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The Citadel in the News: Archive

December 2016

PUBLISH DATE STORIES
Wednesday
December 21, 2016
1. Global scholars send season's greetings from Cyprus
The Kapeluck family is in Cyprus for the holidays. Rainey, the youngest daughter of Professor DuBose Kapeluck has been making Christmas decorations and streaming Christmas music at their temporary home on the Mediterranean island-nation south of Turkey. Kapeluck is the head of The Citadel Department of Political Science and when he was selected to lead the college's first Global Scholars Program in Cyprus, his wife Anne and their four children joined him for the journey more than 6,000 miles from their Charleston, South Carolina home. The Kapelucks arrived in Cyprus in September, joining 30 cadets who had traveled there earlier with another professor. After teaching, engaging with other academics and dignitaries in the area, and exploring the culture with the cadets and his family, Dr. Kapeluck sent the following letter describing the experiences and the value of global learning: Hello friends and colleagues, I thought you'd enjoy seeing the picture of our family on the harbor front of Kyrenia, which is in the northern part of Cyprus. In the background is a short range of mountains, beyond which lies Nicosia, where we are living and studying in collaboration with our partners at the University of Nicosia. The other side of the mountains is a surprisingly short drive from the harbor, but this part of the island of Cyprus is particularly interesting because it is under the control of Turkey and Cypriots of Turkish ancestry. It was a part of Cyprus until 1974. The only country that recognizes the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus (the official name that no one in Cyprus uses) is Turkey. The ability to travel relatively freely was established in 2003, so we were able to enjoy it with the cadets and other participants in the Global Scholars study abroad program.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Wednesday
December 21, 2016
2. Christmas celebration at The Citadel needs support
On Christmas Day, Sunday afternoon, the 5th annual Christmas celebration will be held at Johnson Hagood Stadium at 68 Hagood Avenue in downtown Charleston. More than 5000 guests and volunteers are expected to attend. The celebration is open to the public. The gates open at Johnson Hagood Stadium Sunday at noon. The opening ceremony will include Army special forces paratroopers jumping out of a helicopter and landing on the field. The celebration includes meals, music and a live nativity scene. Gifts, winter clothes and grocery boxes will be distributed at the end of the celebration. Hundreds of volunteers are needed for the celebration. The sponsoring organization, Without Walls Ministry, is also looking for donations of bicycles (new or used), winter clothes, blankets, bibles and wrapped shoe boxes filled with gifts and school supplies for children 14 and under. Those wishing to donate items may call 843-958-1039 or drop them off at Johnson Hagood Stadium for 9 am Saturday through Christmas morning. Volunteers must register at http://www.BirthdayParty4Jesus.org by Friday at 6 pm.
Published in: Lowcountry Source
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Wednesday
December 21, 2016
3. Boland heading to The Citadel
Heritage's McKenzie Boland recently signs her National Letter of Intent to play level volleyball with The Citadel in the fall of 2017. Boland played on the JV team while in eighth grade and was a starter on the varsity her freshman year. She lettered for three years sitting out her junior year. The future Bulldogs player started playing volleyball for the Atlanta Boom before joining the A5 Muzino. She is currently a member of the Tsunami. She helped lead the A5 to the nationals this past season. She has received many accolades while playing and contributes this to her strong work ethic. This work ethic lead to several offers from many schools before deciding on The Citadel for their strong academic program, discipline and the coaches.
Published in: Rockdale Citizen
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Tuesday
December 20, 2016
1. Maddox and Keltner named to All-Southern Conference Faculty and Staff Team
The Southern Conference named its All-Southern Conference Faculty and Staff Team on Dec. 15, 2016, with two representatives each from all 10 member schools being recognized by the league. While the selections were left up to each institution’s discretion, the recipients all shared the common characteristics of demonstrated service to the institution and contributions to campus life and the local community. Faculty members selected should have a proven record of high scholastic achievement among students and/or recognition for a research project or written academic piece, while staff members could be from the instructional/teaching ranks or the non-instructional ranks and should be recognized for bringing out the best in others and creating conditions for success. The 2015 inaugural team consisted of just faculty members, but the team was expanded this year to include staff, as well, doubling the number of recipients of the honor. The Citadel's Melanie Maddox and Sally Keltner among faculty and staff from other institutions were named as part of the all-faculty and staff team.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Tuesday
December 20, 2016
2. The 25th Anniversary of the End of the Soviet Union
December 24, 2016 marks the 25th anniversary of the formal end of the Soviet Union as a political entity on the map of the world. A quarter of a century ago, the curtain was lowered on the 75-year experiment in "building socialism" in the country where it all began following the Bolshevik Revolution in Russia, led by Vladimir Lenin in November 1917. Some historians have estimated that as many as 200 million people worldwide may have died as part of the 20th century dream of creating a collectivist "paradise on earth." The attempt to establish a comprehensive socialist system in many parts of the world over the last 100 years has been one of the cruelest and most brutal episodes in human history. Making a new "better world" was taken to mean the extermination, liquidation, and mass murder of all those who the socialist revolutionary leaders declared to be "class enemies," including the families and even the children of "enemies of the people." Richard M. Ebeling is BB&T Distinguished Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina.
Published in: Foundation for Economic Education
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Tuesday
December 20, 2016
3. Ho, ho, ho: Some gifts come early
So what do you want for Christmas? Good luck on Santa - or somebody else - making it happen. But just in case the smartphone, Hatchimals Egg, drone, Harley, Fiesta Bowl tickets, AR-15, newspaper subscription and/or considerable chunk of change that you crave aren't waiting for you under the tree five mornings from now, count the gifts you've already received, including: Good sports: Clemson's football team is two victories away from a national championship. The Citadel's football team won its first 10 games this season and the Southern Conference title. Charleston Southern's football team won the Big South title. South Carolina's women's and men's basketball teams are nationally ranked. And longtime rasslin' fans, including me, sense that The Shield (Seth Rollins, Roman Reigns and my favorite, Dean "Lunatic Fringe" Ambrose) will reunite. See, reconciliations really can happen.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
December 20, 2016
4. Charleston Southern's Austell and Hammond, Citadel's Pinson and Delaney named first-team All-America
Offensive linemen Erik Austell of Charleston Southern and Isaiah Pinson of The Citadel have been named first-team FCS All-Americans by the American Football Coaches Association. Austell, a 6-4, 285-pound senior, is the first Buccaneer to make an AFCA All-America team, and was named second-team All-America by The Associated Press last week. He helped CSU to a second straight Big South title and FCS playoff bid this season. Pinson, a 6-3, 267-pound junior, won the Southern Conference's Jacobs Blocking Award as the top lineman in the league. Playing for an offense that led FCS in rushing this season, Pinson has started 37 straight games. This season, he played 889 snaps, missing only 15 plays, and recorded 123 knockdown blocks while allowing no sacks and grading out at 90 percent. Pinson also was named to the Walter Camp Football Foundation's first-team All-America squad on Monday, as was his teammate, junior cornerback Dee Delaney.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
December 20, 2016
5. Two Bulldogs earn Walter Camp All-America honors
The Citadel football team placed an FCS-high two cadet-athletes on the Walter Camp All-American Team, it was announced Monday. Defensive back Dee Delaney and offensive lineman Isaiah Pinson each earned All-America accolades from the Walter Camp Football Foundation. Delaney became The Citadel's first two-time Walter Camp All-American, and Pinson earned his second All-America honor of 2016. The Citadel, which has two Walter Camp All-Americans for the second straight year, was one of four teams with multiple representatives on the Walter Camp All-American Team, tying James Madison, Jacksonville State and Sam Houston State for the most in the nation. Delaney was also voted a first-team All-American by the Associated Press and College Sports Madness and was selected as a first-team All-Southern Conference performer by the conference's coaches and media for his performance this season. The junior from Beaufort, South Carolina, recorded 35 tackles, six interceptions, eight pass breakups and one fumble recovery in 2016. His interceptions total tied for third on The Citadel's single-season list, and his 14 total passes defended tied for fourth in a season in program history. Delaney's six interceptions ranked first in the Southern Conference and tied for third in FCS in 2016, and his passes defended total ranked second in the SoCon. He was one of five FCS defenders with two multiple-interception games in 2016, grabbing two against Furman and making interceptions on back-to-back plays in the second round of the FCS Playoffs against Wofford. Delaney's career total of 13 interceptions is tied for second on The Citadel's all-time career list, five behind the program record, and his 32 career passes defended are fourth in program history, also five shy of the Bulldogs' career record. Delaney helped lead a Bulldog defense that ranked first in the Southern Conference in fewest first downs allowed, third-down defense and fewest passing touchdowns allowed. The Citadel held its opponents to 177 first downs, the seventh-best mark in FCS, while allowing 30.1 percent on third-down conversions to rank ninth in FCS. The Bulldogs also ranked 12th in FCS with 13 passing touchdowns allowed.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Tuesday
December 20, 2016
6. Lyles breaks records as UMBC beats The Citadel 120-111, 2 OT
Jarius Lyles scored 32 points and pulled down 20 rebounds as UMBC finally pulled away from The Citadel in the second overtime for a 120-111 victory on Monday night. Lyles became the first UMBC player to score 30 points and have 20 boards in Division I. UMBC also set a record for most points in a game. Jourdan Grant had a layup to give UMBC a 102-100 lead to start the second overtime. The Retrievers never trailed again, making 14 free throws to seal the win. Will Darley had 22 points and Joe Sherburne added 18 for UMBC (8-3). Nolan Gerrity had a career-best 17 points and 15 rebounds. Lyles nailed a trey to give UMBC a 100-97 lead with 24 seconds left in the first OT, but Quayson Williams answered with a 3 with 15 seconds remaining to send it to the second extra period. Preston Parks led The Citadel (7-6) with 24.
Published in: USA Today
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Monday
December 19, 2016
1. One year after cadets don white hoods, The Citadel recommits to diversity and inclusion

Provost Connie Book called the incident "a point of failure" for The Citadel — and a very public one. Images of cadets wearing white, pointed pillowcases over their heads flooded social media and national news outlets last December, provoking a flurry of criticism from alumni, civil rights activists and three Democratic presidential candidates. The episode — six months after a white supremacist gunned down nine black worshipers at Emanuel AME Church — was regarded as another stain on the pre-Civil War college's turbulent history with race and gender. The Citadel's oft-repeated mission is to develop "principled leaders" who exemplify the college's core values of honor, duty and respect. Cadets dressed similarly to Klansmen (while allegedly cracking jokes about white supremacy) were clearly at odds with those values. Fourteen cadets were disciplined as a result.  According to an internal investigation, the cadets involved never intended to cause offense. Their costumes, Citadel leadership concluded, were part of a “Ghosts of Christmas Past” skit. But the incident was still a moment of reckoning for an institution that has long battled a reputation for being stuck in the past. "We wanted to strategically look and see what else could we have done," Book said. "It's not that the cadets had not been exposed to it; there was some sensitivity that was missing about why this would be offensive. When we interviewed them, it was clear that they didn't connect all the dots that you would want them to connect." 

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Monday
December 19, 2016
2. The Citadel awards two grants for transportation research

Two grants totaling $1 million have been awarded to The CItadel's Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering by the Department of Transportation’s University Transportation Center.  The Citadel is the only South Carolina institution invited to be part of the Southeastern Transportation Research, Innovation, Development and Education (STRIDE) Center consortium grant. The STRIDE grant provides up to $14 million over the next five years to 10 regional universities to come up with better ways to reduce traffic congestion. “The Citadel’s School of Engineering has a well-deserved reputation for innovation and excellence that is clearly supported in the form of two new federal grants totaling more than $1 million,” Citadel President John Rosa said. “It is an honor to partner with the other leading institutions to address our nation’s transportation challenges." The Citadel will also participate with a group of other South Carolina institutions for the Center for Connected Multimodal Mobility grant. This federal grant provides up to $7.8 million for the next five years to enhance transportation research as well as undergraduate and graduate education, e-learning opportunities for professionals and outreach programs for K-12 students. Professors William Davis, Dimitra Michalaka and Kweku Brown will lead the efforts for both projects for The Citadel.

Published in: Palmetto Business Daily - Onlilne
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Monday
December 19, 2016
3. Local teen brings 'Wreaths Across America' to Cecil County

Julia Swoboda, of North East, is only 16 years old, but Saturday she pulled off an event that many adults would have found challenging.   Swoboda brought Wreaths Across America, a national program that started at Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia, to the graves of 74 veterans who are buried at St. Mary Anne’s Episcopal Church’s cemetery. Swoboda’s parents, Patrick and Jennifer Swoboda, said this project was not only Julia’s idea, but their daughter organized the entire event, which brought participants from all branches of the military, a representative from Gov. Larry Hogan’s administration and Aberdeen Proving Ground Command Sgt. Maj. Toese Tia to St. Mary Anne’s on Saturday. “I was inspired to do this when my parents and I visited Arlington National Cemetery last year to witness the wreath laying,” Swoboda said Saturday. She comes from a military family and began visiting the grave of her great-grandfather George Balog, a World War II veteran who was an educator with Cecil County Public Schools and is buried at St. Mary Anne’s cemetery. The national event started in 1992 when a wreath company in Maine began donating its surplus wreaths to be laid on graves at Arlington. The wreaths are delivered by donated tractor-trailers that travel Interstate 95 in early December each year for the ceremony in Virginia. Over the years, the event has begun spreading to communities across America, like North East, who honor their own local veterans, explained Maryland Veterans Commission Chairman Fred Shinbur, who traveled from Hagerstown for the ceremony. “The three values of Wreaths Across America is to remember our veterans, to honor them and to teach the next generation about veterans,” he said. This year’s theme is “Say Our Names”, Swoboda explained as she requested those placing wreaths on graves Saturday to say the veteran’s name out loud after laying the wreath down. Tia also addressed participants Saturday inside the church before everyone went outside to lay the wreaths. “Your parents must be very proud of you today,” Tia said of Julia, recognizing her efforts at organizing the event. Ana Tia, Tia’s daughter and a freshman at The Citadel, a military college in South Carolina, attended Saturday’s ceremony along with her mother and father.  “Julia is amazing,” she said. “She’s inspired me to do more.”

Published in: Cecildaily.com - Onlilne
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Monday
December 19, 2016
4. Local business calendar

JAN. 7 - ACCOUNTING SOFTWARE BASICS: The Small Business Development Center of South Carolina, The Citadel and Software Training Consultants starts a two-part training workshop on the basics of using QuickBooks. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Bastin Lab in Bond Hall, 171 Moultrie St., The Citadel. Second session is at the same time on Jan. 21. $149 for both sessions. Go to www.citadel.edu/bastinlab to register.

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Monday
December 19, 2016
5. Reader photos: Red and green

Holiday photo of "The Big Dog" at The Citadel.

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Monday
December 19, 2016
6. Scholars, citing history, warn against Trump

More than 1,200 historians affiliated with hundreds of colleges and universities across the U.S. — including eight scholars at the College of Charleston, two at The Citadel and one at Clemson University — have signed a public statement expressing “concern and alarm” over the First Amendment implications of the election of Donald Trump.“On the eve of a new administration whose key players have traded in hateful rhetoric and emboldened the harassment of various targets, we urge Americans to be vigilant against a mass violation of civil rights and liberties that could result if such troubling developments continue unchecked,” the scholars write.  The call to vigilance was co-signed by College of Charleston professors Mari Crabtree, Adam Domby, Rachel Donaldson, Jon Hale, George Hopkins, Tammy Ingram, W. Scott Poole and John White; Citadel professors Ivy Farr Mcintyre and Kerry Taylor; and Clemson professor Elizabeth L. Jemison. All signers added their names as individual scholars, not representatives of their respective institutions. “Looking back on World War II and the Cold War, we recognize how easily the rights of people have been suspended during times of great uncertainty,” the statement reads. “A key lesson of such ordeals has been to never again repeat these mistakes, and so we issue a call to recognize and act upon the critical links between historical knowledge, informed citizenship, and the protection of civil and human rights.”

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Monday
December 19, 2016
7. Economic Ideas: Adam Smith on Free Trade, Crony Capitalism, and the Benefits from Commercial Society

Adam Smith’s central contribution to economic understanding was surely his demonstration that under an institutional arrangement of individual liberty, property rights, and voluntary exchange the self-interested conduct of market participants could be shown to be consistent with a general betterment of the human condition. The emergence of a social system of division of labor makes men interdependent for the necessities, amenities and luxuries of life. But in the free, competitive market order every individual can only access what others in society can supply him with by offering them something in exchange that they value more highly than what is being asked from them in trade. Thus, as Adam Smith memorably explained, as if by “invisible hand” each individual is guided to apply his knowledge, ability and talents in ways that serve the trading desires of others as the means of fulfilling his own self-interested goals and purposes. Furthermore, not only is the need for government regulation and control of economic affairs shown to be unnecessary for societal improvement, Smith went on to argue that such government intervention was detrimental to the most successful advancements in human material and cultural life. At the heart of Adam Smith’s criticisms of eighteenth century Mercantilism, with its presumption of a need for political direction and planning of economic activities for balance and prosperity, was his insistence that such political paternalism was needed neither in domestic trade and commerce nor in the buying and selling of imports and exports between countries.

Published in: The Future of Freedom - Online
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Monday
December 19, 2016
Big second half gives Virginia Tech a win over The Citadel

The Citadel entered Saturday's game at Virginia Tech leading Division I men's basketball in scoring offense with an average of 105.4 points. But Virginia Tech was the only team that hit triple digits Saturday. Trailing at halftime, the Hokies erupted for 73 second-half points and squashed The Citadel 113-71 at Cassell Coliseum. "Credit them, coming out the second half and just punking us down," said The Citadel coach Duggar Baucom, who is in his second year with the Bulldogs after previously steering VMI. The Hokies shot 69.2 percent from the field in the second half. The 73 points tied a second-half outburst against Johns Hopkins in 1981 for the most points Tech has scored in any half.  "In the second half, pretty much every shot was wide-open and we could knock it down," said Ahmed Hill, who had a career-high 22 points. Chris Clarke recorded the first triple-double by a Hokie in school history. The sophomore forward had 13 points, 12 rebounds and 10 assists.

Published in: Fredericksburg.com - Onlilne
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Monday
December 19, 2016
Virginia Tech Hammers The Citadel Behind Clarke’s Triple-Double

Virginia Tech overcame a 44-40 halftime deficit to blow out The Citadel 113-71 on Saturday afternoon in Cassell Coliseum.  The victory makes the Hokies 9-1 on the season, while The Citadel dropped to 7-5. After playing a poor first half, Tech won the second half 73-27.  73 points is the most points the Hokies have ever scored in a half, breaking their previous record of 68 against South Carolina State in 1982.  Tech also finished the game with 30 assists, which was just one shy of the school record also set in that South Carolina State game. The hero of the game was Chris Clarke, who finished with the first triple-double in Virginia Tech history.  The sophomore wing had 13 points, 12 rebounds and 10 assists.  His final assist came on the last play of the game, when freshman center Khadim Sy hit an unlikely deep three-pointer just before the buzzer.

Published in: Techsideline.com - Online
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Friday
December 16, 2016
1. Lions WR Andre Roberts pursues financial passion, becomes options trader
Andre Roberts thought he'd be an auditor. When he was in college, studying accounting at The Citadel, and playing in the NFL was uncertain at best, that was his plan: to travel around the country studying clients' books and making sure they were compliant with their numbers. Then the NFL became a reality, so he audited his own plans and has been in the league for the past seven seasons. But finance was never too far from his mind. So a few years ago, he started digging back into money and paying more attention to his investments. And in that time, a future broker might have started to take shape. "I did take a finance class [at The Citadel] looking at charts and stuff, and I thought it was pretty cool," Roberts said. "About three years ago, I kind of just got into it. Started reading up on terminology and looking at the markets, and I kind of just wanted to get into it because I'm investing now. "I'm putting some of my money in the markets, so I want to know what's going on with it. So I kind of just got into it like that and started reading more, started understanding how you can actually make money in [the] short term and long term." He began reading and simulating trades on Investopedia to get a feel for what he might be getting into. He read multiple books, attempting to understand the flow of the markets and which way he should dig in with his investments. In doing so, he discovered the options market –- and he kind of fell in love with the idea of it. So he devoured everything, learning the difference between a call (buy) and a put (sell) option at a set price. He became intrigued by the short-term plays of options versus the hold-for-years games of stocks and mutual funds.
Published in: ESPN.com
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Friday
December 16, 2016
2. Economic Ideas: The Institutions and Economics of the Middle Ages, Part 1
In attempting to understanding the ideas and institutions of the period of history that is usually called the "Middle Ages" it must be kept in mind that this covers a time frame that easily is divided up into smaller periods, each of which can be seen to have its own unique characteristics and qualities. Furthermore, each part of Europe had its own historical development in terms of traditions and customs. Only one institution encompassed the entire European world through most of this time - the Catholic Church. The Middle Ages is usually defined as beginning with the fall of the Roman Empire in A.D. 476, to invading Germanic tribes. The "close" of the Middle Ages is commonly said to be around 1500. After this date momentous changes occurred in European history that transformed the face of European society, and the development of the whole world, as well. Fifteen hundred was the eve of the Great Religious Reformation known as Protestantism. It marks the beginning of the "discovery" of the "New World" by Christopher Columbus in 1492 and a sea route around Africa to India in 1498. Shortly after 1500, the compass came into use, which radically changed the ability to travel vast distances out of sight of land and without dependence on clear skies to "read" the stars. It saw the introduction of gunpowder, which transformed warfare. And it was the start of intellectual forces that eventually resulted in the Age of Reason and the Age of Enlightenment in the eighteenth century. Dr. Richard M. Ebeling is the BB & T Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina, He was formerly professor of Economics at Northwood University.
Published in: NassauInstitute.org
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Friday
December 16, 2016
3. The Citadel's Delaney Named AP First-Team All-American
The Citadel defensive back Dee Delaney has been named a first-team All-American by the Associated Press, it was announced Thursday. Delaney earned All-America status from the AP for the second consecutive year after garnering second-team honors in 2015. The junior from Beaufort, South Carolina, is the fifth Bulldog to be an AP All-American in multiple seasons and the first since Andre Roberts in 2007-08. Delaney also was named a first-team All-American by College Sports Madness and was voted first-team All-Southern Conference by the conference's coaches and media this season. Delaney recorded 35 tackles, six interceptions, eight pass breakups and one fumble recovery in 2016. His interceptions total tied for third on The Citadel's single-season list, and his 14 total passes defended tied for fourth in a season in program history. Delaney's six interceptions ranked first in the Southern Conference and tied for third in FCS in 2016, and his passes defended total ranked second in the SoCon. He was one of five FCS defenders with two multiple-interception games in 2016, grabbing two against Furman and making interceptions on back-to-back plays in the second round of the FCS Playoffs against Wofford. Delaney's career total of 13 interceptions is tied for second on The Citadel's all-time career list, five behind the program record, and his 32 career passes defended are fourth in program history, also five shy of the Bulldogs' career record. Delaney helped lead a Bulldog defense that ranked first in the Southern Conference in fewest first downs allowed, third-down defense and fewest passing touchdowns allowed. The Citadel held its opponents to 177 first downs, the seventh-best mark in FCS, while allowing 30.1 percent on third-down conversions to rank ninth in FCS. The Bulldogs also ranked 12th in FCS with 13 passing touchdowns allowed.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Friday
December 16, 2016
4. Connell joins NEMCC softball program as assistant coach
Kevin Connell is excited about transitioning from one diamond sport to the other and joining one of the most tradition-rich ball clubs in the Magnolia State. Connell has been tabbed as the new assistant coach for the Northeast Mississippi Community College softball team, which has qualified for the postseason in 14 of its 16 seasons of fast-pitch competition. The Johnson City, Tenn., native will actually begin his second season at Northeast this spring. Connell served as a volunteer assistant for the baseball program during the 2016 campaign... He signed with the Military College of South Carolina (The Citadel) and completed a stellar career inside the rugged Southern Conference (SoCon) as primarily a relief pitcher. Connell appeared in 94 games during his tenure with the Bulldogs and was the winning pitcher in four of those contests. He compiled 170.2 innings on the mound with 104 strikeouts compared to 84 walks. His overall ERA at The Citadel was a 5.92, but he trimmed that to a 3.74 as a senior. He picked up wins that year against the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and East Tennessee State University.
Published in: WTVA-TV Saltillo, MS
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Thursday
December 15, 2016
1. Citadel engineering school earns $1 million in grants for transportation research
The Citadel's Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE) will help lead collaborative research to identify innovations addressing the Southeast's transportation challenges. Two grants equaling approximately $1 million over five years were recently awarded to the college by the Department of Transportation's University Transportation Center (UTC). The Citadel is the only South Carolina institution invited to partner with other universities for the Southeastern Transportation Research, Innovation, Development and Education (STRIDE) Center consortium grant. The STRIDE grant will provide up to $14 million over the next five years to 10 regional universities towards developing novel strategies for reducing congestion. "The Citadel's School of Engineering has a well-deserved reputation for innovation and excellence that is clearly supported in the form of two new federal grants totaling more than $1 million," said Citadel President, Lt. Gen. John W. Rosa, USAF (Retired). "It is an honor to partner with the other leading institutions to address our nation's transportation challenges." In addition to the STRIDE grant, The Citadel will be a part of a consortium of South Carolina institutions selected to receive the Center for Connected Multimodal Mobility grant. The federal grant will provide up to $7.8 million for the next five years to enable South Carolina to further transportation research, enhance undergraduate and graduate education, e-learning for professionals and engage K-12 students through outreach programs with South Carolina industries.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Thursday
December 15, 2016
2. Citadel alumnus to guide International Space Station
Piloting Middle East missions and pursuing an advanced aviation degree have prepared Citadel graduate and NASA astronaut Col. Randy Bresnik for his next assignment - commanding the International Space Station's (ISS) 53rd expedition in May 2017. Scheduled to overlap "Expedition 52," Bresnik will make his second visit to ISS. With previous experience living as a crew member of the Space Shuttle Atlantis, testing subterranean living for the European Space Agency and directing an underwater laboratory team, the retired USMC officer has inhabited many environments. Currently training for the ISS assignment at Houston's Johnson Space Center, Bresnik became one of only 11 chosen for NASA's Astronaut Class 9 out of a pool of 4,000. "Col. Randy Bresnik is an exceptionally visible example of The Citadel's success at developing principled leaders," said former classmate and colleague Col. Tom Clark USMC (Ret.), who flew with Bresnik in the Marine Corps and serves as director of The Krause Center for Leadership and Ethics. "His unassuming leadership style and service to our country as a pilot and an astronaut continue to inspire cadets and many others who follow Col. Bresnik's accomplishments." Current Citadel cadet Angelica McNerny has been assigned to report on Bresnik's work via the institution's social media. She intends to commission with the USAF after her May graduation for Space Systems Operations training.
Published in: Palmetto Business Daily
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Thursday
December 15, 2016
3. Mayor Riley Conjures Sullivan's Island Memories
In August of 1898 a 12-year-old boy was swimming off Station 12 with a friend when he got caught in a bad current and was carried out. A young newlywed named James L. Coste was working at the lifesaving station on the beach that day. He heard cries for help and went out into the strong current to save the young lad. As he was coming ashore against the current, he became exhausted. Others came to help pull the boy to safety, but Coste was pulled under the water and died. The boy Coste saved that day grew up to become a father and grandfather. His grandson would go on to graduate from the Citadel and later from the University of South Carolina School of Law. After entering politics and serving in the House of Representatives for six years, he was elected Mayor of Charleston in 1975, a role he would fill for forty years. That grandson was Joseph P. Riley Jr. "My life was made possible by a brave act," Riley says reverently. "When we think of heroic acts, [such] as saving lives, during wars, or any time, we don't think of the successive generations that were allowed to be." It was with that story that Riley began his hour-long talk hosted by the Battery Gadsden Cultural Center on Sullivan's Island Thursday night, Nov. 17. Sullivan's Island Mayor Patrick O'Neil introduced Riley to the crowd gathered at Sunrise Presbyterian Church, though he said he struggled to describe the tremendous impact that Riley had on the growth and improvement to Charleston during his time in office. He mused, "I'm really not sure how I can describe what Charleston was like before Mayor Riley. It was kind of like it is today except take away everything you want to do!"
Published in: The Island Eye News
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Thursday
December 15, 2016
4. Low Country Warbirds hear from Cobra chopper pilot
Former military pilots and aircraft personnel recently heard from a Cobra chopper pilot at the 49th annual meeting of the Low Country Warbirds. The meeting was held Wednesday, Dec. 7, the 49th anniversary of the attack on Peral Harbor, at The Fish House Restaurant at Litchfield in Pawleys Island. The guest speaker was Steve Peper of Charleston, a Marine CH 46 and Cobra chopper pilot who graduated from The Citadel. "I went to flight school in Pensicola, Florida, in the beginning of 1979," he said. "I got my wings in '80." Peper said it depended on where you graduated in your class as to what aircraft you were going to be flying. "I ended up flying frogs, CH 46," Peper said. "I was deployed on the USS Iwogima four months later, doing a six-month deployment in the Mediterranean." He said in 1982, he was sent to Lebanon when civil war broke out. "We were off the coast of Greece, but the next thing we knew, we were off coast of Lebanon and we were flying missions there," Peper said. "The PLO was in Beirut because someone tried to assassinate the Israeli ambassador in London." He said the ambassador was there and Peper's squad would fly over from the aircraft carrier to places like Tel Aviv. "They pretty much had the west side of Beirut surrounded and the only goal they had was to kill all of them," Peper said. "They put together this great concept, what they called the multinational peacekeeping corps." He said the MPC consisted of the U.S., the French, the Italians and the British. "The Marines gave us the airport and the perimeter, they gave the French the port, they gave the Italians the southeast of Beirut, and they gave the Brits the mountains because Beirut is right in the middle of a valley," Peper said. "The only thing we were there to do is to let Yasser Arafat and the rest of them out in a peaceful manner, to get to a ship and sail away."
Published in: South Strand News
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Thursday
December 15, 2016
5. Citadel to raze east stands at football stadium
The Citadel plans to demolish and replace the east stands at Johnson Hagood Memorial Stadium in downtown Charleston, according to a news release. The football stadium at 68 Hagood Ave. was built in the 1920s and renovated in 1948. Its west stands were rebuilt in the 2000s, but the 9,300-seat east stands - which serve as the visitors' section - are the oldest portion of the stadium, the news release said. Seating was reduced this football season because of deteriorated conditions, according to the news release. "The Citadel board approved a motion allowing the administration to move forward with the demolition of the eastside stands of Johnson Hagood Stadium," Lt. Gen. John B. Sams Jr., chairman of The Citadel Board of Visitors, said in the news release. "We will be working closely with our adjacent neighborhoods and the Board of Architectural Review." A review by the college found that structural steel upgrades and seismic retrofitting are required, the news release said. The military college didn't release a cost estimate for the work.
Published in: Charleston Regional Business Journal
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Thursday
December 15, 2016
6. Lewis Rudolph Frost III, 82, worked in property management for the Veteran's Administration
Lewis Rudolph Frost III passed away Wednesday, Dec. 14, 2016, at Lower Cape Fear & LifeCareCenter. Mr. Frost was a native of Wilmington, born August 7, 1934, to Lewis R. Frost Jr. and Catherine Cromer Frost. He was graduated from New Hanover High School in 1952 and was a key member of the school's 1951 State Championship winning football team. Later, he attended The Citadel on a football scholarship, graduating June 2, 1956, with a B.S. degree in business. That same day, in Summerall Chapel on campus, he married the former Edna Lee Lennon, with whom he later had three daughters, the late Lee Lennon Frost, Catherine Karine Frost Graves (married to James H. Graves) of Hampstead and Mary Lewis Frost James (married to Andrew R. James) of Raleigh. The couple had four grandchildren, Jessica Nichole Graves Beguhl (married to Daniel G. Beguhl) of Wilmington; Joseph Lewis Graves of Snead's Ferry; Catherine Kaylee James and Elizabeth Drew James, both of Raleigh. They also had a great-grandson, Clayton James Beguhl of Wilmington. He was predeceased by his parents, a daughter, and by his brother, Lt. Col. James Lindsey Frost. Surviving, in addition to his wife, daughters, sons-in-law, grandchildren and great-grandchildren, are his sister, Ms. Elsie M. Frost of Reidsville; and brother and sister-in-law, Alton Y. & Linda (Scotty) Lennon of Wilmington. After leaving The Citadel commissioned as a lieutenant in the U.S. Army, Mr. Frost was stationed at Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Md., and became, at that time, the youngest company commander in the U.S. Army. After his military duty, he and his family moved to Charlotte. He had obtained his Maryland Real Estate License previously and, upon moving to North Carolina in 1962, became licensed there.
Published in: Port City Daily
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Wednesday
December 14, 2016
1. Capriotti earns gold at World Veteran Championships
Dr. Lisa Capriotti, a Citadel chemistry professor, earned her most prestigious accolade recently, winning gold and the title of world champion at the World Veterans Judo Championships contested Nov. 18-21 in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Veterans tournaments are for competitors age 30 and above. The term does not refer to military experience, although Capriotti is a Navy veteran. This prestigious event attracted the best judo players from around the world. Sixty-three countries fielded approximately 1,000 competitors. Capriotti's path to victory included matches against the competitors from France, Germany, and Great Britain. Capriotti's success at the World Championships was her crowning achievement in an outstanding competition year. At the U.S. National championships last fall, Capriotti competed in two different divisions and performed in five kata (formal judged demonstration) categories, walking away with four gold medals, two silvers, and a bronze. She and her husband were then selected to represent the United States at the Pan-American Games in Havana, Cuba, where she competed in two divisions and earned two gold medals.
Published in: The Gazette
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Wednesday
December 14, 2016
2. After more than 35 years, O'Kelley steps down from public service in Beaufort
George O'Kelley moves to adjourn for a final time. The three-term Beaufort City Councilman, former municipal judge and practicing attorney is stepping down from public service. He didn't seek re-election to City Council this year. Mike McFee and incoming Councilwoman Nan Sutton will be sworn in at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Beaufort City Hall. Not one to stick around longer than necessary, O'Kelley, 74, was always one to formally end council meetings. But he has been part of serious work in the city. He helped author city rules banning smoking in city restaurants and texting while driving, a city news release noted. He worked to improve garbage collection and to re-energize downtown business - his office is on Bay Street. He served two stints on the municipal bench, from 1982 to 1986 and again from 1995 to 2000. A graduate of the Citadel and University of South Carolina law school, O'Kelley was a member of the South Carolina Judicial Screening Committee, president of the Beaufort County Bar and served on the Historic Beaufort Foundation board. He served in the Marine Corps on active duty and reserve, and retired as a Lieutenant Colonel with medals and decorations including the Navy/Marine Achievement Medal, Vietnam Campaign and Combat Action Ribbon.
Published in: The Beaufort Gazette
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Wednesday
December 14, 2016
3. Two New Policy and Communications Hires Announced
The W.K. Kellogg Foundation (WKKF) announces the selection of Tonya Williams as its vice president for policy, communications and knowledge analytics and Dion Santana Trahan as its director of advance. Both roles are newly created and will provide pivotal support in setting the direction for all of the foundation's policy, communication and advocacy investments worldwide. Both Williams and Trahan joined the foundation on Dec. 12 and report to AJ Jones II, WKKF's chief policy and communications officer. "We are very excited to welcome Tonya and Dion to WKKF," said Jones. "These two positions will play a critical role as we continue to make advances in our work to create the conditions in our communities and families for children to thrive. Both Tonya and Dion possess unique and invaluable talents that will be an asset to our team and the foundation." In Trahan's role, he will be responsible for managing a portfolio of communication projects across the foundation and collaborating with internal and external stakeholders to design, plan and implement strategic communications campaigns and projects to advance the foundation's mission. Trahan also will play an integral role in preparing WKKF President and CEO La June Montgomery Tabron for events and coordinating with media and other local, national and international entities to successfully communicate the foundation's strategies. Trahan obtained a Master of Laws from Washington College of Law, American University; a Juris Doctor and Bachelor of Civil Law degrees from the Paul M. Herbert Law Center, Louisiana State University; and a bachelor's degree from the Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina.
Published in: Yahoo.com
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Wednesday
December 14, 2016
4. Citadel baseball schedule features recent national champs
Home games against three recent national champions and rival College of Charleston highlight the 50-game baseball schedule announced by The Citadel on Tuesday. The Bulldogs open coach Fred Jordan's 26th season with the Charleston Crab House shootout Feb. 17-19 at Riley Park, with 2015 national champion Virginia in the field and facing the Bulldogs on Feb. 18. Defending national champ Coastal Carolina is at Riley Park on April 5. And two-time NCAA champ South Carolina comes to The Citadel on March 28. A three-game series with College of Charleston is set for March 3-5, with the first and third games at Patriots Point and the middle game at Riley Park. The Bulldogs will play a home-and-home set with Charleston Southern, going to CSU on April 4 and hosting the Bucs on April 18. The Southern Conference tournament is set for May 23-28 in Greenville.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
December 13, 2016
1. Financial firepower

An anonymous $200,000 donation will help restore Civil War cannons at one of South Carolina's most prominent visitor attractions. The gift to the National Park Service's Fort Sumter National Memorial was made in the name of the donor’s father, a Citadel graduate, according to the Fort Sumter-Fort Moultrie Historical Trust. The donor asked not to be identified publicly, trust coordinator Carlin Timmons said Tuesday. "We were just blown away," Timmons said. "We were hand to mouth, that’s really the truth. "The trust has been raising money for the cannons at Fort Moultrie on Sullivan's Island and Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor since 2013. The new six-figure donation will go toward the 11 that have not yet been restored.

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Tuesday
December 13, 2016
Economic Ideas: Adam Smith on Moral Sentiments, Division of Labor and the Invisible Hand

Adam Smith is, without doubt, the most famous member of that group of Scottish Moral Philosophers who contributed to the development of social and economic understanding of the market economy and how economic liberty makes human prosperity possible. He was born in Kirkcaldy, Scotland on June 5, 1723 and he died on July 17, 1790, at the age of 67. His father died two months after he was born, and was raised by his mother, with whom he remained close throughout her life. The story has been told that when he was four years old a band of gypsies stole him away while visiting his grandfather. A posse was formed, the gypsy band was caught up with, and little Adam was soon returned to his mother. How different the history of economic ideas might have been if instead of his release, Adam Smith had grown up among the gypsies and made a living reading tarot cards and picking pockets! Adam Smith studied at the University of Glasgow and Oxford University, after which he lectured for a time at the University of Edinburgh, and then for thirteen years at the University of Glasgow (1751-1763) as Professor of Moral Philosophy. During this time he published his first book, The Theory of Moral Sentiments (1759). For three years (1763-1766) he traveled throughout Europe as the private tutor of a young British nobleman, including almost two years in France, during which time Adam Smith came to know many of the leading French Physiocrats in Paris. He then returned to Scotland for private study and writing, the culmination of which was the publication of An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations on March 9, 1776. In later years, Adam Smith was a commissioner of customs in Edinburgh, and rector of the University of Glasgow.

Published in: Explore Freedom - Online
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Tuesday
December 13, 2016
Hires and Promosions

DeAnn Grayson has joined ServisFirst Bank in Charleston as senior vice president and commercial banking officer. She has 32 years of banking industry experience. She has a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Coker College and master’s degree in business administration from The Citadel.

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Monday
December 12, 2016
1. Citadel grad headed back to space
The windowed cupola looks like a ride in a futuristic kids' playground. It juts out from the International Space Station, flying 250 miles above Earth. Col. Randy Bresnik is looking forward to spending some time there, orbiting the planet every half hour. "On the shuttle, there was so little time to sit down and take it all in," said Bresnik, The Citadel graduate and veteran NASA astronaut who is training to take over command of the station midway through a six-month deployment that lifts off in May. "You could spend all day looking out at the world and never see the same thing twice. The orbits change, the weather changes," he said. "You can never get enough of it." Bresnik, a 1989 graduate, was a Marine Corps aviator when he became one of 11 members of NASA's Astronaut Class 9 in 2004, selected from about 4,000 applicants. He space-walked in 2009 aboard the shuttle Atlantis. The training for that was tough, but didn't touch what he has been going through for more than a year to prepare for the station, its 15 modules shaped like canisters or spheres and packed with equipment complexes. Then there's the shared duties among the Russian and American crew. On Wednesday he squeezed in four hours of combustion rack training to experiment burning different fuels, along with four hours of training for similar work in space outside the station. There was prep work to run a medley of different experiments and training in emergency response tasks that would be divided among as many as five astronauts at one time, speaking two different languages.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
December 12, 2016
2. 75 years later, Pearl Harbor remains a touchstone for Greatest Generation
David P. "Buck" Morris Jr. has suffered only a few sleepless nights since Dec. 7, 1941. Morris was a signalman aboard the destroyer USS Phelps anchored in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. On the morning of the cataclysmic attack by the Japanese, Morris was sitting on his bunk, sliding on his shoes. He heard the blast of the first bomb, followed by the pace of hurried foot steps and intelligible shouts on deck. A fellow crew member lifted the hatch to his bunk and yelled, "The Japs are attacking." A Japanese plane soared above the ship's mast. Morris could see the pilot, wearing a white scarf around his neck, waving. The harbor was engulfed in billowing black smoke... Andrew Kispert, a Marine Corps veteran, doesn't have any memories of the attack on Pearl Harbor. But he does remember the look on his freshman Spanish teacher's face, white with shock, 15 years ago when she relayed the news to her class that the World Trade Center had been deliberately struck with a passenger airplane. He and his classmates assembled in the gymnasium at their Florence high school, where they watched on live TV the wreckage in New York City. A second plane slammed into the other tower. Both collapsed into a heap of rubble. Now a 30-year-old graduate student at The Citadel studying international politics and military affairs, Kispert joined the military right after high school, emboldened by the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
December 12, 2016
3. DHEC says no to Wild Dunes sea walls as groups sue to bring them down
State regulators said no Thursday to the use of the removable sea walls guarding millions of dollars worth of beachfront property at the Wild Dunes resort on the Isle of Palms. The S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control board approved a staff recommendation not to allow them and have the existing devices removed from three properties at the resort on Isle of Palms, as well as several properties on Harbor Island near Beaufort. The decision will go to a 60-day public comment period and a public hearing before a final board decision early next year. Stakeholders expect the final decision to be appealed in court... The decision came as environmental groups Sierra Club and S.C. Wildlife Federation have filed a notice of intent to sue the agency in federal court. The groups are waging a legal battle over whether the devices endanger nesting sea turtles, which are protected species. The device design team, which is working with The Citadel researchers, contends they don't. The groups are likely to continue with the suit, said attorney Amy Armstrong, with the S.C. Environmental Law Project, which is representing them. The board overturned a staff recommendation to remove the walls at the end of the study period last July, while that staff decision was being legally challenged, she said.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
December 12, 2016
4. State agencies request less, but needs still outweigh available budget dollars
Roads may be the most visible problem in South Carolina, but state agencies are ready for their annual battle over budget dollars as lawmakers determine where limited new money goes next year. House lawmakers will begin the budget-writing process once they return to the Statehouse in January. Though economists forecast lawmakers will have an additional $446 million to spend over fiscal 2016, the money doesn't come close to addressing the $1.9 billion in needs that state agencies have identified... The College of Charleston, led by former Lt. Gov. Glenn McConnell, has asked for an additional $130.5 million, including: $53.3 million for renovations to the Simons Center for the Arts; $35 million for a learning technology center; and $23 million for the Silcox Physical Education and Health Center renovation. The Medical University of South Carolina has requested an additional $108.5 million for the fiscal year starting July 1. About $61 million would go for a building that would provide additional space for all its colleges and serve as the new home for the College of Pharmacy. Security upgrades, not new buildings, is one of The Citadel's top priorities. A security assessment found the college's uniformed students and faculty can "be viewed a high pay-off target to a lone wolf attack when compared to other college campuses," its budget request said. The Citadel asked for $1.2 million to secure buildings on its open campus with key card access points, and improvements to the campus alert systems.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
December 12, 2016
5. Economic Ideas: Adam Smith on Moral Sentiments, Division of Labor and the Invisible Hand
Adam Smith is, without doubt, the most famous member of that group of Scottish Moral Philosophers who contributed to the development of social and economic understanding of the market economy and how economic liberty makes human prosperity possible. He was born in Kirkcaldy, Scotland on June 5, 1723 and he died on July 17, 1790, at the age of 67. His father died two months after he was born, and was raised by his mother, with whom he remained close throughout her life. The story has been told that when he was four years old a band of gypsies stole him away while visiting his grandfather. A posse was formed, the gypsy band was caught up with, and little Adam was soon returned to his mother. How different the history of economic ideas might have been if instead of his release, Adam Smith had grown up among the gypsies and made a living reading tarot cards and picking pockets! Adam Smith studied at the University of Glasgow and Oxford University, after which he lectured for a time at the University of Edinburgh, and then for thirteen years at the University of Glasgow (1751-1763) as Professor of Moral Philosophy. During this time he published his first book, The Theory of Moral Sentiments (1759). Dr. Richard M. Ebeling is the recently appointed BB&T Distinguished Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel.
Published in: The Future of Freedom Foundation
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Monday
December 12, 2016
6. Hires and promotions
Banking - DeAnn Grayson has joined ServisFirst Bank in Charleston as senior vice president and commercial banking officer. She has 32 years of banking industry experience. She has a bachelor's degree in business administration from Coker College and master's degree in business administration from The Citadel.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
December 12, 2016
7. Local business calendar
Wednesday - Trump's Global Challenges: The Bastiat Society of Charleston and the World Affairs Council of Charleston hold a forum with acting U.S. Ambassador to Sudan Jerry Lanier. Topic: "Washington and the World: The Global Challenges Facing the Trump Administration." 5:15 p.m. Mark Clark Hall's Buyer Auditorium at The Citadel. $20. Go to waccharleston.org/meetinginfo.php for details.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
December 12, 2016
8. Citadel women's teams take a step forward
The Citadel has been playing women's volleyball since 1998, but not until this season did the Bulldogs land a player on the all-Southern Conference team. Moriah Smith, a junior outside hitter from Durham, N.C., earned that distinction when she was named to the all-SoCon second team. "We are thrilled that Moriah was selected for this honor," said second-year volleyball coach Craig Mosqueda. "To be the first in Citadel history to receive a post-season award is an indicator of her determination to help change the direction of this program." Indeed, The Citadel's women's fall sports of volleyball and soccer both made steps in the right direction this season. After going winless in the SoCon since 2012, the volleyball team snapped a 72-match losing streak in league play with a 3-2 win over Furman in October. It was also the Bulldogs' first win in 35 tries against Furman. The Citadel finished the season at 8-24 overall and 1-15 in the SoCon, the Bulldogs' most regular-season wins since the 2008 team went 9-23. The Citadel had gone 0-16 in the SoCon in each of the past four seasons. A big reason for that progress was Smith, who set a school record with 457 kills, averaging a program-best 3.84 kills per set. She was named SoCon offensive player of the week in September, also a first for The Citadel program. "This past spring and summer, Moriah put in a ton of work so that she could help her team be more competitive," said Mosqueda, who was hired from Anderson University in January 2015. "She is a pleasure to coach and I foresee great things going into her senior year."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
December 12, 2016
9. Local gridiron standouts eager to end their career on a high note
Sure, being the brother of legendary Myrtle Beach girls basketball player and South Carolina women's hoops alum Khadijah Sessions has its perks. But taking the easy road was never in Keyonte Sessions' DNA. "(Me and my sister) often get compared to (veteran NBA player) Ramon Sessions for all that he did while here at Myrtle Beach," he said. "It's an honor to share that last name, but also encourages you to put in the work to be great." A four-year letterman for the Myrtle Beach football team, the Seahawks' jack-of-all-trades was the last of a remnant of those left from the program's last state title in 2013. Though unable to add to his ring collection this season - his last in a Myrtle Beach uniform - he will end his career in familiar surroundings. Having become quite familiar with Myrtle Beach's Doug Shaw Memorial Stadium, Sessions' last hurrah in the green and gold will come in Saturday's Touchstone Energy Cooperatives North-South Bowl. The opportunity to play in front of friends and family is one he is certainly not taking lightly. "It's great to have one last game at Doug Shaw Stadium after suffering a playoff loss away from here," he said. "It's great to get out here on Doug Shaw and get out here and compete." Largely contributing on the defensive side of the ball, Sessions showcased his vast array of skills this past season, scoring a total of 21 touchdowns. He added another trip to pay dirt via a fumble recovery, in addition to 82 tackles and an interception. "You just can't say enough about Keyonte," said Myrtle Beach football coach Mickey Wilson. "He lines up as a running back, wide receiver, fields punts, plays defense, he does all you can ask. That's the type of player you want on your football team." Sessions committed to The Citadel in late October. While the thought of losing his trademark locks hurt, he is eager to begin his time in Charleston. "I've had them since my freshman year, but I'll have no problem letting them go," he said. "I'm really looking forward to going (to The Citadel)."
Published in: Myrtle Beach Online
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Friday
December 9, 2016
1. Citadel graduate to lead his second International Space Station expedition
Veteran NASA astronaut and Citadel alumnus, Col. Randy Bresnik, USMC (Ret.), is training for his next mission: he will command Expedition 53 to the International Space Station (ISS) scheduled to launch in May of 2017. Halfway through his anticipated six months on the ISS when the commander of Expedition 52 departs, Bresnik will assume command of the space station itself. Bresnik is one of 45 active astronauts listed by NASA, and a senior one with regard to experience. This will be his second visit to the ISS. His primary missions have included: STS-129: In 2009, Bresnik was a part of the Space Shuttle Atlantis crew that docked with the ISS for 11 days of assignments. His two spacewalks during that mission known as STS-129 totaled 11 hours and 50 minutes. His daughter was born while he was on the mission; Cave-a-naut: Bresnik trained as a cave-a-naut (a video can be seen by clicking here) for the European Space Agency, testing impacts on the human body while living deep beneath the Earth's surface; Aquanaut: In 2014, Bresnik commanded a team of aquanauts for NASA's Extreme Environment Mission Operation (NEEMO), aboard the Aquarius underwater laboratory.
Published in: Charleston Business Mag
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Friday
December 9, 2016
2a. Citadel pursuing plans for major improvement to Johnson Hagood Stadium
Early in the new year The Citadel plans to begin exploring possibilities to replace the deteriorated eastside stands at Johnson Hagood Stadium. "The Citadel Board approved a motion allowing the administration to move forward with the demolition of the eastside stands of Johnson Hagood Stadium," said Lt. Gen. John B. Sams, Jr., chairman of The Citadel Board of Visitors. "We will be working closely with our adjacent neighborhoods and the Board of Architectural Review." The original stadium was constructed in the 1920s, renovated in 1948, with the westside stands rebuilt in the 2000s. The eastside stands and associated facilities are the oldest remaining portion of the structures. They serve as the visitors' section during the Bulldogs football games and can seat approximately 9,300 people, although seating was reduced this past season due to the deteriorated condition of the facility. In the summer of 2016, the college conducted an extensive review of possibilities for phased improvements to the eastside structure that required structural steel upgrades and seismic retrofitting among other costly upgrades. In early December, after reviewing all options, The Citadel Board of Visitors determined that renovation was not feasible and decided to move forward with razing the structure.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Friday
December 9, 2016
2b. JH stadium
JH stadium
Published in: LowcountryBizSC.com
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Friday
December 9, 2016
3. Seawalls versus sea turtles: DHEC moving to ban plastic seawalls on South Carolina beaches
The state's environmental protection agency took steps Thursday to ban experimental plastic seawalls that once were touted as a way to protect oceanfront property without eroding the South Carolina coast. After hearing evidence that the walls are a threat to wildlife and public beach access, the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control board agreed to seek public comment on whether to end the seawall experiment. Agency staff members want to prohibit the walls, known as wave dissipation systems, that have been erected on two South Carolina beaches. The board would decide the matter after the 60-day comment period and a public hearing... Developed by researchers at The Citadel, wave dissipation devices have been installed in the past two years on one stretch of beach at Harbor Island and three stretches in the Wild Dunes area of Isle of Palms. The walls are hundreds of feet long, and in some spots, extend well out onto what is left of the beaches. Unlike seawalls made of concrete, the plastic walls are portable, temporary structures that can be taken down during sea turtle nesting season. They contain openings that let sea water and some sand get through them, which is supposed to limit beach erosion and help beaches build up behind them.
Published in: The State
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Friday
December 9, 2016
4. East Cooper Habitat for Humanity elects board member
East Cooper Habitat for Humanity, a nonprofit, non-denominational Christian housing organization, has elected Jeff Peacock as a board member. Peacock is the area director for enterprise sales, southeast, at Benefitfocus, a cloud-based benefits management platform that aims to simplify how organizations and individuals shop for, enroll in, manage and exchange benefits. He has been with Benefitfocus since 2008 and was with Infor from 2005 to 2008 and with Blackbaud, Inc. from 1999 until 2005. Prior to launching his business career, Peacock served as assistant men's soccer coach at the College of Charleston from 1994-1999 and at The Citadel from 1990-1993. He has attained degrees from Charleston Southern University and from The Citadel. Peacock has been a volunteer with Habitat for Humanity on their home building sites and has also been involved in their home repair projects. He lives with his wife Jean and daughters Grace, Lucy, and Leah in Mt. Pleasant. East Cooper Habitat for Humanity (ECHFH) assists families by building safe, well-constructed homes. Working in partnership with low-income families, ECHFH utilizes volunteer labor and donated funds to provide a "hand up," not a "hand out." Homeowners are chosen based on their demonstrated ability to handle personal finances and their willingness to contribute at least 350 hours of "sweat equity" on their home. Upon completion, Habitat homes are purchased by the homeowner with monthly payments under an interest-free mortgage over 30 years, and those payments are directed toward future homebuilding efforts as received.
Published in: Moultrie News
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Friday
December 9, 2016
5. Citadel's Warren Sledge snaps shooting slump in rout
Citadel basketball coach Duggar Baucom was hard on his seniors after a come-from-ahead loss to Campbell on Sunday. And rightfully so, said one of those seniors, guard Warren Sledge. "I'm the captain of this team, and I take full ownership for what happened against Campbell," Sledge said of a game in which the Bulldogs lost a 10-point second-half lead. "Coach had the right to be hard on us on Sunday, because the team didn't come out and play with effort, at all." A game against lower-division Toccoa Falls on Wednesday night was the perfect chance for Sledge and the Bulldogs to bounce back, and they did just that with a 144-94 rout at McAlister Field House. Sledge scored 18 points and dished 10 assists, and more importantly hit 6 of 10 shots from 3-point range. The 6-3 senior had made just 5 of 30 (16.7 percent) over the first 10 games of the season. "It felt great," said Sledge, who shot a solid 38 percent from 3-point range last season. "Everybody was so happy for me, because they know I can shoot it. Coach said after the game, 'We finally got you out of the slump. You've been the missing link.'" Sledge has dual responsibilities on this young team, shepherding nine freshmen into Baucom's fast-paced system while looking after his own game. "We've expected a lot of Warren, and he's got to have pretty broad shoulders," said Baucom, whose team is 7-4 after playing its final non-Division I foe of the season. "Stuff kind of rolls downhill, so my wrath goes to him first, and then to other guys.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Friday
December 9, 2016
6. FUMA Commandant of Cadets has died
Fork Union Military Academy has announced the sudden passing of one of its leaders. Colonel Duane Fender, the Commandant of Cadets, passed away unexpectedly on Tuesday evening. He was 56. According to a release, Fender was refereeing an interscholastic basketball game at Orange County when he apparently suffered a major cardiac event. He graduated from FUMA in 1979, where he played varsity football. He then attended The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina before returning to FUMA when he joined the staff and helped coach the football team. In a 2012 interview, Fender said, "I consider myself a family man and I try to treat the FUMA cadets as if they were part of my own family." He was married to Lynn Pulliam, the daughter of former FUMA Commandant Colonel "Red" Pulliam, in 1983. The couple had two daughters, Lauren and Lindsay.
Broadcast on: CBS Charlottesville, VA
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Thursday
December 8, 2016
1. Citadel grad, cadet looking to explore space
The intrepid Col. Randy Bresnik is scheduled to return to space in May, this time to command the International Space Station. And this time, The Citadel graduate's training will be blogged by cadet Angelica McNerny, who is contracted to be commissioned by the Air Force when she graduates in May as she pursues a career in space exploration. She flew Wednesday to the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. "It doesn't get much better than this," she said. Bresnik, a 1989 graduate, was a veteran Marine Corps aviator when he became one of 11 members of NASA's Astronaut Class 9 in 2004, selected from about 4,000 applicants. He space-walked in 2009 aboard the shuttle Atlantis and talked later about the awe of circling the Earth every half-hour, watching the sun rise. On the space station, he will lead an international crew, commissioned in space as the current mission leader returns to Earth. "His unassuming leadership style and service to our country as a pilot and astronaut continue to inspire cadets and many others who follow Col. Bresnik's accomplishments," said Col. Tom Clark, director of The Citadel's Krause Center for Leadership Ethics. To view McNerny's blog, go to www.citadel.edu, click on the Bresnik link and then on #CitadeSpaceStar.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
December 8, 2016
2. Citadel Space Star to Lead His Second International Space Station Expedition
Veteran NASA astronaut and Citadel alumnus, Col. Randy Bresnik, USMC (Ret.), is training for his next mission: he will command Expedition 53 to the International Space Station scheduled to launch in May of 2017. Halfway through his anticipated six months on the ISS when the commander of Expedition 52 departs, Bresnik will assume command of the space station itself. Bresnik is one of 45 active astronauts listed by NASA, and a senior one with regard to experience. This will be his second visit to the ISS. His primary missions have included: STS-129: In 2009, Bresnik was a part of the Space Shuttle Atlantis crew that docked with the ISS for 11 days of assignments. His two spacewalks during that mission known as STS-129 totaled 11 hours and 50 minutes. His daughter was born while he was on the mission. A video of his celebration in space can be seen by clicking here. Cave-a-naut: Bresnik trained as a cave-a-naut (a video can be seen by clicking here) for the European Space Agency, testing impacts on the human body while living deep beneath the Earth's surface. Aquanaut: In 2014, Bresnik commanded a team of aquanauts for NASA's Extreme Environment Mission Operation, aboard the Aquarius underwater laboratory. Much of the training for the May expedition to the ISS occurs at Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. Citadel Cadet Angelica McNerny will be onsite at the center Dec. 8 to observe Bresnik in an ISS mockup where training for emergency scenarios will be underway. She will be reporting on his endeavors for several months until launch on a Citadel blog and via the college's social media using #CitadelSpaceStar.
Published in: CharlestonCEO.com
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Thursday
December 8, 2016
3. Video: Entrepreneurship, the Market Economy and Human Betterment
On Thursday, Octobert 20, 2016 The Nassau Institute & The College of The Bahamas presented a lecture by Professor Richard Ebeling on "Entrepreneurship, the Market Economy and Human Betterment" in the lecture hall at the Harry C. Moore Library at College of The Bahamas (now the University of The Bahamas) starting at 6:30pm. Summary of lecture: "We easily take for granted the continuous and wondrous material and cultural improvements in our everyday lives. But they are neither guaranteed nor certain. Instead, they are due to the entrepreneurial mind and spirit that, in fact, is potentially in any one of us. But the innovations, creativity and alertness to market opportunities from which human betterment comes is dependent upon a political and economic environment of freedom and competitive openness, without which prosperity and rising standards of living would be impossible."
Published in: NassauInstitute.org
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Thursday
December 8, 2016
4. Citadel's Brent Thompson second in national coach of the year voting
The Citadel football coach Brent Thompson finished as the runner-up in voting for the Eddie Robinson Award, given annually to the FCS national coach of the year. Thompson received 37 first-place votes and 435 points in voting by national media, finishing just behind award winner K.C. Keeler of Sam Houston State. Former Citadel coach Mike Houston, now at James Madison, was third in the voting. Thompson, who was Houston's offensive coordinator at Lenoir-Rhyne and at The Citadel, led the Bulldogs to a 10-2 record and a second straight Southern Conference championship. The Bulldogs went 8-0 in the SoCon and won their first 10 games of the season. Keeler received 41 first-place votes and 442 points to narrowly beat out Thompson.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
December 8, 2016
5. The Citadel gets 50 point win over Toccoa Falls
Zane Najdawi and Warren Sledge each posted double-doubles as The Citadel men's basketball team cruised to a 144-94 win over Toccoa Falls on Wednesday evening. The Citadel (7-4) raced out to an eight-point lead in the first 1:30 as Quayson Williams and Sledge each buried three-pointers and Brian White hit a jumper. The Bulldogs never took their foot off the gas and after White hit back-to-back three-pointers with four minutes remaining, The Citadel had extended its lead to 58-41. At the halftime break, head coach Duggar Baucom and company held a 77-51 lead thanks to aPreston Parks' three-pointer with one second remaining in the half. The 77 points scored in the first half is second most in program history behind the 83 points the Bulldogs put up against Mid-Atlantic Christian last year. White opened the second half with back-to-back threes, extending The Citadel's lead to 32 and with 12:23 remaining in the game, Kaelon Harris hit two free throws to make it 100-71. Ezekiel Balogun threw down his fourth dunk of the game with 1:18 remaining and then hit two free throws one minute later to give the Bulldogs the 50-point victory. The Citadel had 14 finish in the scoring column with nine tallying double digits. Najdawi led the team with 22 points and 10 rebounds while Sledge finished with 18 points, on six-of-10 shooting from behind the arc, and 10 assists. Balogun finished one rebound shy of a double-double, scoring a career-high 15 points in 10 minutes of action. The Bulldogs shot 50 percent from the field for the fourth time this season and finished 35-of-40 from the charity stripe. The Citadel forced the Eagles (4-5) to turn the ball over 28 times as the Bulldogs scored 42 points off the miscues.
Published in: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Thursday
December 8, 2016
6. The Citadel Basketball Moving To FM Radio
The Citadel basketball games will have an increased presence in the Charleston market, including a move to FM radio, it was announced Wednesday. Kirkman Broadcasting, the radio rights holder for The Citadel Athletics, has finalized plans to move the Bulldogs' basketball games from 1450-AM to the company's new all-sports stations 98.5-FM and 1340-AM The Zone. The move takes place in time for Wednesday night's Holy City Hoops Classic finale against Toccoa Falls. Of The Citadel's final 21 regular season games, 14 will air on The Zone with another four airing on ESPN Radio 98.9-FM and three additional games being broadcast on ESPN Radio 94.7-FM and 910-AM. Each broadcast, led by the Voice of the Bulldogs Mike Legg, begins 30 minutes prior to tip off with the pre-game show. Wednesday night's game against Toccoa Falls is set for 7 p.m. inside McAlister Field House. Tickets are available by calling The Citadel Athletic Ticket Office at 843-953-DOGS (3647).
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Wednesday
December 7, 2016
1. Citadel space star to lead his second International Space Station expedition
Veteran NASA astronaut and Citadel alumnus, Col. Randy Bresnik, USMC (Ret.), is training for his next mission: he will command Expedition 53 to the International Space Station (ISS) scheduled to launch in May of 2017. Halfway through his anticipated six months on the ISS, when the commander of Expedition 52 departs, Bresnik will assume command of the space station itself. Bresnik is one of 45 active astronauts listed by NASA, and a senior one with regard to experience. This will be his second visit to the ISS. His primary missions have included: STS-129: In 1009, Bresnik was a part of the Space Shuttle Atlantic crew that docked with the ISS for 11 days of assignments. His two spacewalks during that mission known as STS-129 totaled 11 hours and 50 minutes. His daughter was born while he was on the mission. A video of his celebration in space can be seen in the article. Cave-a-naut: Bresnik trained as a cave-a-naut for the European Space Agency, testing impacts on the human body while living deep beneath the Earth's surface. Aquanaut: In 2014, Bresnik commanded a team of aquanauts for NASA's Extreme Environment Mission Operation (NEEMO), aboard the Aquarius underwater laboratory. Much of the training for the May expedition to the ISS occurs at Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. Citadel Cadet Angelica McNerny will be onsite at the center Dec. 8 to observe Bresnik in an ISS mockup where training for emergency scenarios will be underway. She will be reporting on his endeavors for several months until launch on a Citadel blog and via the college's social media using #CitadelSpaceStar.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Wednesday
December 7, 2016
2. 97-year-old shares memories of military life on and after Pearl Harbor Day
Stationed in Gander, Newfoundland, on Dec. 7, 1941, James "Jim" Kendrick remembers clearly the immediate security measures taken to defend his military base after word arrived that the Japanese had bombed Pearl Harbor. "Security on the base was drastically changed," said Kendrick who retired as a lieutenant colonel with 28 years of service as a World War II military bomber pilot. "We went on such extreme security that when the commander's car was going somewhere and failed to stop, they put four bullets into the car," he said. Kendrick said the fear, just like after the terror attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, was that Pearl Harbor was just the initial attack with more to come. Every military base was placed on immediate alert... Kendrick can still remember flying over a torpedoed ship one day and seeing two bodies frozen to death in a small rescue boat, the rest of the crew missing. There was no way to reach them in time to save them. Later in his career, Kendrick was stationed at the U.S. Air Force headquarters in Washington, D.C. He retired to Myrtle Beach and says that and attending The Citadel are the best decisions he ever made. "Being ninety-seven and one-half, I am a lucky man," Kendrick said. A North Carolina native, he outlived the love of his life, Geneva "Ninky" Sanders Kendrick, who died almost four years ago. He is happy to be active, still driving and able to remember so many facts about his past. He is quick to say that he is a "saver of everything" but not a hero or a fighter pilot.
Published in: Myrtle Beach Online
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Wednesday
December 7, 2016
3. Patriots Point holds Pearl Harbor memorial service
The 75th anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and six other military bases on Oahu will be commemorated on Wednesday, Dec. 7 with a memorial service aboard the historic USS Yorktown. The free service, located at 40 Patriots Point Road in Mount Pleasant, begins at 11 a.m. and is expected to end at noon. A pre-ceremony video will play before it starts. The service will include a wreath laying, tolling of a bell and a traditional gun salute in memory of each of the 25 known South Carolina men who were killed during the attack. Captain Scott D. Heller, the commanding officer of SPAWAR Systems Center (SSC) Atlantic, and Larry Grant, an adjunct professor in the Department of History at The Citadel will be the featured speakers. Museum admission and parking will be waived from 10 to 11 a.m. for the memorial service. The museum will feature unique artifacts from ships involved in the Pearl Harbor attack on display. The Japanese used more than 353 aircraft during the hour-and-15-minute attack on Pearl Harbor. More than 2,403 U.S. personnel, including 68 civilians were killed. In total, more than 300 U.S. aircraft and 19 Navy ships were destroyed or damaged, including eight battleships.
Broadcast on: WCBD-TV Charleston, SC
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Wednesday
December 7, 2016
4. Judo instructor competes in international event
Local educators Robert Gouthro and Dr. Lisa Capriotti recently represented the United States in the World Judo Kata Championships in Malta, a small island nation in the Mediterranean off Africa. Thirty nations sent their premier judo teams to compete and Gouthro and Capriotti placed seventh. Gouthro teaches English at Fort Dorchester Elementary School. The pair has practiced kata, which requires two people performing together, for the past five years and train throughout the year. Their goal is to win gold at the International Judo Federation World Kata Championships. Kata is a technical and exacting demonstration of precise skills, judged by experts. "No United States team has ever won at the IJF World Kata tournament so it's a very tough nut to crack," Gouthro said. As with any international competition, financing is a huge challenge, and we fundraise year round. Most European and Asian teams are fully funded by their governments or sports federations, so we're at a big disadvantage. Even so, I'm sure this is something we can do." In addition to competition training, Gouthro and Capriotti volunteer as instructors at the Samurai Judo Association on the Naval Weapons Station in Goose Creek. That club offers free judo and jujitsu (self-defense) instruction with five classes each week to active duty military personnel, retirees, and adult dependents and Department of Defense contractors. They also volunteer at the American Judo and Jujitsu Academy on Highway 78 in Summerville.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom - Faculty News
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Wednesday
December 7, 2016
5. Clarendon Hall earns SACS accreditation
Clarendon Hall has been awarded accreditation upon the recommendation from an external review team representing AdvaceED, the parent organization of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. The accreditation is for a five-year period. The external review team was trained by the South Carolina Independent School Association and was chaired by Dr. Stephenie Hewett, associate professor at The Citadel. AdvanceED is a global accrediting agency which serves more than 34,000 schools. The resources and standards of AdvanceEd ensure that Clarendon Hall is committed to continuous school improvement. The rigorous review process focused on five standards: Standard 1 - Purpose and Direction; Standard 2 - Governance and Leadership; Standard 3 - Teaching and Assessing for Learning; Standard 4 - Resources and Support Systems; Standard 5 - Using Results for Continuous Improvement. By ensuring continuous improvement in these areas, AdvanceEd seeks to create and initiate change, growth and innovation in their schools. "The process of SACS Accreditation is absolutely exhaustive, but it exposes our opportunities for improvement, which have already begun," said Clarendon Hall Headmaster Phillip Rizzo. "With the help of SCISA, we are developing a professional development model which will ultimately allow us to better serve our students." The South Carolina Independent School Association is a non-profit, voluntary association of more than 120 independent schools, which serve more than 37,000 teachers and students.
Published in: ManningLive.com
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Wednesday
December 7, 2016
6. The Citadel's Najdawi Earns Second Weekly Honor
Zane Najdawi has been named Southern Conference Player of the Week for the second time this season, it was announced Tuesday. "We are all very proud of Zane and his early season accomplishments," head coach Duggar Baucom said. "Zane understands that his work ethic, attention to detail and high motor are the big reasons for his success. He comes in every day and tries to better his best. He is a fun kid to coach and he has earned his teammates' complete confidence in him on both ends of the floor." Najdawi had three stellar performances for The Citadel at the Holy City Hoops Classic this past weekend, beginning with his first career 30-point game against Colgate on Dec. 2. The sophomore finished 16-of-17 from the free throw line, grabbed nine rebounds and recorded four steals in the contest, helping the Bulldogs top the Raiders 108-101 in the tournament opener. In a 97-92 win over USC Upstate, Najdawi finished with 16 points and six rebounds after going six-of-12 from the floor as the 'Dogs earned their third consecutive victory. Najdawi wrapped up the weekend with his third double-double of the season, finishing with 21 points and 11 rebounds against Campbell, going seven-of-10 from the field and six-of-seven from the free throw line. This season, Najdawi is averaging a team-best 19.9 points and 8.3 rebounds per game and has recorded six 20-point games already this season. Currently shooting 86 percent from the free throw line, Najdawi has tallied five consecutive games scoring in double figures. He has led the team in scoring five times this year and has been the team's leading rebounder seven times.
Published in: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Wednesday
December 7, 2016
7. The Citadel Sets Game At Georgia Tech In 2019
The Citadel football team will travel to Atlanta to play Georgia Tech in the 2019 season, athletic director Jim Senter announced Tuesday. "I am excited about this opportunity for our football team," Senter said. "We strive to provide exceptional experiences for all of our cadet-athletes, and playing games in ACC environments is a great experience for the members of our football program. We need guarantee games in FCS, and our goal is to play those around the Southeast to reduce travel and allow our fans to see us play. This is a regional game in a fantastic city, which allows our great fan base to travel and enjoy The Citadel football in Atlanta." The Bulldogs are set to play in Bobby Dodd Stadium on Sept. 14, 2019. The game will be the 11th meeting all-time between the two schools in a series that dates back to 1912. With the addition of Georgia Tech to the 2019 schedule, The Citadel has FBS contests set for each of the next three seasons. The Bulldogs travel to Clemson on Nov. 18, 2017, and to Alabama on Nov. 17, 2018. "I want to thank Jim Senter for working tirelessly to find us a guarantee game for the 2019 season," head coach Brent Thompson said. "These schedules are not easy to make, and for us the guarantee games are important for many reasons. We have a strong following in Georgia, and it is a state we recruit heavily. Having this agreement finalized now allows us to tell recruits that they will have the opportunity to play back home in a great environment. We are completely focused on finishing strong with our 2017 signing class and beginning preparation for the 2017 season, but it is great to have guarantee games for the next three years established."
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Tuesday
December 6, 2016
1. The Citadel joins national initiative to introduce students to computer science
To kick off national Computer Science Education Week, the White House is recognizing a Year of Action Supporting Computer Science for All. As part of the initiative, The Citadel will offer teacher professional development opportunities and engage middle school students in coding education from Dec. 5 - 11, 2016. "We are so excited to be able to support the Lowcountry and the state of South Carolina's initiative to infuse computer science into all schools," said Director of the STEM Center of Excellence at The Citadel, Jennifer Albert, Ph.D. "South Carolina Superintendent of Education, Molly Spearman, has advocated for an Hour of Code in every school, and we stemhave been able to help a large number of schools achieve that in the Charleston area." The Citadel will participate in the following activities during Computer Science Education Week: Monday, Dec. 5 - Hour of Code at Lexington Technology Center; Tuesday, Dec. 6 - Hour of Code at College Park Middle School and Summerville High School; Wednesday, Dec. 7 - Hour of Code at Windsor Hill Art Infused Elementary School; Thursday, Dec. 8 - Hour of Code at Newington Elementary School. In the summer of 2017, The Citadel will offer a STEAM Summer Camp on coding for teachers and students in collaboration with Engaging Creative Minds. The STEM Center of Excellence at The Citadel works to prepare students for the 21st century workforce. A collaborative effort of The Citadel's Schools of Education, Engineering and Science and Mathematics, the STEM Center delivers outreach initiatives to increase student interest, participation and opportunities in the STEM disciplines and develops innovative programming related to teacher preparation and professional development activities. The STEM Center also supports The Citadel's efforts to produce more graduates who are poised to become successful leaders in STEM fields.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Tuesday
December 6, 2016
2. The Charleston International Airport-Bulldog Connection
With the roar of aircraft surrounding them, 11 cadets and veteran students from The Citadel stood on Taxiway Alpha studying how Charleston International Airport is improving its infrastructure to support a rapidly growing Lowcountry aviation industry. "I'm trying to shoot for a Boeing internship this summer to work on the construction side of things; building planes and to see what they're made of, so seeing how the airport and control tower works goes hand and hand," said Cadet Cody Floyd. For weeks the junior Civil Engineering major from Georgetown, S.C., had anticipated the Nov. 3 trip, which was made possible by Citadel graduates working at the airport. "This was a unique chance for the cadets to broaden their knowledge of airport operations and see how the work we are doing here applies to their Civil Engineering studies and to possible engineering careers in the aviation field," said Hernan Pena, vice president of engineering for the Charleston County Aviation Authority. Pena, a 1984 graduate of The Military college of South Carolina, along with Phil Strope, Class of 1999, of ADC Engineering; and airport Project Engineer Jonathan Sheppard, Evening Undergraduate Studies, Class of 2006, took the cadets onto the airfield where a $21 million taxiway improvement project is under way. The group also visited the FAA Air Traffic Control Tower. The taxiway project includes lighting upgrades, sign replacement, concrete reconstruction and drainage improvements. It is being funded by the FAA Airport Improvement Program (90 percent) and the Aviation Authority (10 percent).
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Tuesday
December 6, 2016
3. Judo instructors compete in international event
Local educators Robert Gouthro and Dr. Lisa Capriotti recently represented the United States in the World Judo Kata Championships in Malta, a small island nation in the Mediterranean off Africa. Thirty nations sent their premier judo teams to compete and Gouthro and Capriotti placed seventh. Gouthro teaches English at Fort Dorchester Elementary School. Capriotti, a US Navy veteran, teaches chemistry at The Citadel. Gouthro has studied judo, karate, iaido, and jujitsu for fourteen years and recently was promoted to second-degree black belt in judo. Capriotti has studied judo, karate, iaido, and jujitsu for over 17 years and also holds second-degree black belt rank in judo. The pair has practiced kata, which requires two people performing together, for the past five years and train throughout the year. Their goal is to win gold at the International Judo Federation World Kata Championships. Kata is a technical and exacting demonstration of precise skills, judged by experts. "No United States team has ever won at the IJF World Kata tournament so it's a very tough nut to crack," Gouthro said. As with any international competition, financing is a huge challenge, and we fundraise year round. Most European and Asian teams are fully funded by their governments or sports federations, so we're at a big disadvantage. Even so, I'm sure this is something we can do." In addition to competition training, Gouthro and Capriotti volunteer as instructors at the Samurai Judo Association on the Naval Weapons Station in Goose Creek. That club offers free judo and jujitsu (self-defense) instruction with five classes each week to active duty military personnel, retirees, and adult dependents and Department of Defense contractors.
Published in: The Gazette
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Tuesday
December 6, 2016
4. Tim Smith appointed to City Council
The Lincolnton City Council voted unanimously Thursday to appoint Tim Smith to the board in place of Devin Rhyne, who announced his resignation at the conclusion that day's meeting. Smith, like Rhyne, is a Republican who resides inside the Ward 1 precinct. Smith was born and raised in Lincoln County, graduating from Lincolnton High School. Smith went to college at The Citadel and earned his degree in business administration before returning to Lincolnton where he has worked as a certified public accountant for more than 25 years. Rhyne approached Smith about serving as his successor some time ago when he and his family first made the decision to begin building a new house on the western end of Lincoln County. "He knows my values and what I stand for and he knows that we see things pretty much eye-to-eye most of the time," Smith said. Smith spoke about his priorities as a newly minted councilman in an interview with the Lincoln Times-News. "I see that there are more things that we need to be doing for the infrastructure around town," Smith said. "We've done a good job of recovering from all of the hard times that we've had since 2008 and now we need to be putting money back into the infrastructure. That means the water, the sewer, the power and the roads in order to make sure that we've got something here for the next generation and the generation after that. A lot of what has been built in this town is 40 or 50 years old and we have to continue to replace this stuff."
Published in: Lincoln-Times News
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Tuesday
December 6, 2016
5. Walker Tops Journeymen Tussle with 100th Victory
The Citadel wrestling's Aaron Walker placed first in Pool A of the 157-lb weight class to lead the Bulldogs at the Journeymen Tussle on Sunday. Walker (11-4) dropped his first match against Pennsylvania's Maaziah Bethea by a close 8-7 decision, but rebounded with two straight victories to claim his pool. He won by forfeit over NC State's Max Roshkopf before defeating Rutgers' John Van Brill in a 12-10 sudden victory. With the two victories, Walker reached 100 victories for his career. He owns a record of 100-29 at The Citadel and has now won 11 of his last 13 matches after starting the season at 0-2. The Bulldogs also added three third place finishes in Andrew Szalwinski, Douglas Gudenburr and Sawyer Root. Szalwinski (6-9) dropped his first two matches of the tournament, but responded with two straight victories to grab third place at 133 pounds. In a Bulldog battle, Szalwinski faced teammate Andrew Clayton (1-8) in the third round. Szalwinski came away with a close 2-0 decision over Clayton. He then defeated Pennsylvania's Tristan Devincenzo by a 9-4 decision to close out his tournament. Gudenburr (13-6) began his day with a 5-2 decision over Pennsylvania's Patrick Munn before dropping his second round match at 141 pounds. Gudenburr bounced back with a 16-0 technical fall over Charles Banaszak in just 2:57. He fell in his final round match to Campbell's Joshua Heil to finish 2-2 at the tournament.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Monday
December 5, 2016
1a. World-class bass opera singer and Citadel alumnus to address Class of 2017
Former Citadel football player turned internationally-known opera singer, Morris Robinson, will deliver the last address The Citadel Class of 2017 hears before heading out into the world and forging paths as leaders across the nation. Robinson, Class of 1991, will address the South Carolina Corps of Cadets during commencement at 9 a.m. on Saturday, May 6. Robinson grew up in Atlanta, the son of a Baptist minister and a mother who insisted her children play musical instruments and be successful in school. His earliest memory of singing was in his church's kid's choir when he was just six years old. Throughout his childhood, he was always drawn to the football field, but at the age of 10 he was too large to play in his age group and instead joined the elite Atlanta Boys Choir. After being offered scholarships for music at multiple colleges, Robinson decided to enroll at The Citadel so he could play football. As a cadet he played for the Bulldogs and sang in The Citadel Choir - excelling in academics and extracurricular activities. "It is an honor for the Class of 2017 to be able to hear from such an inspirational leader as we prepare to head out into the world," said senior cadet Devin Taylor, Echo Company athletic officer. "Morris Robinson's story sends a message to keep reaching for your goals no matter how big they may be." Robinson graduated with a degree in English and worked for 3M Technologies in Washington, D.C. for several years before eventually auditioning for a spot with The Choral Arts Society of Washington. Shortly after earning a place with the choir, his career took him to Boston where he was accepted into the New England Conservatory of Music's continuing education program ultimately earning a place in The Opera Institute at Boston University.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Monday
December 5, 2016
1b. morris robinson
morris robinson
Published in: Charleston Business Mag
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Monday
December 5, 2016
2a. Citadel Graduate College alumna becomes oldest woman to swim Straits of Gibraltar
Nancy Haynsworth, a Citadel Graduate College alumna, U.S. Air Force veteran and instructor at the college, recently became the oldest woman to swim across the Straits of Gibraltar this year. In late November, the Asociacion Cruce a Nado Estrechio de Gibraltar (ACNEG) honored the 59-year-old Haynsworth as the Oldest Female Swimmer with Neoprene for 2016. "I started competitive swimming at the age of 40, so I could swim with my two children," said Haynsworth. "We competed in swim meets throughout Europe when I was stationed there. My son swam for the U.S. Coast Guard Academy, and my daughter swims for the academy now. She was part of my support crew, monitoring my hydration, stroke rate, and body temperature during the swim in the strait." Of the 141 people who have successfully crossed the Straits, 22 are women. "I trained very hard for three years for this particular event, swimming a minimum of 30,000 meters per week along with strength and functional fitness land training and extra land cardio, while adhering to a sound nutrition program," Haynsworth said. "It is a thrill to be the oldest person to accomplish the swim this year, just in time for my 60th."
Published in: Palmetto Business Daily
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Monday
December 5, 2016
2b. nancy haynsworth
nancy haynsworth
Published in: CharlestonCEO.com
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Monday
December 5, 2016
2c. nancy haynsworth
nancy haynsworth
Published in: Charleston Business Mag
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Monday
December 5, 2016
3. A piece of history returns to The Citadel
The Friends of the Daniel Library will hold a ceremony celebrating the acquisition of the James B. White Sword at 6:30p.m., Tuesday, Dec. 6. The program will include a tribute to the sword donors, recognition of the descendants of James B. White, as well as an homage to the Battalion of State Cadets. The event is open to the public. Tim Keohane, the sword's owner and one of the people who made the return of the sword possible, provided the following article to explain the history of the sword and the story behind the acquisition of this Citadel artifact. Maj. James B. White graduated from The Citadel in 1849. In 1852, he became professor of mathematics at his alma mater. He was appointed fifth president (then called superintendent) of the college in 1861 and served in that capacity until 1865. During the Civil War, cadets were known as the Battalion of State Cadets. White led the Cadet Battalion of State Cadets at the Battle of Tulfinny Creek in December 1864. Following the war, The Citadel was closed and White retired to Marion, S.C., where he established a private academy-the only school in Marion at the time. He also became involved in the first alumni association and was instrumental in the reopening of The Citadel in 1877. He died in 1906. In August of 2015, I was reminded of White's place in Citadel history when I got a call from Dan Carroll, '86, a sword collector. "Tim, I believe I have found a unique piece of Citadel history for auction," he said.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Monday
December 5, 2016
4. Citadel labor historian arrested in Crosstown protest
One of the seven people arrested in Tuesday's traffic-disrupting protest for a $15 minimum wage was Kieran Taylor, an associate professor at The Citadel and historian of American labor movements. Tuesday evening, organizers held up signs and chanted outside of a McDonald's restaurant on the Septima P. Clark Expressway, a road named after a local educator and civil rights-era activist. Police arrested seven protesters on disorderly conduct charges when they blocked traffic on the expressway, also known as the Crosstown. Protesters were arguing for union representation and a living wage, or enough for a full-time worker to supply his or her basic needs. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology Living Wage Calculator, which tracks grocery and childcare costs among other indices, places the living wage for a single adult in Charleston County at $11.69 an hour. The living wage for a single parent of one child is $21.60. The federally mandated minimum wage, which many restaurant and service workers earn, is $7.25 an hour. "People out there are hurting, and I think they deserve a living wage," Taylor said. "I think we're a better community, we're a better country when people are paid a living wage."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
December 5, 2016
5. Hires and promotions
Business services - Kirk McMillan has joined Abraxas Business Services as principal of its Charleston business-brokerage office. He also is CEO of RiseWell LLC and chair of Vistage. He has a bachelor's degree in business administration from The Citadel and a master's degree in business administration from Kennesaw State University.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
December 5, 2016
6. Behind Citadel grad Jeff Farrington, North Greenville looks to advance in D-II playoffs
Fifty miles north of Clemson, where college football reigns supreme and all eyes are on the Tigers' hunt for a playoff berth, Jeff Farrington's North Greenville team is quietly writing the story of their own postseason. The 9-4 Division II Crusaders don't garner the prestige or the national attention neighboring Clemson does, but come Saturday, North Greenville is set to match up with North Alabama in the third round of the NCAA playoffs with a trip to the semifinals on the line. Much of the Crusaders' success stems from Farrington and the way he approaches running his program. And much of his background comes from his previous ties to the Lowcountry - The Citadel. "I walked on and played for Art Baker there at The Citadel and that was in 1978, and I graduated in the spring of '82," Farrington said. "There are a lot of things you take from (The Citadel), but I guess a standard of discipline and the way you go about things (are what I took). There are all kinds of ways to do things, I certainly believe that. And there's not one way, you just have a system and you keep working on it and go about it." The former defensive back jokes he rode the bench more than he saw the field during his days at Johnson Hagood Stadium, but he lettered twice. When his playing days came to a close, Farrington figured he would become a high school coach, but the staff at The Citadel convinced him to give college coaching a try instead. He was offered a position as a graduate assistant the following spring.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
December 5, 2016
7. Citadel Notes: Stadium's east side to be renovated; Georgia Tech on 2019 schedule
The Citadel's Board of Visitors has decided to "fully renovate" the east side of Johnson Hagood Stadium, the school announced Friday. The school will begin working with the Board of Architectural Review early next year to "determine the best way to accomplish the goal of improving this important community asset," Citadel athletic director Jim Senter said in a statement. The Citadel was unable to use the east side (visitors' side) of the 21,000-seat stadium earlier this season due to lead-paint discovered on that side of the stadium. After lead-paint mitigation and repainting, about 3,000 seats on the east side were available for the final three home games of the regular season. Johnson Hagood Stadium was originally built in 1948, with the west side (home side) rebuilt in 2005. Civil War-era graves were discovered on the site in 1999, including crewmen of the submarine H.L. Hunley. The statement from the school said the Board of Visitors had reviewed "all options" and decided to renovate due "to the deteriorated condition of the structure." The Citadel will face Georgia Tech during the 2019 football season, the school confirmed Friday. The game is set for Sept. 14 at Bobby Dodd Stadium in Atlanta, and The Citadel will earn a guaranteed check of $400,000. The means the Bulldogs will play Power 5 conference teams Clemson in 2017, Alabama in 2018 and Georgia Tech in 2019.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
December 5, 2016
8a. 'It hurts': Wofford knocks Citadel from FCS playoffs
Tyler Renew stood in front of the Corps of Cadets on Saturday night, listening to The Citadel's alma mater for the last time as a Bulldogs' football player. "It hurts," The Citadel's senior fullback sighed after his final game. A 17-3 loss to Wofford before 10,366 fans at Johnson Hagood Stadium on Saturday night was a painful end to a special season for The Citadel. The Bulldogs won 10 games and a second straight Southern Conference championship, earning a No. 6 seed and first-round bye in the FCS playoffs. None of that mattered to the upset-minded Terriers, who rode backup quarterback Joe Newman - a freshman and the fourth Wofford QB to play this season - to the FCS quarterfinals. Newman's 36-yard touchdown run in the fourth quarter provided the winning points, and cornerback Devin Watson - cousin to Clemson star Deshaun Watson - sealed the win with a 64-yard interception return for a TD with 30 seconds left. The 10-3 Terriers advance to face Youngstown State, a 40-24 winner over No. 3 Jacksonville State. That Youngstown State would have come to The Citadel (10-2) for a quarterfinal game next week only added to Bulldog pain.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
December 5, 2016
8b. Inside the Game: Wofford at The Citadel
Here are four things to watch as No. 19 Wofford visits No. 6 The Citadel at 6 p.m. Saturday in the second round of the FCS playoffs: Injury List - Some key players could be unavailable or limited for both sides. Citadel slotback Cam Jackson, the Bulldogs' second-leading rusher and most dynamic playmaker, has missed the last two games with a thigh bruise suffered against Samford, and is not on the depth chart this week. Wofford's list of questionable players includes linebackers Datavius Watson and Lincoln Stewart, both injured in last week's 15-14 win over Charleston Southern. Running back Lennox McAfee also was hurt last week, and is not on the depth chart. Safety Malik Rivera, who made six tackles in the Terriers' 24-21 loss to The Citadel earlier this season, missed last week's game with mono. On the Line - The matchup pitting The Citadel's offensive line against Wofford's defensive front will be pivotal. The Bulldogs have three all-SoCon linemen, including Jacobs Blocking Award winner Isaiah Pinson, and the top rushing offense in FCS. Yet the Bulldogs could find little room earlier this season, held to a season-low 190 rushing yards by the Terriers, who boast the top rushing, scoring and total defense in the SoCon. Linemen Miles Brown and Tyler Vaughn were named all-SoCon.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
December 5, 2016
8c. Locals Dee Delaney, Kyle Weaver share in Citadel's special season
When does a team know the season has a chance to be something special? "We kind of felt that way coming out of camp," Citadel cornerback Dee Delaney said. "We just needed everybody to buy in." Sometimes it takes a big win, though, to solidify that feeling. "When we beat Chattanooga, that was a huge game for our program," guard Kyle Weaver said. "Then we go out and keep following that up. Everybody keeps getting excited." And there could be little doubt something magical was in the air in the way the Bulldogs beat Wofford in October – an option pitch picked off and run back for a touchdown to tie the game, then winning in overtime. It's a journey that has taken The Citadel to a 10-0 start, a second consecutive Southern Conference crown and high hopes as the Bulldogs (10-1) jump into Saturday's second round of the FCS playoffs. And a handful of Beaufort County cadets have played a role along the way. Delaney's four interceptions are second in the league, moving the junior up to fourth on the Bulldogs' career interception list with nine. He was an FCS All-American last season, just two years after converting from his receiver days at Whale Branch. Weaver, a Hilton Head Christian graduate, has made 36 consecutive starts for an offensive line that has paved the way for The Citadel's triple option to lead the FCS at 358.5 rushing yards per game.
Published in: The Island Packet
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Monday
December 5, 2016
9a. Bulldogs Win Opener at Holy City Hoops Classic
The Citadel men's basketball team opened play at the Holy City Hoops Classic with a 108-101 win over Colgate on Friday afternoon, improving to 4-0 at home this season. The Bulldogs (5-3) started the game with back-to-back threes by Quayson Williams and Brian White, allowing them to jump out to a quick six-point advantage. With 16:06 remaining, the Raiders took the lead and maintained control until the eight minute mark when Kaelon Harris took a charge and then on the ensuing possession Leandro Allende hit a three-pointer to regain the lead. White caught fire after the lead change, hitting back-to-back-to-back treys to make the score 36-30 with 5:42 remaining in the half. The Citadel controlled the tempo of the game from then on out and with 3:45 remaining Ezekiel Balogun hit a three-pointer to make it a 44-37 game and then followed with a monster block on Colgate's next shot attempt. White's fifth three-pointer in the half came with less than two minutes remaining and then Allende followed with one of his own to push the lead to eight. On the shot by Allende, Najdawi got fouled and sank both free throws to make the score 54-44. Colgate was able to hit one three-pointer before the half but the 'Dogs still held onto a 54-47 lead heading into the halftime break. Najdawi opened the half with four points in the first two minutes, hitting back-to-back layups to make it 58-49. Following the layups by Najdawi, the Bulldogs went on a 15-2 run to push their lead to 18 with 11:45 left to play. The Citadel sealed the game with clutch free throw shooting down the stretch, sinking 14-of-16 from the charity stripe in the last five minutes to clinch the 108-101 win.
Published in: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
December 5, 2016
9b. Bulldogs Fall To Campbell 97-91
The Citadel men's basketball team dropped a close contest to Campbell on Sunday afternoon, 97-91. The Citadel (6-4) led by as many as 12 in the first half and shot 40.6 percent from the floor as they took a 44-36 lead into the halftime break with Matt Frierson leading the way with 12 points. The sophomore hit all four of his three-pointers in the first 20 minutes of the game. The second half featured six ties and five lead changes as Campbell (5-4) caught fire, shooting 66.7 percent from the floor and 82.1 percent from the free throw line. With 5:35 left in the game, Campbell tied the game on a layup to make it 73-73 and then took the lead a possession later. Despite numerous big shots from the 'Dogs, Campbell would not relinquish the lead for the rest of the game, going 11-of-14 from the charity stripe and earning the close victory over the Bulldogs. The Citadel defense recorded 16 steals and forced the Camels to turn the ball over 24 times in the game, recording 26 points off those miscues. Zane Najdawi recorded his third double-double of the year, grabbing 11 rebounds and pouring in a team-best 21 points. The sophomore has six 20-point games this season as he finished seven-of-10 from the floor. Preston Parks followed up his big outing against USC Upstate on Saturday with 20 points against the Camels, tallying five assists and four steals in 30 minutes of action. Frierson, Frankie Johnson and Quayson Williams all finished in double figures for the 'Dogs. With two today, Williams continues his streak of at least one three-pointer in every game this season.
Published in: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
December 5, 2016
9c. Preston Parks paces Citadel past USC Upstate
Along with his other skills, Citadel basketball coach Duggar Baucom is apparently a talented cartographer. Baucom recently sketched a map of upstate South Carolina for freshman guard Preston Parks, who played at Wade Hampton High School in Greenville. That school is surrounded by Division I basketball programs Presbyterian, Furman, Wofford and USC Upstate, all of whom appear on the Bulldogs' schedule this season. Message received. Parks scored 25 points and took over down the stretch of a tight game Saturday, leading The Citadel to a 97-92 victory over USC Upstate in the Holy City Hoops Classic at McAlister Field House. The Bulldogs' third straight victory moved them to 6-3 overall, 5-0 at home and 4-1 against fellow mid-major squads. The Citadel faces Campbell at 3 p.m. Sunday. Parks, a 6-1 guard, scored or assisted on 10 of the Bulldogs' final 12 points as The Citadel rallied from 84-80 deficit in the final five minutes. The left-hander hit two straight 3-pointers, dished to Zane Najdawi for a layup and sank two free throws with 26 seconds left.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
December 5, 2016
9d. Wrestling Heads to New York for Journeymen Tussle
The Citadel wrestling team will wrestle for the first time in over two weeks at the Journeymen Tussle on Sunday in Hempstead, New York. The tournament will consist of a round-robin format with seven teams competing. It will feature No. 17 Rutgers, No. 18 North Carolina State, No. 20 Penn, Campbell, Brown and Hofstra. The Bulldogs last wrestled at the Navy Classic where they were led by a pair of third place finishes by Ty Buckiso (9-6) and Aaron Walker (9-3). Buckiso went 4-1 in the 149-lb weight class, opening the tournament with a technical fall over Ohio's Nick Steed. Buckiso defeated Delaware Valley's Rob Duxbury in the quarterfinals by major decision 12-0 to advance to the semis. The junior was then defeated by a narrow 8-6 decision by eventual tournament champion Sahid Kargbo of George Mason. Buckiso won his final two matches over Indiana's Luke Blanton by technical fall and Kent State's Tim Rooney by a 6-4 decision in the third place match. After winning his pool at the Journeymen Collegiate Classic, Walker continued to impress with a 5-1 record on Saturday. The graduate student opened with back-to-back pins of Delaware Valley's Sekou Harris at 6:28 and Brown's Willy McDonald at 4:03.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Friday
December 2, 2016
1. Patriots Point host memorial service to commemorate the 75th anniversary of attack on Pearl Harbor
The 75th anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and six other military bases on the Hawaiian island of Oahu will be commemorated on Wednesday, Dec. 7 with a memorial service aboard the historic USS Yorktown. The free program will begin at 11 a.m. A pre-ceremony video will play before it starts. The service, organized together with Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) Post 10624, will include a wreath laying, tolling of a bell and a traditional gun salute in memory of each of the 25 known South Carolina men who were killed during the attack. Captain Scott D. Heller, the commanding officer of SPAWAR Systems Center (SSC) Atlantic, and Larry Grant, an adjunct professor in the Department of History at The Citadel will be the featured speakers. Patriots Point Naval & Maritime Museum and VFW Post 10624 are both actively searching for survivors of the attacks on Dec. 7, 1941 who are able to attend the memorial service. Those who served that infamous day are asked to contact Chris Hauff at 843-881-5984 if they would like to participate. Museum admission and parking will be waived from 10 to 11 a.m. for the memorial service. Throughout the day, museum curators will have unique artifacts from ships involved in the Pearl Harbor attack on display. The exhibit will include shrapnel from a bomb that hit the USS West Virginia.
Published in: Moultrie News
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Friday
December 2, 2016
2. FCS Second Round: Wofford-The Citadel
FCS Playoffs Second Round; The Matchup - Wofford (9-3) at No. 6 seed The Citadel (10-1); Kickoff - 6 p.m. ET at Johnson Hagood Stadium (21,000) in Charleston, South Carolina; Coverage - ESPN3; Series - The Citadel leads 41-27-1; Players to Watch - Wofford: FB Lorenzo Long (260 carries, 1,290 yards, 16 TDs), DE Tyler Vaughn (46 TT, 16.5 TFL, 8 sacks), SS Jaleel Green (56 TT, 5 INTs, 5 PBU); The Citadel: FB Tyler Renew (224 carries, 1,020 yards, 4 TDs), LB Kailik Williams (95 TT, 8 TFL, 2 INTs), CB Dee Delaney (35 TT, 4 INTs, 8 PBU); The Skinny - Two Southern Conference teams that run triple option offenses collide on what should be a perfect December day in Charleston (forecast: partly sunny with a 63-degree high). The Citadel won the regular-season matchup 24-21 in overtime on October 22 en route to an unbeaten record in conference play. The Bulldogs have the No. 1 rushing attack in the FCS (358.5 ypg), although they managed only 190 yards on 51 carries in the first meeting with Wofford. They have four players over 600 rushing yards, including QB Dominique Allen (601 yards, 7 TDs), but they don't want to play from behind as he's completed only 36.5 percent of his passes. The Bulldogs have won six times by eight or fewer points and lost only to an FBS program (North Carolina). They've allowed only 36 points in the fourth quarter, the lowest total in the SoCon.
Published in: Yahoo Sports
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Friday
December 2, 2016
3. Holy City Hoops Classic will test Citadel freshmen
Freshman orientation for Citadel basketball players thus far has included an eight-day, three-game road trip and road games at mid-major foes College of Charleston and Stetson. The next test for the Bulldogs' nine freshmen is three games in three days in the first Holy City Hoops Classic, which begins Friday at McAlister Field House. The Citadel (4-3) will face Colgate at 2 p.m. Friday, USC Upstate at noon Saturday and Campbell at 3 p.m. Sunday in the tournament. Freshman Preston Parks scored 20 points and fellow rookie Frankie Johnson added 10 in the Bulldogs' 97-83 win over Presbyterian on Monday. Freshman Kaelon Harris is averaging 14.3 points per game, behind only sophomores Zane Najdawi (18.9 ppg) and Quayson Williams (15 ppg). "Our freshmen have really picked things up quick," said Citadel coach Duggar Baucom, whose club is playing at the fastest tempo in Division I, according to kenpom.com. "That's really been great to see." The Bulldogs' first opponent, Colgate, is 2-4 overall with victories over Cornell (67-63) and Union (91-68), and losses to Syracuse, NJIT, Penn State and Columbia. Forward Will Rayman, a 6-8 freshman, is averaging 13.2 points, and 6-7 junior Jordan Swopshire is averaging 12.3 points.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Friday
December 2, 2016
4. Tech to play the Citadel in 2019
Georgia Tech will open its 2019 season against the Citadel. The game will be played Aug. 31 at Bobby Dodd Stadium. The Citadel will receive $400,000 for the game. For its non-conference schedule, Tech will also play South Florida Sept. 7 and Georgia Nov. 30, both at home. The Jackets are scheduled to also play Tulane in New Orleans that season, but the school was considering canceling it. Beyond its standard seven-game league ledger against the other six teams in the Coastal Division and Clemson, the Jackets will also play a home game against N.C. State. The Citadel, an FCS team in the Southern Conference, runs an option-based spread offense similar to Tech's. It will be the 11th game against the Bulldogs. The two teams last met in 2001, a 35-7 win for the Jackets.
Published in: Atlanta Journal-Constitution
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Thursday
December 1, 2016
1. Citadel alumna/instructor/veteran earns title for Straits of Gibraltar swim
Citadel Graduate College alumna and U.S. Air Force veteran, who is now an instructor at the college, has earned the position as the oldest woman to swim across the Straits of Gibraltar in 2016. Nancy Haynsworth, who is 59, was named Oldest Female Swimmer with Neoprene for 2016 by the Asociacion Cruce a Nado Estrechio de Gibraltar (ACNEG) in late November. According to the ACNEG, 22 of the 141 people who successfully made the swim in 2016 were women. Haynsworth is a marathon swimming hobbyist who teaches aquatics, lifeguarding, swimming, and Contemporary Health and Fitness Foundation courses at The Citadel. She graduated with a Master's degree in Health Exercise and Sport Science in 2010 after serving as a Navy fitness professional in the Kingdom of Bahrain and at other Naval facilities for a decade. Prior to that civilian assignment, she served as an aircraft maintenance officer in the Air Force. "I started competitive swimming at the age of 40, so I could swim with my two children," Haynsworth said. "We competed in swim meets throughout Europe when I was stationed there. My son swam for the U.S. Coast Guard Academy, and my daughter swims for the academy now. She was part of my support crew, monitoring my hydration, stroke rate, and body temperature during the swim in the strait." Haynsworth eventually switched from Masters Swimming to Marathon Swimming in 2008, and began training for the Gibraltar swim after setting it as a personal goal to accomplish as a celebration for her 60th birthday.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Thursday
December 1, 2016
2. 7 arrested during protest that blocked Crosstown identified
The seven people arrested in downtown Charleston Tuesday evening during a protest for a higher minimum wage have been identified. Pictured above from left to right and top to bottom are Justin Stanley, Kellie Hendricks, Erica Cokley, Kieran Taylor, Sandra Grach, Paul Garbarini and Leslie Porcher. They are each charged with disorderly conduct. Their arrests came after police spent the day warning for the potential for charges if area roadways were blocked. As a group blocked the Crosstown Tuesday evening, there were several prompts from police for the crowd to disperse before arrests were made. According to an incident report provided by the Charleston Police Department, one of the men arrested, Kieran Taylor, is a history professor at The Citadel. We reached out to The Citadel for information on how the school views the arrest based on its code of conduct. As of 12:30 a.m. Thursday we had not received a response. The protest was one of several that happened this week in support of raising the minimum wage nationwide to $15 an hour.
Published in: WCIV-TV Charleston, SC
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Thursday
December 1, 2016
3. 'Girl power' courses through leadership summit
Nearly 300 young women struck a power pose to the tune of Beyonce's "Run the World (Girls)" during the inaugural Women's Leadership Summit at the Reagan Library. Rebekah Harding, the Reagan Foundation's education outreach manager, told the group of 12- to 20-year-olds that the Nov. 19 summit was about learning what they are capable of achieving for the future. "The energy you bring into the room is going to be really important. I want this (power pose) to be intentional, to fill the entire room with the girl power you all are bringing to the table," she told the hundreds of future leaders. "You are all a force, and I can't wait to see what you do." Inspired by the 35th anniversary of Sandra Day O'Connor's appointment to the Supreme Court by then-President Ronald Reagan, the summit drew young women from all over Southern California, said Rebecca Gallacher, the foundation's education administrative coordinator. "(The summit) is really about teaching girls to step out on their own leadership journeys, whether they're in college and know what the next step is or they're 12 years old and still figuring out what their identity is," Gallacher said. Picutred: Nancy Mace, the first woman to graduate from The Citadel, tells attendees of the Young Women's Leadership Summit about her experiences attending the South Carolina military academy.
Published in: The Acorn Newspapers
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Thursday
December 1, 2016
4. Navy League-Aurora to host annual Pearl Harbor Day luncheon
The community is invited to the annual Pearl Harbor Day luncheon from 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday, Dec. 5, at the Gaslight Manor, 2485 Church Road, Aurora. It is hosted by the Aurora Navy League Council 247 in concert with the Aurora Rotary International. You do not need to be a member of the Navy League or have a reservation to attend. The Navy League is a civilian organization started by President Teddy Roosevelt to provide civilian support the Navy, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, Merchant Marine, and Sea Cadets. The reception will begin at 11:15 a.m. followed by the extensive buffet luncheon at 11:45 a.m. The cost is $20 all-inclusive, and tickets may be purchased at the door. The program will start with the West Aurora Air Force JROTC Unit as the Color Guard, followed by the Bratton Awards to area high school students who achieved exemplary academic records and community involvement. These awards are judged by a combination of the Aurora Council of the Navy League, Aurora Rotary International, and Aurora University. Pearl Harbor Survivors will be honored during the program. The keynote speaker is Rear Admiral Stephen C. Evans, USN, Commander Naval Service Training Command, Great Lakes. He is the son of a U.S. Marine. A native of Beaufort, South Carolina, he graduated from The Citadel in 1986 earning a bachelor of arts. His sea tours include being a plank owner in USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71); fire control officer, USS DEYO (DD 989); combat systems officer, USS Hewitt (DD 966); executive officer, USS Hue City (CG 66); commanding officer, USS Mitscher (DDG 57); deputy commodore, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 24; and commodore, DESRON- 50 where he commanded Combined Task Force 55 (Middle East Force) and the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) Combined Task Force 152.
Published in: Daily Herald
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Thursday
December 1, 2016
5. Highlights of management accounting research
Academic research in management accounting can provide companies with insight in using management accounting systems to better achieve strategic and operating objectives. It explains or predicts how the design of managerial accounting systems will affect management actions and an organization's success, or how internal and external organizational forces will affect the design of management accounting systems. Below, we summarize recent management accounting research from leading academic accounting journals. The Balanced Scorecard: A Visual Way to Spark Strategy - The management of operations is largely a plan, control, and evaluate process that typically shapes itself as a complete feedback loop. However, the design and implementation of strategy is a much more open and evolutionary process. In their article, "Exploring How the Balanced Scorecard Engages and Unfolds: Articulating the Visual Power of Accounting Inscriptions" (Contemporary Accounting Research, Winter 2015), Cristiano Busco and Paolo Quattrone explore the balanced scorecard model as a helpful but somewhat "incomplete" way to energize and anchor dialogue among managers in an organization's process of refining and deploying strategic objectives and measures. The authors report on their experience in a large multinational corporation operating in the oil and gas industry. They collected data over a four-year period through interviews, documentation, observation, and participation as the organization designed and rolled out its balanced scorecard system. Written by Cynthia E. Bolt-Lee, associate professor of accounting in the School of Business at The Citadel in Charleston, S.C.
Published in: Journal of Accountancy
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Thursday
December 1, 2016
6. What does the future hold for Burke's Stoney Field?
According to Charleston County School District, in June of this year, Davis and Floyd, Inc. completed a Feasibility Study for CCSD investigating site improvements at Stoney Field. CCSD Director of Communications and Technology Andy Pruitt says that the study revealed that "overall, the field condition was rated poor and differential settlement was identified as the main contributor. The settlement is a result of decomposing material embedded in the uncontrolled landfill that Stoney was built upon. Due to this, drainage facilities of the field are also in poor condition. Although the slope of the field is adequate, the network of systems used to transfer water to the sewer system have been impacted by the settlement issue. Davis and Floyd recommended three alternative time-based solutions to improve the field conditions." The plan is as follows: One Year: Restore the field with two feet of fill and add 2–4 inches of soil annually until settlement terminates - $1,457,510 plus annual maintenance of $429,000. Five Year: Restore the field by deliberately consolidating subsurface soils to limit 3–4 inches of settlement in 5–10 years - $2,543,024 plus annual maintenance of $266,000. Long Term: Install timber piles to support a concrete slab, track and associated drainage will limit long term settlement to less than 1 inch but will still require maintenance for the field - $5,314,806 plus annual maintenance of $266,000. CCSD reports that in August 2016, they approved $1 million in funding from the Phase IV Sales Tax Capital Program (2017-2022) for the Stoney Field Improvements project. According to CCSD, "Between July and November 2016, the school district staff met with leaders from both the City of Charleston and The Citadel to pursue possible shared use and funding options. CCSD staff is also pursuing additional funding options."
Published in: Charleston City Paper
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Thursday
December 1, 2016
7a. Will The Citadel need a 'fourth option' against Wofford?
The three options in The Citadel's triple-option offense are the quarterback, the fullback and the slotback. On a typical play, quarterback Dominique Allen gives the football to fullback Tyler Renew, pitches it to starting slotbacks Cam Jackson or Reggie Williams, or keeps it himself. Together, those four players combined for about 290 rushing yards and two touchdowns per game this season, fueling the top rushing offense in FCS and sparking the Bulldogs to a 10-1 record and second straight Southern Conference title. In The Citadel's 24-21 overtime win at Wofford on Oct. 22, however, the Bulldogs went 0 for 3 on the triple-option. Fullback Renew was held to 3.7 yards per carry, slotbacks Jackson and Williams combined for only 65 yards and Allen managed just 14 yards on eight tries. The Citadel was limited to a season-low 190 rushing yards and needed Kailik Williams' interception of a Wofford pitch-out for a touchdown, a blocked field goal and four Wofford turnovers to eke out the victory in OT. "Not a high point of our 2016 season," Citadel coach Brent Thompson said of the offensive performance. That's why the Bulldogs may need a "fourth option" of some kind when they host 9-3 Wofford in the second round of the FCS playoffs Saturday at Johnson Hagood Stadium. The forward pass, a new wrinkle, a couple of trick plays – something new for the Terriers, whose defense ranks first in the Southern Conference in scoring, rushing and total defense.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
December 1, 2016
7b. Sapakoff: Ideal college major for Citadel coach Brent Thompson - 'Peace, War and Diplomacy'
Sometimes Brent Thompson gets tempted to tell the Citadel team bus driver to stop when the Bulldogs are passing by the Revolutionary War battle sites at Ninety-Six, or Cowpens or any Civil War spot of significance. This week, the first-year Citadel football head coach won't let anything get in the way of preparation for a Saturday FCS playoff game pitting the Bulldogs (10-1) against Wofford (9-3) at Johnson Hagood Stadium. But looking back, it's easy to wonder how football got in the way. Thompson, 40, majored in "Peace, War and Diplomacy" at Norwich University, a private military-themed college in Northfield, Vermont, founded in 1819. It's the perfect major for the leader of a hard-nosed, grind-it-out, triple-option football team representing The Military College of South Carolina. Way better than Sociology or Phys Ed. So perfect that Thompson almost doesn't belong in sports. "If not for football, I would probably see myself in the Secret Service or the CIA or the FBI," Thompson said. "A government position, but not necessarily an elected position. "I wanted to work for a government agency, have a military career. My degree really was all-encompassing in history and political science and things I was interested in at the time." Thompson still keeps up with foreign affairs and international politics as much as possible. He has friends in military and government jobs. Favorite college class: "Citizen Soldier and American History." Favorite period of history: "Early American, the American Revolution and on from there."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
December 1, 2016
8. Chiefs get Chris Swauger as new manager, pitching coach Orozco returns
The Peoria Chiefs will have a new manager for the 2017 Midwest League season. The parent club St. Louis Cardinals have assigned Chris Swauger to manage the Peoria team. He follows a terrific three-year run at the helm in Peoria by Joe Kruzel. The Cardinals promoted Chiefs hitting coach Jobel Jimenez to class-AA Springfield, and sent Kruzel to serve as manager at short-season State College of the New York-Penn League. Dernier Orozco returns as Chiefs pitching coach. Peoria's new hitting coach is Donnie Ecker. "Johnson City was a good step for me in my development," Swauger said. "Now I get to make this jump to full-season ball, 140 games. It's an opportunity, a challenge to get players prepared and make them better. One thing that will help is, I feel like there will be some players in Peoria who I've already worked with in the system, built a relationship with, and that will help. "I'm excited about it, I've heard nothing but great things about Peoria and the Chiefs organization. Swauger, 30, is a former minor-league outfielder and first baseman who was drafted by the Cardinals in the 26th round of the 2008 MLB draft. He played until 2014, and later that season served as hitting coach for the Cardinals' rookie league team at Johnson City of the Appalachian League. He then made his debut as a manager in 2015 with Johnson City, and in his second season at the helm, last summer, he led the Johnson City club to the Appalachian League championship after a 39-29 regular season. The 6-foot, 195-pound Swauger played college baseball for The Citadel and went on to a seven-year minor-league career in the Cardinals organization, including two stints with class-AAA Memphis.
Published in: Journal Star
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Thursday
December 1, 2016
9. The Citadel Golf Signs Two
The Citadel head golf coach Lori Bonacci announced the additions of Ashlee Richardson and Nadia Sandler to the 2017 recruiting class on Wednesday. Richardson comes to The Citadel following a stellar high school career at Greenville Senior High School that included 10 wins, 30 top-5 finishes and 10 top-10 finishes. The Simpsonville, South Carolina, native was named High School Player of the Year for three consecutive years from 2014-2016 and served as captain during the 2015 and 2016 seasons. Richardson, a five-year varsity golf letterwinner, helped lead Greenville Senior to a first place finish in 4A region 1 play, third place in 4A upper state competition and a second place finish in the 4A state championships. Last season, Richardson was named to the all-region team, all-upper state team and all-state team while also being named the 2016 Greenville Player of the Year. Richardson plans to major in criminal justice at The Citadel. "Ashlee will make an immediate impact on the program," Coach Bonacci said. "She will succeed both on the course and in the classroom here at The Citadel." Sandler joins the 2017 class from Penn High School in South Bend, Indiana. While at Penn, Sandler compiled 34 top-5 finishes including 18 first place finishes. A four-year captain, Sandler helped lead her team to four Northern Indiana conference and sectional championships, a regional title in 2015 and a second place finish in the state championships in 2013. Last year, Sandler was named to the Northern Indiana conference first team, East Noble Regional all-region team, the Penn Girls and Northern Indiana Conference Most Valuable Player and was a sectional medalist. An all-academic team selection, Sandler will major in political science at The Citadel.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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