as Allatoona's starting quarterback, completing 60 percent of his passes for 1,439 yards and 15 touchdowns, to only four interceptions. He also ran for 624 yards and another 19 touchdowns. On the other side of the field, Webb posted 88 tackles and four interceptions. With the experience of winning a state title, both players are looking to carry The Citadel to the next level after it went 9-4 with a 5-1 record in the Southern Conference. The Bulldogs reached the second round of in the Football Championship Subdivision playoffs, winning a postseason game for the first time since 1992.
Published in: The Marietta Daily Journal
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Thursday
February 4, 2016
7a. Four Calhoun County Saints sign football scholarships
It's only fitting that on Wednesday's National Signing Day, when four Calhoun County football players signed with college programs, that one Saint decided to play in the "Holy City" while three others opted for Methodist University. Wide receiver Rashad Riley signed with The Citadel in Charleston, while linebacker DaAmir Wilkins, wide receiver Johnathan Smith and defensive back Marquise Greene all signed with Methodist in Fayetteville, N.C. Having posted an 11-1 season, where they only lost in state playoffs, the Saints are only graduating a handful of starters. But CC Coach Bill Kimrey is pleased with the decisions these four graduating student-athletes made and the opportunities they have in front of them. "It's a blessed day, and I'm real proud of these well-deserving kids," Kimrey said. "They were with us through 8-3 their junior season, and then 11-1 this season, helping out so much with the leadership on our team. "They are each, obviously, talented. But their character and their leadership are what helped turn this program around." Riley also considered offers from Methodist and North Greenville, before choosing to sign with the Bulldogs program. "I like the way they are structured and believe I will be a good fit there," Riley said of The Citadel program. "I believe I can play at the Division I level, and I believe that I can really excel at The Citadel."
Published in: The Times and Democrat
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Thursday
February 4, 2016
7b. Athletes sign with college programs
Some athletes and college coaches alike should rest easier now that National Signing Day has arrived. Feb. 3 is the first day this winter that high school athletes can commit in writing to playing for a college football team next school year. All three Dorchester District Two high schools had a signing-day celebration Wednesday during which athletes made their plans official. In all, 16 DD2 athletes signed a letter of intent. That includes 11 football players, two soccer players, a wrestler, a volleyball player and a softball player. Clemson University, University of South Carolina, U. S. Naval Academy, The Citadel, S.C. State University and nine other colleges landed a DD2 athlete. Riley Rozanski, K- The Citadel
Published in: Journal Scene
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Thursday
February 4, 2016
7c. County quintet signs: football, girl's soccer, golf
Five Lancaster County athletes signed athletic scholarships on national signing day. Two Buford High School football players are taking their games to the next level. Jackets' senior kicker-punter Wade Lambert is headed to The Citadel in Charleston, while Lambert's BHS teammate, ace defensive back Christian Catledge, has signed to play football at Newberry College. Catledge played in the North-South All-Star game.
Published in: The Lancaster News
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Thursday
February 4, 2016
8. Lowcountry signing day: Fort Dorchester's John Simpson signs with Clemson
Goose Creek wide receiver Dijon Profit signed with The Citadel, while All-Lowcountry offensive lineman Blake Jeresaty of Bishop England signed his national letter of intent with Wofford. Wofford also signed Brandon Brown, a 6-1, 225-pounder linebacker from Ashley Ridge, another first-team All-Lowcountry pick. Brown had 133 tackles and played in the North-South All-Star Game. Charleston Southern inked West Ashley's All-Lowcountry defensive back, Malik Brown, a 6-0, 188-pounder. Brown played outside linebacker for West Ashley last season, making more than 100 tackles. Malik Brown's West Ashley teammate, quarterback Justin Berry, signed with Indiana, while Wildcats receiver, T'Qele Holmes signed with Coastal Carolina. James Island running back Buss Hamilton signed with South Carolina State, along with All-Lowcountry lineman Malcolm Garrett of Cross.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
February 3, 2016
1. The Citadel should be commended for punishing students photographed wearing white pillowcases
If it is The Citadel's goal to foster a more inclusive and accepting climate on its campus, then it did exactly the right thing by punishing 14 cadets with ties to a racially insensitive prank in which several students wore white pillowcases on their heads. On a college campus with a history of racial exclusion like The Citadel, unpunished incidents which demonstrate bigotry or intolerance can dramatically set back the school's current goal of inclusion. This is because administrative inaction could easily be perceived as indifference toward or approval of the offensive conduct. At these schools, a concerted effort is required by administrators and students to promote an atmosphere that is tolerant of all races, ethnicities, and cultural backgrounds. When it comes to The Citadel, Lt. Gen. John Rosa correctly decided that the cadets' professed intent was irrelevant and punished those involved accordingly. One cadet was suspended for a year, and two others for a semester. Some of the other students received other lesser, on-campus punishments, including being forced to march for extended periods at a time.
Published in: Charleston City Paper
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Wednesday
February 3, 2016
2. Storm the Citadel, This School's Got Talent and Superintendent Spearman Reflects
The audio portion of Molly Spearman's January message to educators is a part of the upcoming Speaking of Schools podcast, along with STEM competition featuring about 700 students as they "Storm The Citadel." Listeners also will learn about voting for the top prize winner in this year's "This School's Got Talent" competition.
Broadcast on: ETVR
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Wednesday
February 3, 2016
3. A discussion with the chief academic officer at The Citadel
The college's provost, Dr. Connie Book, discusses her duties, goals and challenges: Brig. Gen. Connie Book, Ph.D., is the number two official at The Military College of South Carolina. She arrived in 2015 from Elon University, where she held leadership positions, including the role of associate provost, which she held for a period of 16 years. At The Citadel, Dr. Book is responsible for all academic functions such as accreditation, admissions, curriculum and financial aid. She directs the strategy for and oversees the college's five academic schools. She has worked in higher education as a professor or administrator the majority of her career, and she holds a broadcast journalism degree from Louisiana State University, and a Ph.D. in telecommunications from the University of Georgia. The following is a discussion between Book and Cadet Devin Taylor, regimental public affairs NCO for the 2015-16 academic year.
Published in: The Digitel
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Wednesday
February 3, 2016
4a. Senator Tim Scott talks to News 2 about why he is endorsing Marco Rubio for president
Senator Tim Scott says not only is he endorsing Senator Marco Rubio for President, he will soon be working to help him win in New Hampshire and South Carolina. "It certainly is my great privilege to endorse Marco Rubio." Senator Scott says Rubio is the strongest conservative that he believes can win the Presidency. He also says he knows who would make a good Vice President. "He already has Trey Gowdy already on the campaign trail, and I look forward to joining Trey. Trey would of course make a good vice presidential candidate." Scott plans to campaign for Rubio in South Carolina and New Hampshire. He said Rubio scores very high by conservative organizations. "The Republicans in the Senate have an overall score of about 60. I'm in the middle to high 80s. Marco Rubio's at 94 out of 100. There's no doubt if you can get what you want 94% of the time, that's pretty good." Senator Scott said there was some little things that helped him make the decision. "I liked his response when he came to Charleston and he wanted to visit Emanuel AME. He didn't bring anybody with him. Just the two of us went down to the church, without a single camera, to pay his respect and to pray for the families. That says a lot about Marco Rubio." Citadel Political Science Professor DuBose Kapeluck talked to News 2 about what this endorsement might mean for the South Carolina primary. "Tim Scott, has a conservative following, but also has a lot of moderates who like Tim Scott. That might make a Rubio more appealing in South Carolina."
Broadcast on: WCBD-TV Charleston, SC
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Wednesday
February 3, 2016
4b. U.S. Sen. Tim Scott endorses Marco Rubio for president
U.S. Sen. Tim Scott released a video Tuesday endorsing Marco Rubio. "I am putting my confidence and my trust in Marco Rubio, because I believe that he takes us to that better future. Marco Rubio understands that here in America, it's not about where you start, it's about where you are going," he said. "We have one shot in 2016 to beat Hillary Clinton and that shot is Marco Rubio, and with him as our candidate: we win." The news comes as Rubio had a strong showing in the Iowa Republican caucuses, finishing behind U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz and Donald Trump. Cruz was projected to win with about 28 percent of the vote. Trump was at 24 percent with Rubio at 23 percent. Hillary Clinton and Sen. Bernie Sanders were locked in a dead-heat in the Democratic caucus but Clinton squeaked to the top by a narrow margin. Citadel professor of political science, DuBose Kapeluck was interviewed on the topic. "Well I think it was kind of a safe bet on the part of Tim Scott," said Kapeluck. "The fact that Rubio did so well last night relative with what he was expected to do made him sort of a presumptive establishment candidate and I think that's somebody that Tim Scott thinks he can work with."
Broadcast on: WCIV-TV Charleston, SC
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Wednesday
February 3, 2016
4c. SC voters today older, more diverse than in 2008
The S.C. voters that presidential candidates will be wooing over the next weeks are far different than in 2008, the last time the state had two presidential primaries. Those voters are older and more diverse racially. Most are signing up in counties where Republicans dominate at the polls. And there are a lot more of them - 3 million compared to 2.2 million in 2008. The State compared the makeup of S.C. registered voters leading up to the state's 2008 presidential primaries to those who registered in time to vote in the GOP and Democratic presidential primaries on Feb. 20 and 27, respectively. The number of registered voters, age 65 and up, has increased by 57 percent since 2008, making older voters the fastest-growing age group. Older voters now account for one in four S.C. registered voters, up from one in five in eight years ago... Older S.C. registered voters tend to be more conservative, said Scott Buchanan, a political scientists at The Citadel. That could favor Republican turnout in the state's Feb. 20 GOP primary, he said. "People who are older and are registered to vote are much more likely to show up and vote on election day," he said.
Published in: The State
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Wednesday
February 3, 2016
5a. Fall 2015 students honored
The Citadel, Charleston, S.C. - Charles E. Lawson Turner, sophomore, recently awarded the Gold Star, earned for academic excellence maintaining a 3.7 or higher GPA, for the 3rd semester in a row. He is a graduate of Benedictine Military School where he served as cadet colonel his senior year. He is the son of Bart Christiana Turner, of Savannah.
Published in: Savannah Morning News
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Wednesday
February 3, 2016
5b. School News: The Citadel
The Citadel's Dean's List and Gold Stars lists are announced. Click the article to view each list.
Published in: Moultrie News
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Wednesday
February 3, 2016
5c. January school notes
Gregory Krueger of Katonah made the president's list and dean's list at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina.
Published in: Lewisboro Ledger
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Wednesday
February 3, 2016
5d. Mendham, Chester, Long Valley, Harding students gain honors from colleges
Jesse Ray Nardone of Long Valley was named to the President's List at The Citadel in Charleston, S.C. and James McManus of Mendham and John Olcese of Long Valley were named to the dean's list.
Published in: Observer-Tribune
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Wednesday
February 3, 2016
6. From Football To Opera: Singer Morris Robinson Takes Center Stage
Morris Robinson has the kind of bass voice that reverberates so strongly, you feel it in your concert seat. Listening to it, you assume he's been singing all of his life. And he has - but not opera. Robinson grew up in Atlanta, the son of a Baptist minister and a mother who spent a lot of time making sure her children played musical instruments and did well in school. His earliest memory of singing was being "in the kiddie choir," standing on a chair in church and singing the hymn "Can't Nobody Do Me Like Jesus." He got a lot of applause. "Then I realized I wanted to play the drums, which is a lot more exciting than singing. So I ended up being the church drummer." For a long time as a youth, Morris Robinson says, "singing was just something to do. Nobody thought of it as a viable profession." Aiming For One Goal - What he really wanted to do was play football. And he did, but soon he grew too big to play in his division in the youth leagues, so reluctantly, he turned to music. He sang in the Atlanta Boys' Choir and in the chorus at his performing arts high school, where he also played football. "When you're a big black guy down south in Georgia," he grins, "you play ball. It's like a rite of passage." Chorus was fun, but football was cool. And cool counts a lot in high school. His prowess on the field got him to The Citadel, the military college in Charleston, S.C., where he played ball and soloed in the schools' venerated Christmas concert with an "O Holy Night" people still remember. An offensive lineman, Robinson was voted All-American three times - but it wasn't enough to get him a much hoped-for spot with the NFL.
Published in: NPR
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Wednesday
February 3, 2016
7. Area to be well represented in top seats for the SCDOT commission
Horry County, and especially the Loris area, will be well represented as, according to a South Carolina Department of Transportation (SCDOT) commission press release, the SCDOT commission unanimously elected Mike Wooten of the 7th Congressional District, which includes Horry County, as the new chairman of the SCDOT commission. The commission also unanimously elected John N. Hardee, formerly of Loris and of the 2nd Congressional District as the new vice chairman of the SCDOT commission. Wooten, of Murrells Inlet, is the founding partner and principle engineer of DDC Engineers, Inc., a Myrtle Beach-based engineering consulting firm specializing in land planning, landscape architecture, environmental planning, land surveying and civil engineering. Before founding DDC Engineers, Inc. in 1986, Wooten was employed by Santee Cooper where he was responsible for the upkeep of 42 miles of dams. He also served as the liaison with the US Army Corps of Engineers and South Carolina congressional delegation for the state-owned utility. He earned a bachelor of science degree in civil engineering from The Citadel in 1977.
Published in: MyHorryNews.com
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Tuesday
February 2, 2016
1. Lt. Gen. John Rosa: Veterans in Blue
Lieutenant General (Ret.) John Rosa entered the Air Force in May 1973 after receiving his commission from The Citadel, Charleston, S.C. Throughout his career, he served as an operations group commander and a wing commander three times. He also served as the deputy director for operations for the Joint Chiefs of Staff in Washington, D.C. In that position, he managed the National Military Command Center and was the military spokesman for the Pentagon when U.S. troops were deployed to Afghanistan and Iraq. After this assignment, Rosa became the superintendent of the U.S. Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, Colo. where he directed a four-year academic, military, athletic and character development program where cadets earn a bachelor's degree and a commission as an Air Force officer. While at the academy, Rosa decided to retire from the Air Force but not from serving. Upon retirement, Rosa returned to Charleston to become the 19th president of his alma mater January 3, 2006. His concern for keeping The Citadel education relevant in the 21st century while upholding the values that make the college unique has strengthened the college in significant ways. Since Rosa became president, The Citadel has increased the size of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets to full capacity and completed a $100 million capital campaign -- two benchmarks of a vibrant institution.
Published in: Veterans in Blue
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Tuesday
February 2, 2016
2. Campaign Town Hall in Carroll, Iowa: Jeb Bush
Republican Presidential Candidate, Jeb Bush, speaks at a campaign town hall in Carroll, Iowa. "...and we now are in a world that is far more dangerous than the world that Barack Obama was inaugurated into. I got to give a speech at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina, a military school, and I laid out a vision for how we can restore America's presence in the world. It was a blast going to this place because the great majority of these students are going to go serve in the military, the Marines, the Navy, the Air Force, the Coast Guard. They're going to the school because they want to show their love of country," said Bush.
Broadcast on: CSPAN
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Tuesday
February 2, 2016
3. Citadel blown out by Chattanooga, 125-85
A shorthanded Citadel team playing its third game in five days was no match for Southern Conference leader Chattanooga on Monday night. West Ashley High School graduate Tre' McLean scored 17 points and grabbed six rebounds, and Chattanooga hammered the Bulldogs, 125-85, at McKenzie Arena. Greg Pryor scored 21 points to lead the Mocs (19-3, 8-1), who scored their most points against a Division I foe in school history. Brian White came off the bench to score 18 for The Citadel (10-13, 3-7), who were without injured guards Warren Sledge and Quayson Williams. Those two combine for about 45 minutes and 19 points per game, but likely would not made much of a difference against the Mocs. "It is what it is," said Citadel coach Duggar Baucom. "They are 19-3 for a reason - they've beaten Georgia, Illinois and Dayton for a reason. They are easily the most talented team in the league, so credit to them. They had a lot to do with how we played." With Sledge and Williams out, the Bulldogs played a lot of 1-3-1 zone early in the game and trailed just 24-22 with 5:50 left in the first half. The Mocs outscored the Bulldogs, 24-11, the rest of the half and led, 48-33, at the break. "We were pretty good for about 11 minutes," Baucom said. "Then they took over and really got to the foul line a lot in the first half. But our guys competed, we didn't get anyone else hurt and we'll regroup and get ready for Mercer."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
February 2, 2016
4. Bobby Pope: Bobby Lamb finally will have fully loaded Mercer roster
When Mercer opens the 2016 college football season next fall at Five Star Stadium against The Citadel, Bears head coach Bobby Lamb will be playing with a fully loaded gun for the first time. In the initial year of the program's reboot, Mercer finished the season with a 10-2 record with a non-scholarship roster. In the second year after joining the Southern Conference, which allows programs to have a maximum 63 scholarships, the Bears had 38, and this past season the number increased to 51. Next fall that number jumps to the full 63. Even with the reduced numbers, Mercer finished at 6-6 in 2014 and 5-6 during the 2015 campaign, which included a win over third-ranked Chattanooga. Wednesday is the first day teams are allowed to sign players for the 2016 class, and Lamb said the Bears will bring 15 newcomers to the roster. Included will be three offensive linemen, one quarterback, one tailback, one tight end, two wide receivers, two safeties, one cornerback, one inside linebacker, one outside linebacker and two defensive linemen. Lamb and his eight-member coaching staff will have seen close to a 1,000 players in search of those 15 individuals. Mercer's primary recruiting base is Georgia, where each coach is assigned an area in the state. The coaches also have additional areas in the border states with three coaches scouting in Tennessee, three more in South Carolina and Alabama and four in Florida.
Published in: The Macon Telegraph
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Tuesday
February 2, 2016
5. ETSU announces 2016 football schedule
After announcing the Buccaneers will play a home game with Western Carolina at Bristol Motor Speedway last week, head coach Carl Torbush released the full 2016 ETSU football schedule on Monday. The Bucs, who returned to the gridiron for the first time since 2003 and played as an FCS Independent a year ago, will play a full Southern Conference schedule in 2016. Six home games, including a visit from rival and reigning conference champion Chattanooga and the game at BMS, highlight the schedule. "We are truly excited about announcing our complete 2016 football schedule," said Coach Torbush. "Obviously, being back in the SoCon will be an exciting and challenging opportunity for our young football program." For the second straight year, ETSU kicks off the season against Kennesaw State, as the Bucs head to Georgia on Sept. 3. The two start-up programs squared off in the 2015 opener in Johnson City and conclude the home-and-home series in 2016. Coming off their open week on Sept. 10, the Bucs begin SoCon play versus Western Carolina in the historic game at Bristol Motor Speedway on Sept 17. This marks ETSU's first SoCon game since Nov. 22, 2003 when the Bucs defeated The Citadel, 16-13. Sandwiched between a pair of SoCon road games with Wofford (Sept. 24) and VMI (Oct. 8) is ETSU's home game with Chattanooga on Oct. 1. The Mocs claimed a share of the conference championship, while also picking up a win in the FCS Playoffs last season.
Published in: Johnson City Press
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Monday
February 1, 2016
1a. A Gold Star for academic achievement
Jacob Robbins of Union, South Carolina was awarded Gold Stars by The Citadel for earning a grade point ratio of 3.7 or higher during the 2015 fall semester. Students that achieve Gold Star recognition are also placed on The Citadel's Dean's List.
Published in: The Union Times
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Monday
February 1, 2016
1b. Hamilton awarded Gold Star
Joshua Hamilton of Cottageville was awarded Gold Stars by The Citadel for earning a grade point ratio of 3.7 or higher during the 2015 fall semester. Students who achieve Gold Star recognition are also placed on The Citadel's dean's list.
Published in: The Press and Standard
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Monday
February 1, 2016
1c. Student News: The Citadel
Michael Bell of Stafford County recently graduated from The Citadel in Charleston, S.C. Bell and David Cochran of Spotsylvania County were named to the Citadel's dean's list for the fall 2015 semester. Cochran also received a Gold Star for earning a grade point ratio of 3.7 or higher.
Published in: Fredericksburg.com
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Monday
February 1, 2016
2a. Cadets at The Citadel
The following cadets were named to the Dean's List at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina for the fall 2015 term - Thomas Simrill of Acworth; Jeffrey Cain of Kennesaw; Steven Buffington, Ryan Chestnutt, Jared Turnage and Zachary Williams, all of Marietta; and Jong Yi of Smyrna. The following cadets received Gold Star recognition at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina for outstanding academic achievement - Jeffrey Cain of Kennesaw; Steven Buffington, Ryan Chestnutt and Jared Turnage, all of Marietta; and Jong Yi of Smyrna. The Citadel offers a classic military college education for young men and women profoundly focused on leadership excellence and academic distinction. Graduates are not required to serve in the military but about 30 percent of each class commission as officers in every branch of U.S. military service.
Published in: The Marietta Daily Journal
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Monday
February 1, 2016
2b. Cadets take top honors at The Citadel
Dean's List honors The Citadel cadets registered for 12 or more semester hours and whose grade point average is 3.2 or higher with no grade below a C for the previous semester's work. Local students on the fall dean's list include: from Prosperity: Andrew Bedenbaugh, Benjamin Bedenbaugh and Joseph Bedenbaugh; from Greenwood: Shawn Cheshire, Samuel Rice, Forrest Alexander, Timothy Burke, Koby Eklund, Woods Erwin and Cauley Hobson; from Abbeville: Allison Auten; and from Ninety Six: Matthew Bryant.
Published in: Index-Journal
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Monday
February 1, 2016
2c. Local Dean's List students recognized
Stephen Cleary of McDonough was recognized for outstanding academic achievement and earned Dean's List recognition for the fall 2015 semester at The Citadel South Carolina Corps of Cadets in Charleston, S.C. Cadets must earn at least a 3.2 GPA on a minimum 12 semester hours.
Published in: Henry Herald
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Monday
February 1, 2016
2d. The Citadel South Carolina Corps of Cadets earn top honors in the fall 2015 semester
Members of The Citadel South Carolina Corps of Cadets earned top honors in the fall 2015 semester. Dean's List recognition is given to cadets registered for 12 or more semester hours and whose grade point average is 3.2 or higher with no grade below a C for the previous semester's work. Cadet Gabriel Foster of Tuscaloosa made the Dean's List for the fall 2015 semester. To make the list, cadets must have at least 12 semester hour, at least a 3.2 grade point average and no grade below a C for the previous semester's work.
Published in: Tuscaloosa News
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Monday
February 1, 2016
3. Story of bravery illustrates character, leadership at Mead Hall presentation
U.S. Marine Corps Maj. Gen. John S. Grinalds used the story of a brave, young Marine lance corporal who died in Vietnam to illustrate the traits of character, leadership and education at a special program at Mead Hall Episcopal School on Thursday. Grinalds, a former president of The Citadel in Charleston, spoke as part of a yearlong series commemorating the 100th anniversary of the founding of Aiken Preparatory School, which merged with Mead Hall in 2012. During his presentation, Grinalds described the bravery of Alfred Herring, a 20-year-old Marine lance corporal from Mullins. Although wounded during an ambush, Herring risked his life to ensure that the wounded and dead from his squad were helicoptered to the hospital. After making certain the wounded were safe and the dead removed, Herring, having taken shrapnel in the femoral artery, bled out in the last helicopter from the scene. "I've often thought about what his performance in the last 20 minutes of his life signified," Grinalds said. "This is what I have drawn out of it."
Published in: Aiken Standard
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Monday
February 1, 2016
4a. Individual Rights Must Be Preserved Without Interference From The Government
What is the role of government in society? This has been and remains the most fundamental question in all political discussions and debates. Its answer determines the nature of the social order and how people are expected and allowed to interact with one another - on the basis of either force or freedom. The alternatives are really rather simple. Government may be narrowly limited to perform the essential task of protecting each individual's right to his life, liberty, and honestly acquired property. Or it may be used to try to modify, influence, or dictate the conduct of the citizenry. In the first case, the government is assigned the duty of impartial umpire, enforcing the societal rules against assault, murder, robbery, and fraud. All human relationships are to be based on mutual consent and voluntary association and exchange. In the second case, government is an active player in people's affairs, using its legitimized power of coercion to determine how the members of the society may live, work, and associate with each other. The government tries to assure certain outcomes or forms of behavior considered desirable by those who wield political authority. Dr. Richard M. Ebeling is the BB&T Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel in Charleston, SC.
Published in: EpicTimes.com
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Monday
February 1, 2016
4b. WVU seeks volunteers to write online encyclopedia entries
West Virginia University is looking for some volunteers to write history. Specifically, the school library's new Wikipedian-in-residence Kelly Doyle will train volunteers to write articles about women West Virginians and submit them to the online encyclopedia. A Wikipedian in Residence is an editor based at an institution who facilitates the creation and improvement of Wikipedia articles related to that institution's mission. Doyle is one of about 30 Wikipedians working at institutions around the world... Doyle currently teaches in the WVU Department of English. She previously worked as a research assistant with the Avery Research Center for African American History and Culture at the College of Charleston, in Charleston, South Carolina, and as an academic support specialist at The Citadel's Academic Support Center. She earned her bachelor's in English from University of Delaware and master's in English literature from the College of Charleston and The Citadel Graduate College.
Published in: The State Journal
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Monday
February 1, 2016
5. Teams from eight colleges met Saturday in cybersecurity competition
Nearly 60 students representing eight universities from around the Southeast will turn Clemson University's Hendrix Student Center into a cybersecurity battleground in Saturday's GhostRed competition, held in conjunction with General Electric (GE) Power engineers and Clemson University's Office of Information Security and Privacy. The event, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on the second-floor ballroom, pits teams of four against each other in a Jeopardy-style, computer-based Capture the Flag competition. This competition, built and conducted by a volunteer team of GE engineers, challenges students to get hands-on with industrial control systems, programming, technology trivia, networking, cryptography and more. "Students will learn and gain real world cybersecurity knowledge and understanding while having fun during this event competing with their collegiate counterparts from other universities," said Kevin McKenzie, Clemson's chief information security officer. Teams representing Clemson, Auburn University, The Citadel, Columbus State University, Kennesaw State University, the University of South Alabama, the University of South Carolina and Southern Wesleyan University will square off for prizes and bragging rights in the one-day competition. Clemson will field four teams, South Carolina will enter three teams and Columbus State and South Alabama each plan to bring two.
Published in: The Clemson Newsstand
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Monday
February 1, 2016
6. Review: 'A Thousand Naked Strangers' by Kevin Hazzard
Review: In the summer of 1997, Kevin Hazzard was leading a Jet Ski tour when he heard two riders collide. Thud. He zipped toward the wreckage, unsure of what to expect, and found the riders floating in red water. One looked surprised. The other was missing his mouth. Hazzard, then a teenager, had never witnessed such gore. He didn't stay calm. He didn't swiftly summon help. He did, instead, what bystanders are asked not to do in an emergency: He panicked. A Thousand Naked Strangers, his memoir of 10 years as a paramedic in accident-prone Atlanta, is a wild, winding ride toward redemption. The author makes up for his inaction that day. He faces eyeball-eating maggots, an elbow nailed to a plaster wall, skull fragments beneath his tennis shoes, the jagged, crimson smile of a man whose face just met a chain saw and a drugged-out patient with wandering hands: "Dude has grabbed my nuts." If these images make you queasy, don't climb into his ambulance. Hazzard, a former reporter with a penchant for expletives, writes trauma how he sees it: up close, unvarnished, at warp speed. Think gonzo journalism meets emergency-room noir. He's a reluctant voyeur of someone's worst day, every day. This coming-of-age story, equal parts earnest and irreverent, begins shortly after Sept. 11, 2001. Hazzard, a graduate of The Citadel, a military college in South Carolina, watches his college buddies deploy to Iraq. They're off risking their lives, testing their manhood. He chose to follow his writing passion and became a journalist, often stuck in snoozy city council meetings, still haunted by the Jet Ski crash.
Published in: Miami Herald
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Monday
February 1, 2016
7a. Henry scores 21 in The Citadel's 78-75 win over VMI
Derrick Henry gave The Citadel its final lead, scored 21 points, and the Bulldogs presented coach Duggar Baucom with a victory over his former program, edging VMI 78-75 Saturday. Baucom left VMI after 10 seasons where he coached the Keydets to four straight victories over the Bulldogs prior to Saturday. Henry made two free throws then added layup with a minute left for a 77-73 lead. P.J. Boutte, the Bulldogs' shortest player at 5-foot-9, grabbed 11 rebounds, seven off the offensive boards, including one with 10 seconds left that led to a free throw before VMI missed a free throw and final shot. The Citadel (10-12, 3-6 Southern) shot only 36 percent and was outrebounded 55-39, but made 19 of 24 free throws to VMI's 6 of 11 and took advantage of 20 Keydet turnovers. Phillip Anglade had 16 points and 11 rebounds and QJ Peterson 14 points and 10 boards for VMI (6-14, 1-8).
Published in: The Washington Times
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Monday
February 1, 2016
7b. At VMI, Citadel's Duggar Baucom nearly died - and found his coaching style
Duggar Baucom's first year as VMI's basketball coach could hardly have gone any worse. It was Baucom's first shot at a Division I job, back in 2005-06, and the Keydets lost their final 12 games of the season to finish with a record of 7-20. But that was not the worst of it. Baucom, 46 years old at the time, spent much of that season in the hospital. The pacemaker he'd had installed after a heart attack at age 30 had eroded; from Jan. 2 to Aug. 15, Baucom was in various hospitals for 48 days, undergoing five surgeries in four states. "I almost died in Virginia," Baucom says now with a rueful smile. Little wonder, then, that Baucom - now in his first season at The Citadel - has awaited with mixed emotions Saturday's 1 p.m. game against VMI at McAlister Field House. The place where he almost died is also the place where he found his identity as a coach, cooking up the fast-paced style that has The Citadel leading the nation in scoring this season, and sparked VMI to three Big South championship games and two 20-win seasons in his 10 years there. "I've kind of just dreaded this game," said Baucom, whose Bulldogs are 9-12 this season and 2-6 in the Southern Conference. "Every kid on their team except for one, I either signed or coached. It will be unique, because I love everyone of those kids and their families. They've been like part of my family.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
February 1, 2016
7c. Mocs to focus on thrashing The Citadel on the court amid 'tough enough' trash talk
One of Matt McCall's biggest accomplishments in his first season as the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga men's basketball coach has been to create a family atmosphere, from the team managers to the players to the coaching staff that meets for family dinners. On the court, no Moc has been named Southern Conference player of the week. The fact that the team has so many interchangeable parts and pieces it's rare one player stands out above the others could be a factor in that lack of individual recognition. Nine UTC players average more than 5.7 points per game, though, showing McCall's philosophies of "playing for each other" and "playing for the team." But after an 84-78 win at The Citadel on Jan. 2, a member of the family was singled out, and while the Mocs aren't worried about it, they do remember. Tre' McLean, who led the Mocs in scoring, rebounding and steals in a triumphant return to his hometown of Charleston, S.C., was called "classless" by The Citadel head coach Duggar Baucom after a postgame exchange between McLean and a Bulldogs assistant coach that led to the two being restrained. Words had been exchanged numerous times throughout the game, with the assistant telling the 6-foot-5 guard/forward that he wasn't "tough enough" to play at The Citadel. After the game, Baucom agreed with that assessment. When asked to comment on McLean's return to his hometown, Baucom provided this: "You don't want me to say anything about him. The way he acted after the game, he's classless. All I know is that he's not tough enough to go to Citadel."
Published in: TimesFreePress.com
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Monday
February 1, 2016
7d. Benedictine's Sanders Creech commits to The Citadel
Sanders Creech, the standout offensive lineman from Benedictine, made a verbal commitment to The Citadel Saturday, announcing his decision on his twitter account. The 6-foot, 260-pound guard was an All-Savannah Morning News first-team selection and a Class AA All-State first team selection by the Georgia Sportswriters Association. He led an offensive line that paved the way for a rushing game that averaged 312 yards per game. Creech took an official visit to the school, located in Charleston, S.C. this week. "The staff, the opportunity and the tradition at The Citadel are incredible," Creech said. "Coach (John) Ward and the staff just made me feel at home. The academics coupled with the opportunity to earn my commission in the USMC just made it all work. I'm very excited to be part of the tradition and to join the SoCon champions." Creech will join his former teammate, Tristan Harkleroad, on the Bulldogs' offensive line. Creech is set to sign on Wednesday, along with teammate Tru'Self Cooper, who has committed to Georgia Southern.
Published in: Savannah Morning News
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Monday
February 1, 2016
7e. Midlands football players make college choices
Chapin quarterback Logan Bailey will announce his college choice Wednesday morning. Bailey's final three are Newberry, Limestone and The Citadel. Bailey took his official visit to The Citadel over the weekend. "The visit went well. I really enjoyed getting to meet with all the coaches and see the program," Bailey said of The Citadel. Newberry quarterback Yafari Werts also will wait until signing day. Werts has been a Georgia Southern commit, but visited Appalachian State over the weekend. Appalachian State is recruiting Werts as a receiver. Werts told Phil Kornblut he liked "their plan for me and how they want to get the ball in my hands and stuff like that," he said. "They've had receivers drafted like five times in six years, so they put receivers in the league." Blythewood defensive back Khris Pam will announce his college choice Tuesday. His final three are Presbyterian, Western Carolina and Charleston Southern. Pam was played in the Touchstone Energy Cooperatives Bowl and Blue-Grey All-Star game earlier this month in Tampa, Fla. Spring Valley quarterback Ryan Lee will make his college choice Wednesday. Lee has been favoring Coastal Carolina and took an official visit there. CCU is recruiting Lee as a receiver. Lee will be the fifth Spring Valley player to sign, joining offensive lineman Prince Howard (The Citadel), defensive back Cameron Jones (Army), kicker R.J. Bacon (Presbyterian) and running back Ty'Juan Fulton (Georgia Military).
Published in: The State
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Monday
February 1, 2016
7f. Cass senior wins district title in DAR scholarship contest
Payton Chester has become an award-winning writer at a young age. The Cass High senior won first place in the DAR Good Citizens Scholarship Contest for the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution Etowah Chapter in late October and was notified "a couple of weeks ago" that he'd also won at the district level. The DAR Good Citizens program and scholarship contest is intended to encourage and reward the qualities of good citizenship and is open to all seniors enrolled in accredited public or private secondary schools that are in good standing with their state boards of education. Students selected as DAR Good Citizens must have the qualities of dependability (including truthfulness, loyalty and punctuality), service (including cooperation, courtesy and consideration of others), leadership (including personality, self-control and ability to assume responsibility) and patriotism (including unselfish interest in family, school, community and nation) to an outstanding degree... The son of Chris and Kim Chester of Cartersville said he has received a Congressional nomination from U.S. Rep. Barry Loudermilk to attend the U.S. Air Force Academy, "but I have not been accepted yet." "I'm expecting to hear whether I've been accepted or not in the next few weeks," he said. "I do plan to make this my career. I'm hoping to follow the paths of either military medicine - flight surgeon, hopefully - or a pilot." He has a backup plan if the academy doesn't work out. "I've been accepted to The Citadel - a military college in Charleston, South Carolina - so if I'm not accepted to the AFA, I'll most likely go there, with the intentions to commission into the Air Force afterwards," he said.
Published in: The Daily Tribune News
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Monday
February 1, 2016
8a. Citadel no stranger to recruiting through controversy
Former Citadel coach Mike Houston knew he had a problem on that Thursday last December. Houston was in Atlanta on a recruiting visit when news began to break about the "white hoods" photos at The Citadel. That night, he had to answer questions about the controversy from parents of potential football recruits. "We've been very, very upfront with our recruits about the whole situation," said new Citadel coach Brent Thompson, who replaced Houston on Jan. 20. "I think we'll be fine moving forward." The Citadel concluded its investigation into the photos last week, punishing 14 cadets for the incident in which cadets dressed up to sing Christmas carols in pillowcase hoods that some believed resembled those worn by the Ku Klux Klan. That incident, and Houston's departure after just two seasons for James Madison, came right in the middle of recruiting season. Those events threatened to blunt momentum from the Bulldogs' 9-4 season, Southern Conference championship and upset victory over South Carolina in 2015. Despite it all, the Bulldogs have an unofficial list of at least 16 commitments reported through various sources, with signing day set for Wednesday. Of course, this is not the first time Citadel coaches have recruited through controversy.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
February 1, 2016
8b. Tripp Weaver joins JMU staff as cornerbacks coach
Tripp Weaver spent the past two seasons working with Mike Houston at The Citadel. Now, Weaver will coach cornerbacks for Houston at JMU. "I've known Tripp since he was a kid," Houston said in a press release Friday. "He played quarterback for me when I was a high school coach, so I've known him a long time. I've watched him grow as a coach, both at East Carolina and with me at The Citadel for the last two years. He's a great young mind, is an enthusiastic recruiter and has a great work ethic." Weaver spent the previous two seasons on Houston's staff at The Citadel as the outside linebackers coach. Prior to The Citadel, Weaver was an assistant coach at his alma mater, East Carolina, where he worked primarily with the secondary. A native of Asheville, N.C., Weaver graduated from ECU in 2012. He is also a 2008 graduate of T.C. Roberson High School, where Houston coached for a decade, including the last five as the head coach (1996-2005). Additionally, John Bowers will remain on the JMU staff as previously announced and will coach the outside linebackers again next season.
Published in: Richmond Times-Dispatch
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Monday
February 1, 2016
8c. UNCG races past The Citadel, 102-95
Two Bulldogs scored 20 points each, four more scored in double figures and The Citadel piled up 95 points against UNC Greensboro on Thursday night at McAlister Field House. But all that offense means nothing without at least a little defense and rebounding, and the Bulldogs could not muster enough of either in a 102-95 loss to UNC Greensboro. The Spartans, led by 30 points from senior Kayel Locke, shot a blistering 62 percent in the first half, racing to a 60-53 edge at halftime. That's as many points as UNCG (8-13, 4-4 Southern Conference) had scored in four games this season. "We scored 95 points; we've got to win that game," said senior Quinton Marshall, who along with Derrick Henry scored 20 points for the Bulldogs (9-12, 2-6). "We've got to stop them, point blank." The Citadel especially could not stop Locke, a 6-5, 240-pounder who made 11 of 14 shots - including all three of his 3-pointers - and grabbed eight rebounds.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
February 1, 2016
8d. Wofford Rifle Defeats The Citadel
The Wofford College rifle team defeated The Citadel on Saturday at the Taylor Center Rifle Range and Calvary Gym. The Terriers earned the win with a 4430, followed by The Citadel men with 4299 and The Citadel women with a 2068 (air rifle only). Tommy McKelvey, in her first match of the season due to foreign study last semester, led the team's air rifle effort with 578 (551 in small bore). Jim Stanley, who was also abroad last semester, led the team in small bore rifle with a 566 (556 in air). McKelvey and Stanley both had match high scores in air and small bore rifle respectively. The two were followed by Zoe Kloth (561 air/513 small bore), Cierra Holcombe (548/549 and personal record in small bore), Nick Hunter (544/521), and Seth Flanagan (543/496). Reid Schuster and J.T. Jones also shot air rifle only for the team scoring 528 and 524 respectively. Georgia Military College and Clemson also competed in non-NCAA competition with scores of 4147 and 3967, respectively. The Terriers next match will be on February 6 at the University of North Georgia.
Published in: WoffordTerriers.com
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Monday
February 1, 2016
8e. It's great to be a fan of the hometown team
I grew up in a family of sports nuts. As long as I can remember, a football game, a baseball game or a basketball game was on the TV. The men in my extended family would sit around and quiz each other on sports trivia and argue over stats and numbers. My dad and my brother used to play this ridiculous game in which one would imitate a major league baseball player's swing and the other one would have to guess who the baseball player was. My dad would videotape football games and then watch them over and over, yelling and screaming and acting as if he didn't know what was going to happen. I don't know how many times he watched The Citadel's 1990 upset over University of South Carolina until I accidentally videotaped over it - I still don't think I have been forgiven. My grandfather was an All-American football player at West Point, so I grew up watching U.S. Army football and attending the Army-Navy game back when Army actually beat Navy. I attended a college with a hallowed football history. Fordham University is most famous for its offensive line known as the Seven Rocks of Granite led by Vince Lombardi, although it was no longer the powerhouse it once had been by the time I arrived in the mid-'90s. Despite all of that family history and exposure, I never paid that much attention to sports. I didn't really discover football until I turned 30.
Published in: The Daily Sentinel
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Monday
February 1, 2016
9. Tim Scruggs (1949 - 2016) Obituary
Lieutenant Colonel Tim Scruggs, U.S. Army, Ret. died on January 27, 2016. The relatives of Tim Scruggs will have a Funeral Service that will be held at Citadel Summerall Chapel on January 31, 2016 at 3 pm. Visitation with the family will be at The Citadel Summerall Chapel one hour prior. Graveside service will be at Arlington National Cemetery, date to be announced. Online condolences may be made at www.CharlestonFunerals.com. Tim was born on September 26, 1949 in McCormick, SC. His father was Jack Scruggs, Jr. of McCormick, SC and his mother was Francesca Boynton Grimaldi of Hendersonville, SC. He was a 1967 graduate of James Island High School, a 1971 graduate of The Citadel in Civil Engineering, a 1985 graduate of The Command and General Staff College, and a 2005 Phi Theta Kappa honor society graduate of Trident Technical College in International Business. He was a life member of the Association of Citadel Men and the U.S. Army Transportation Corps Regiment and was a member of The Scruggs Family Association. His special joys were Citadel Sports Games, deep sea fishing, history, and enjoying the beach and his family. He especially enjoyed exploring the cultures of the 53 countries he visited and toured. LTC Scruggs was dual branched to the Engineer Corps and the Transportation Corps. While serving 23 years in the Army, he served overseas in Vietnam, Germany, Korea, Egypt, Panama, Japan, Philippines, Puerto Rico and England.
Published in: Star News Legacy
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