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The Citadel in the News: Archive

November 2016

PUBLISH DATE STORIES
Wednesday
November 30, 2016
1.1 The Citadel's annual Christmas Candlelight service shortened to two days this year

A Lowcountry Christmas tradition returns to The Citadel this year, but with a shortened schedule. The 79th annual Christmas Candlelight Services are scheduled for Friday, Dec. 2 and Sunday, Dec. 4 in Summerall Chapel. The school had to cancel the Saturday service due to other activities on campus that day. The candlelight services feature cadets from the Protestant, Catholic, and Gospel Choirs, the Cadet Chorale and members of The Citadel Regimental. The hour-long program is free and includes scripture readings and carols to celebrate Christmas. It begins with the Procession of Lights and includes a collection of traditional favorites of the season. Services on Friday and Sunday will start at 7:30 p.m. Seating for the candlelight services is first come, first served and usually fills up early. To allow more people to view the traditional Christmas service, The Citadel will make them available through a live stream. The Friday service will also be recorded and available to view at any time. You can watch the live or recorded video on Citadel.edu. Overflow viewing for the services Friday and Sunday will also be provided in a room near the Summerall Chapel. Seating for the room in Bond Hall will open at 6:30 p.m. Flash cameras and video lights will not be allowed in the Chapel. 

Broadcast on: WCSC-TV 5 - Online
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Wednesday
November 30, 2016
1.2 The Citadel to host candlelight services Friday and Sunday

The Citadel will host its 79th annual Christmas Candlelight Service at Summerall Chapel on Friday and Sunday. The hour-long services will begin at 7:30 p.m. Unlike past years, there will be no Saturday ceremony. The Citadel's Christmas Candlelight Service dates back to 1937, when the Corps of Cadets first gathered in their new chapel to sing Christmas carols for faculty and staff. Nearly a century later, the service is one of the Lowcountry's most popular holiday traditions, featuring performances by cadet choirs and members of The Citadel Regimental Band.Seats fill quickly, so if you plan on attending one of the services arrive early. The Citadel will offer overflow seating at Bond Hall, where the services will be streamed live. You can also watch the live-stream at home at Citadel.edu. 

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Wednesday
November 30, 2016
Citadel hopes to buck FCS playoff attendance trend when Wofford visits Johnson Hagood Stadium

When it comes to the FCS playoffs, the term "playoff atmosphere" often means missing fans and empty seats.The Citadel is hoping to buck that trend when the No. 6-seeded Bulldogs host Wofford for a second-round game at 6 p.m. Saturday at Johnson Hagood Stadium.  A search of attendance figures for last weekend's first-round games showed that crowds at eight host schools were down an average of 59.8 percent from the season average. Wofford, for example, drew 2,605 fans for its 15-14 win over Palmetto State rival Charleston Southern, a 65.8 percent decrease from its season average of 7,625 fans. New Hampshire had the biggest drop-off, with 2,240 fans on hand for a 64-21 win over Lehigh, a 76.7 percent slide from its season average of 9,630. Chattanooga saw the smallest decrease; yet the Mocs' crowd of 5,238 fans still was down 41.1 percent from their season average of 8,886 fans. Playoff games are played at on-campus sites until the Jan. 7 title game in Frisco, Texas. Citadel coach Brent Thompson is hoping for something different for Saturday's game, the Bulldogs' first home playoff game since 1992. "I think our fans will turn out," Citadel coach Brent Thompson said Sunday. "We were disappointed we didn't get a home game last year in the playoffs, but we had a good showing at Coastal Carolina and then at Charleston Southern. "I think we can do well and get a number higher than the games we saw on Saturday."

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Wednesday
November 30, 2016
For Citadel, Wofford rematch in FCS playoffs is 'scary'

Watching in his office Saturday afternoon, Citadel football coach Brent Thompson wasn't sure who to root for as Wofford and Charleston Southern staged an old-school defensive slugfest in the FCS playoffs. “It was scary either way,” Thompson said Sunday. “It was a defensive struggle on both sides, and both defenses played exceptionally well. It was just a matter of (if) somebody was going to pop one here or there.” It was Wofford's Lorenzo Long who popped a 32-yard touchdown run late in the third quarter that proved to be the difference in the Terriers' 15-14 win over CSU in the playoffs' first round. That set up a Wofford-Citadel rematch in the second round, set for 6 p.m. Saturday at Johnson Hagood Stadium. The Bulldogs escaped Wofford (9-3) with a 24-21 overtime victory on Oct. 22, one of two OT victories for The Citadel this season en route to a 10-1 record and the outright Southern Conference title.  The Citadel won that day due to a miracle play pulled off by SoCon defensive player of the year Kailik Williams, who snatched an ill-advised option pitch out of the air and ran 13 yards for a touchdown that tied the score at 21 with 5:57 to play.

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Wednesday
November 30, 2016
Najdawi's 27 leads The Citadel past Presbyterian

Zane Najdawi scored 27 points and added nine rebounds and The Citadel methodically pulled away from Presbyterian down the stretch in a 97-83 win on Monday night. Najdawi finished 7 of 11 from the field and hit all 12 of his free throws. Preston Parks hit four 3-pointers and finished with 20 points for the Bulldogs (4-3), and Quayson Williams added 14. Overall The Citadel shot 55.6 percent from the field and hit 25 of 36 at the line. Jo'Vantae Millner scored 26 points for Presbyterian (2-4). Reggie Dillard added 17 for the Blue Hose. The Citadel had a 12-0 run to close out the first half and took a 50-39 lead into the break. A Davon Bell layup for Presbyterian cut the Bulldogs lead to four (82-78) with 6:26 to go, but The Citadel responded, pushing its advantage back to 90-80 on free throws by Najdawi and Tom Koopman.

Published in: FOX Sports - online
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Wednesday
November 30, 2016
Wofford banged up heading into rematch with The Citadel

The Terriers will try to find 60 bodies healthy enough to suit up for a second-round playoff game. That could be a challenge.  Wofford, already a beat-up football team, added some significant names last week in the physical 15-14 victory at home against Charleston Southern. Terriers coach Mike Ayers said it might not be until the buses pull out Friday morning that he knows which players will be available for a 6 p.m. Saturday game against sixth-ranked The Citadel at Johnson Hagood Stadium. “I got the first list of injured guys this morning. It’s a long list,” Ayers said Monday. “It’s going to be wait-and-see for a lot of them. I’m sure that some will be able to play and probably at least one or two that will not. It just depends on how they rehab.”

Published in: Spartanburg Hearld - Online
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Wednesday
November 30, 2016
Wofford player: We should have won, and Citadel knows it

Wofford players have made no secret of their desire for a FCS playoff rematch with The Citadel, a chance to avenge the Terriers' 24-21 overtime loss on Oct. 22. "We're looking for revenge," Wofford safety JoJo Tillery told reporters in Spartanburg on Monday. "We all know, and even they know, that we should have won that first one, but mistakes happen. I'm looking to ball out, and my teammates are, too." After earning a first-round bye in the playoffs, Citadel players had to be a little more circumspect, waiting to learn if they would face Wofford or Charleston Southern in the second round. Wofford's 15-14 victory over CSU set up the second chance the Terriers wanted.  Now, the Bulldogs are getting pumped about it, as well. The rematch is on for 6 p.m. Saturday at Johnson Hagood Stadium. "We were going to be eager to play either team that got here," linebacker Myles Pierce said Tuesday. "We knew they are both heavy, downhill running teams. Wofford is a conference team, a big rivalry game, so we are just as excited to play as they are."

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Tuesday
November 29, 2016
1. Open call for artists to submit designs for Citadel's 175th celebration poster
The Citadel is issuing an open call to artists around the state of South Carolina to submit designs to be considered for the poster commemorating the military college's upcoming 175th anniversary. The milestone anniversary will be celebrated during the 2017-18 academic year. The winning design, which will be announced at the first home football game on Sept. 2, 2017, will grace t-shirts, banners, posters, and The Citadel magazine. The winning artist will receive $1,000 (subject to tax). There is expansive information about the history of The Citadel available on citadel.edu. On December 20, 1842, the South Carolina state legislature passed an act to establish The Citadel. Three months later-March 20, 1843-the first 20 cadets reported to original Citadel campus on Marion Square, marking the beginning of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. Entries are being accepted now through April 2, 2017. Artists are encouraged to consider exciting, yet classic, designs. Submission requirements for The Citadel 175 Design Contest are as follows: All designs must be vertical in orientation; All media is acceptable; Entries must be submitted in one of three ways: as a high-resolution digital image, a stretched canvas, or bound foam core; A signed consent waiver must be submitted via hard mail. If submitting the design digitally, a printed copy of the artwork should be included with the waiver for identification purposes). The mailing address is address is: The Citadel Office of Marketing and Communications, 171 Moultrie St., Charleston, SC, 29409 For complete contest details, including a printable copy of the waiver, click here. The winning artist will be notified by August 1, 2017, and will be invited to the Sept. 2, 2017, football game against Newberry College in Johnson Hagood Stadium where the unveiling will take place. Artists whose designs are not selected will be notified by email in September and will have two weeks from notification to arrange for the return of the art work at their expense. Digital submissions, or high resolution photos of a non-digital piece, are highly encouraged.
Published in: Moultrie News
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Tuesday
November 29, 2016
2. Economic Ideas: Adam Ferguson and Society as a Spontaneous Order
One of the most cherished misunderstandings, if not delusions, of the social engineer - the individual who would presume to attempt to remake society through conscious and planned design - is the confident belief that he (and those like him) can ever know enough to successfully remold mankind and human institutions. An appreciation of how limited is our individual knowledge and abilities to intentionally try make a "better world" through government regulation, control and central planning has been slow in fully developing, and still eludes too many among what is sometimes referred to as the "intellectual class" who influence and often seem to direct the social policy discourse in the modern world. Yet, it was precisely the call for men to use their reason to understand the modesty with which they should approach matters of social evolution and societal change that was a central hallmark of several of the members of the Scottish Enlightenment. A leading figure in this Scottish movement was Adam Ferguson (1723-1816), who for several years held a chair in Moral Philosophy at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland, until his retirement at the age of sixty-two. Ferguson had also been sympathetic to the grievances of the American colonists against the British crown, but believed that the government in London was ultimately in its rights to oppose American independence. Dr. Richard M. Ebeling is the recently appointed BB&T Distinguished Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel.
Published in: The Future of Freedom Foundation
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Tuesday
November 29, 2016
3. SGPT interviews Spartan Race winner Robert Kilian
SGPT: Tell us about yourself? Thanks for your military service by the way. Robert Killian: I am married with two children and currently living in Longmont, CO. I really enjoy being in the mountains and exploring all the outdoor activities that Colorado has to offer; snowboarding, trail running, biking, hiking, and mountain climbing. I also dabble in auto mechanics as a hobby, rebuilding a 1987 Porsche 944 Turbo I bought in college. I am a 2004 graduate of The Citadel and was also born in Charleston, SC. I enlisted as a 19D Calvary Scout in 1999 at the age of 17 prior to attending college. Upon graduation I earned a commissioned as an officer and was assigned to a newly activated 4th Brigade 10th Mountain Division. SGPT: Did you have an athletic background growing up? RK: I didn't have much of an athletic background before middle school and even then I distinctly remember always being one of the last kids picked for team sports. However, my Uncle and legal guardian at the time, LTC (R) Taube Roy slowly got me into running and tennis. I remember a teacher once noticed I was frustrated for not being picked up during a gym class game and he told me, "Be so good they can't ignore you." Those words have probably pushed me to achieve goals that even I thought weren't possible given my uncommon upbringing. I ended up as the number 1 runner and Men's Tennis player at Wade Hampton High School which earned me a partial athletic scholarship to attend The Citadel. There I ran all the distance events during indoor and outdoor track as well as cross-country. I was the MVP in both for three of my four years there.
Published in: SealGrinderPT.com
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Tuesday
November 29, 2016
4. Najdawi's 27 leads The Citadel past Presbyterian
Zane Najdawi scored 27 points and added nine rebounds and The Citadel methodically pulled away from Presbyterian down the stretch in a 97-83 win on Monday night. Najdawi finished 7 of 11 from the field and hit all 12 of his free throws. Preston Parks hit four 3-pointers and finished with 20 points for the Bulldogs (4-3), and Quayson Williams added 14. Overall The Citadel shot 55.6 percent from the field and hit 25 of 36 at the line. Jo'Vantae Millner scored 26 points for Presbyterian (2-4). Reggie Dillard added 17 for the Blue Hose. The Citadel had a 12-0 run to close out the first half and took a 50-39 lead into the break. A Davon Bell layup for Presbyterian cut the Bulldogs lead to four (82-78) with 6:26 to go, but The Citadel responded, pushing its advantage back to 90-80 on free throws by Najdawi and Tom Koopman.
Published in: FoxSports.com
(view article) (no cache available)

Tuesday
November 29, 2016
5. Citadel hopes to buck FCS playoff attendance trend when Wofford visits Johnson Hagood Stadium
When it comes to the FCS playoffs, the term "playoff atmosphere" often means missing fans and empty seats. The Citadel is hoping to buck that trend when the No. 6-seeded Bulldogs host Wofford for a second-round game at 6 p.m. Saturday at Johnson Hagood Stadium. A search of attendance figures for last weekend's first-round games showed that crowds at eight host schools were down an average of 59.8 percent from the season average. Wofford, for example, drew 2,605 fans for its 15-14 win over Palmetto State rival Charleston Southern, a 65.8 percent decrease from its season average of 7,625 fans. New Hampshire had the biggest drop-off, with 2,240 fans on hand for a 64-21 win over Lehigh, a 76.7 percent slide from its season average of 9,630. Chattanooga saw the smallest decrease; yet the Mocs' crowd of 5,238 fans still was down 41.1 percent from their season average of 8,886 fans. Playoff games are played at on-campus sites until the Jan. 7 title game in Frisco, Texas. Citadel coach Brent Thompson is hoping for something different for Saturday's game, the Bulldogs' first home playoff game since 1992. "I think our fans will turn out," Citadel coach Brent Thompson said Sunday. "We were disappointed we didn't get a home game last year in the playoffs, but we had a good showing at Coastal Carolina and then at Charleston Southern. "I think we can do well and get a number higher than the games we saw on Saturday."
Published in: The Post and Courier
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Tuesday
November 29, 2016
6. For Citadel, Wofford rematch in FCS playoffs is 'scary'
Watching in his office Saturday afternoon, Citadel football coach Brent Thompson wasn't sure who to root for as Wofford and Charleston Southern staged an old-school defensive slugfest in the FCS playoffs. "It was scary either way," Thompson said Sunday. "It was a defensive struggle on both sides, and both defenses played exceptionally well. It was just a matter of (if) somebody was going to pop one here or there." It was Wofford's Lorenzo Long who popped a 32-yard touchdown run late in the third quarter that proved to be the difference in the Terriers' 15-14 win over CSU in the playoffs' first round. That set up a Wofford-Citadel rematch in the second round, set for 6 p.m. Saturday at Johnson Hagood Stadium. The Bulldogs escaped Wofford (9-3) with a 24-21 overtime victory on Oct. 22, one of two OT victories for The Citadel this season en route to a 10-1 record and the outright Southern Conference title. The Citadel won that day due to a miracle play pulled off by SoCon defensive player of the year Kailik Williams, who snatched an ill-advised option pitch out of the air and ran 13 yards for a touchdown that tied the score at 21 with 5:57 to play.
Published in: The Post and Courier
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Tuesday
November 29, 2016
7. Beckley follows through on his Citadel commitment
When you take a look at Devin Beckley's football statistics from this past season, you have to wonder why some college did not try to sway the Camden High School senior from his decision to play baseball at The Citadel. The 6-foot-3, 215-pound right-hander's heart, though, has always been on the baseball field and he was not about to let a possible last-minute sales job from a college football coach take away his diamond dreams. After having given a verbal pledge to The Citadel last spring, Beckley made good on his commitment by signing with Fred Jordan's Bulldogs during the November signing period. The signing ceremony, held inside the CHS library, came four days after Beckley had set a new school-record for passing yards (434) and total offense (584) in the Bulldogs' 77-61 first round AAA state playoff loss to Chapman. Beckley had stood firm in repeating that he would not play football in college nor, suit up for another football game again after he plays in the Dec. 17 North-South All-Star football game in Myrtle Beach. Following his signing, he said there may not have been any football-playing options available to him. "I think college (football) coaches know that I was pretty committed to playing baseball so, they stayed away," he said. "I'm not real sure that they've looked at me, anyway." Beckley is coming off an All-State junior campaign at Camden High in which he fashioned a 7-1 record with two saves for the Region 4-AAA runners-up while pitching to a 1.47 earned run average. In 57 innings of work, he struck out 70 batters, walked three and hit a dozen. Opponents batted at a .160 clip against him.
Published in: Chronicle-Independent
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Monday
November 28, 2016
1a. The Citadel calls on artists to design commemorative image
The Citadel is holding an open call to artists to submit images that will be considered for the commemoration of the college's 175th anniversary, which will be celebrated during the 2017-18 academic year. The winning image will be announced on Sept. 2, 2017 and be used on T-shirts, banners, posters and The Citadel magazine. The winner will receive $1,000. The deadline to submit entries is April 2. The submission requirements are as follows: All designs must be vertical in orientation; All media is acceptable; and Entries must be submitted in one of three ways: as a high-resolution digital image, a stretched canvas, or bound foam core. Digital submissions should be emailed to designcontest@citadel.edu. A signed consent waiver must be submitted via mail. If submitting the design digitally, a printed copy of the artwork should be included with the waiver for identification purposes. The mailing address is: The Citadel Office of Marketing and Communications, 171 Moultrie St., Charleston, SC, 29409.
Published in: Palmetto Business Daily
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Monday
November 28, 2016
1b. poster
poster contest
Published in: TheDigitel.com
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Monday
November 28, 2016
1c. poster
poster contest
Published in: The Dillon Herald
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Monday
November 28, 2016
2. Praying for justice in Charleston
Deacon Thad Miller closed his barbershop for the evening and sat in a worn leather chair by the front window. He was exhausted. Not just by the day's work, but also the topic of conversation gripping his city. Residents in Charleston are struggling under the weight of two racially charged trials. Jury selection is scheduled to resume Monday in the trial of Dylann Roof, a white supremacist who confessed to killing nine people at Mother Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church. The trial of Michael Slager, a white former North Charleston police officer charged in the shooting death of an unarmed black man, Walter Scott, 50, started about a month ago... Miller's barbershop is a safe space where black men talk openly about politics and race above a clipper's buzz. "They're going to let this guy walk," Joseph Singleton, a 59-year-old carpenter shop supervisor at The Citadel, a military college in Charleston, said about Slager. "I haven't seen them prosecute a policeman here yet. Singleton, who stopped by for a haircut after work, said 9th Judicial Circuit Solicitor Scarlett A. Wilson has successfully prosecuted many defendants. "But let's see how well she does against - I call it one of her own people - a cop," he said. Sinngleton knows the Scott family. He served in the Marine Corps with one of Scott's uncles in the 1970s. Walter Scott was killed on April 4, 2015, during a routine traffic stop for a faulty brake light. For unknown reasons, Scott attempted to flee on foot. Slager fired eight shots, striking Scott five times. Three of those bullets hit him in the back.
Published in: CNN.com
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Monday
November 28, 2016
3. Beans, greens, potatoes, tomatoes; Lowcountry athletes talk Thanksgiving favorites
Beans, greens, potatoes, tomatoes. The viral video has been viewed millions of times and sparked intense debate of the tastiest Turkey-day dish. News 2 went around town to The Citadel, Charleston Southern, and local high schools to find out what coaches and athletes prefer to eat on Thanksgiving day. "My mom makes a sweet potato casserole that's so sweet, it will make you lose your sight," said Charleston Southern head football coach Jamey Chadwell. The Citadel's Brent Thompson and his football team can afford to stuff themselves with a bye-week coming up as the Bulldogs prepare to face the winner of this weekend's Charleston Southern-Wofford game. Click the link above to find out what meals the hog-mollies enjoy.
Broadcast on: WCBD-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
November 28, 2016
4. Thanksgiving Was a Triumph of Capitalism over Collectivism
This time of the year, whether in good economic times or bad, is when we gather with our family and friends and enjoy a Thanksgiving meal together. It marks a remembrance of those early Pilgrim Fathers who crossed the uncharted ocean from Europe to make a new start in Plymouth, Massachusetts. What is less appreciated is that Thanksgiving is also a celebration of the birth of free enterprise in America. The English Puritans, who left Great Britain and sailed across the Atlantic on the Mayflower in 1620, were not only escaping from religious persecution in their homeland. They also wanted to turn their backs on what they viewed as the materialistic and greedy corruption of the Old World. Two years of communism in practice had left alive only a fraction of the original number of the Plymouth colonists. In the New World, they wanted to erect a New Jerusalem that would not only be religiously devout, but be built on a new foundation of communal sharing and social altruism. Their goal was the communism of Plato's Republic, in which all would work and share in common, knowing neither private property nor self-interested acquisitiveness. What resulted is recorded in the journal of Governor William Bradford, the head of the colony. The colonists collectively cleared and worked land, but they brought forth neither the bountiful harvest they hoped for, nor did it create a spirit of shared and cheerful brotherhood. The less industrious members of the colony came late to their work in the fields, and were slow and easy in their labors. Knowing that they and their families were to receive an equal share of whatever the group produced, they saw little reason to be more diligent their efforts. The harder working among the colonists became resentful that their efforts would be redistributed to the more malingering members of the colony. Soon they, too, were coming late to work and were less energetic in the fields. Dr. Richard M. Ebeling is the BB & T Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina, He was formerly professor of Economics at Northwood University.
Published in: NassauInstitute.org
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Monday
November 28, 2016
5. Economic Ideas: Francis Hutcheson and a System of Natural Liberty
Scotland would seem a strange place for the emergence of center of intellectual development that would influence the stream of ideas throughout the world. Scotland had been unified with England near the beginning of the eighteenth century. It was considered a "backwater" of European civilization. But perhaps because of the strong nationalist sentiments and resentments that still lingered among many Scots, scholars and professors attempted to look beyond Great Britain for intellectual influences and associations outside the orbit and dominance of London. Thus, Scottish thinkers were familiar with, and often had personal ties with many of the leading intellectual figures on the European continent, including and especially in France. But the emerging Scottish variation on the Enlightenment was not merely a shadow or reflection of Enlightenment ideas in France. It developed in distinct ways, especially in the circles around the universities in Edinburgh and Glasgow. Dr. Richard M. Ebeling is the recently appointed BB&T Distinguished Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel.
Published in: The Future of Freedom Foundation
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Monday
November 28, 2016
6. The Citadel Leads SoCon On All-Conference Teams
The Citadel was well-represented on the All-Southern Conference teams announced Tuesday with 14 different Bulldogs earning 24 total places on the all-conference or all-freshman teams. Head coach Brent Thompson was selected as the Southern Conference Coach of the Year by the coaches and media, while defensive back Kailik Williams was voted the SoCon Defensive Player of the Year by the media and offensive lineman Isaiah Pinson earned the Jacobs Blocking Trophy selected by the coaches. The Citadel had a conference-best 11 All-SoCon selections on the media team, including a league-high eight on the first team, and was the only team with at least one representative on first-team and second-team offense, defense and special teams. The Bulldogs had 10 on the coaches' team, second in the conference, and three more selections on the All-Freshman Team. Thompson, in his first year as head coach after two years as the Bulldogs' offensive coordinator, has led The Citadel to a 10-1 overall record and the No. 6 seed in the FCS Playoffs. The Citadel earned its second straight Southern Conference championship and tied the record for SoCon wins in a season by completing only the seventh 8-0 conference season in SoCon history. Thompson has shattered The Citadel's record for most wins by a first-year head coach, bettering the previous record of six wins, set in 1916, on Oct. 15 and is only four victories away from the program’s record for most wins in the first two years of a coaching career. He is one of only two first-year head coaches in Southern Conference history to win eight conference games and the first since Bob Pruett led Marshall to eight wins in 1996. Thompson is the first to earn the coaches' Coach of the Year honor in his first season since Georgia Southern's Paul Johnson in 1997.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Monday
November 28, 2016
7. Wofford's defense keys win in opening round of FCS playoffs
Devin Watson made two interceptions in the fourth quarter, Tyler Vaughn had a safety just before halftime and Wofford held off Charleston Southern 15-14 on Saturday in the opening round of the FCS playoffs. Wofford will face The Citadel, the sixth seed, next Saturday. Charleston Southern started its last drive with 3:03 remaining in the fourth quarter from the 48-yard-line but the Buccaneers lost yards on first down after a sack. On second down, Darius Hammond broke several tackles for a 13-yard reception. Charleston Southern was whistled for a false start on third-and-short but freshman receiver Kameron Brown made a first down with a 12-yard grab.
Published in: Washington Post
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Monday
November 28, 2016
8. ASU's 127-point explosion buries The Citadel
A wide-open, run-and-gun style opened up Arizona State's offense, even if the defense had some lapses. The Sun Devils had six players finish in double figures and their point total tied for the second-highest ever in program history. Freshman Sam Cunliffe had 23 points and 10 rebounds, and Kodi Justice scored a season-high 20 points to lead Arizona State to a 127-110 victory over The Citadel on Wednesday. Justice scored 13 points in the first half, when ASU built a 55-45 lead. Cunliffe scored 16 points in the second half. The Sun Devils (4-2) surpassed 100 points for the first time since 2009. "Sam looked really smooth out there," ASU coach Bobby Hurley said. "He looks more and more relaxed and comfortable in what we're doing. He's thrown himself into both ends of the floor." Obinna Oleka added 20 points and 15 rebounds and Tra Holder, the team's leading scorer at 17.2 points per game, scored 22.
Published in: FoxSports.com
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Tuesday
November 22, 2016
1. Open Call for Artists to Submit Designs for The Citadel's 175th Celebration
The Citadel is issuing an open call to artists for designs to be considered as the image that will commemorate the military college's upcoming 175th anniversary. The milestone anniversary will be celebrated during the 2017-18 academic year. The winning design, which will be announced at the first home football game on Sept. 2, 2017, will grace t-shirts, banners, posters, and The Citadel magazine. The winning artist will receive $1,000 (subject to tax). There is expansive information about the history of The Citadel available on The Citadel website here. Carolina state legislature passed an act to establish The Citadel. Three months later--March 20, 1843--the first 20 cadets reported to original Citadel campus on Marion Square, marking the beginning of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. Entries are being accepted now through April 2, 2017. Artists are encouraged to consider exciting, yet classic, designs. Submission requirements for The Citadel 175 Design Contest are as follows: All designs must be vertical in orientation; All media is acceptable; Entries must be submitted in one of three ways: as a high-resolution digital image, a stretched canvas, or bound foam core. Digital submissions should be emailed to designcontest@citadel.edu; A signed consent waiver must be submitted via hard mail. If submitting the design digitally, a printed copy of the artwork should be included with the waiver for identification purposes). The mailing address is: The Citadel Office of Marketing and Communications, 171 Moultrie St., Charleston, SC, 29409. For complete contest details, including a printable copy of the waiver, click here. The winning artist will be notified by August 1, 2017, and will be invited to the Sept. 2, 2017, football game against Newberry College in Johnson Hagood Stadium where the unveiling will take place. Artists whose designs are not selected will be notified by email in September and will have two weeks from notification to arrange for the return of the art work at their expense. Digital submissions, or high resolution photos of a non-digital piece, are highly encouraged.
Published in: Daily Times Leader Columbus, MS and published by multiple media outlets across the country
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Tuesday
November 22, 2016
2. Thanksgiving Was a Triumph of Capitalism over Collectivism
This time of the year, whether in good economic times or bad, is when we gather with our family and friends and enjoy a Thanksgiving meal together. It marks a remembrance of those early Pilgrim Fathers who crossed the uncharted ocean from Europe to make a new start in Plymouth, Massachusetts. What is less appreciated is that Thanksgiving is also a celebration of the birth of free enterprise in America. The English Puritans, who left Great Britain and sailed across the Atlantic on the Mayflower in 1620, were not only escaping from religious persecution in their homeland. They also wanted to turn their backs on what they viewed as the materialistic and greedy corruption of the Old World. In the New World, they wanted to erect a New Jerusalem that would not only be religiously devout, but be built on a new foundation of communal sharing and social altruism. Their goal was the communism of Plato's Republic, in which all would work and share in common, knowing neither private property nor self-interested acquisitiveness. What resulted is recorded in the journal of Governor William Bradford, the head of the colony. The colonists collectively cleared and worked land, but they brought forth neither the bountiful harvest they hoped for, nor did it create a spirit of shared and cheerful brotherhood. Richard M. Ebeling is BB&T Distinguished Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina.
Published in: Foundation for Economic Education
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Tuesday
November 22, 2016
3. Citadel basketball signs three
The Citadel has signed three basketball players for the 2017 recruiting class, coach Duggar Baucom announced Monday. Derek Webster Jr., Hayden Brown and Rob Johnson, all forwards, will join the Bulldogs next fall. Webster, 6-8, is from Seffner Christian Academy in Riverview, Florida, and averaged 12.3 points and 6.7 rebounds as a junior and played for the Southeast Elite AAU team. He wants to major in pre-med at The Citadel. "Derek has a powerful physique and is an explosive athlete," Baucom said. "While most of his offensive work is done around the rim finishing and rebounding, he is quick and strong enough to guard players in the post and on the perimeter. Derek is a workhorse and will do anything to help his team win." Brown, 6-6, is a three-sport standout at Byrnes High School and was named Class AAAA state player of the year after leading his team to a state championship last season. He averaged 14 points, six rebounds and three assists as a junior and plans to major in business. Brown, 6-6, is a three-sport standout at Byrnes High School and was named Class AAAA state player of the year after leading his team to a state championship last season. He averaged 14 points, six rebounds and three assists as a junior and plans to major in business.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
November 22, 2016
4. No. 20 Iowa State blasts Citadel basketball, 130-63
Playing in front of 14,228 fans against the No. 20 Iowa State Cyclones, The Citadel looked like "deer in the headlights," Bulldogs basketball coach Duggar Baucom said. The Citadel got run over, 130-63, on Sunday at Hilton Coliseum in Ames, Iowa. The 3-2 Bulldogs, who won 116-112 at Stetson on Friday, wind up this road trip at Arizona State on Wednesday. Naz Mitrou-Long led Iowa State (3-0) with 26 points as the Cyclones outrebounded The Citadel, 63-33, and held the Bulldogs to 21 baskets in 77 attempts (27.3 percent). "I thought our guys really came out like deer in the headlights," Baucom said. "We went down 10-0, and it was a fight after that. Our guys were very tentative, but that will happen when you are this young and playing in front of that many people." Quayson Williams scored 15 points and Matt Frierson added 12 as The Citadel shot 15 of 45 from 3-point range (33.3 percent). Freshman Kaleon Harris scored 10 points with eight rebounds. The Citadel's chief inside threat, 6-7 sophomore Zane Najdawi, fouled out after just 18 minutes with six points and one rebound. "Matt was very efficient, and Kaleon Harris did a good job," Baucom said. "He was the least scared, and at least he attacked, and we can live with that. Quayson hit some baskets late and is shooting the 3 pretty well."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
November 21, 2016
1. Open call for artists to submit designs for Citadel's 175th celebration
The Citadel is issuing an open call to all artists everywhere to submit designs to be considered for the image that will be used to commemorate the military college's upcoming 175th anniversary. The milestone anniversary will be celebrated during the 2017-18 academic year. The winning design, which will be announced at the first home football game on Sept. 2, 2017, will grace t-shirts, banners, posters, and The Citadel magazine. The winning artist will receive $1,000 (subject to tax). There is expansive information about the history of The Citadel available on citadel.edu to aid in artists' research. On December 20, 1842, the South Carolina state legislature passed an act to establish The Citadel. Three months later-March 20, 1843-the first 20 cadets reported to original Citadel campus on Marion Square, marking the beginning of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. Entries are being accepted now through April 2, 2017. Artists are encouraged to consider exciting, yet classic, designs. Submission requirements for The Citadel 175 Design Contest are as follows: All designs must be vertical in orientation; All media is acceptable; Entries must be submitted in one of three ways: as a high-resolution digital image, a stretched canvas, or bound foam core. Digital submissions should be emailed to DesignContest@citadel.edu; a signed consent waiver must be submitted via hard mail. If submitting the design digitally, a printed copy of the artwork should be included with the waiver for identification purposes). The mailing address is: The Citadel Office of Marketing and Communications, 171 Moultrie St., Charleston, SC, 29409
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Monday
November 21, 2016
2. Economic Ideas: Mercantilism As Monarchy's Planned Economy
The Feudal System had resulted in the disintegration of the unity that much of Western, Southern, and Eastern Europe had known under the Roman Empire. Following the fall of Rome, Europe was divided into local and regional political and economic entities, each politically functioning and economically surviving in high degrees of isolation from each other. However, beginning in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, forces came into play that began to reverse this. Kings and princes were determined to concentrate power in their own hands as "absolute" rulers, which meant reducing the power and authority of the nobility at the local and regional levels. Mercantilism developed in the emerging nation-states under the kings, especially, in France and Spain and in Great Britain, as a set of economic tools to assist in bringing about the centralization of political power and control. The process worked its way out in different ways and to different extents in these countries. In Spain and France, the monarchies became nearly "absolute" to the extent that methods and technologies of the time permitted this concentration of power in the hands of kings. In Great Britain, a long history of resistance by the nobility against losing their "traditional" rights and privileges prevented this from happening to the degree experienced in these other nations. Dr. Richard M. Ebeling is the BB & T Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina, He was formerly professor of Economics at Northwood University. Was formerly president of The Foundation for Economic Education (FEE), was the Ludwig von Mises Professor of Economics at Hillsdale College in Hillsdale, Michigan, and served as president of academic affairs for The Future of Freedom Foundation (FFF).
Published in: NassauInstitute.org
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Monday
November 21, 2016
3. A prayerful Charleston tradition provides annual inspiration for cadets
The Charleston Leadership Foundation's annual Prayer Breakfast is a large community event that attracts many different people. For 15 years, Citadel cadets have attended the gathering, which is sponsored by the Charleston Leadership Foundation with the goal of uniting Christian leaders to serve the community. This fall the breakfast was held on Nov. 7 at the Embassy Suites Hotel and Convention Center and 11 cadets attended. The mayor of Charleston, and other elected officials from the area were among the notable attendees, along with Mayor Linda Page, who leads Mt. Pleasant. Ed Kobel, president and chief operating officer for DeBartolo Development, was the inspirational speaker. DeBartolo talked about his challenging childhood and about striving to overcome difficulties to build a successful career in real estate, only to see it come crashing down. "You can't make this stuff up, but through God's guidance, I was able to rebuild my career and our company's business which now extends across the country and from Hawaii to Puerto Rico," Kobel said. One of the highlights for cadets was the opportunity to meet Maj. Gen. John S. Grinalds and his wife Norwood. Grinalds served as president of The Citadel from 1997 to 2005. Before the conclusion of the breakfast, a new music video called "Stirred Up," by Fred Norris was played for the crowd. The video can be found by clicking here . The song was inspired by Charleston's solidarity in the wake of the June 2015 shooting of the nine parishioners at the Mother Emanuel AME church. Cadets left the breakfast humming the melody to the new song and thankful for what had been an exciting opportunity. Tristan Arrowood is currently the Regimental Public Affairs NCO of the Corps of Cadets. He also serves as head usher and chaplain for the Protestant color guard for chapel related services. He is scheduled to graduate in May 2018 with a degree in biology.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Monday
November 21, 2016
4. Cadets get glimpse of boot camp life
Last week, McDowell NJROTC cadets traveled to Parris Island Marine Corps Recruit Depot and Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort. On the way they visited The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina. At The Citadel they heard about student life and academic programs and then took a tour of the campus. During their stay at Parris Island, they received a brief exposure to what a marine recruit experiences during boot camp. Sergeant Cruz, a drill instructor, led them through activities such as obstacle courses, drills and physical training - in addition to mundane items such as how to make a bed properly, discipline and a focus on rapid obedience. "This week was awesome, not only did we see what recruits go through but we were treated similar to recruits so I have a better understanding of what Marine Corps boot camp is like," Morgan Dale, a McDowell High cadet and junior said. In addition to the recruit activities the cadets visited to the Marine Corps Museum and observed a recruit company graduation. On MCAS Beaufort, the cadets visited flight control, including watching flight operations from the control tower. They visited one of the Marine Corps air squadrons where they learned about Marine Corps aviation and were able to examine an F-18 fighter jet.
Published in: McDowell News
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Monday
November 21, 2016
5a. Hires and promotions
Banking - Ken Pickens has been promoted to executive vice president at South Atlantic Bank. He is the bank's regional executive for the Charleston and Mount Pleasant markets. He has more than 30 years of banking industry experience. He has a bachelor's degree and a master's degree in business administration, both from The Citadel. Communication - Jason Torres has joined Practical Dramatics as a trainer and conversation catalyst. He has a bachelor's degree in theatre perforce and communication from the College of Charleston and a master's degree in counselor education from The Citadel.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
November 21, 2016
5b. Real Estate News items
Ravenel Associates Real Estate recently "expanded its sales capabilities" by adding a long-time Lowcountry community backer and sales agent as Realtor. Leigh P. Rowe "has spent the past 40 years enjoying the history, beauty and people of Charleston while helping clients buy and sell distinctive homes from McClellanville to Edisto Island," the agency, which also goes by the name RARE Charleston, explains. "Leigh's connection to the community is a valuable asset to our clients and our team," RARE Charleston Managing Broker Forrest Edwards says. "Her knowledge and love of the Charleston area and her interest in representing the Lowcountry home buyers and sellers shines through the first time you meet her," he says. Before setting up shop with RARE Charleston, the associate earned awards for her accomplishments as a national manufacturer's pharmaceutical sales representative. Rowe serves on the Old Village Historic District Commission in Mount Pleasant and received the South Carolina Honor Award for Historic Preservation. According to RARE Charleston, she's "passionate about her involvement in the community" and spends time with local charities, her church and various architectural review boards. Rowe obtained a bachelor's degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a master's degree from The Citadel.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
November 21, 2016
5c. Self-motivated
Last spring, the word "interim" was removed from Coach Call's title, and Call brought new staff members along for the ride. Call hired Coach Ahren Self from Clarke County High School to take over the Defensive Coordinator position, or the "Defensive Legion of Boom" - a title Self brought along with him. "I wanted to come back home to finish the rest of my career and life" said Self. Self coached at the Citadel when Coach Call played for The Citadel. "Being at The Citadel taught me how to work hard and grow up very quickly. It also taught me to take pride in what you do, and to be the best at it" Self said. The Citadel is a military school with strict expectations for their students and athletic programs. Self takes on a lot of these tendencies as the Defensive Coordinator for SHS. He expects nothing short of athletes' best. "I want to impact students lives in a good way and teach them the importance in working hard," said Self. Self works extremely hard and gets his players to do the same. He knows that they want to win as much as he does and won't stop until they can. Summerville High School has a tradition for their academic and athletic excellence, and this was one of the aspects that brought Self to Summerville. "I like the tradition here that they have with football," Self said.
Published in: The Wave Breaker
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Monday
November 21, 2016
6. Citadel loses first game of season to UNC, will learn FCS playoff seeding Sunday morning
Tyler Renew took his seat at the press conference table, fielded a few questions on a blustery night in Chapel Hill, N.C. and then finally unleashed what everyone in the room was thinking. "At times, having a season like this, you kind of forget what it's like to lose," the senior running back said following The Citadel's 41-7 loss to North Carolina. "Having this today, you make sure that you never lose again." Since September, when the Bulldogs opened the year with a nail biter of a victory over Mercer, Brent Thompson's Citadel squad has been defined by school record after school record, win after win. To mark The Citadel's most recent loss before Saturday night would have been to turn back the calendar 350 days to last December, when the Bulldogs fell to Charleston Southern in the FCS playoffs a season ago. Thompson and Co. were hopeful the Bulldogs' streak of dominance would continue at UNC, but now they'll turn their attention toward the NCAA FCS playoffs and the selection show set to air 11 a.m. Sunday on ESPNU. "I just told the players in (the locker room), we've got a long season left ahead of us," Thompson said. "We're nowhere near playing the way we wanted to play out there today but we needed a day like that to remind us that if you don't play well and you turn the ball over and you make a lot of mistakes, then you're not gonna win very many football games that way."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
November 21, 2016
7a. The Citadel Earns No. 6 Seed In FCS Playoffs
The Citadel has earned the No. 6 seed and a first-round bye in the FCS Playoffs, it was announced Sunday on the NCAA FCS Football Championship Selection Special on ESPNU. The Citadel earned a national seed for the first time under the current 24-team format and for the second time in program history. The Bulldogs were the No. 2 seed in the 1992 playoffs that featured 16 teams with the top four earning seeds. The Citadel will host the winner of Charleston Southern at Wofford on Dec. 3 at 6 p.m. in the second round of the playoffs. The game will be broadcast on ESPN3. The Citadel enters the playoffs 10-1 overall after losing at North Carolina in the regular season finale. The Bulldogs earned their second straight Southern Conference championship and tied the record for most SoCon wins in a season by completing only the seventh 8-0 conference season in SoCon history. The Citadel broke the program's single-season program record with six road wins, the most in FCS in 2016, and is one win away from tying the single-season program record of 11 victories set in 1992. The Citadel is making its fifth postseason appearance and has advanced to the playoffs in back-to-back seasons for the first time. Last season, the Bulldogs made the program's first postseason appearance since 1992 and won a road playoff game for the first time in school history with a 41-38 victory at Coastal Carolina in the first round.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
November 21, 2016
7b. Citadel playoff path: First-round bye, then a familiar foe
There was no mistaking the mix of sighs, cheers and laughs from Citadel football players when their FCS playoff path was revealed on ESPNU on Sunday morning. As expected, the Bulldogs (10-1) earned a No. 6 seed and first-round bye in the 24 team playoffs. Also as expected, The Citadel will face a familiar foe in the second round on Dec. 3 at Johnson Hagood Stadium – either Charleston Southern or Wofford. The bye week and first home playoff game since 1992 were welcome news. The potential second-round foe generated mixed reviews. "It'd be nice to face somebody else, somebody besides teams we play all the time," said quarterback Dominique Allen, who along with his teammates watched the selection show at Johnson Hagood Stadium. "But it is what it is. It will be a fun matchup no matter who it is, and if we want to make this run, we've got to get past one of them." Wofford (8-3) and Charleston Southern (7-3) will meet at 2 p.m. Saturday at Gibbs Stadium in Spartanburg, with the winner traveling to Johnson Hagood Stadium for a 6 p.m. game on Dec. 3. The Citadel faces fellow Southern Conference member Wofford each season, and took a 24-21 overtime victory this year. CSU and The Citadel have played five times in the last four years, with the Bucs winning four straight, including a 14-6 playoff win in 2015. "When it's the playoffs, you look for some different opponents," Thompson said. "You want to get some people to travel in and maybe work outside (the norm) a little bit. But it is what it is, and we have to win the state of South Carolina at this point."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
November 21, 2016
8. Bulldogs Win Nail-Biter at Stetson 116-112
The Citadel men's basketball team made eight free throws in the last 32 seconds of the game to clinch a 116-112 win at Stetson on Friday evening. Both teams got off to quick starts, combining to score 32 points a little over five minutes into the game. The Bulldogs (3-1) got the majority of their points in that span from Brian White as the senior hit three three-pointers. The Citadel stayed hot from three-point range as the half continued and with six minutes remaining had already drained nine treys, giving them a 10-point cushion heading into the halftime break. White finished the first half with 16 points on six-of-seven shooting from the floor and Kaelon Harris had 15 for the Bulldogs. The 'Dogs continued their hot shooting in the second half, going on an 11-0 run from 12:40-10:48 to push their lead to 16. The run was sparked by a three-pointer by Ezekiel Balogun and capped by a White layup. With under two minutes remaining in the game, Stetson (2-1) went on a run and hit a three-pointer to make it a one-point game. But a deep three by Matt Frierson with 50 seconds left gave The Citadel a four-point advantage and then Frankie Johnson sank two free throws with 32 seconds left to make it a six-point Bulldogs' lead. The Hatters closed the gap back down to two points with 16 seconds remaining after making a layup and two free throws. Stetson then fouled freshman Preston Parks who calmly sank two free throws to push it back to a four point lead.
Published in: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
November 21, 2016
9. Bulldogs Face Furman to Open SoCon Championships
The Citadel volleyball team will play Furman in the first round of the Southern Conference Championships on Saturday in Birmingham, Alabama. The Bulldogs (8-24, 1-15 SoCon) last met up with Furman (10-18, 6-10 SoCon) on Oct. 16 when The Citadel won its lone conference match of the season and its first since 2011. The five-set victory over Furman was also the first in program history against the Paladins, breaking a string of 35 straight losses. The Citadel enters the SoCon Championships having made four previous appearances in the tournament. Furman is the reigning SoCon tournament champions after defeating Chattanooga in the finals in 2015. On Wednesday, outside hitter Moriah Smith was selected to the All-SoCon Second Team. The award is the first post-season recognition for a Bulldog volleyball player in program history. Smith finished the regular season with 457 kills, the most in a single season in program history. In the SoCon, Smith ranks second in total kills and fourth in kills per set. She is also 10th in digs per set at 3.18, recording 379 total digs on the year. Libero Samantha Espy has recorded 1,430 digs in her career. She is just 21 digs short of breaking Rachel Sanders' (2008-12) program record. The Bulldogs wrapped up the regular season with the second most digs in the conference with 1,957. They are also third in total service aces with 150, fourth in total assists with 1,329 and fifth in total kills with 1,405.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Friday
November 18, 2016
1. Expert: Haley in Trump cabinet could help 'build a bridge'
South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley backed Florida Senator Marco Rubio during the GOP primaries. She wasn't a fan of Donald Trump, but she voted for him last week. Thursday, she had what was possibly an interview for a major role in his cabinet that would put her on the world stage. Television cameras kept a watchful eye on Gov. Haley's whereabouts at Trump Tower in New York City. Back home in South Carolina, political observers ponder the possibility of Governor Haley leaving her post. "I'm sure she will give it very serious consideration if it were to be offered," said Dr. Scott Buchanan of the political science department at The Citadel. Buchanan said he understands why the nation's next president is interviewing a popular 2-term governor from South Carolina for a cabinet position. "Getting a conservative Republican into the administration helps build a bridge to some in the Republican party who still are not entirely sure about President-elect Trump," he said. Some critics may question the governor's credentials for a high-profile foreign policy job in Washington, but political experts like Dr. Buchanan agree. "Granted, Secretary of State generally does require a certain level of expertise. But most other cabinet positions, you pick it up as you go," Buchanan said. People we spoke to in downtown Charleston seem to be supportive of Governor Haley's political ambitions.
Broadcast on: WCIV-TV Charleston, SC
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Friday
November 18, 2016
2. President-elect Trump considering Gov. Haley for position in administration
South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley could possibly have a role in President-elect Donald Trump's administration. The two met Thursday at Trump Tower. Governor Haley's staff released this statement after: "Governor Haley was pleased to meet with President-elect Trump. They had a good discussion, and she is very encouraged about the coming administration and the new direction it will bring to Washington." According to Joe Scarborough, former Florida congressman and host of MSNBC's Morning "Morning Joe," sources close to him say Haley is being considered for Secretary of State. According to Scarborough, Trump's transition team spent several days reaching out to former rivals to fill important cabinet positions. This is a stark contract to a battle that played out in 140 characters between the pair on Tuesday, March 1. It came on the heels of Trump sharing tweets from two senior aides, trying to portray Haley as hypocritical of him releasing tax returns. Trump tweeted: "The people of South Carolina are embarrassed by Nikki Haley." The governor has also criticized Trump saying he represents "everything a governor doesn't want in a president." Haley endorsed Marco Rubio for president Wednesday, February 17, telling a crowd of supporters she chose to back a candidate who can "show my parents that the best decision they made for their children was coming to America." Haley reaffirmed her support for Donald Trump, after vowing to vote for the then-GOP nominee despite his attacks on her.
Broadcast on: WCBD-TV Charleston, SC
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Friday
November 18, 2016
3. The Citadel remembers longtime athletics department staffer, coach
Family, friends and The Citadel community honored the life of a longtime athletics department member. Mike Groshon, a 1976 Citadel graduate, died last week of leukemia. The James Island native worked for the military college for the last 35 years. Groshon served the athletics department in a number of ways, including facility and field maintenance, equipment manager and tennis coach. You may have seen him with the school's bulldog mascots, which he took care of. Groshon also started The Citadel's annual most beautiful bulldog contest.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Friday
November 18, 2016
4. College Corner: Simon enrolls at The Citadel
Jeff Simon, of Burlington, enrolled at The Citadel as part of the Class of 2020, the largest recorded freshman class in the history of the college. The Citadel offers a military college education focused on leadership and academics. Graduates are not required to serve in the military, but about 30 percent of each class commission as officers in every branch of U.S. military service.
Published in: Cincinnati.com
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Friday
November 18, 2016
5. Citadel player most likely to be internet meme? Jonathan King
In the 2016 yearbook of Citadel football, Jonathan King might be voted "Most Likely to be an Internet Meme." There's something about the perpetually smiling King, a junior defensive lineman, that seems to invite teasing from his teammates. After the Bulldogs' 24-21 overtime win at Wofford this season, someone a posted a photo of King celebrating the victory, his arms raised to the heavens as if in prayer. "When you been hungry all game and coach say we got Bojangles on the bus," read the caption. And when the 6-1, 248-pound King rumbled 54 yards for a "big-man touchdown" at VMI last week, a photo of King in full flight appeared on Twitter. The caption hinted that King had not run that fast since the last time Grandma called him to dinner. "My teammates will text me a picture and they're like, 'Can I do it?'" King said. "I tell them, go ahead, I don't care. They are pretty hilarious." Even King gets in on the act. On his own Twitter account is this post: "I'm a D1 college athlete who stills get winded walking up stairs: a memoir." King's contributions on the field this season have been no laughing matter. Despite not being the biggest or quickest player on the defensive line,. King has turned in his share of big plays for the 10-0 Bulldogs, who gun for a perfect regular season at 3:30 p.m. Saturday at North Carolina. King's 9.5 tackles for loss are tied for second for the Bulldogs, as are his 4.5 sacks. In last week's 30-20 victory at VMI, King kick-started The Citadel with a sack-and-strip, a 54-yard fumble return for a TD and 10-0 lead in the first quarter, enough to earn him Southern Conference defensive player of the week honors. Serious effort is the key to King's production, said teammate Kevin Graham.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Friday
November 18, 2016
6. Sapakoff: Kevin Higgins, no Citadel regrets, braces for Clemson
As soon as Kevin Higgins saw Pittsburgh kicker Chris Blewitt going bananas after a 48-yard field goal at Death Valley, he knew Wake Forest was in trouble. "Clemson will be very, very excited to play," the Demon Deacons' associate head coach and wide receivers coach said. "They have a lot of pride, I know that. We are going to get their very best. We would rather they would have won their game last week coming into our place." Clemson, down from No. 2 to No. 4 in the College Football Playoff ranking after a 43-42 loss to Pittsburgh, now requires a victory Saturday night at Wake Forest to clinch a spot in the Atlantic Coast Conference Championship Game. Just as the Tigers and Deacons get going in Winston-Salem, a Citadel team led by seniors Higgins recruited will seek upset icing on a 10-0 cake at another ACC home field. The Bulldogs, their Southern Conference title and FCS playoff bid secure, close the regular season with nothing to lose against North Carolina. Regrets? None. Higgins, 60, is too busy for second-guessing his decision to leave The Citadel even if inclined. He put in nine seasons as head coach, lasting as long as any Citadel head coach since the program was founded with a 0-0 tie against Porter Military Academy in 1905 (Eddie Teague and Charlie Taaffe also coached nine seasons).
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Friday
November 18, 2016
7. Retired Circuit Court Judge Alban Brooke: 1931-2016
Retired Circuit Judge Alban Brooke was highly regarded for his fairness, respectful demeanor and devotion to his mentally disabled son. He died Nov. 4 from a head injury suffered after an accidental fall. Judge Brooke was 85. He was an attorney for 29 years in private practice and as a prosecutor before serving as a Circuit Court judge for 13 years. There will be a memorial service at 11 a.m. Tuesday at Westside Chapel, 4541 Shirley Ave. "I think he brought a gentle and respectful demeanor to the bench, but he was always clear, firm and fair in his decisions," said U.S. District Judge Brian Davis, adding that opinion was shared by lawyers he recently had lunch with who had practiced before Judge Brooke. One attorney recalled that in one of his last trials before Judge Brooke that he was so fair in his sustaining of objections that the lawyer had nothing to complain about, Davis said. Judge Brooke was born in Louisville, Ky., and grew up in Sandy Spring, Md. He received his bachelor's degree in political science from The Citadel in Charleston, S.C., in 1953. He was a good athlete who played baseball in college and was drafted by the Baltimore Orioles as a pitcher but chose to serve in the Air Force as a radar operator during the Korean War, said his son, attorney Allan Brooke of Jacksonville. After his discharge, Judge Brooke attended George Washington University Law School in Washington, D.C. He moved to Jacksonville, his wife's hometown, and began a 20-year stint in private practice in 1960. In 1967, he served as staff attorney to State Sen. Tom Slade when the charter for the consolidated government was finalized and he was active in the campaign for its adoption, according to Times-Union archives.
Published in: Jacksonville.com
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Thursday
November 17, 2016
1. Citadel mourns Mike Groshon, proud keeper of bulldog mascots
During this happiest of Citadel football seasons - the Bulldogs are 10-0 for the first time ever - there's been something missing at Johnson Hagood Stadium. Mike Groshon, best known to Citadel fans as the keeper of bulldog mascots General and Boo, was absent from the sidelines and pregame tailgates for the Bulldogs' final two regular-season games. "Probably the first home games he's missed in 30 years," said one of Groshon's best friends, Citadel track and field coach Jody Huddleston. Groshon, whose official title was assistant athletic director for facilities, died Friday after battling a type of leukemia known as chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma. A 1976 Citadel graduate, Groshon was 62. A service for Groshon will be held at 11 a.m. Thursday at The Citadel's Summerall Chapel. "We are all saddened by the loss of Mike Groshon," said The Citadel athletic director Jim Senter. "He devoted most of his life to The Citadel and cared deeply about the institution, athletics and people that he encountered throughout his time here. "His affiliation with the college began in the 1970s as a cadet, and his dedication improved many different areas of the college. He worked behind the scenes in many roles, taking great pride in preparing each of our athletic playing surfaces for competition, but he also took on a public role as our live mascot guardian.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
November 17, 2016
2. Year after Citadel stunner, Gamecocks 'do not take lightly' another SoCon foe
They're one of four unbeaten teams in Division I football, they've clinched another conference championship, and they're once again bound for the FCS playoffs. In the final weeks of a dream season, the last thing The Citadel is thinking about is South Carolina. But rest assured, the Gamecocks are thinking about the Bulldogs. At least, their stunning 23-22 upset of USC last season at Williams-Brice Stadium, for the Gamecocks the lowest point in a 3-9 campaign. Memories of that afternoon, and the days that preceded it, remain vivid in the minds of South Carolina players who host another opponent from the Southern Conference this week. "It drives me nuts," senior left tackle Mason Zandi said. "It definitely creates a sense of urgency to tell the young guys, 'Look, see what you've watched on film? They're going to play twice as better than that.' Because every FCS team that plays (an FBS) team, they're going to want to beat you. That's what I'm trying to stress to the guys: 'Look, do not take this lightly. Regardless of their record... don't take it lightly. At all.'" Western Carolina, which visits for a 4 p.m. game Saturday, is not last year's Citadel team, which shared the SoCon title and was bound for the FCS playoffs. The Catamounts (2-8) are in the final week of an unexpectedly down season, and don't run the kind of option offense the Bulldogs used to rush for 350 yards against the Gamecocks a season ago.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
November 17, 2016
3. Undefeated Citadel team still not in top 5 of FCS rankings
The FCS playoff rankings were released Tuesday night, and The Citadel, now 10-0 on the season is still not in the top five. Here's a look at how things shake out... 1) North Dakota State; 2) Jacksonville State; 3) Eastern Washington; 4) James Madison. The Citadel comes in at six, but coach Brent Thompson says his team deserves to be in the top four. Watch the video in the article.
Published in: WCIV-TV Charleston, SC
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Thursday
November 17, 2016
4. Smith Receives First Program All-Conference Award
Outside hitter Moriah Smith has been selected to the All-SoCon Second Team, it was announced Wednesday. The award is the first post-season award for a Bulldog volleyball player in program history. "We are thrilled that Moriah was selected for this honor," said head coach Craigh Mosqueda. "To be the first in The Citadel history to receive a post-season award is an indicator of her determination to help change the direction of our program." Smith finished the regular season with 457 kills, the most in a single season in program history. Her 3.84 kills per set are also ranked first in program history in a single season. In the SoCon, Smith ranks second in total kills and fourth in kills per set. She is also 10th in digs per set at 3.18, recording 379 total digs on the year. "This past spring and summer, Moriah put in a ton of work so that she could help her team be more competitive. Her hard work is paying off," said Mosqueda. "She is a pleausre to coach and I forsee great things going into her senior year." On Sept. 5, Smith was selected the Southern Conference Offensive Player of the Week after recording 80 kills in four matches. The award was the first given by the SoCon to a Bulldog volleyball player. In just the third match of the season against Gardner-Webb on Aug. 27, Smith also set another program record with 35 kills in a single match, surpassing the previous mark of 29. The junior helped lead The Citadel to its first Southern Conference win in nearly five years when the Bulldogs defeated Furman in five sets on Oct. 16. Smith finished the match with 21 kills and 19 digs. The win was also the first in program history over Furman, breaking a 35-match losing streak to the Paladins.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Wednesday
November 16, 2016
1. The unexpectedly undefeated
For the second straight season, a college football team from our state enters the second half of November unbeaten. No, not Clemson. The Citadel. The Tigers did make it all the way to Jan. 11 last season before losing in the Football Bowl Series national championship game to Alabama. Clemson also made it to last Saturday before suffering this season's first defeat. But now the only team from our state without a loss is right here in Charleston. The Citadel Bulldogs are 10-0, Southern Conference champions and ranked sixth nationally in the Football Championship Series coaches' poll. That's particularly remarkable for a school that, coming into this year, had finished with just three winning records in the previous 18 seasons. Experts expect the Bulldogs' winning streak to end Saturday when they play at North Carolina, which is tied for first place in the Atlantic Coast Conference's Coastal Division. However, last year the Bulldogs upset another Carolina - the Gamecocks - in a 23-22 thriller in Columbia. The Citadel then reached the second round of the FCS playoffs before being eliminated by local rival Charleston Southern.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
November 16, 2016
2. Citadel makes its case for top-four seed in FCS playoffs
The FCS playoff field will be announced Sunday, and The Citadel is guaranteed of only one thing at this point - the Bulldogs will be included in the 24-team bracket by virtue of winning the Southern Conference's automatic bid. All else is speculation until Selection Sunday, but the 10-0 Bulldogs can feel fairly certain of a top-eight seed and first-round bye in the playoffs, which begin Nov. 26. The Citadel is ranked No. 6 in the FCS Coaches Poll released Monday, and was also No. 6 in the FCS selection committee's third and final preliminary rankings released Tuesday night. But in the FCS playoffs, not all seeds are created equal. The top two seeds are guaranteed home games through the semifinals, as long as they meet the NCAA's minimum bid to host. Seeds No. 3 and 4 get two home games with minimum bids; seeds 5-8 are certain of only one home game with a minimum bid. Can the Bulldogs, who completed an 8-0 SoCon season with a 30-20 win at VMI last week, make the jump to a top-four seed by Sunday? Citadel coach Brent Thompson made the Bulldogs' case Tuesday at his weekly news conference. "We won all of our FCS games, so we know that we've done everything we can to get us into that top four, whether the committee thinks that or not," said Thompson, whose team wraps up the regular season Saturday at FBS foe North Carolina. "We've played three top 25 teams so far, and we're playing a pretty good FBS team (this week).
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
November 16, 2016
3. Thompson Named Coach Of The Year Finalist
The Citadel head football coach Brent Thompson has been named one of 15 STATS Eddie Robinson Award finalists, it was announced Tuesday. Thompson, in his first year as head coach after two years as the Bulldogs' offensive coordinator, has led The Citadel to a 10-0 overall record and a No. 5 national ranking. The Bulldogs are one of two remaining undefeated FCS teams and one of only four unbeaten teams in all of Division I. The Citadel earned its second straight Southern Conference championship and tied the record for SoCon wins in a season by completing only the seventh 8-0 conference season in SoCon history. The Bulldogs also have earned the SoCon's automatic bid to the NCAA FCS Playoffs, marking the first time in program history the team has made back-to-back playoff appearances. Thompson has shattered The Citadel's record for most wins by a first-year head coach, bettering the previous record of six wins, set in 1916, on Oct. 15 and is only four victories away from the program's record for most wins in the first two years of a coaching career. He is one of only two first-year head coaches in Southern Conference history to win eight conference games and the first since Bob Pruett led Marshall to eight wins in 1996. The Bulldogs have broken the single-season program record with six road wins and are one win away from tying the single-season program record of 11 victories set in 1992. The Citadel leads all of Division I in rushing yards per game, averaging 359.9 yards on the ground, and in fewest sacks allowed with one. The Bulldogs also lead the Southern Conference in yards per completion, fewest tackles for loss allowed, rushing touchdowns, third-down conversions, yards per rush, fewest first downs allowed, third-down defense, fourth-down defense, tackles for loss, sacks and punt returns. Their 17.2 yards per completion rank second in FCS, while the 3.2 tackles for loss per game rank third and the 31 rushing touchdowns rank as the fourth-highest total in the country.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Wednesday
November 16, 2016
4. Najdawi earns SoCon weekly honor
Zane Najdawi has been named Southern Conference Player of the Week, it was announced Tuesday. The sophomore posted two double-doubles in as many games over the weekend and shot 61 percent from the floor. Najdawi posted his first career double-double on Nov. 11 against crosstown rival College of Charleston, pouring in a career-high 28 points and 12 rebounds. Two days later the Midlothian, Virginia, native picked up right where he left off against the Cougars, going for 26 points and 10 rebounds in just 18 minutes of action against Johnson University on Nov. 13. Najdawi is the first Bulldog to post back-to-back double-doubles since Mike Groselle did so in 2011. Najdawi has been stellar from the free-throw line so far this season, knocking down 20-of-21 from the charity stripe in the first two games. The 6-7 forward, who currently holds the school's freshman record for most blocked shots in a season, had four swats in the two games. This is the first weekly honor for a Bulldog basketball player since Feb. 18, 2014, when Ashton Moore earned the award. It is also the second SoCon Player of the Week award for The Citadel this week after defensive lineman Jonathan King earned football’s Defensive Player of the Week award on Monday.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Wednesday
November 16, 2016
5. The Citadel gets 119-90 win over Truett-McConnell
The Citadel men's basketball team earned its second straight win on Tuesday evening, downing Truett McConnell 119-90 inside McAlister Field House. The victory also marked the 200th career win for head coach Duggar Baucom. Senior Warren Sledge opened the game with a three-pointer and then Leandro Allende and Preston Parks followed with threes of their own to give the Bulldogs (1-2) a 9-3 lead. The Citadel continued to widen the gap, knocking down four three-pointers in the first six minutes of the game, and taking a 33-21 lead into the under eight media timeout thanks to an and-one by Kaelon Harris. Truett McConnell (3-4) continued to try and chip away at the Bulldogs' lead but Zane Najdawi kept the momentum in the 'Dogs favor after pulling down a rebound and then making a tough putback to give the The Citadel a 38-24 lead. Quayson Williams followed the bucket with his second three-pointer of the game to put the Bulldogs up by 17 with six minutes remaining in the first half. With a 53-45 advantage at the start of the second half, the Bulldogs scored five points in the first 10 seconds thanks to a three-pointer by Williams and a difficult layup by Frankie Johnson to extend their lead to 13. The Bulldogs continued to turn up the pressure on defense as the game wore on, forcing the Bears to turn the ball over 30 times and scoring 17 points off of turnovers.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Wednesday
November 16, 2016
6. Fort Moultrie quarters on sale Thursday
Rolls of freshly minted quarters commemorating Fort Moultrie go on sale Thursday. A forum to learn about U.S mint coin programs starts at 6 p.m. Wednesday in the Fort Moultrie visitor center auditorium on Sullivan's Island. Fort Moultrie is engraved over an image of Sgt. William Jasper, a member of the 2nd South Carolina Infantry that defended the fort against British invasion on June 28, 1776. A ceremony with representatives of the National Park Service and the U.S. Mint starts at 10:30 a.m. Thursday in the field behind the fort. The Plantation Singers and Lorraine White will provide music, The Citadel Color Guard will present the nation's colors, and Park Service living historians will fire a salute using reproduction muskets. Coins will be available after the ceremony in a South State Bank tent on the field. Rolls of quarters will be sold for cash only in $10 increments from $10 to $100. At noon Thursday, Nicholas Butler, a historian with the Charleston County Public Library, will present "Sgt. William Jasper: An Enigmatic Hero" in the visitor center. Park rangers will continue to discuss Jasper in programs that start at 1, 2 and 3 p.m.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
November 16, 2016
7. Amy Browning Buddin Obituary
Amy Browning Buddin SUMMERVILLE - Amy Anne Browning Buddin of Summerville, SC passed away on November 11, 2016 due to pneumonia and complications from progressive multiple sclerosis, of which she was diagnosed 12 years ago. She was born on November 30, 1983 in Charleston and graduated from Summerville High School in 2002. She attended the University of South Carolina and received a Bachelor of Science in Psychology from the College of Charleston in 2007. Amy worked at The Citadel and in the service industry, and she truly enjoyed helping and conversing with others. She was the granddaughter of Ed and Elizabeth Browning of Columbia, SC and Jim and Ruth Richardson of Ocala, FL; cousin of Christopher Mayer of Lexington, SC. She is survived by her parents, Marshall "Lynn" and Sue Richardson Browning of Summerville; her sister, Alyson Browning, of Columbia, SC; aunts and uncles, Ellen Richardson Shelnutt (John) of Atlanta, GA; Judy Browning Mayer of Lexington, SC; Bob Browning of Lexington, SC; and Tim Browning of Lexington, SC. A memorial service is planned for Friday, November 18, 2016 at 5PM, in Summerville at Bethany Methodist Church Spell Chapel. Visitors will be received at 4PM at Bethany Friendship Circle. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, the South Carolina Aquarium, or Children in Crisis of Summerville.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Legacy
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Tuesday
November 15, 2016
1. A Tribute to Coach Mike Groshon, '76
Mr. Michael Douglas Groshon, Citadel Class of 1976, was a lifelong Bulldog and one of The Citadel's most loyal alumni, employees, and friends. He was 62 years old when he lost his battle with leukemia on Nov. 11, 2016. As a cadet, Mike was an avid tennis player and member of the tennis team. A member of Palmetto Company, he graduated from The Citadel with a degree in business administration in 1976. He worked for several businesses, before returning to become a member of the college's athletics staff on July 15, 1981. He eventually became "Coach Mike"; a loyal and beloved member of The Citadel family. As a 35 year employee of the college, and an alumnus, he was a friend, colleague and servant-leader to many. (Photo right courtesy of The Post and Courier). Mike was a facilities manager, equipment manager, and a field maintenance expert who was passionate about keeping the field at Johnson Hagood Stadium as well as Summerall Field in top condition. He was a mentor and tennis coach to cadets, earning the Southern Conference title of Coach of the Year in 2000. He was a sailor and enjoyed teaching cadets how to sail in earlier years. But Mike Groshon was perhaps best known as the "Dad" and guardian to the college's mascots. The Class of 2003 created the college's live-mascot program (dogs had been loaned by fans and alumni since the 1920s). Mike made the program possible. He lived with the mascots on campus, cared for them, took them to games, appearances, photo shoots (the dogs often adorned with bandanas or hats), vet appointments and even to see Santa.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Tuesday
November 15, 2016
2. Dr. Dorothy Perrin Moore of The Citadel discusses women's entrepreneurship
Women's Entrepreneurship Day will be celebrated Wednesday at the United Nations and around the country. Taking note will be Dr. Dorothy Perrin Moore, an international authority and speaker on women's entrepreneurship. Moore is an emeritus professor of business administration at The Citadel School of Business, where she held the title of Distinguished Professor of Entrepreneurship. She's also a published author. Her most recent book is "Womenpreneurs - 21st Century Success Strategies," before that she penned "Careerpreneurs - Lessons From Leading Women Entrepreneurs on Building A Career Without Boundaries," a Foreword Magazine Gold Award first-place winner in business. Moore's other scholarly writings include "Women Entrepreneurs - Moving Beyond the Glass Ceiling," which she co-authored, and numerous articles, book chapters and technical reports. A former entrepreneur, she has a Ph.D. in management, organizational behavior and human resource management from the Darla Moore School of Business at the University of South Carolina. She is a Justin G. Longenecker Fellow in the U.S. Association of Small Business and Entrepreneurship and Moore was a Small Business Administration Women in Business Advocate for South Carolina.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
November 15, 2016
3. "Pitchfork" Ben Tillman, governor, U.S. senator
Benjamin Ryan Tillman was born in Edgefield District on August 11, 1847, to Benjamin and Sophia Tillman. The family was wealthy in land and slaves, and Ben Tillman was educated in local schoolhouses and on the family's acres. A serious illness at the age of sixteen cost him his left eye, and his convalescence kept him out of Confederate service. In 1868 he married Sallie Starke. They had seven children. In the mid-1870s Tillman joined the Sweetwater Sabre Club and became part of the paramilitary rifle-club movement, through which white landowners challenged the Republican state government. He took part in the Hamburg Massacre (July 1876), in which rifle-club members (known thereafter as "Red Shirts") besieged a black militia unit and murdered several captives. Tillman later explained that "the leading white men of Edgefield" had determined "to seize the first opportunity that the negroes might offer them to provoke a riot and teach the negroes a lesson." The massacre fractured compromise arrangements between state Democrats and Republicans and helped create the electoral crisis of 1876-1877... Though Tillman was the leader of the "Farmers" movement (also known as the "Reform" or "Tillman" movement), he was most effective as a gadfly. In newspapers and on the stump, Tillman denounced the state's leadership as a "ring" of "broken-down politicians and old superannuated Bourbon aristocrats, who are thoroughly incompetent, who worship the past, and are incapable of progress of any sort, but who boldly assume to govern us by divine right." Their educational institutions demonstrated their uselessness: South Carolina College produced "helpless beings," while the Citadel was "a military dude factory." Further, he charged elected officials with malfeasance and corruption, often insinuating that particular men were to blame but then denying having done so.
Published in: CharlestonCurrents.com
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Tuesday
November 15, 2016
4. FCS Notes: Citadel No. 6 in final Coaches Poll before Selection Sunday
The Citadel remained at No. 6 in the FCS Coaches Poll released Monday, the final poll before the 24-team playoff field is announced on Sunday. The top six in the poll remained unchanged, with No. 1 Sam Houston State and the Bulldogs both 10-0 and the only unbeaten teams in FCS. The Citadel, already assured of a spot in the playoffs, clinched the outright SoCon title with a 30-20 win at VMI last week. Wofford (7-3) joined the Top 25 at No. 19, giving the Southern Conference four teams in the top 19. Chattanooga (8-2) dropped from No. 7 to No. 11 after losing to Wofford, with Samford (7-3) at No. 18. Charleston Southern (6-3) is up one spot to No. 13 after keeping its Big South title and FCS playoff hopes alive with a 48-26 win at Liberty. The Bucs can clinch a share of the title and the Big South's automatic playoff bid with a win over Kennesaw State on Saturday. Kennesaw State (8-2) is ranked 22nd in the FCS poll. The third playoff ranking from the FCS selection committee (the last one before Selection Sunday) will be released Thursday.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
November 15, 2016
5. King named SoCon defensive player of the week
The Citadel's Jonathan King has been named the Southern Conference Defensive Player of the Week, it was announced Monday. King recorded three tackles, including a career-high-tying 2.0 for loss with 1.0 sack, one quarterback hurry, one forced fumble and one fumble recovery he returned 54 yards for a touchdown in The Citadel's 30-20 win at VMI. The junior defensive lineman from Statesville, North Carolina, registered a strip-sack on VMI's quarterback and returned the fumble he forced for his first career touchdown. The score gave the Bulldogs a 10-0 lead with 1:36 remaining in the first quarter. This season, King has 25 tackles, including 9.5 for loss with 4.5 sacks, four quarterback hurries, one forced fumble, one fumble recovery and one blocked kick. He is tied for seventh in the Southern Conference with 7.0 tackles for loss in conference play. King earned his first SoCon honor and The Citadel's 10th conference recognition so far this season. B-back Tyler Renew has two Offensive Player of the Week certificates earned in week one and week 10, and defensive back Kailik Williams also has two honors after being named the September Defensive Player of the Month and the Defensive Player of the Week in week eight. Defensive back Dee Delaney was named Defensive Player of the Week for week two, DeAndre Schoultz picked up Special Teams Player of the Week in week three, linebacker Joe Crochet earned the week five SoCon Defensive Player of the Week honor and kicker Cody Clark was the conference's Special Teams Player of the Week in week seven. In addition, Myles Pierce was named the SoCon Student-Athlete of the Week in week eight.
Published in: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Tuesday
November 15, 2016
6. The weirdest stats from The Citadel's 146-point game on Sunday
The Citadel is known for its frantic style of play, complete with fast breaks, traps, quick subs, and lots and lots of points. So it's not a surprise that the Bulldogs were able to put up a triple-digit number on an NCCAA school on Sunday. But 146 points? 146? The Citadel beat something called Johnson University, which is allegedly in Florida, 146-84, to improve to 1-1 on the young season. Here are some of the more bizarre numbers from a game where a team that gave up 84 points won by more than 60: The Citadel scored 80 points in the second half; It also broke the program record for points in a game by 14 points; All 15 players to appear in the game for the Bulldogs scored; Only four players scored in double figures for The Citadel, but nine players had at least eight points; Johnson University turned the ball over 39 times and every player to appear in the game for the Suns had at least two turnovers; The Citadel took 106 total shots and 50 from three; Preston Parks put up a truly odd stat line with five points on 1-10 shooting, 10 assists, eight steals, and six turnovers; Brian White had 18 points, nine rebounds, four steals, two assists and four fouls, all in 16 minutes; Think that was impressive? Look at Zane Najdawi's numbers. In just 18 minutes, he put up 26 points, 10 rebounds, two steals, and two blocks, while making 10 of 11 free throw attempts.
Published in: MidMajorMadness.com
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Tuesday
November 15, 2016
7. Opp chooses to continue cross country career at The Citadel
One of the most decorated cross country athletes in recent Burke County history has made her selection to continue running at the collegiate level. Draughn senior Amber Opp accepted a full scholarship offer from The Citadel, signing Monday to continue her cross country career with the Charleston, South Carolina, military college. She likes the team and the coaching staff at the college, but Opp also cited a family tradition that played a part in her deciding to become a Bulldog. "My uncle went to The Citadel and then later on went to West Point," Opp said. "My dad was in the army and so was my grandpa." Opp qualified for state all four years, making it the first three times at Freedom before transferring to Draughn for her senior year. Opp top 10 at state earlier this month earned her all-state honors in cross country. She placed the highest of any Burke County runner in eighth (19:39.96), lowering her own 5k girls school record from earlier this fall. Opp won her fourth straight county title after winning the 5,000-meter Burke County individual championship at Draughn last month. "My favorite (high school) memories are being with the team and going out to eat after meets," Opp said. "(Aside) from the running part, getting to know the team (was the best part)."
Published in: The News Herald
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Tuesday
November 15, 2016
8. William F. Turner, chemical company executive and veteran, dies
William F. Turner, a retired chemical company executive who was a highly decorated World War II veteran and an artist whose pen-and-ink drawings chronicled Harford County scenes, died Thursday and of heart failure at his Churchville home. He was 91. The son of William F. Turner Jr., a Con Edison personnel worker, and Sarah Beverly Turner, a homemaker, William Fisher Turner was born and raised in Brooklyn, N.Y., where he graduated in 1942 from Erasmus Hall High School. He studied for one semester at Clemson University before enlisting in the Army. After studying at The Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina, he joined the 95th Infantry Division of Gen. George S. Patton Jr.'s 3rd Army. As a combat infantryman, Mr. Turner fought in the Battle of Metz, France. His decorations included the Silver Star for gallantry in action, three Bronze Stars and the Combat Infantry Badge. "He was a bazookman who stood 6 feet 4," said his wife of 38 years, Patricia Richards, a retired Baltimore County public schools psychologist. "He received the Silver Star after he dragged a wounded buddy to safety while under fire."
Published in: The Baltimore Sun
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Monday
November 14, 2016
1. Mike Groshon, keeper of Citadel's bulldogs, battles leukemia
Editor's Note: Mike Groshon passed away Friday night (Nov. 11) at the age of 63. During this happiest of Citadel football seasons - the Bulldogs are 9-0 for the first time ever - there's been something missing at Johnson Hagood Stadium. Mike Groshon, best known to Citadel fans as the keeper of bulldog mascots General and Boo, has been absent from the sidelines and pre-game tailgates during the last two games. "Probably the first home games he's missed in 30 years," said one of Groshon's best friends, Citadel track and field coach Jody Huddleston. Groshon, whose official title is assistant athletic director for facilities, has been in the hospital, fighting for his life against a type of leukemia known as chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma. At age 63, Groshon just finished a second round of chemotherapy. "He's fighting hard, but he's lost of a lot of weight because he hasn't been able to eat," Huddleston said. Groshon, a Charleston native and 1976 graduate of The Citadel, and his bulldogs have been ambassadors of the school for about 13 years now, since the class of 2003 sparked the idea of an official mascot program.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
November 14, 2016
2. Perfect 10: Citadel claims outright SoCon title, Silver Shako
With the coveted Silver Shako and an outright Southern Conference title on the line Saturday at VMI, The Citadel had to dig deep. Deep into the depth chart, to replace some injured starters, including star slotback Cam Jackson. Deep into the playbook, to throw the ball for more yards than the Bulldogs have all season. And deep into themselves, for yet another fourth-quarter gutcheck. The Citadel found answers in all three places, finishing off the first perfect SoCon season in school history with a 30-20 win over VMI before 8,251 fans at Alumni Memorial Field in Lexington, Va. The 10-0 Bulldogs locked up an undefeated 8-0 season in the SoCon and outright league championship, their second straight SoCon title and fourth in school history. Already in the bag was an automatic bid to the FCS playoffs; now, the sixth-ranked Bulldogs are almost certain to receive a top-eight seed, first-round bye and guaranteed home game in the 24-team playoffs. "It's huge," said quarterback Dominique Allen, who threw for a season-high 133 yards and a touchdown, and also ran for 113 yards and another score. "It says so much about how far we've come as a program, the players, the coaching staff, the strength staff, everybody involved. If you believe and you want something badly enough, you can achieve it. And we just kept believing that we could do this." Starting slotbacks Jackson and Reggie Williams did not play, and neither did starting receiver Jorian Jordan.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
November 14, 2016
3. Graduate certificates entry point for documented advanced skills
Each year, employers seek ways to improve their business plans to connect with potential clients, while employees seek opportunities to improve their skills and increase their responsibilities; both, hopefully leading to a promotion for the individual or of the company. Graduate certificates appear to be a solution for each to gain the desired competitive edge. According to Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce, the fastest growing postsecondary credential is a graduate certificate. By 2010, postsecondary graduate certificates accounted for more than 22 percent of the credentials, up from six percent in 1980. So why should an engineer consider a graduate certificate or a company support an employee obtaining a graduate certificate? Each decision is, of course, personal, but some comments that have been noted are: 1) Broaden/deepen current professional skills; 2) Gain new professional skills for a career change; 3) Gain specialized skill set to focus the broad undergraduate degree; 4) Quickly add specific professional skills based on client demand; 5) Document a professional skill in as few as four courses (six months to one year, "low-risk test drive") while considering the time commitment for a master's degree and whether a thesis or a course-only degree best supports future perceived needs. Written by Col. Ronald W. Welch, USA (Ret.), Ph.D., PE, F.ASCE, F.ASEE, F.SAME, has served as Dean of The Citadel School of Engineering since 2011. He is a graduate of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point where he earned a B.S. in Engineering Mechanics and eventually became a professor and served in leadership roles for the Army while on active duty for almost 25 years. Welch earned his master's and Ph.D. in Civil Engineering from the University of Illinois. Since 1999, Welch has served as a mentor, program developer and coordinator of the nationally renowned Excellence in Civil Engineering Education Teaching Workshop sponsored by the American Society of Civil Engineers.
Published in: Charleston Business Magazine
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Monday
November 14, 2016
4. Gold Star mom shares story of ultimate sacrifice with cadets on Veterans Day
Karen Vaughn's son was killed in Afghanistan five years ago, and Friday she brought the story of his sacrifice to young cadets at The Citadel who may have to put their own lives on the line. "I say all the time to my son, I miss you with every breath," she said. Gold Star mother Karen Vaughn's son Aaron was more than an elite Navy Seal. He was a husband, a father and a Christian. He was a man who loved his country. "Aaron had almost zero expectation. Should he lay down his life for his country, he thought it would be the greatest honor on Earth," Karen said. Aaron was killed in Afghanistan in 2011. His chopper was shot down with 30 Americans on board. Since then, she has channeled her pain to fight. "I have dedicated my life to make Americans aware of what our fighters are dealing with on foreign soil," she said. On Veterans Day, Karen took her message to The Citadel. "It affects me very personally," junior cadet Grant Miller. "I had family that has served. Myself, I am going into the Army upon graduation. Having visuals of parents and their child being but in harm's way was striking and moving." While Aaron's sacrifice inspired cadets, Karen doesn't want another message to get lost. Among those messages - the plight of veterans who make it home to hard times, physical and mental problems. "We need to do better at recognizing veterans around the country and all service branches," said senior cadet Cody Ford. "I feel they made such an impact, and we need to give back to that and show our thanks."
Published in: WCIV-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
November 14, 2016
5. Citadel honors first African American, female cadet during homecoming
The Citadel celebrated homecoming Nov. 5 with events that kicked off the coming months of commemorating the 50th anniversary of African American cadets and the 20th anniversary of females in South Carolina Corps of Cadets. During the homecoming football game, The Citadel Black Alumni Association took the field along with Lt. Gen. John W. Rosa, USAF (Ret.), president of The Citadel, to honor the late Charles D. Foster, the institution's first black cadet, who began attending the school in 1966 and graduated in 1970. Foster's brother William was part of the group that took part in the on-field ceremony. "Charles Foster was a pioneer and should be honored, just as the first female cadet to graduate from the Corps, Nancy Mace, should be honored - what they did was not easy. Their courage and tenacity laid the foundation for The Citadel to become more diverse, and therefore stronger year after year," Rosa said. "Because of them, and those who followed the path they paved, a culture supporting diversity at all levels evolved, enabling us to work together to develop principled leaders for our nation."
Published in: Plametto Business Daily
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Monday
November 14, 2016
6. Is everyone wondering what just happened?
All politics is local, so let's start with that. Congratulations to Sumter Mayor Joe McElveen upon being elected to a fifth four-year term. Joe was born in Sumter, graduated from The Citadel, served in the Air Force, served on Sumter City Council, served in the South Carolina House of Representatives and now marks 16 years of service as Sumter mayor. How's that for a lifetime record of public service? Sumter has always had mayors we could all be proud of, and in my adult professional life I've had the privilege of being friends, working closely with and covering the late Mayor Bubba McElveen, Mayor Steve Creech and Mayor Joe McElveen. You won't find any finer men anywhere in this big old country, and Sumter is extremely fortunate. The same can be said about former Sumter Item intern now South Carolina Sen. Thomas McElveen, who was re-elected to a second term. Thomas, like his father, is a dedicated public servant who is smart, accessible, responsive and trustworthy. In this day and age, that's not something you hear about all politicians. Thanks to all of the other local men and women who take the time to serve the public on various boards and commissions, city and county councils, in the state legislature and in Washington. Our job as a local newspaper is to report on their work and hold them accountable to the public, but if good people don't accept the responsibility of public service, then communities suffer. It's kind of like communities that don't have a responsible local newspaper. They become what's known as "news deserts" that shrivel up and die like an Old West ghost town.
Published in: The Sumter Item
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Monday
November 14, 2016
7. Hires and promotions
Lighting - Jamey Nelson has joined Carolina Lanterns and Lighting as vice president of sales. Previously, he was director of business development at Palmetto Surfacing Inc. He has a bachelor's degree from Lander University and a master's in business administration from The Citadel.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
November 14, 2016
8a. The Citadel wins a shootout on the hardwood
The Citadel men's basketball team made 17 three-pointers and Zane Najdawi posted his second consecutive double-double as the Bulldogs rolled to a 146-84 win over Johnson University (Fla.) on Sunday afternoon. The 146 points shattered the previous program record for most points in a game by 14. The Bulldogs (1-1) got off to a quick start in the game and never slowed down, scoring five points in the first 35 seconds thanks to three-pointer by Matt Frierson and a layup by Leandro Allende. Aaron Washington extended The Citadel's lead to 13-5 three minutes later, draining a three-pointer for the first points of his career. Washington finished the game with seven points and two steals. The Bulldogs continued to pour it on and with 6:37 left in the first half led 51-26 after Bobby Duncan made a tough layup and then converted the and-one. Frierson drilled his fourth three-pointer of the game with 3:42 remaining in the half to pad the 'Dogs lead to 28. The sophomore finished the game with 21 points, nailing seven three-pointers and recording five steals in just his second career start. The Citadel took a 66-43 lead into the halftime break, tallying 30 points off of 18 forced turnovers. The 66 points marked the first time since Nov. 27, 2015, that the ‘Dogs scored at least 60 points in a half. The game also marked the first time since Feb. 27 vs. VMI that The Citadel hit at least 10 three-pointers in a game. The 17 treys made by the 'Dogs ties for fourth best in program history.
Published in: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
November 14, 2016
8b. College of Charleston opens basketball season against rival Citadel
College of Charleston guard Cameron Johnson has heard all about Duggarball - The Citadel's up-tempo, three-point shooting offense designed to overwhelm and wear down an opponent - nicknamed after Bulldogs head coach Duggar Baucom. A year ago, Baucom preached "Embrace the Pace" to his players, but the new offensive system translated into just 10 wins. With nine new faces in the lineup, the Bulldogs appear to be more prepared to run the kind of system that Baucom had envisioned when he took over the program. And that's just fine with Johnson, whose team plays host to The Citadel on Friday at 7 p.m. in the season-opener for both teams. "They're going to do what they do and we’re going to do what we do," said Johnson, who averaged 12.3 points a game last season for the Cougars. "They like to get up-and-down the floor and shoot a bunch of three-pointers. We're going to defend and rebound. That's what we do." The Cougars, who were missing Joe Chealey and Grant Riller last year due to injuries, figure to be a more up-tempo team this season with their return. While the Cougars will still lean heavily on their defense and rebounding, they will have more options and more depth this season. "They are going to press and shoots threes," said College of Charleston coach Earl Grant. "Obviously, we have to be prepared for their press defense. When you play against a pressing team, you have to be aggressive with your offense and try to attack them. They do a great job doing what they like to do and we have to be ready for that."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
November 14, 2016
8c. Strong work ethic leads Greenville High's Richardson to The Citadel
Ashlee Richardson looked beyond golf before signing a scholarship offer Wednesday to attend The Citadel. "I like the lifestyle - maybe I'll even join the military after college," said the Greenville High senior, who capped a strong 2016 golf year by earning all-state honors with a seventh-place finish in the recent Class AAAA high school state tournament. "I like the structure. I think it will be a different experience than what other student-athletes are experiencing." Richardson said she looked forward to marching and the experiences of being a "knob," the term used for first-year Citadel students, who must show deference to upperclassmen. Richardson showed she could thrive with discipline and structure during the past year, especially since the summer. That's when she began tailoring her practicing to working on weaknesses and started spending daily two-hour sessions on the putting green. "My putting got a lot better," she said. "I worked really, really hard this summer." Though she attracted more attention from recruiters after a tie for third place at The Blade, where she shot rounds of 74 and 73 at Thornblade Club, Richardson said she had always been interested in Citadel.
Published in: GreenvilleOnline.com
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Friday
November 11, 2016
1. Uncanny connection brings pride for cadet from Holland on Veterans Day and beyond

A Dutch high school basketball player, Tom Koopman, received a call from a Citadel athletics recruiter in 2013 asking him to consider a full basketball scholarship to attend an American military college called The Citadel, in Charleston, South Carolina. Koopman had never heard of the college which was very far away from his home in Holland, but eventually he accepted the offer, matriculated as a freshman in August of 2013 and began playing for the Bulldogs. The 6’8 center is now a senior, a successful cadet and a leader on the team. Cadet Tom Koopman and his father attend Class of 2017 ring ceremony in Oct. “This was the start of something unique. I learned from the recruiter that The Citadel was a military college, but until you are here experiencing it, it’s hard to understand just how special this place is,” said Koopman. “It was quite the struggle in the beginning, but as cadets develop, they begin to see the bigger picture and understand the value of earning a place in the South Carolina Corps of Cadets.” Koopman received his coveted Citadel ring in October during Parents’ Weekend. His father, Patrick, flew to Charleston from their home in Baarlo, Holland, to celebrate the achievement with his son. But before the Koopmans walked through the symbolic giant gold ring, they had something special in hand that would connect their family with the college from decades earlier.

Published in: Citadel Newsroom - online
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Friday
November 11, 2016
2. Citadel War Memorial to honor fallen alumni

With alumni having served their nation for nearly 175 years, The Citadel's Class of 1967 has funded a $1 million project, The Citadel War Memorial, at a Charleston groundbreaking ceremony Nov. 4. Envisioned as a place for cadets, alumni, students, faculty and staff as well as campus visitors to gather in honor of the institution’s fallen heroes, the memorial groundbreaking coincided with The Citadel’s Homecoming for 2016, observed at the designated site along the campus’ aptly named Avenue of Remembrance in a spot adjacent to Summerall Chapel. Lt. Gen. John B. Sams Jr., member of the Class of 1967 and chair of The Citadel Board of Visitors, expressed satisfaction with the inception of the project, noting that it has been on the table for several years. “I am pleased that this vision is finally coming to fruition and that we are able to honor all Citadel alumni who have made the ultimate sacrifice,” Sams said. The memorial design will feature iron gates leading the way into a courtyard with black granite walls bearing inscriptions about The Citadel’s role in history.

Published in: Palmetto Business Daily - online
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Friday
November 11, 2016
Chester bridge named for Army hero

Chesterfield County government and schools officials named the Chester Bridge in honor of fallen Sgt. Aaron X. Wittman, U.S. Army.  At a Nov. 6 ceremony at Chester Village Green, the bridge was officially named the Sergeant Aaron Xavier Wittman Memorial Bridge. Representatives and alumni from The Citadel, Military College of South Carolina, where Wittman graduated, attended the ceremony. Lt. Col. Jack W. Parker Jr., U.S. Army and The Citadel Class of 1987, read a poem that he wrote in Wittman’s honor. Wittman died on Jan. 10, 2013, while serving during Operation Enduring Freedom. Wittman was assigned to 3rd Battalion, 69th Armor Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division from Fort Stewart, Georgia. He died in the Khogyani district of Afghanistan, from injuries caused by small-arms fire. Wittman graduated from L.C. Bird High School in 2003, where he lettered in both wrestling and track. He then followed his family’s proud military tradition by attending The Citadel, Lima Company Class of 2007. He served in the South Carolina National Guard while attending The Citadel and was deployed, along with other classmates, to Afghanistan with the 218th Brigade Combat Team in 2007. After returning from his deployment in 2008, he returned to the Citadel as a veteran student, completed his last semester, and graduated with the Class of 2009. Wittman enlisted in the U.S. Army in 2010. He received numerous awards, including the Purple Heart and Bronze Star posthumously.

Published in: The Progress Index - website
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Friday
November 11, 2016
Mike Groshon, keeper of Citadel's bulldogs, battles leukemia

During this happiest of Citadel football seasons — the Bulldogs are 9-0 for the first time ever — there's been something missing at Johnson Hagood Stadium. Mike Groshon, best known to Citadel fans as the keeper of bulldog mascots General and Boo, has been absent from the sidelines and pre-game tailgates during the last two games. “Probably the first home games he's missed in 30 years,” said one of Groshon's best friends, Citadel track and field coach Jody Huddleston.  Groshon, whose official title is assistant athletic director for facilities, has been in the hospital, fighting for his life against a type of leukemia known as chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma.  At age 63, Groshon just finished a second round of chemotherapy. “He's fighting hard, but he's lost of a lot of weight because he hasn't been able to eat,” Huddleston said.  Groshon, a Charleston native and 1976 graduate of The Citadel, and his bulldogs have been ambassadors of the school for about 13 years now, since the class of 2003 sparked the idea of an official mascot program.

Published in: The Post and Courier - http://www.postandcourier.com/sports/mike-groshon-keeper-of-citadel-s-bulldogs-battles-leukemia/article_9cae891e-a764-11e6-8d34-630ed303577a.html
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Friday
November 11, 2016
Six Byrnes Rebels sign letters of intent

Six Byrnes athletes will continue their athletic careers as they signed in various collegiate sports on Wednesday at the District 5 Fine Arts Center.Parker Birch, a shortstop, signed to play softball at Erskine. She has a career batting average of .362 with 95 RBIs and 120 runs scored. Birch said that she’s looking forward to developing her skills at the college level. “They are family there,” she said. “I’m excited to see that. I’m excited to join them and hopefully make a difference. I hope I’m going to keep getting better this year. …Hopefully my batting average will stay up and hard work will pay off.” Hayden Brown signed to play basketball at The Citadel. He helped lead the Rebels to their first state championship in 23 years last season. He scored 25 points with 12 rebounds and two blocks in the championship game. “I’m really excited about going to The Citadel,” Brown said. “I see big things happening with the basketball program. It’s always been my goal to make the NCAA Tournament, and I think that we can do that.”

Published in: Spartanburg Hearld - online
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Thursday
November 10, 2016
1. The Citadel Honors First African-American Cadet
During its 2016 Homecoming weekend, The Citadel honored the first black cadet, the late Charles D. Foster, who entered The Citadel in 1966 and graduated in 1970. Nancy Mace, the first female cadet, was also honored for the occasion. "Charles Foster was a pioneer and should be honored, just as the first female cadet to graduate from the Corps, Nancy Mace, should be honored - what they did was not easy. "Their courage and tenacity laid the foundation for The Citadel to become more diverse, and therefore stronger year after year," said Lt. Gen. John W. Rosa, USAF (Ret.), president of The Citadel. "Because of them, and those who followed the path they paved, a culture supporting diversity at all levels evolved, enabling us to work together to develop principled leaders for our nation." Under Rosa's leadership since 2006, The LEAD Plan 2018 was created, outlining the college's strategic plan to enroll a diverse community of leaders as faculty and staff and to expand cadet and student diversity. Foundational training and education related to the ethical treatment of cultural, gender, racial and religious diversity matters was expanded for the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, and Rosa established a Diversity Council comprised of cadets, students, faculty and staff. Additionally, Rosa has overseen the development of a robust menu of clubs, activities, workshops and services dedicated to fostering an understanding of issues related to diversity, as well as to supporting the success of female and minority students.
Published in: The Charleston Chronicle
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Thursday
November 10, 2016
2a. Citadel Class of 1990 alumnus, Judge Tillman "Tripp" Self, III, named to Georgia Court of Appeals
Gov. Nathan Deal continued a transformation of the judiciary on Wednesday by tapping three new Georgia Supreme Court justices and two new Georgia Court of Appeals judges. The governor tapped Court of Appeals Judges Michael Boggs and Nels Peterson and state Solicitor General Britt Grant to the state's top bench. He selected state Sen. Charlie Bethel, R-Dalton, and Bibb County Superior Court Judge Tripp Self III to replace them. Deal won approval to expand the Georgia Supreme Court from seven justices to nine earlier this year, and last year he pushed an expansion of the appeals court from 12 to 15 judges. He will appoint a majority of the state's top bench and more than a quarter of the appeals court by the end of his term.
Published in: Atlanta Journal-Constitution
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Thursday
November 10, 2016
2b. tripp self
tripp self
Published in: Governor Nathan Deal Newsroom
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Thursday
November 10, 2016
2c. tripp self
tripp self
Published in: The Macon Telegraph
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Thursday
November 10, 2016
3. County honors fallen Soldier at bridge-naming ceremony
Several hundred community members attended the Sgt. Aaron X. Wittman Bridge Dedication ceremony Sunday at Chester Village Green. Wittman - whose parents live in the Chester area and are supported by the Survivor Outreach Program at Fort Lee - was killed Jan. 10, 2013, while serving in Afghanistan. He suffered fatal injuries from small arms fire when his unit came under attack while on mounted patrol. He was assigned to a 3rd Infantry Division brigade combat team out of Fort Stewart, Ga. It was his second deployment in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. "We are proud (to) recognize Aaron by naming this bridge in his honor," said Steve Elswick, chairman of the Chesterfield County Board of Supervisors, during remarks at the ceremony. "It is a fitting way to memorialize his life and the sacrifices he made to defend our country." Attendees also included many other county and school district administrators, as well as faculty members of Chester's L.C. Byrd High School from which Wittman graduated in 2003. Representatives from Fort Lee and The Citadel, Military College of South Carolina, where Wittman completed a four-year program in 2009 were present as well. Lt. Col. Jack W. Parker Jr., Citadel Class of 1987, read a poem in the fallen Soldier's honor at the ceremony. Wittman's parents, Carol and Duane, talked about the ceremony and their son's memory in a Chester Village News article published the week prior to the memorial event.
Published in: Fort Lee Traveller
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Thursday
November 10, 2016
4. Precinct clerk and academic coach in The Citadel Academic Support Center, Melinda Norris, featured in USA Today
Precinct clerk Melinda Norris dealt with a unique situation at her polling place in South Carolina Tuesday: A voter's water broke. At her polling place at St. Johns High in Johns Island, S.C., a pregnant woman in line wasn't feeling great, so the voter got out of the standing line, and moved to her car in the curbside line reserved for those who are unable to stand. That's where she realized she was about to go into labor. Norris, 50, told USA TODAY on the phone that she met the woman and her husband outside, and they asked her if there was any way they could vote without waiting in line. "I brought the (ballot) machine out to the parking lot, and we got them processed," Norris said. "It was really funny, because he kept telling her to vote straight ticket, and she said, 'I can't!'" After the pregnant voter submitted her ballot and went to the hospital, another funny thing happened: Norris encountered two more very pregnant women in line who were voting on their due dates. They didn't go into labor, though. "I'm just glad I didn't have to do a delivery," Norris, who's been working polls for the last three elections, joked.
Published in: USA Today
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Thursday
November 10, 2016
5. Meet Lt. Col. Stuart Jolly - Our New EVP
We're proud to announce that Lt. Col. Stuart Jolly has joined the Compact for America team as Executive Vice President of Development. With LTC Jolly's leadership, we expect incredible things. Here's why: Stuart Jolly served as the National Field Director for the Donald J. Trump for President for the first 7 months of the campaign responsible for national political strategy and hiring in all Primary & Caucus states. He personally ran NH, SC, and NC and won 22 state primaries and caucuses leading up to the NY primary. Jolly is also a retired Lieutenant Colonel from the US Army where he served as an Aviation officer flying UH‐60 Blackhawks in the 101st Airborne Division at Fort Campbell, KY and 3rd Infantry Division in Europe. He served with distinction as a Company Commander in Germany and as a Foreign Area Officer in the Defense Attache Office (DAO) in the US Embassy in Brussels, Belgium. LTC Jolly is also a Veteran of the Gulf War where he earned a Bronze Star and two Air Medals for his service in Iraq... Stuart holds degrees and is a graduate of The Citadel in Charleston, SC (BA Political Science) and a Masters Degree in International Studies in Business from East Carolina University in North Carolina. And from the military, Jolly is a graduate of the Defense Language Institute (DLI) at the Presidio of Monterey, California, the US Army Flight School at Fort Rucker, Alabama, and the Command and General Staff College (CGSC) at Fort Leavenworth, KS.
Published in: Western Free Press
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Thursday
November 10, 2016
6a. Melvin awards scholarships
Melvin United Methodist Church recently presented scholarships for the 2016-2017 school year to Haley Meeks, Amanda Wilson, Emily Green and Daxton Derrick. Meeks, daughter of Robert and Robyn Meeks, Cumberland, is attending Allegany College of Maryland and is pursuing her associate degree in the medical assistant program. She is a 2010 graduate of Fort Hill High School. Wilson, daughter of Sam and Cathy Wilson, Cumberland, is attending ACM and is working toward her associate degree in childhood education. Wilson is a 2015 graduate of Fort Hill High School. Green is attending ACM, pursuing her associate degree in nursing. She is a 2013 graduate of Fort Hill High School and is the daughter of Steve and Willie Green. Derrick is attending The Citadel, Military College of South Carolina, Charleston, pursuing a degree in political science with a concentration on military and international affairs. A 2016 graduate of Fort Hill High School, he is the son of James and Tammy Derrick, formerly of Cumberland.
Published in: Cumberland Times-News
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Thursday
November 10, 2016
6b. RCHS seniors apply to colleges
The Randolph County High School Senior Class of 2017 engaged in College Application Week Oct. 31-Nov. 4. Each student applied to college or a post-secondary institution with 100 percent admission to higher learning. Out of 75 seniors, there was a total of 29 colleges and universities students applied to throughout the United States. The local colleges and universities were Southern Union, Auburn University, Gadsden State and University of West Georgia with some as far as California Art Institute, Ohio Christian College, Savannah School of Fine Arts and The Citadel. Career coach Robin Cottle and RCHS counselor Rhonda Loveless worked with the students individually and in groups to facilitate the process of working toward the future with this promising senior class. Cottle and Loveless have been working with the senior class building resumes and career interest inventories and helping seniors begin the college journey. It is an exciting time for the seniors of 2017. Now is the time to search for scholarships.
Published in: The Randolph Leader
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Thursday
November 10, 2016
7a. Early signing period: Barron Collier has four athletes commit to college programs
Julie Tanner, the lone volleyball player, also went Division I. She signed a full athletic scholarship offer to play at The Citadel, a military college in Charleston, South Carolina. Tanner, a 6-foot-1 middle blocker, didn't intend on attending a military college. But when she took a tour of The Citadel's campus, she loved it. Plus her dad, uncle and grandfather served in the Navy. "The structure and the atmosphere in general makes it an amazing place," Tanner said. "It was nothing like any of the other schools I looked at." Students at The Citadel are not required to enlist in the military after graduation, and Tanner said she likely won't.
Published in: Naples Daily News
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Thursday
November 10, 2016
7b. National Signing Day list - Montverde Academy
Maria Contreras from Montverde Academy signed to play soccer at The Citadel in Charleston, SC.
Published in: Orlando Sentinel
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Thursday
November 10, 2016
7c. Eight Dorman athletes moving on to next level
Eight Dorman athletes signed national letters of intent in various sports during a ceremony held on Wednesday inside the arena. Will Graham will play tennis at The Citadel.
Published in: GoUpstate.com
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Thursday
November 10, 2016
8. William James 'Sully' Sullivan Jr., 53 Obituary
William James "Sully" Sullivan, Jr., 53, of Columbia, passed away unexpectedly Saturday, Nov. 5. He was born in Bayonne, N.J., on Nov. 30, 1962, to the late William Sullivan Sr. and Elizabeth "Betty" Foderaro. Sully graduated from Kempsville High School, and went on to receive a bachelor's degree from The Citadel Military College of Charleston in 1984. After graduating, he went on to run his own car lot, Sully's Wholesale in Summerville for many years. He was married to his former wife, Kaye Barnes Sullivan, for 20 years and had two children who were his pride and joy. Sully was a member of Oscar Company at the Citadel and was a pitcher for the Bulldogs. He loved his college and the many lasting friendships made there. He enjoyed attending Homecoming each year and reconnecting with old and new friends. Sully was a 19-year survivor of Stage 4 non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma and had devoted his life to supporting those afflicted with the disease. He loved participating in "Relay for Life" each year, and Camp Happy Days as a counselor. He had a warm and loving spirit, and always saw the good in every situation. He had a passion for sharing hope to those afflicted with cancer and visited hospitals; especially children, to encourage them along their journey sharing God's love and grace. He always wanted to help others, and was an organ donor. His donation gift of life has gone on to save two lives, through kidney donation here in SC. A stranger's vision will be repaired through cornea donation, and with his tissue donation, many lives will be touched as well. We are rejoicing in knowing his wish to help others will be carried on.
Published in: Cola Daily
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Wednesday
November 9, 2016
1. How SC propelled Trump's candidacy
If Donald Trump moves into the Oval Office in January, he can thank South Carolina for more than just its nine electoral votes. The Palmetto State reclaimed its role this year as a Republican kingmaker, giving the wild-card candidate a crucial primary victory in February. South Carolinians then stuck with Trump through his myriad of political stumbles, all the way to November. "South Carolina showed that he wasn't a fluke," Winthrop University political scientist Scott Huffmon said. South Carolina's "First in the South" GOP primary has a near-sterling record of picking the eventual GOP nominee, in part because of its broad and diverse Republican electorate. "South Carolina is seen as a state where every streak of Republicanism and every streak of conservativism is represented," Huffmon said. The lone exception to the S.C. GOP's perfect record of picking their party's nominee was four years ago, when former U.S. House Speaker Newt Gingrich rode the momentum from two solid debate performances to an S.C. primary victory. After his S.C. primary win, Gingrich won just one other primary - in his home state of Georgia - and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney became the eventual GOP nominee. By the time the S.C. Republican Primary rolled around in February, Trump had shocked pundits and a crowded field of GOP competitors with a second-place finish in Iowa's primary and then a victory in New Hampshire's contest. But questions lingered around the celebrity businessman's campaign. "Is he a for-real candidate?" asked Scott Buchanan, a political scientist at The Citadel. "He wins New Hampshire, and then the next question is: 'Can he win in the South?' "That's a critical question for GOP contenders to answer. In today's political climate, Republican presidential candidates must sweep virtually every Southern and Midwestern state to reach 270 Electoral College votes.
Published in: The State
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Wednesday
November 9, 2016
2. CCSD announces new Interim Chief Accountability Officer appointment
Charleston County School District (CCSD) has appointed Dr. Valerie Harrison as the new interim chief accountability officer. Previous to this appointment, Harrison served as the District's interim chief academic officer for the past year. In this new role, Harrison will be responsible for leading collaborative efforts to design, recommend, implement, and monitor a district-wide accountability system for greater equity, access, and achievement for all students. She will also lead collaborative efforts to develop, implement, and monitor innovative programs to expand opportunities and outcomes for all students in order to ensure students' cultural, academic, social/emotional, and individual needs are addressed. "I look forward to presenting, establishing, and monitoring the implementation of a comprehensive accountability system," said Harrison. "I believe we can take data on student learning and school effectiveness and use it to improve learning opportunities, academic achievement, equity, and access for all students in Charleston County School District." As chief accountability officer, Harrison will provide learning opportunities for district and school staff members in an effort to enhance inclusion and promote appreciation of diversity. She will also ensure linkage to various community groups to further cultivate and develop positive relationships. Harrison will oversee Student Assessment and Accountability, School Choice, Innovative Programs and Grants, and Diversity and Inclusion Initiatives within the District. "Valerie will excel in this new role," said Gerrita Postlewait, CCSD Superintendent. "She is the right individual to lead these efforts and will foster the systemic change needed to help close the achievement gap for our students." Harrison holds both a bachelor's and master's in English from South Carolina State University. She received her terminal degree in curriculum and instruction from the University of South Carolina. She also studied at The Citadel, Vanderbilt, and the Center for Creative Leadership.
Published in: Moultrie News
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Wednesday
November 9, 2016
3. Inside Cam Jackson's game-saving run for The Citadel
Near the end of Cam Jackson's 63-yard run against Samford on Saturday, Citadel play-by-play man Mike Legg's voice rose with excitement. "And he is finally - no, he's still up!" Legg exclaimed. "Twenty, 15, 10, I can't believe that run by Cam Jackson!" Legg was not the only one who couldn't believe that run. Jackson's 63-yard scamper – at a moment when the Bulldogs seemed dead in the water, down by 10 points with little more than five minutes to go, facing third and 7 – saved the game and The Citadel's shot at a perfect run through the Southern Conference. Jackson's run set up the Tyler Renew touchdown that got the Bulldogs to within 34-31 with 4:24 left. Cody Clark kicked field goals to force overtime and for a 37-34 lead in OT, and Samford bounced a field goal off the left upright as The Citadel (9-0, 7-0) clinched at least a share of a second straight SoCon title and an automatic berth in the FCS playoffs. The Citadel, ranked No. 6 in the FCS Coaches Poll, can clinch the outright SoCon championship with a win Saturday at VMI (3-6, 1-5).
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
November 8, 2016
1. Live 5 Investigates: Challenges in minority officer recruitment
Police departments and sheriff's offices typically hope the diversity of their officers reflects the community they are policing. A Live 5 investigation shows getting and keeping minority officers continues to be a struggle for some local agencies. We collected data from local agencies to compare five years of demographic trends. Overall, African American officers are often underrepresented when compared to a city or county's census population. In several departments, Asian and Hispanic officers were underrepresented or completely unrepresented when compared to the population. Charleston PD has one of the biggest recruitment efforts. They have built connections with local universities, churches and community groups to engage with potential recruits. "This isn't over for us yet- it'll continue to be a challenge," said Lt. Thomas Adams with the Charleston Police Department... "If a community does not trust its policing agency, that's where the issues occur," said Professor Ed Lugo. He is retired from the Secret Service after 25 years of service, and now teaches with The Citadel's Department of Criminal Justice. "Diversity is an opportunity to leverage access to the community," Lugo explained. "The community is simply more apt to cooperate with people they relate with. So the diversity and demographics of being able to match demographically your police department with your community is a wonderful thing. But that isn't the only answer. Because just getting someone that looks like 'me' doesn't satisfy the recruiting process." He says officers also need to be smart, charismatic, and empathetic. That's one reason CPD is so focused on the pipeline of local and state colleges and their related internship program. Lugo added, "The issues of finding these personnel, it is not just law enforcement's responsibility. The community is a stakeholder here. It is their responsibility that if they see a good candidate, they should recruit also. They should make recommendations."
Published in: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Tuesday
November 8, 2016
2a. Celebrating Citadel Diversity Milestones in the 50th and 20th Years
The Citadel's 2016 Homecoming weekend will kick off a number of special events being held in coming months to commemorate the 50th anniversary of African American cadets and the 20th anniversary of females in the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. During the homecoming football game on Nov. 5, members of The Citadel Black Alumni Association took the field, alongside the President of The Citadel, to honor the college's first black cadet, the late Charles D. Foster, who entered The Citadel in 1966 and graduated in 1970. Foster's brother, William, will be with the group. The association recently arranged for the reading of a congressional record in honor of Charles Foster, on the floor of the U.S. Senate with the assistance of U.S. Senator Tim Scott. "Charles Foster was a pioneer and should be honored, just as the first female cadet to graduate from the Corps, Nancy Mace, should be honored - what they did was not easy. Their courage and tenacity laid the foundation for The Citadel to become more diverse, and therefore stronger year after year," said Lt. Gen. John W. Rosa, USAF (Ret.), president of The Citadel. "Because of them, and those who followed the path they paved, a culture supporting diversity at all levels evolved, enabling us to work together to develop principled leaders for our nation." Mace was born into a Citadel family, with her father, Brig. Gen. James E. Mace, having been the former commandant of cadets and one of the college's most decorated graduates. Her mother, Anne J. Mace, Ph.D., graduated with a master's degree in teaching from The Citadel Graduate College in 1972. (Women have attended The Citadel Graduate College since it was formed in the mid-1960s.)
Published in: CharlestonCEO.com
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Tuesday
November 8, 2016
2b. Celebrating Citadel Diversity Milestones in the 50th and 20th years
The Citadel's 2016 Homecoming weekend will kick off a number of special events being held in coming months to commemorate the 50th anniversary of African American cadets and the 20th anniversary of females in the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. During the homecoming football game on Nov. 5, members of The Citadel Black Alumni Association will take the field, alongside the President of The Citadel, to honor the college's first black cadet, the late Charles D. Foster, who entered The Citadel in 1966 and graduated in 1970. Foster's brother, William, will be with the group. The association recently arranged for the reading of a congressional record in honor of Charles Foster, on the floor of the U.S. Senate with the assistance of U.S. Senator Tim Scott. "Charles Foster was a pioneer and should be honored, just as the first female cadet to graduate from the Corps, Nancy Mace, should be honored - what they did was not easy. Their courage and tenacity laid the foundation for The Citadel to become more diverse, and therefore stronger year after year," said Lt. Gen. John W. Rosa, USAF (Ret.), president of The Citadel. "Because of them, and those who followed the path they paved, a culture supporting diversity at all levels evolved, enabling us to work together to develop principled leaders for our nation."
Published in: LowcountryBizSC.com
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Tuesday
November 8, 2016
3. Some advice for new president, from South Carolinians who've been there dispensing it
Running for president is an act of colossal ego. Without a healthy dose of self-belief no candidate could survive the brutal process of a national campaign, and that's doubly true this year. But on Wednesday, regardless of the outcome of this always nasty, angry campaign, the run for the office phase will be over. The winner will have to focus on the next phase: preparing to be president, and that requires intense humility. No matter who wins, no matter what his or her background, the vastness of the job ahead is awe-inspiring. "This is still the most powerful office on Earth," said South Carolina native Tucker Eskew, who served in the administration of George W. Bush. "The decisions they will make will matter. The mistakes they may make can be existential. No one should laugh off the awfulness of this process. But no one should forget that once there's a winner, that winner has real power. They don't listen to the advice of others at some substantial risk." In past transitions, South Carolinians have played important roles in this process. Eskew, today a political communications strategist in Washington, helped with Bush's transition. Donald Fowler, 81, a political scientist who's been a professor at the University of South Carolina and The Citadel and is a former chairman of the Democratic National Committee, helped prepare Bill Clinton and Jimmy Carter to take office. Eskew and Fowler agreed to share their insights on the process, which both agreed is central to the success of a presidency, even if it seems out of step with what it takes to reach that office. It's important to remember that the clock is ticking the whole time: The transition ends Jan. 20, when the new president takes the oath of office and President Barack Obama leaves the White House. Fowler explained: "The really good ones, they admit they need to learn and reach out for help. Being president is the world’s toughest job."
Published in: McClatchy DC and multiple media outlets across the country
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Tuesday
November 8, 2016
4. Psst, you really don’t have to have an ID to vote in SC
How strong is South Carolina's voter ID law? Not very. On Tuesday, voters will be asked to present a government-issued photo ID when they go to vote. But a voter who doesn't have one still can cast a ballot, thanks to a federal court order. In 2011, South Carolina's GOP-controlled Legislature passed a law requiring voters to show a photo ID before casting a ballot. But after a legal challenge, a federal court opened a loophole in the law, saying voters without ID can vote, as long as they can cite an impediment that stopped them from getting one. As a result, voters without an ID will be able to cast a provisional ballot Tuesday that will be counted when the final vote total is certified. "It counts as long as the voter is who they say they are, and the reason given can't be proven false," said Chris Whitmire of the S.C. Election Commission. This will be the first presidential election with the S.C. voter ID requirement in place. A pre-election challenge to the law in 2012 pushed back its implementation. In the 2014 election, only 99 provisional ballots statewide were rejected by county election boards. (Provisional ballots can be cast if there are other problems as well with a voter's registration, including if their address has changed.) As it stands, the voter ID law hasn't halted many South Carolinians from voting. Scott Buchanan, a political science professor at The Citadel, examined county-level data and found only a "couple hundred" ballots were cast by someone impeded from getting an ID - about 0.01 percent of all ballots cast. "Contrary to what many people thought, turnout actually went up for white and black voters" in 2014 over the 2010 election, held before the voter ID law went into effect, Buchanan said.
Published in: Myrtle Beach Online
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Tuesday
November 8, 2016
5. The Citadel moves up one spot to No. 6 in FCS Coaches Poll
The Citadel moved up one place to No. 6 in the FCS Coaches Poll released Monday after the Bulldogs clinched a share of the Southern Conference championship with last weeks' 37-34 overtime win over Samford. The Bulldogs (9-0, 7-0) also earned the SoCon's automatic bid to the FCS playoffs. The Citadel can claim the outright SoCon title with a win at VMI on Saturday. Charleston Southern (5-3, 2-1 Big South) dropped from No. 9 to No. 14 in the Coaches Poll after a 17-10 loss to Gardner-Webb. The Buccaneers must win out at Liberty and against Kennesaw State to claim a second straight Big South crown and automatic bid to the playoffs. Liberty (6-3, 4-0) moved into the FCS Coaches Poll at No. 24, and can claim the league title and automatic bid with a win over CSU. The top five spots remained the same from last week's coaches' poll, with Sam Houston State (9-0), Jacksonville State (8-1), Eastern Washington (8-1), North Dakota State (8-1) and James Madison (8-1) at the top.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
November 8, 2016
6. Citadel's Renew named National Offensive Player of the Week
National Offensive Player of the Week: Tyler Renew, The Citadel, FB, Sr., 5-11, 217, Columbia, South Carolina In The Citadel's triple-option offense, Renew plays the position known as B-Back, but he was strictly "A" material in a Top 25 win against Samford. Renew carried the ball 45 times for 285 yards and three touchdowns - all career highs - as the unbeaten Bulldogs prevailed 37-34 in overtime, clinching at least a share of their second straight Southern Conference title and an FCS playoff bid. While coming within one yard of The Citadel's single-game rushing record, he scored on runs of 55, 58 and 4 yards.
Published in: FoxSports.com
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Tuesday
November 8, 2016
7. Game time announced for The Citadel-North Carolina game
The Citadel football team's regular season finale at North Carolina on Nov. 19 has been selected for a 3:30 p.m. kickoff, it was announced Monday. The Bulldogs and Tar Heels are meeting for the fifth time in the series and first time since 2009, with each game taking place in Chapel Hill. The game will be broadcast on ACC Network Extra, which is available on ESPN3 and the ESPN app. The Citadel Athletic Ticket Office has a limited number of tickets remaining for the game. Tickets are $40 each and are located in sections 100 and 101 in the lower bowl of Kenan Memorial Stadium. Fans interested in purchasing tickets should contact The Citadel Athletic Ticket Office at 843-953-DOGS (3647). North Carolina is currently 7-2 and in first place in the ACC Coastal Division. The Tar Heels, ranked 15th in the latest Associated Press poll, travel to Duke this week for a Thursday night game on ESPN. The 5th-ranked Bulldogs, who are 9-0 and have clinched the Southern Conference's automatic bid to the NCAA FCS Playoffs and at least a share of their second straight conference title, travel to VMI this week. The Military Classic of the South kicks off at 1:30 p.m. in Lexington, Virginia, and will be broadcast on ESPN3.
Published in: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Tuesday
November 8, 2016
8. Citadel welcomes nine freshmen for second season of "Duggarball"
"Duggarball" was a shock to the system for Citadel players last season. "It was a huge difference," says senior guard Warren Sledge. Coach Duggar Baucom came to The Citadel last year from VMI, vowing to implement his "Embrace the Pace" style of pressing, 3-point shooting basketball. The Bulldogs went from one of the slowest-paced teams in Division I to the fastest, averaging 80 possessions per game according to stats guru Ken Pomeroy. After a 7-4 start, however, the faster pace did not translate into victories. The Citadel finished Baucom's first season at 10-22 overall and 3-15 in the Southern Conference, good for last place in the league. For year two of Duggarball, Baucom recruited nine freshmen whom he hopes are more suited to his style - a quicker, more athletic player who can maintain 40 minutes of frenetic, up-and-down basketball. "I think Coach Baucom and his staff did a great job of recruiting this class," said Sledge, who averaged 10.3 points per game last season. "It's a bunch of talented kids who come from great places. They are doing a great job of of transitioning to Coach's style of ball, and they've matured a lot over the summer." Two of the freshmen are likely to be in the starting lineup when the Bulldogs open the season Friday at College of Charleston - point guard Frankie Johnson of Darlington and 6-6 swingman Leandre Allende of Puerto Rico.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
November 7, 2016
1a. Citadel breaks ground on new war memorial
South Carolina's military college broke ground this weekend on a new monument honoring its more than 700 alumni who have died in service to their country. The Citadel's new $1 million War Memorial is entirely funded by the Class of 1967 and will feature the names of the fallen former cadets, along with a history of their actions. According to the school, the memorial will have iron gates leading visitors into an interior courtyard, where black granite walls will display descriptions of The Citadel's involvement in wars and conflicts since 1846. Board of Visitors Chairman Gen. (Lt.) John Sams of the class 1967 helped spearhead the project. He says 745 names will be included on the finished monument when it opens for Homecoming Weekend 2017, with room for more if needed. Sams, who lost ten classmates to the Vietnam War, says it's vitally important their names and stories are remembered. "Each name there is represented by a fmily. It's representative of brothers and sisters, parents and friends. So for each of those names, there's an independent story."
Published in: South Carolina Radio Network
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Monday
November 7, 2016
1b. New Citadel War Memorial will honor fallen alumni
A new war memorial is in the works to honor fallen Citadel heroes. Friday afternoon was the start of Citadel homecoming and also the groundbreaking ceremony to commence construction of the new Citadel War Memorial. The new Citadel War Memorial will be located along the Avenue of Remembrance between Summerall Chapel and Mark Clark Hall. The memorial will honor fallen Citadel alumni who lost their lives in the line of duty. The memorial will be a courtyard on the Citadel campus, encompassed by black granite walls. Names of the Citadel's fallen will be etched under each respective conflict beside the names of other fallen alumni. This wall will also be a living memorial, and names of future fallen soldiers will also be added. The memorial will offer a gathering place for cadets, students, alumni, faculty, staff and visitors to gather and pay their respect. "They have done their duty, they have served with honor, and we needed to do something on campus to respect their service and sacrifice," said Lt. Gen. W. Michael Steele, member of the Class of 1967. The 1967 alumni class funded $1 million for the construction of the project. "Our class suffered the most casualties in Viet Nam, and we started thinking about how many Citadel alumni have perished in conflicts serving their nation and how we could best honor them," said Steele. "Our class lost more guys in Vietnam than any other citadel class and the guys we lost, like all the classes that lost guys over there. Were great guys and we hated losing them and if we could do something here to memorialize their sacrifice it seemed like a worthy thing to do," John Warley, Citadel class of 1967 said. The dedication ceremony for the memorial is expected to be at the 2017 homecoming.
Published in: WBTV-TV Charlotte, NC and published by multiple media outlets
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Monday
November 7, 2016
1c. Bridge in Chester renamed after soldier killed in Afghanistan
A bridge in Chester was renamed on Sunday for a soldier who lost his life in Afghanistan. The West Hundred Road Bridge will be officially renamed the Sergeant Aaron Xavier Wittman Memorial Bridge. Sergeant Wittman was 28-years-old when he was killed in Afghanistan on Jan. 10, 2013 while serving during Operation Enduring Freedom. Wittman was assigned to 3rd Battalion, 69th Armor Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division from Fort Stewart, Georgia. He died in the Khogyani district of Afghanistan, from injuries caused by small-arms fire. He graduated from L.C. Bird High School in 2003. He also served in the South Carolina National Guard while attending The Citadel and was deployed, along with other classmates, to Afghanistan with the 218th Brigade Combat Team in 2007. After returning from his deployment in 2008, he returned to The Citadel as a veteran student, completed his last semester, and graduated with the Class of 2009.
Published in: WWBT-TV Richmond, VA
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Monday
November 7, 2016
2a. Citadel celebrates diversity milestones
As we celebrate Homecoming this year at The Citadel, we are also proud to celebrate milestones in our institution's history that have shaped who we are today. Fifty years ago, Charles DeLesline Foster, a 17-year-old high school graduate from Charleston, made history when he became the first African American to join the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. Foster was a pioneer whose enrollment gave the scores of African Americans who followed in his footsteps the opportunity to benefit from the powerful military leadership model on which The Citadel was founded. Moreover-and part of the diversity conversation in higher education that is often overlooked-desegregation allowed cadets to be engaged in classes and in the barracks with other cadets whose life experiences were different from their own. This diverse learning environment advances cadets' awareness and understanding, driving the educational goals we seek. The Citadel today is the Southern region's most highly ranked public, comprehensive college. Our graduates, representing every demographic, are advancing our military as cadets become commissioned officers. Citadel graduates can be found across South Carolina and the nation, employed in leadership positions in engineering, medicine, law, business and intelligence professions.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
November 7, 2016
2b. Citadel Salutes First Black Graduate Who Broke Color Line 50 Years Ago
The Citadel plans to recognize its first African-American graduate on Saturday at halftime of its homecoming game, reports the Post and Courier. At age 17, Charles Foster enrolled 50 years ago at the historic military college in South Carolina as the first Black student. He graduated in 1970 with a business degree and served in the Army. Foster died in a house fire in 1986. Foster is an unsung hero in the wave of school desegregations during the civil rights movement. "There were scant news articles about (Foster) at the time, and it wasn't treated as a big deal at the time," Lamont Melvin, a Citadel graduate and chair of the institution's Minority Alumni Association, told the newspaper. He continued: "There are reports by some that he had struggles after attending The Citadel, and they tend to focus on that. Our position is that he is a trailblazer worthy of recognition by a grateful group of African-American Citadel alumni." Foster endured name calling and more intense punishment than other cadets, Dave Hooper, Foster's first Citadel roommate, told Diverse, a higher education magazine. In the 2007 interview, Hooper recalled receiving letters warning him against associating with the Black cadet, and upperclassmen urged classmates to pressure Foster to quit.
Published in: Pittsburgh Courier
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Monday
November 7, 2016
2c. The Citadel will celebrate diversity milestones
The Citadel's 2016 Homecoming weekend will highlight a number of special events being held in coming months to commemorate the 50th anniversary of African-American cadets and the 20th anniversary of females in the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. During the homecoming football game on Nov. 5, members of The Citadel Black Alumni Association will take the field, alongside the president of The Citadel, to honor the college's first black cadet, the late Charles D. Foster, who entered The Citadel in 1966 and graduated in 1970. Foster's brother, William, will be with the group. The association recently arranged for the reading of a congressional record in honor of Charles Foster, on the floor of the U.S. Senate with the assistance of U.S. Sen. Tim Scott. "Charles Foster was a pioneer and should be honored, just as the first female cadet to graduate from the Corps, Nancy Mace, should be honored - what they did was not easy. Their courage and tenacity laid the foundation for The Citadel to become more diverse, and therefore stronger year after year," said retired Lt. Gen. John W. Rosa, USAF, president of The Citadel. "Because of them, and those who followed the path they paved, a culture supporting diversity at all levels evolved, enabling us to work together to develop principled leaders for our nation."
Published in: South Strand News
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Monday
November 7, 2016
3. Ranger Hall of Famer: Man to donate medal to honor former Citadel classmate
When retired Army Lt. Col. Jim Tucker was inducted into the Army Ranger Hall of Fame in July, he received a bronze medallion the size of a saucer. "At 83 years old, I find it a little difficult to wear around my neck," the Fort Walton Beach resident said with a chuckle. "So I decided I wanted to donate it to a place where I thought it could be appreciated." That place turned out to be his alma mater, The Citadel, South Carolina's historic military college. In particular, Tucker wanted to donate the medallion to the school's Cordell Airborne Rangers Club, a voluntary organization that trains Citadel cadets in modern infantry tactics. The Cordell Rangers are named in honor of Capt. Terry Cordell, a member of The Citadel's Class of 1957. One of the first members of the Army's Special Forces, Cordell became the first Army officer (and first Citadel graduate) to die in Vietnam when he was shot down while providing aerial fire support on Oct. 15, 1962.
Published in: Stars and Stripes
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Monday
November 7, 2016
4. What happens when there is war
Friday is Veterans Day. Today is Military Appreciation Day in Clemson. Today is Homecoming day at The Citadel, also known as the Military College of South Carolina. Sunday is the Veterans Day Parade in downtown Charleston. Hosted by the Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, it will feature military units, floats and vintage vehicles. The parade begins at 2 p.m. on the corner of East Bay and Market streets. It will get off to a soaring start with a C-17 flyover by Joint Base Charleston's 437th Airlift Wing, then proceed south on East Bay, turn right on Broad and end at Colonial Lake. The Citadel delivered an inspiring Military Appreciation Day on Sept. 10, when Bulldogs fans appreciated a 19-14 victory over Furman that night at Johnson Hagood Stadium. The school's Regimental Band played the songs of our five armed services - Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, Coast Guard. There will be considerable military flavor again at today's Homecoming game at Johnson Hagood as The Citadel, still unbeaten, plays Samford in a high-stakes Southern Conference showdown. The Tiger Band will play military tunes today, too, in Death Valley as Clemson. Unfortunately, though, while Clemson honors Americans in military uniform past and present today, the unbeaten Tigers will wear garish purple jerseys and pants against the Orange of Syracuse.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
November 7, 2016
5. Cigarette butts lead beach trash clean-up
Cigarette butts are, once again, the king of South Carolina beach litter. Volunteers collected thousands of the unsightly butts on Sept. 17, the state's largest one-day beach and river sweep. But the effort is about more than aesthetics. Cigarette butts are a recognized threat to marine life because they contain plastics and toxic metals that leach into the environment. Shrimp and fish can ingest the microscopic pieces of plastic, which pose an unknown risk to human health, according to researchers at The Citadel. The count is more of a general estimate than an exact tally, said Joey Holleman, public information coordinator for the South Carolina Sea Grant Consortium. "I'm sure they are not counting them one-by-one. They will have a can or something full of them and they will say that can holds a hundred," he said. Sea Grant and the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources lead the annual Beach Sweep/River Sweep. Some of the cigarette butt collection numbers posted at the Ocean Conservancy website are: 3,065 at Breach Inlet and 1,300 at Wild Dunes - both on Isle of Palms; more than 2,500 at Northbridge Park in North Charleston; more than 4,000 at Folly Beach.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
November 7, 2016
6. Writer of the Week: Robert Jordan
Born in October 1948 in Charleston, South Carolina, Robert Jordan's immense talent and rigorous devotion to literature was shown at an early age. Jordan taught himself to read at the age of four, and where most children were still reading simple stories, by age six Jordan had managed to choke down the likes of literary legend Jules Verne. His passion for reading, and subsequently writing, shone throughout the early phases of his life. Jordan served two military tours with the U.S. Army in Vietnam as a helicopter gunner. His two tours left him with two years of wartime experience that he put to great use in his novels and a plethora of medals in honor of his bravery and initiative. After serving his time in Vietnam, Jordan went on to receive a degree in physics from The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina. He continued his military service as a nuclear engineer for the U.S. Navy. Throughout his career as a nuclear engineer, Jordan was able to write the first few drafts of the Wheel of Time, a series that set a hallmark for modern fantasy and is renowned amongst writing circles. Jordan put a great deal of his military knowledge to full use in his novels, which are set in a high-fantasy setting of warring kingdoms and rebellions.
Published in: McDaniel Free Press
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Monday
November 7, 2016
7. Soldiers' Angels Hosts Hunger Relief Program Serving 200 Veteran Families
Soldiers' Angels will host a Mobile Food Distribution for homeless and at-risk veterans from the Charleston area on Thursday, November 10th, 2016. Through its partnerships with The Citadel and the Low Country Food Bank, Soldiers' Angels will distribute food to over 200 Veteran families as a part of Soldiers' Angels Hunger Relief Programs. When: 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM, Thursday, November 10th, 2016; What: Mobile Food Distribution; Who: Soldiers' Angels; In partnership with The Citadel and the Low Country Food Bank; For: Economically Challenged Veterans and Wounded Service Members; Where: The Altman Athletic Center located at Hagood Stadium parking lot The Citadel, 69 Hagood Avenue, Charleston, SC 29403
Published in: Moultrie News
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Monday
November 7, 2016
8a. The Citadel clinches SoCon title with win over Samford
Tyler Renew had 45 carries for 285 yards and three touchdowns, Cody Clark made a 36-yard field goal in overtime and The Citadel beat Samford 37-34 on Saturday to set a program record with its ninth straight victory. Renew was two carries and a yard away from tying two single-game school records. The Citadel (9-0, 7-0 Southern Conference) trailed 34-24 with 6:17 remaining but Renew capped a five-play, 72-yard drive with a short TD and Clark tied it with 3 seconds left on a 34-yard field goal. On the second possession of overtime, Reece Everett's 44-yard field-goal attempt hit the upright for Samford (6-3, 4-2). Cam Jackson added 100 yards rushing and one touchdown for The Citadel, which has a share of the SoCon title for the second straight year. Renew's other two scores came from 55 and 58 yards out as The Citadel outgained Samford 463-93 on the ground. Devlin Hodges threw for 280 yards and two touchdowns, and ran for 94 yards and two scores for Samford. Kelvin McKnight made nine catches for 118 yards.
Published in: http://www.live5news.com/story/33639646/the-citadel-clinches-socon-title-with-win-over-samford
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Monday
November 7, 2016
8b. Sapakoff: Citadel rally mirrors the Jeffreys path of adjustments
Life at the Citadel is all about adjustments, from that first haircut and freshman "knob" year through fine-tuning for what happens after getting one of the nation's most coveted class rings. The undefeated Citadel football team made just enough tweaks Saturday during a 37-34 overtime victory over Samford, bouncing back from a 10-point deficit in the fourth quarter to grab the Southern Conference bid to the FCS playoffs. Senior right tackle Nick Jeffreys called the homecoming win before 15,015 fans at Johnson Hagood Stadium "an emotional ride." Way bigger, he said, than a certain 2015 upset party in Columbia. "Just because of the (SoCon) title and the way we played as a team," Jeffreys said. "The South Carolina game last year was big but it didn't matter in terms of what it does for us in the conference." It was just a matter of the Bulldogs mirroring the hyper-adjustment example Jeffreys has set since arriving on campus from Oklahoma City in 2013. All 20 of the Citadel seniors currently ranked No. 7 in the FCS poll have been through three head coaches.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
November 7, 2016
8c. Bulldogs Down Crusaders in Exhibition Matchup
The Citadel men's basketball team opened the 2016-17 season with a dominate 97-62 win over North Greenville on Friday afternoon, draining 14 threes in the victory. Zane Najdawi got the scoring started for the Bulldogs, hitting a jumper less than one minute in and senior Warren Sledge followed with a three-pointer to give The Citadel a 5-3 lead. The game remained close through the first five minutes but back-to-back threes by Matt Frierson gave the Bulldogs a 17-14 lead. They would not give up the lead the rest of the game. The Citadel finished the first half on a five-point run thanks three free throws by Frankie Johnson and a jumper by Quayson Williams, giving them a 42-30 lead heading into halftime. Williams wasted little time for the Bulldogs in the second half, knocking down a three in the corner to extend the 'Dogs lead to 15. The sophomore finished the game with 11 points. Head coach Duggar Baucom and company continued to pour it on and nine minutes into the second half freshman Kaelon Harris threw down a dunk to push The Citadel's lead to 29. The dunk was set up thanks to a steal by Sledge as the Bulldogs finished the game with 39 points off of turnovers.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
November 7, 2016
9. Patsy Mizell, 85, first woman elected to N. Chas. council, dies
Patsy Williams Hughes Mizell of North Charleston, the first woman elected to the North Charleston City Council, died Tuesday. She was 85. Mizell, first married to the late Francis M. Hughes and wife of Henry Mizell, was born in Fort Worth, Texas. She moved to Charleston in 1940 and graduated from Chicora High School in 1951. She attended Baptist College and The Citadel. She worked as a telephone operator, shipping company employee and substitute teacher. Her first foray into politics came in 1969, when she was appointed to the North Charleston Public Service District Commission. During her service with the commission, the city of North Charleston was incorporated in 1972. Two years later, she ran for City Council. In 1974, she became the first woman to be elected to the young city's governing body. A Democrat, she held the seat for 21 years, ending in 1995. Besides being the first woman on the council, she was the only woman to serve
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Friday
November 4, 2016
1. Honoring the achievements of African American and Female pioneer-cadets and alumni
The Citadel's 2016 Homecoming weekend will kick off a number of special events being held in coming months to commemorate the 50th anniversary of African American cadets and the 20th anniversary of females in the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. During the homecoming football game on Nov. 5, members of The Citadel Black Alumni Association will take the field, alongside the President of The Citadel, to honor the college's first black cadet, the late Charles D. Foster, who entered The Citadel in 1966 and graduated in 1970. Foster's brother, William, will be with the group. The association recently arranged for the reading of a congressional record in honor of Charles Foster, on the floor of the U.S. Senate with the assistance of U.S. Senator Tim Scott. "Charles Foster was a pioneer and should be honored, just as the first female cadet to graduate from the Corps, Nancy Mace, should be honored - what they did was not easy. Their courage and tenacity laid the foundation for The Citadel to become more diverse, and therefore stronger year after year," said Lt. Gen. John W. Rosa, USAF (Ret.), president of The Citadel. "Because of them, and those who followed the path they paved, a culture supporting diversity at all levels evolved, enabling us to work together to develop principled leaders for our nation." Mace was born into a Citadel family, with her father, Brig. Gen. James E. Mace, having been the former commandant of cadets and one of the college's most decorated graduates. Her mother, Anne J. Mace, Ph.D., graduated with a master's degree in teaching from The Citadel Graduate College in 1972. (Women have attended The Citadel Graduate College since it was formed in the mid-1960s.)
Published in: The Charleston Digitel
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Friday
November 4, 2016
2. Citadel Salutes First Black Graduate Who Broke Color Line 50 Years Ago
The Citadel plans to recognize its first African-American graduate on Saturday at halftime of its homecoming game, reports the Post and Courier. At age 17, Charles Foster enrolled 50 years ago at the historic military college in South Carolina as the first Black student. He graduated in 1970 with a business degree and served in the Army. Foster died in a house fire in 1986. Foster is an unsung hero in the wave of school desegregations during the civil rights movement. "There were scant news articles about (Foster) at the time, and it wasn't treated as a big deal at the time," Lamont Melvin, a Citadel graduate and chair of the institution's Minority Alumni Association, told the newspaper. He continued: "There are reports by some that he had struggles after attending The Citadel, and they tend to focus on that. Our position is that he is a trailblazer worthy of recognition by a grateful group of African-American Citadel alumni." Foster endured name calling and more intense punishment than other cadets, Dave Hooper, Foster's first Citadel roommate, told Diverse, a higher education magazine. In the 2007 interview, Hooper recalled receiving letters warning him against associating with the Black cadet, and upperclassmen urged classmates to pressure Foster to quit.
Published in: ChicagoDefender.com and published by multiple media outlets across the country
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Friday
November 4, 2016
3. Citadel No. 6, Charleston Southern No. 9 in FCS playoff rankings
A first-round bye and home-field advantage are keys to a deep playoff run, says Citadel football coach Brent Thompson. The 8-0 Bulldogs could be in line for both, according to the first playoff rankings released by the FCS selection committee on Thursday. The Citadel is No. 6 and Charleston Southern is No. 9 in the top 10 announced by the committee. The top eight seeds in the 24-team playoff receive a first-round bye and play at home in the second round (if they put in the minimum bid to the NCAA). The Citadel can clinch the Southern Conference's automatic bid to the playoffs with a homecoming victory over Samford at 2 p.m. Saturday at Johnson Hagood Stadium. The FCS committee will release two more weekly rankings before the playoff field is announced on Nov. 20. "If we win, we'll get what we want out of it," said Thompson, who with Mike Houston at Lenoir-Rhyne advanced through the Division II playoffs to the national title game. "To make a good, deep run in the playoffs, it's first-round bye and home-field advantage," he said. "That's how we did it at Lenoir-Rhyne, and the only way I know to do that is to keep on winning."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
November 3, 2016
1. Celebrating Citadel Diversity Milestones in the 50th and 20th years
The Citadel's 2016 Homecoming weekend will kick off a number of special events being held in coming months to commemorate the 50th anniversary of African American cadets and the 20th anniversary of females in the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. During the homecoming football game on Nov. 5, members of The Citadel Black Alumni Association will take the field, along side the President of The Citadel to honor the first black cadet, the late Charles D. Foster, who entered The Citadel in 1966 and graduated in 1970. Foster's brother, William, will be with the group. The association recently arranged for the reading of a congressional record in honor of Charles Foster, on the floor of the U.S. Senate with the assistance of U.S. Senator Tim Scott. "Charles Foster was a pioneer and should be honored, just as the first female cadet to graduate from the Corps, Nancy Mace, should be honored - what they did was not easy. Their courage and tenacity laid the foundation for The Citadel to become more diverse, and therefore stronger year after year," said Lt. Gen. John W. Rosa, USAF (Ret.), president of The Citadel. "Because of them, and those who followed the path they paved, a culture supporting diversity at all levels evolved, enabling us to work together to develop principled leaders for our nation." Mace was born into a Citadel family, with her father, Brig. Gen. James E. Mace, having been the former commandant of cadets and one of the college's most decorated graduates. Her mother, Anne J. Mace, Ph.D., graduated with a master's degree in teaching from The Citadel Graduate College in 1972. (Women have attended The Citadel Graduate College since it was formed in the mid-1960s.)
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Thursday
November 3, 2016
2a. The Citadel War Memorial to honor fallen alumni
Citadel alumni have proudly served in every national conflict since the Mexican War, and now close to 175 years later, those who have made the ultimate sacrifice in service will be eternally honored on campus. In recognition of its 50th reunion and in collaboration with the college administration and The Citadel Foundation, The Citadel Class of 1967 has funded the $1 million construction of The Citadel War Memorial. The Citadel War Memorial will offer a solemn gathering place for cadets, students, alumni, faculty, staff and visitors to honor and pay respect to The Citadel's fallen heroes. Groundbreaking for the war memorial will begin during Homecoming 2016 on Friday, Nov. 4 at 3 p.m. along the Avenue of Remembrance between Summerall Chapel and Mark Clark Hall. "The creation of The Citadel War Memorial has been a vision of The Citadel and the Class of 1967 for many years," said Lt. Gen. John B. Sams, Jr., class chairman of the Class of 1967 and chairman of The Citadel Board of Visitors. "We are all delighted that this vision is finally coming to fruition and that we are able to honor all Citadel alumni who have made the ultimate sacrifice." Situated in front of the Thomas D. Howie Memorial Bell Tower and Columbarium, and adjacent to Summerall Chapel and Gen. Mark W. Clark's gravesite, the war memorial will have iron gates leading visitors into an interior courtyard, where black granite walls will display descriptions of The Citadel's involvement in wars and conflicts since 1846.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Thursday
November 3, 2016
2b. war memorial
war memorial
Published in: LowcountryBizSC.com
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Thursday
November 3, 2016
3. Citadel to honor Charles Foster, first black graduate, at homecoming
Fifty years ago, Charles Foster, an honors student at the former Charles A. Brown High School in Charleston, reported to The Citadel as the first black student to join the S.C. Corps of Cadets. Foster was just 17 when he matriculated in 1966. He graduated in 1970 as a business major, a member of "G" Company and the first African-American to get through the military school. He served in the Army and died in a Texas house fire in 1986, having never married and without children. Foster's breaking of the color line at the school never received the attention of other desegregation stories of the 1960s, or of the female pioneer cadets at The Citadel in the 1990s. But The Citadel Minority Alumni Association aims to change that this weekend during the Bulldogs' homecoming game against Samford. The Minority Alumni Association will present a check for $123,000 to school president Lt. Gen. John Rosa. The funds will go to several of The Citadel Foundation minority scholarships in Foster's honor. And Foster will be recognized just before halftime of the 2 p.m. game against Samford University at Johnson Hagood Stadium, with his brother, William, among those in attendance. U.S. Sen. Tim Scott recently read a statement into the Congressional Record honoring Charles Foster.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
November 3, 2016
4. GWU Professors Helped Steer Alumna in the Right Career Path
Kristy Young Johnson ('92) took a course in her first semester at Gardner-Webb that prevented her from making the wrong decision about her future. "I hadn't really considered a career in science before I got to GWU," Johnson shared. "I was enrolled in biology with Dr. Tom Jones. His class was a wonderful introduction, touching on so many different aspects of biology that I finished the semester wanting to know more. Every science class I took just added to my curiosity." Johnson switched her major to chemistry, and GWU professors urged her to pursue her doctorate. "When I started graduate school, I remember being so thankful for all of my undergraduate classes," she reflected. "My first biochemistry class started with a lot of the same material we had covered at GWU, and I frequently found myself referring back to my undergraduate notes and textbooks." Johnson began teaching in 2000 as an adjunct professor at The Citadel in Charleston, S.C. She joined the faculty in 2002 and is an associate professor in the biology department. She gives students the same support and encouragement she received at Gardner-Webb, even creating and seeking approval for a bioterrorism course because of student interest after anthrax attacks in 2001. No textbook was available, so she used a variety of reference books.
Published in: Gardner-Webb University Newscenter
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Thursday
November 3, 2016
5. Edmund J. Ostrowski Obituary
With great sadness we announce the passing of Edmund J. Ostrowski on Oct. 26, 2016 at his residence in Las Vegas, Nev. Ed was born Nov. 26, 1942 to the late Edmund and Bernadette (Crowe) Ostrowski. He attended local schools and graduated from Crosby High in 1959. He continued his education at The Citadel Military College in Charleston, S.C., graduating in 1963. Ed taught in Danbury, Conn. for one year. He then enlisted in the Officers Candidate School in the USMC. He was commissioned a second lieutenant and served a tour of duty in Vietnam as a Marine helicopter pilot and was promoted to captain. Upon his return to the States, he was enlisted to train new recruits in T-38s at Pensacola, Fla. He was later assigned to Nellis Air Force Base in Las Vegas, Nev. and remained there the rest of his life. Ed loved hiking, taking in nature, golfing, flying and he was an avid reader. He leaves behind his sister, Suzann Derek and husband Raymond Derek, and his nephew Raymond and niece Rebecca. He also leaves his special friend Sandra Mike. He was a faithful communicant at St. Joseph's Catholic Church for many years. Burial will be at Southern Nevada Veterans Cemetery in Boulder City, Nev.
Published in: Republican American
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Wednesday
November 2, 2016
1. Entrepreneurship, the Market Economy and Human Betterment
Through almost all mankind's history, the human condition was one of abject poverty and hardship. Yes, there were kings and princes and religious orders that lived better than the mass of humanity. But when looking back at their standards of living, even the most privileged and powerful political leader or tribal chieftain spent his life in a material condition that most of us, today, would consider not much better than bare subsistence. For thousands of years, this was the circumstance of the human race. Starting less than three hundred years ago, the human condition began to change - slowly, unevenly, and localized at first in just a few areas of Western and Central Europe, and then North America. Since then, this improvement has been spreading around the globe. Economic historians have estimated the degree to which poverty has been abolished around the world. Only around 200 hundred years ago, in 1820, about 95 percent of the world's population lived in poverty, with an estimated 85 percent living in "abject" poverty. In 2015, the World Bank calculated that less than 10 percent of humanity continued to live in such circumstances. Dr. Richard M. Ebeling is the recently appointed BB&T Distinguished Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel. He was formerly professor of Economics at Northwood University, president of The Foundation for Economic Education (2003-2008), was the Ludwig von Mises Professor of Economics at Hillsdale College (1988-2003) in Hillsdale, Michigan, and served as vice president of academic affairs for The Future of Freedom Foundation (1989-2003).
Published in: The Future of Freedom Foundation
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Wednesday
November 2, 2016
2. Kent County Vietnam Veterans to host ceremony Nov. 11
Kent County Chapter 850, Vietnam Veterans of America, will host a Veterans Day ceremony at 2 p.m., Friday, Nov. 11, at the Kent County Memorial Park in Dover. The keynote speaker will be Air Force Col. D. Scott "Bull" Durham, commander of the 512th Airlift Wing, an Air Force Reserve command associate wing located at Dover Air Force Base. He is the senior officer responsible for the 1,750-person organization, which supports Air Mobility Command's worldwide airlift mission, operating C-5M Super Galaxy and C-17A Globemaster III aircraft. Durham began his military career when he graduated from the Reserve Officers' Training Corps at The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina. He served as an air traffic controller, a C-130E pilot and a C-17A pilot while on active duty. During this time he flew numerous combat missions supporting operations in Kosovo, Hungary, Iraq and Afghanistan. The Kent County Veterans Memorial Park is situated on the northern tip of the Kent County Administration Building property and was created by VVA Chapter 850 through private donations and selling of memorial bricks. The site is home to multiple memorials to those lost in American conflicts, including Vietnam, Korea and the Middle East. It also includes a Gold Star Mother and Families Memorial, a tribute to war dogs and their handlers and a POW/MIA Chair of Honor. The park features a UH 1 "Huey" helicopter on an 18-foot stand. Attendees are encouraged to bring a can of food for the Veterans United Outreach, a committee of Chapter 850 that will host Thanksgiving dinner for veterans in need. The park is on South Little Creek Road in Dover across from IHOP restaurant.
Published in: Cape Gazette
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Wednesday
November 2, 2016
3. South Atlantic Bancshares Announces New Board Member Regional Executive Promoted and New Loan Officer added in Mount Pleasant
South Atlantic Bancshares, Inc., parent company of South Atlantic Bank, announced the appointment of Michael C. Tawes, Sr. to the board of directors of the holding company and the bank. Tawes expands the board to 12 members. Tawes has more than 23 years of real estate experience in Charleston. He is a partner with Valbridge Property Advisors/Atlantic Appraisals in Mount Pleasant, and with Atlantic Real Estate Services. Tawes is a graduate of the University of South Carolina with a B.S. degree in business administration and is a Certified General Real Estate Appraiser in South Carolina. He is also a member of the Charleston Trident Area Board of Realtors. K. Wayne Wicker, chairman of the board and chief executive officer of South Atlantic Bancshares, said, "We're pleased to have someone with Michael's business experience and depth of knowledge of the community join our board of directors. Our new Mount Pleasant office will open this coming summer, and we look forward to a growing presence in Charleston. His insight will be a tremendous asset to our board as we look for new opportunities." Also announced were the promotion of Ken Pickens to executive vice president and the addition of Eric Wooten as vice president and commercial relationship manager in Mount Pleasant, as the bank further develops its footprint in the market. Pickens, regional executive for Charleston and Mt. Pleasant, will oversee the Bank's expansion and the 2017 opening of our 8,000 square-foot office building on Johnnie Dodds Boulevard. He joined the bank in October 2013 when the Mount Pleasant office first opened on Queensborough Blvd. He has more than 30 years of banking experience including service as a regional senior vice president and senior credit officer with a local community bank and with a regional bank in downtown Charleston. He is an honor graduate of The Citadel with BS and MBA degrees and completed the Stonier Graduate School of Banking at Georgetown University. He serves on the Board of the South Carolina Bankers Association Economic Developers Council and the Charleston Area Alumni Citadel Club. Wooten has 37 years of banking experience, all in the Charleston market. He most recently worked with CommunityOne Bank as a commercial lender. He worked at First Federal for 16 years and served as the director of commercial credit risk management. Wooten is a graduate of The Citadel with B.S. and M.B.A. degrees. He is a past chairman of the South Carolina Bankers Association Credit Committee. He serves as treasurer of and is a past board member of The Citadel Alumni Association.
Published in: Moultrie News
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Wednesday
November 2, 2016
4. Samford at Citadel a high-stakes clash of styles
More than once this season, Citadel coach Brent Thompson has said that the Bulldogs' defense must make the opposition "one-dimensional." "For us, most of the time that means taking away the run," Thompson said earlier this season. This time, Samford coach Chris Hatcher has already done that for him. With a share of a second straight Southern Conference title on the line Saturday against No. 18 Samford, the seventh-ranked Bulldogs face a team that's already fairly one-dimensional. Samford, employing Hatcher's "Hatch Attack," is going to throw the ball - 48 times a game so far this season. "We've never really faced a team this year that's thrown the ball this much," Thompson said Tuesday at his weekly news conference. "So we've got to do our best to play that one dimension. We've got to do a good job of being able to cover and pressure the passer, get it out of his hands a little quicker and force some mistakes.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
November 2, 2016
5. The Citadel can clinch a share of the SoCon vs. Samford
The Citadel will look to clinch a share of the Southern Conference regular-season championship when it hosts Samford on Saturday. The Bulldogs remained undefeated with a 45-10 victory over East Tennessee State this past Saturday. The win extended the longest winning streak to start a season in program history, and ties the most consecutive wins ever by a Citadel team. The Bulldogs shared the title last season. Samford enters Saturday's game with a 4-1 conference record. Chattanooga's 6-1 in SoCon play, but The Citadel owns the tie-breaker.
Published in: The State
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Tuesday
November 1, 2016
1. World Series pitcher Mike Clevinger left Citadel early to turn pro
When The Citadel baseball team held its pro day in October of 2010, scouts flocked to Charleston to see Asher Wojciechowski. At 6-4 and 235 pounds, the draft-eligible junior looked like a prototypical Major League Baseball starting pitcher. But according to Citadel coach Fred Jordan, scouts left that day also buzzing about a skinny right-hander who had just reported to The Citadel campus - Mike Clevinger. "There were as many scouts talking about Mike and his change-up as there were about Asher and his fastball," Jordan recalled. Clevinger, now a relief pitcher with the Cleveland Indians, is the first former Citadel player to appear in the World Series. He's made two appearances so far for the Indians, allowing no hits or runs in two innings while walking two and striking out one. Clevinger, who signed with The Citadel out of Jacksonville, Fla., played one season for the Bulldogs, going 5-3 with a 5.15 earned run average for the Bulldogs in 2010. That was the most recent Citadel team to win a Southern Conference championship, riding a pitching rotation of future pros Wojciechowski, Matt Talley and Clevinger to a 43-22 overall record, 24-6 league mark and SoCon regular-season and tournament titles. "Mike was an outstanding freshman for us," Jordan said. "He was our Sunday starter and had a great year. He had a tremendous change-up, a big-league change-up."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
November 1, 2016
2. Economic Ideas: The French Physiocrats and the Case for Laissez-faire
In the middle decades of the eighteenth century two schools of thought emerged, one in France and the other in Great Britain that were critical of Mercantilism, the government system of economic planning and regulation in the 1700s. In Great Britain, the primary thinkers were members of what has become known as the Scottish Moral Philosophers. In France the proponents of the new ideas of economic freedom were known as the Physiocrats. The term came from the ancient Greek word, "physiocracy," meaning "rule by nature." They also liked to call themselves "the economists." Central to their critique of the regulatory state of their time was insistence that there was a "natural order" to things in the social world as much as in the physical world. A proper arrangement of the institutions of society required reflection on the nature of man, his requirements for survival and betterment, and his relationship to others in society. Dr. Richard M. Ebeling is the recently appointed BB&T Distinguished Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel. He was formerly professor of Economics at Northwood University, president of The Foundation for Economic Education (2003-2008), was the Ludwig von Mises Professor of Economics at Hillsdale College (1988-2003) in Hillsdale, Michigan, and served as vice president of academic affairs for The Future of Freedom Foundation (1989-2003).
Published in: The Future Freedom Foundation
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Tuesday
November 1, 2016
3. Citadel, Charleston Southern get first look at playoff rankings this week
Selection Sunday for the FCS playoffs is just three weeks away, set for Nov. 20. But The Citadel and Charleston Southern will get an early look at how they stand in the FCS playoff picture this week. The FCS selection committee is due to make public its first ranking of the season on Thursday. The selection committee will release a Top 10 list during ESPN's "College Football Live" program at 3 p.m. Thursday. It will be the first of three weekly rankings heading to Nov. 20, when the 24-team FCS playoff field will be announced. Ten conference winners automatically qualify, with 14 teams selected at-large. The top eight seeds in the field receive a bye for the first round, set for Nov. 26. The championship game is Jan. 7 in Frisco, Texas. Both The Citadel (8-0) and Charleston Southern (5-2) would appear to have a shot at a top-eight seed and first-round bye. The Bulldogs, one of two undefeated teams left in FCS, are at No. 7 in this week's FCS Coaches Poll, with CSU at No. 9. In the FCS STATS media poll, The Citadel is No. 5 and Charleston Southern is No. 8. The latest playoff projection from FCS STATS has The Citadel as a No. 5 seed, and playing host in the second round to the first-round winner between Charleston Southern and Samford.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
November 1, 2016
4. Area standouts use Halloween weekend to grab treats on college gridiron
On a weekend known for its ghouls and goblins, former area standouts had more treats than tricks on the college gridiron... A host of others made contributions on Saturday. Here's a list: Tyler Davis, The Citadel (So., OL): Continuing what has become a storybook season for the Bulldogs, the Waccamaw alum was part of an offensive line that helped his team rack up 504 yards - 427 of which came by way of the team's running game - in a 45-10 win over East Tennessee State.
Published in: Myrtle Beach Online
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