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The Citadel in the News: Archive

October 2016

PUBLISH DATE STORIES
Monday
October 31, 2016
1. The Citadel sets program record with 8th straight win
The 5th-ranked Citadel football team remained undefeated with a 45-10 win over SoCon foe ETSU on Saturday afternoon, racking up 427 rushing yards in the victory. The win gives The Citadel a single-season record eight straight wins and ties the program record with seven consecutive Southern Conference home victories. The win also gave the Bulldogs a program-record-tying six conference wins this season and is the 12th SoCon win since the beginning of the 2015 season, the most conference wins in a two-year stretch in program history. The Bulldogs (8-0, 6-0 SoCon) opened the scoring on their first possession, taking a 7-0 lead with 10:32 remaining in the first quarter. The six-play, 65-yard drive started with a 38-yard pass from Dominique Allen to Jorian Jordan to put The Citadel on the 27-yard line. Five plays later, Cam Jackson punched it in from one yard out and the Bulldogs took a 7-0 lead. On the Bulldogs’ next drive, Jackson broke loose for a 53-yard run to set up another scoring opportunity for The Citadel. Two plays later, Allen found Jordan in the end zone to make it a 14-0 game. In the second quarter, the Bulldogs tacked on another score just 50 seconds in as Reggie Williams took it 11 yards to push the lead to 21-0.
Published in: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
October 31, 2016
2. Once this woman got into the Citadel, she was unstoppable
They didn't want her. The Citadel's bigwigs lobbied hard to keep young women like Petra Lovetinska Seipel out of their state-supported, all-male military academy. Yet Seipel, who became one of The Citadel's first female graduates, was in Washington, D.C., last week to talk up the place that didn't want to accept her. She's 38 now and a major in the Marine Corps at a time when the country could be on the verge of electing its first female commander in chief. But Seipel wasn't planning to focus on Hillary Clinton or feminism or even gender when she spoke to students at her alma mater, Woodrow Wilson High School in the District. "I like to talk about opportunity," she told me as she made sure her uniform was in order before her appearance at the school. "Not just about women in the military." Seipel has always concentrated on proving that women can do the job - and that's not uncommon among female pioneers in the military, law enforcement, science, technology and other male-dominated fields. They often refuse to utter the word "feminism," even when it has helped them break barriers.
Published in: Stars and Stripes
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Monday
October 31, 2016
3. John T. Crawford Jr. appointed by Governor of South Carolina to serve on ReWa Board of Commissioners
Local attorney John T. Crawford Jr. has been appointed by the Governor of South Carolina to serve on the Renewable Water Resources (ReWa) Board of Commissioners. A Connecticut native who grew up in South Carolina, Crawford graduated from The Citadel with academic and military honors. He earned his law degree from the University of South Carolina School of Law, where he was a Carolina Scholar. He began his legal career with the construction practice group of a large national law firm in Greenville and joined Kenison, Dudley & Crawford LLC in 2005. He is the co-author of "Defenses in Construction Defect Case," which was published in the ABA Construction Law Journal, South Carolina Mechanics' Liens and Bonds and South Carolina Construction Law Update.
Published in: Upstate Business Journal
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Monday
October 31, 2016
4. Charleston Symphony reports economic impact on community
We have heard it said a million times: Arts groups do more than entertain. They educate, too. And they improve a community's quality of life and bolster economic activity. Every so often, an arts organization releases information that proves its positive economic impact in an effort to better justify its existence. And that's what the Charleston Symphony Orchestra has done this month. Working with The Citadel School of Business Administration, the CSO produced an economic impact study showing that the nonprofit spends, directly and indirectly, nearly $5 million each year locally, and that its patrons spend almost $2 million more. That's pretty good for a relatively small organization that operates in a relatively small market, said board member Kevin Garvey, who is chairman of the CSO's development and marketing committee. The symphony's annual budget was about $3.25 million last season, when the study was put together - this year it's $3.7 million - but its quantitative impact is larger. In addition to the $3 million or so spent on production by the CSO, another $665,000 is spent on CSO-related activities by the Gaillard Center, suppliers and other partners and affiliates, according to marketing director Jennifer Metts. Plus, the wages paid by the symphony to its full-time and part-time employees and contractors translate into another $1.3 million in spending each year.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
October 31, 2016
5. PHA student leaders travel to The Citadel
Elected student leaders from members of the South Carolina Independent Schools Student Association held their Fall Conference in the Summerall Chapel on the campus of The Citadel in Charleston. The students attend 39 different SCISA schools including Patrick Henry Academy, in Estill. Generally, the Fall Conference is held in the House Chamber at the State House in Columbia. The chamber was not available due to a current renovation project. Cmdr. Joe Molina, Chaplain to the Corps of Cadets, was in charge of the opening prayer and devotion. The President of the Citadel, Lt. General John Rosa, welcomed the participants to The Citadel and gave a brief talk. While in session on the campus, the students held their general meeting, which included discussions on the Student Exchange program, the Student Council of the Year, the Honor Society of the Year and the 2017 Spring Convention. Additionally, during a development session, resolutions, which will be debated during the 2017 Spring Convention, were introduced.
Published in: The Hampton County Guardian
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Monday
October 31, 2016
6. Dee Delaney, Khalil Lewis among finalists as SC’s top football collegian
Citadel cornerback Dee Delaney (Whale Branch) and Gardner-Webb running back Khalil Lewis (Hilton Head Island) are among 25 finalists chosen for this year's South Carolina Football Hall of Fame Collegiate Player of the Year award. Clemson quarterback Deshaun Watson heads the list, seeking to become the first man to win back-to-back trophies. The award is in its fourth year, to be presented at the Hall of Fame's annual induction ceremony next April. All nominees must be either from the state of South Carolina or play for one of the state's 13 college football programs. The winner will be determined by an online vote of the Hall of Fame's board of directors, executive team, supporting members and media. Delaney, an FCS All-American in 2015, has added three more interceptions to his career total this year for a Citadel team that entered Saturday unbeaten through its first seven games. Two of those picks came in a September win over Furman, earning him Defensive Player of the Week honors in the Southern Conference. Delaney's 10 career interceptions currently rank fifth on The Citadel's all-time list, and his 26 pass breakups are tied for seventh.
Published in: The Island Packet
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Monday
October 31, 2016
7. Citadel working to fill football bandwagon
Barring a potential home playoff game, there are only two more chances for Charleston fans to see The Citadel Bulldogs football team at Johnson Hagood Stadium this season. The 7-0 Bulldogs, one of two unbeaten teams left in FCS, play host to ETSU at 2 p.m. Saturday, and to Samford for a Nov. 5 homecoming game. First-year coach Brent Thompson, whose team is ranked No. 7 in the FCS Coaches Poll, hopes that's enough time to fill up the Bulldogs' bandwagon. "That's what we're trying to create," Thompson said this week. "The fan support is always there and has always been there. But now what I think (Citadel fans) are starting to do is drag other people in with them, starting to get people who are Citadel fans, but not necessarily alums, involved. That's what we want." As part of that outreach, The Citadel is offering free tickets to Saturday' game against ETSU (3-4, 1-4) to first responders in the tri-county area. That includes police, fire, EMS, hospital workers, S.C. Electric & Gas, S.C. Dept. of Transportation, municipal public works, municipal parks and urban forestry. Family members of first responders can get 50 percent off regular ticket prices. "That's how we're going to fill up Johnson Hagood Stadium - not just by bringing in our own fans and our own alums in there and our own Corps of Cadets - but it's more about bringing the guy down the road that, hey, he's a good football fan. He wants to see good FCS football and he's excited about what's going on in Charleston.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Friday
October 28, 2016
1a. The Citadel didn't want to admit women. But once this woman got in, she was unstoppable.
They didn't want her. The Citadel's bigwigs lobbied hard to keep young women like Petra Lovetinska Seipel out of their state-supported, all-male military academy. Yet Seipel, who became one of The Citadel's first female graduates, was in Washington last week to talk up the place that didn't want to accept her. She's 38 now and a major in the Marine Corps at a time when the country could be on the verge of electing its first female commander in chief. But Seipel wasn't planning to focus on Hillary Clinton or feminism or even gender when she spoke to students at her alma mater, Woodrow Wilson High School in Northwest D.C. "I like to talk about opportunity," she told me as she made sure her uniform was in order before her appearance at the school. "Not just about women in the military." Seipel has always concentrated on proving that women can do the job - and that's not uncommon among female pioneers in the military, law enforcement, science, technology and other male-dominated fields. They often refuse to utter the word "feminism," even when it has helped them break barriers.
Published in: Washington Post
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Friday
October 28, 2016
1b. petra
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Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Friday
October 28, 2016
1c. Women at The Citadel - video
Female cadets at The Citadel speak about their thoughts on what it means to be a leader. Please click to view the video.
Published in: Washington Post
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Friday
October 28, 2016
2. Upcoming news from The Citadel - November & December
Events include: Unbreakable author, Ret. Navy SEAL Thom Shea, to address Citadel Republican Society; The Citadel War Memorial Groundbreaking; Homecoming 2016; "A Matter of Honor" presented by The Citadel History Club; Veterans Day at The Citadel; The Citadel Republican Society presents a discussion with Karen Vaughn, Gold Star mother; Soldiers' Angels Mobile Pantry; Friends of the Daniel Library Lecture: Abandoned in Hell with authors William Albracht and Marvin J. Wolf; The Citadel's 79th Christmas Candlelight Services; The Return of the James B. White sword hosted by the Friends of the Daniel Library; Disaster Resistant University Multi-Hazard Mitigation Plan; Storm The Citadel 2017 registration is now open; November & December feature from The Citadel Experts Guide.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Friday
October 28, 2016
3. Bart Daniel Named NAFUSA President
On October 8, 2016, at the NAFUSA annual conference in San Diego, E. Bart Daniel (District of South Carolina, 1989-1992) was elected president of NAFUSA by acclamation. Daniel served as United States Attorney from 1989 to 1992. While U.S. Attorney Bart was appointed to the Attorney General's Advisory Committee. He also directed the investigation and prosecution of Operation Lost Trust, one of the nation's largest and most successful public corruption prosecutions. It resulted in 27 convictions, including 17 members of the South Carolina General Assembly along with other public officials. Bart served as Lead Counsel in 6 of the 8 jury trials, all resulting in convictions. In 1991 Bart was awarded the Attorney General's Flag Award – the highest award given to a U.S. Attorney. Bart graduated from The Citadel and University of South Carolina School of Law. He served as an Assistant Attorney General in its White Collar Crime Unit from 1980 to 1982. He was then appointed as an Assistant U. S. Attorney, prosecuting white collar and False Claims Act cases for 4 years. Thereafter, Bart opened his law practice defending government investigations and False Claims Act cases before being appointed U.S. Attorney in 1989.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Friday
October 28, 2016
4. President's Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll
The President's Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll recognizes institutions of higher education that support exemplary community service programs and raise the visibility of effective practices in campus community partnerships. The Honor Roll's Presidential Award is the highest federal recognition an institution can receive for its commitment to community, service-learning, and civic engagement. CNCS has administered the award since 2006 in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Education and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, as well as the American Council on Education, Campus Compact, and the Interfaith Youth Core. The President's Honor Roll recognizes higher education institutions in four categories: General Community Service; Interfaith Community Service; Economic Opportunity; Education. Below are the recipients of the 2015 President's Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll: General Community Service - The Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina (SC)
Published in: NationalService.gov
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Friday
October 28, 2016
5. Entrepreneurship, the Market Economy and Human Betterment
Through almost all mankind's history, the human condition was one of abject poverty and hardship. Yes, there were kings and princes and religious orders that lived better than the mass of humanity. But when looking back at their standards of living, even the most privileged and powerful political leader or tribal chieftain spent his life in a material condition that most of us, today, would consider not much better than bare subsistence. For thousands of years, this was the circumstance of the human race. Starting less than three hundred years ago, the human condition began to change – slowly, unevenly, and localized at first in just a few areas of Western and Central Europe, and then North America. Since then, this improvement has been spreading around the globe. Economic historians have estimated the degree to which poverty has been abolished around the world. Only around 200 hundred years ago, in 1820, about 95 percent of the world's population lived in poverty, with an estimated 85 percent living in "abject" poverty. In 2015, the World Bank calculated that less than 10 percent of humanity continued to live in such circumstances. Dr. Richard M. Ebeling is the BB & T Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina, He was formerly professor of Economics at Northwood University.
Published in: NassauInstitute.org
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Friday
October 28, 2016
6. College news - The Citadel
The Summerall Cup, named for The Citadel's president from 1931-53, is donated by the European Citadel Association. It is awarded annually to the cadet company with the best overall academic achievement. Graham Lee of Pawleys Island was among 71 other cadets in India Company who were recognized for their oustanding academic achievements during the 2015-16 school year. The Milton A. Pearlstine Award is presented annually by The Citadel Alumni Association in honor of Milton A. Pearlstine, Citadel Class of 1919 and past president of the CAA, to the cadet company achieving the highest freshman class grade point ratio for the previous school year. Salvatore Lackey of Pawleys Island was among 65 other cadets in Romeo Company who were recognized for their oustanding academic achievements and peer leadership during the 2015-16 school year. Papa Company has been awarded the President’s Cup for the 2015-16 school year. The President's Cup was established by General Hugh P. Harris, president of The Citadel from 1965-70. It is awarded annually to the cadet company that establishes the highest combined score in academic achievement, military performance, extracurricular participation and fourth class retention during the previous academic year and is the highest honor that can be bestowed upon a cadet company. Corey Moeller of Pawleys Island was among 67 other cadets in Papa Company who were recognized for their contributions to the company's success during the 2015-16 school year. For the year following the company's achievements this group of cadets is designated as the honor company for the Corps of Cadets, serving as ambassadors of The Citadel at special functions.
Published in: South Strand News
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Friday
October 28, 2016
7. Citadel's Myles Pierce is 'Little Mike' no longer
Growing up in Daphne, Ala., Citadel linebacker Myles Pierce was often called "Little Mike." And for good reason. Pierce's older brother, Michael, would grow into a 6-0, 339-pound defensive tackle for the NFL's Baltimore Ravens. "I was always known as 'Little Mike,'" Myles says, "always known as Mike's brother. But I always looked up to him, so it was fine with me. I always wanted to be a football player, and he was always a standout player. So I wanted to be just like him." Minus 100 pounds or so, Myles Pierce has done a pretty good job of being like Mike. They both earned scholarships to Southern Conference schools, Michael at Samford, Myles at The Citadel. And after an all-SoCon career at Samford, Michael is making a good impression as a Ravens rookie, with two sacks this season. Myles is making a name for himself this year, as well. The 6-0, 229-pound junior is second on the Bulldogs' defense with 40 tackles this season, and is coming off what coach Brent Thompson called "the best game of his career" in last week's 24-21 overtime win at Wofford.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Friday
October 28, 2016
8. Clarence Adams Renneker Jr. Obituary
Clarence Adams Renneker Jr., 94, of Mount Pleasant, entered into eternal rest with his family by his side Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016. He was born Sunday, March 12, 1922, in Orangeburg to the late Mrs. Mary Carwile Renneker and the late Mr. Clarence A Renneker. Clarence ("Ikey") was a Citadel graduate (class of 1943), Summerall Guard and served in the U.S. Army during World War II. He pursued a lifelong career as a second-generation clothing merchant and as the owner of Renneker's Inc. in Orangeburg. Ikey was married to the love of his life, Laura, for 72 years, and they retired in Mount Pleasant in 1986. He enjoyed spending time with his family, reading his Bible daily, and serving at Mount Pleasant Presbyterian Church. Clarence was a dedicated trooper at Royall Hardware and founded "The Well." His family will remember him as a loving husband, father, grandfather and friend. He is survived by his loving wife of 72 years, Laura Renneker of Mount Pleasant; three sons, Clarence "Ike" Adams Renneker III of Edisto Island, James Plowden Renneker of Mount Pleasant, and John Burton Renneker of Atlanta; a daughter, Anne Renneker (Frederick Jaeger) of Mount Pleasant; three grandchildren, Ben Jaeger, Lucy Renneker and James Renneker; special friend Beth Colley (Larry) of Mount Pleasant; brother-in-law John Richards Plowden of Phoenix; and many loving friends and family.
Published in: The Times and Democrat
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Thursday
October 27, 2016
1. Bart Daniel Named NAFUSA President
On October 8, 2016, at the NAFUSA annual conference in San Diego, E. Bart Daniel (District of South Carolina, 1989-1992) was elected president of NAFUSA by acclamation. Daniel served as United States Attorney from 1989 to 1992. While U.S. Attorney Bart was appointed to the Attorney General's Advisory Committee. He also directed the investigation and prosecution of Operation Lost Trust, one of the nation's largest and most successful public corruption prosecutions. It resulted in 27 convictions, including 17 members of the South Carolina General Assembly along with other public officials. Bart served as Lead Counsel in 6 of the 8 jury trials, all resulting in convictions. In 1991 Bart was awarded the Attorney General's Flag Award – the highest award given to a U.S. Attorney. Bart graduated from The Citadel and University of South Carolina School of Law. He served as an Assistant Attorney General in its White Collar Crime Unit from 1980 to 1982. He was then appointed as an Assistant U. S. Attorney, prosecuting white collar and False Claims Act cases for 4 years. Thereafter, Bart opened his law practice defending government investigations and False Claims Act cases before being appointed U.S. Attorney in 1989.
Published in: National Association of Former United States Attorneys
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Thursday
October 27, 2016
2. Love, Honor, Loss: Celebrating the life of Sgt. Aaron Wittman
In Aaron Xavier Wittman's senior year at The Citadel, his yearbook quote was "If you don't live for something, you will die for nothing." His father, Duane Wittman, said it was shocking that he chose this quote, but that it was also a prophetic sign of things to come. Sgt. Wittman became the first U.S. casualty of 2013 in the War on Terror when he was killed in Kyogyani district, Nangarhar Province, Afghanistan on January 10, 2013. It was his second tour in Afghanistan, and he was awarded the Purple Heart and Bronze Star with V for Valor posthumously. His mother, Carol Wittman, said looking back on her son's life, the signs that he would die young were there: a fan of costume parties, Aaron once dressed up as Anthony Edwards' character, Goose, from "Top Gun"; Goose died in the film. And right before his second deployment to Afghanistan, the family attended and ran in the second annual Jeffrey A. Reed Memorial Fund 5K Run; Aaron won the race. His mother also said he had about a bad dream about dying. "I think all the signs were there: he won Jeffrey Reed's run just before he left, he was Goose, I mean looking back..." Carol said. "I think he knew and was just trying to prepare us and we just didn't want any parts of that." Aaron's sacrifice will be recognized November 6, 2016, as the Chesterfield County Board of Supervisors approved a resolution to rename the West Hundred Bridge Road Bridge – which is over the CSX railroad tracks - the "Sergeant Aaron Xavier Wittman Memorial Bridge."
Published in: Village News
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Thursday
October 27, 2016
3. Kent County Vietnam veterans to host ceremony in Dover
Kent Country Chapter 850, Vietnam Veterans of America, will host a Veterans Day ceremony at 2 p.m. on Nov. 11 at the Kent County Memorial Park on South Little Creek Road in Dover. The keynote speaker will be Air Force Col. D. Scott "Bull" Durham, commander of the 512th Airlift Wing, an Air Force Reserve Command associate wing located at Dover Air Force Base. He is the senior officer responsible for the 1,750-person organization, which supports Air Mobility Command's worldwide airlift mission, operating C-5M Super Galaxy and C-17A Globemaster III aircraft. Durham began his military career when he graduated from ROTC at The Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina. He served as an air traffic controller, a C-130E Pilot and a C-17A Pilot while on active duty. During this time, he flew numerous combat missions supporting operations in Kosovo, Hungary, Iraq and Afghanistan. The Kent County Veterans Memorial Park is situated on the northern tip of the Kent County Administration Building property and was created by VVA Chapter 850 through private donations and selling of memorial bricks. The site is home to multiple memorials to those lost in American conflicts, including Vietnam, Korea and the Middle East. It also includes a Gold Star Mother and Families Memorial; a tribute to War Dogs and their handlers; a POW/MIA Chair of Honor and features a UH 1 "Huey" helicopter on an 18-foot stand.
Published in: Dover Post
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Thursday
October 27, 2016
4. Two area cadets win President's Cup
The President's Cup was established by General Hugh P. Harris, president of The Citadel from 1965-70. It is awarded annually to the cadet company that establishes the highest combined score in academic achievement, military performance, extracurricular participation and fourth class retention. The following cadets from Papa Company have been recognized for their contributions to the company's success during the 2015-16 school year: Thomas Griffith of Aiken and William Hartzog of Williston.
Published in: Aiken Standard
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Thursday
October 27, 2016
5. Cubs, Indians and 'perfect timing' for the Bill Veeck World Series
It could have been bougainvellia plants covering the most famous fence in baseball. Or a bunch of ficus trees. Bill Veeck as a young Chicago Cubs front office staffer in 1937 tried other gardening ideas before he settled on the iconic ivy that grew to cover the outfield wall at Wrigley Field. But that isn't his most significant tie to the Cubs-Indians World Series, the most nostalgic Fall Classic ever staged. Veeck owned the Indians in 1948, when they won their last World Series. Though the late baseball maverick is best remembered as a master showman who once sent 3-foot-7 Eddie Gaedel up to pinch hit for the St. Louis Browns, Veeck always said winning was "the best promotion."... Mike Veeck, 65, teaches a marketing class at The Citadel and still has ownership stake in independent league professional teams in the Midwest. He is well known as a chip off the old creative promotions block, having presided over such schemes as Nobody Night, Silent Night and National Laundry Day at Charleston's Riley Park while helping the RiverDogs break turnstile records. Bill Veeck, who died in 1971, also designed the Wrigley Field scoreboard. But the 1948 Indians remain as close to Mike Veeck's heart as anything in baseball. One year after Jackie Robinson broke the Major League color barrier, the Indians became the first integrated team to win the World Series. The Cleveland roster included lanky pitcher Satchel Paige and slugging outfielder Larry Doby, a Camden, S.C., native. Paige and Doby went on to make the Hall of Fame.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
October 27, 2016
6. Hall of Famer Tom Glavine Headlines 2017 Hot Stove Banquet
Two Cy Young Awards, a World Series ring, and over 4,000 career innings as part of one of the most dominant teams of the last three decades: even one of these accolades can ensure a place in Cooperstown, but Tom Glavine can boast them all. The Braves Hall of Famer and one of the greatest left-handers to take the mound will be the honored guest at the Charleston RiverDogs' 13th Annual Hot Stove Banquet and Auction Presented by Tom McQueeney State Farm on Friday, January 27 at the Charleston Marriott Crystal Ballroom. Welcoming a member currently enshrined in Cooperstown for the seventh consecutive year, the Hot Stove Banquet has become one of the most highly anticipated RiverDogs annual events. Past speakers include Bobby Cox, John Smoltz, Ryne Sandberg, Wade Boggs, and Goose Gossage in an event that brings baseball fans together to celebrate the magic of America's favorite pastime. Tom McQueeney State Farm Insurance is the presenting sponsor for the 10th consecutive year. Proceeds from the Hot Stove Banquet benefit The Citadel, College of Charleston and Charleston Southern baseball scholarship funds. Glavine, the two-time Cy Young Award winner, will share behind-the-scenes stories, answer questions and pose for pictures. The event will open with a silent auction beginning at 6pm that includes baseball memorabilia from past Hot Stove speakers, collectibles from RiverDogs Director of Fun Bill Murray, vacation packages and more. The program begins at 7pm.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Thursday
October 27, 2016
7. Citadel's Pierce Named Student-Athlete of the Week
The Citadel linebacker Myles Pierce has been named the General Shale Southern Conference Student-Athlete of the Week for competition held Oct. 19-25, the league office announced Wednesday. Pierce recorded a career-high 12 tackles, including 1.5 for a loss, in The Citadel's 24-21 overtime win at Wofford on Saturday. The junior nearly doubled his previous career-high total of seven tackles set in the victory at Gardner-Webb earlier this season. Pierce also provided the hit on Wofford's quarterback that allowed teammate Kailik Williams to intercept a pitch that was returned for a touchdown to tie the game at 21-21 with 5:57 left in the fourth quarter. The Daphne, Ala., native ranks 10th in the SoCon in tackles for a loss this season with 6.5. In the classroom, Pierce boasts a 3.81 grade point average as a business accounting major. The General Shale Southern Conference Student-Athlete of the Week recognizes student-athletes that hold a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.3 and whose sport is currently in-season. Nominees must have also completed at least one full academic year at their respective institutions.
Published in: SoConSports.com
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Thursday
October 27, 2016
8. The Citadel picked 9th, 10th in SoCon Preseason Polls
The Southern Conference media has named Chattanooga the preseason favorite for the upcoming 2016-17 men's basketball season. The Mocs, who were also picked first in the coaches poll, earned 26 of 30 first-place votes and finished with 296 points. ETSU was tabbed second (268) on the strength of the remaining four first-place votes. Furman and Wofford tied for third with 213 points apiece. The Paladins and Terriers posted identical 11-7 records in league play a season ago. Mercer was slotted fifth with 194 points. UNCG (142) was tabbed sixth. The Spartans went 10-8 in league play a season ago and advanced to the second round of the College Basketball Invitational (CBI). Samford (113) narrowly edged Western Carolina (112) for seventh place. After going 10-8 in conference games last season, the Catamounts earned a bid to CBI. Samford enters its third season under head coach Scott Padgett. The Citadel (53) and VMI (48) rounded out the poll. Both the Bulldogs and Keydets are under the direction of second-year coaches as Duggar Baucom and Dan Earl took over their respective programs during the spring of 2015. Eight of the 10 Southern Conference teams will take the floor Nov. 11 to start the regular season. The 2017 Southern Conference Championship presented by General Shale will be held March 3-6 at the U.S. Cellular Center in Asheville, N.C.
Published in: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Wednesday
October 26, 2016
1. Lifting a curtain on the most-watched presidential debates: Mike McCurry speaks
Charleston native Mike McCurry, former White House press secretary under President Bill Clinton, has kept busy this fall as co-chair of the Commission on Presidential Debates. He helped arrange two of the three most-watched debates in history. Those watching them on C-SPAN might have seen McCurry urging the audience to turn off their cellphones and to refrain from boos or cheers. Sixty-two years to the day after he was born at Charleston's Roper Hospital, McCurry returns Thursday to The Citadel to discuss his experiences. He gave a preview to The Post and Courier. P&C: Was this a difficult year for the commission to do its job given the political climate? McCurry: "It's a very contentious election with two candidates that are diametrically opposed on many issues. Picking moderators who could do a very fair and balanced job was difficult. As you know, in the last debate we picked a moderator from FOX television, and that certainly was controversial on the moderate, Democratic side. But I thought Chris Wallace acquitted himself quite well in the debate and arguably got the best reviews of any of the debate moderators." P&C: What was your, or the commission's, biggest frustration? McCurry: "As I look back on the debates, I'm always struck that there are subjects that never quite make it... We didn't have a good robust debate about poverty in America or hunger in America. We had some discussion of race relations, but thinking of Charleston and the events that have consumed that city, we probably could have had more around that."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
October 26, 2016
2. Leadership Day: Learning to lead by making connections
Developing principled leaders through service has been essential to The Citadel's mission since it was founded in 1842. In 2010, the Krause Center for Leadership and Ethics started Leadership Day, a day when the entire South Carolina Corps of Cadets is solely dedicated to service learning and ethics education. Every cadet participates, whether it is through hands-on volunteerism, job shadowing business leaders, or attending ethics training from a global organization. The Citadel's 2016 Leadership Day is October 19, 2016 and hundreds of cadets and students will spread out across the Lowcountry to volunteer and learn leadership by serving others. The Krause Center utilizes the Company Community Engagement Council (CCEC) to coordinate a key piece of The Citadel's campus-wide cadet leadership development. The CCEC is a group of service learning liaisons for each company intended to educate, motivate, and mobilize volunteers to build relationships between a cause and their company. For Jeffery "Bo" Cain, a junior political science major and CCEC liaison for Kilo Company, becoming an effective leader begins by engaging with the community you are a part of. That's why he, along with around 25 other cadets from Kilo Company, make the drive to North Charleston every Monday afternoon to volunteer at Metanoia Community Development Corporation. Metanoia is a non-profit located in North Charleston dedicated to “finding the assets in neighborhoods and using them as building blocks for the eventual success of some of our region's most distressed communities."
Published in: DaretoLead.com
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Wednesday
October 26, 2016
3. Goshen teen makes honoring military veterans his mission
Connor Thomas has focused on the military all his life. "Both my grandpas were veterans," Thomas said. One served in Hawaii in the '50s while the other served 20 years in the Air Force. "I've had a long connection in the family with veterans. It's always been there; my love for the military." That military focus never blurred for the Goshen High School senior who founded the MyGI foundation whose state mission is: "Put Veterans first." "We put on events year-round," Thomas said about how his MyGI Foundation raises money to help veterans. "That money goes to other specific veteran organizations. Places like the DAV, the Joseph House which is a homeless veteran's shelter, and the VA Hospital in downtown Cincinnati." Money raised from car shows organized by MyGI the last two years was specifically earmarked for treatment of homeless veterans at the VA hospital in Cincinnati. Thomas' foundation earned official status as a 501-C3 just last winter, but the teen organized events to help veterans before that. The first was a "Polar Plunge" at East Fork Lake in February 2015 which raised $1,500 they donated to the Disabled American Veterans. Two months after that, April 2015 he organized a 5K run which raised $10,000 for the Joseph House... That is just one way this high school senior puts veterans first. Thomas is hoping to pursue a military career himself. He's already been accepted to The Citadel and is in the application and interview process for entry into West Point. He has been recognized for his service to veterans including a citation from the Army Chief of Staff for exemplary work for disabled veterans. He also has numerous athletic and academic achievements including Distinguished Scholar Athlete NIAAA with a 4.039 weighted grade point average in 2016.
Published in: Cincinnati.com
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Wednesday
October 26, 2016
4. North Korea a stark challenge to US
The World Affairs Council of Charleston (WACC, formerly the Charleston Foreign Affairs Forum) was founded in the early 1980s as a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization. The council's mission is to educate and engage the wider Charleston community through timely activities on world affairs and international relations. According to Slade Metcalf, spokesperson for the alliance, the group is about learning and educating. It is not a lobbying group and is non-partisan. To maintain neutrality, politics and agendas are discouraged and avoided. On Monday, Nov. 7 the council will host speaker Scott Snyder, one of the nation's leading experts on North Korea. He is senior fellow for Korea Studies and director of the program on U.S.-Korea policy at the Council on Foreign Relations in Washington. He previously founded and directed the Center for U.S.-Korea Policy at the Asia Foundation and served as the foundation's representative in Korea for a number of years. Other affiliations focused on Korea have included the U.S. Institute of Peace and Stanford University, where he was a visiting fellow. He is co-chair of the advisory council of the National Committee on North Korea... Speakers like Snyder come from far and wide to be featured presenters at the council's six events hosted throughout the year. Topics have ranged from Brexit to ISIS to war and peace in the Middle East. With a membership of about 300, the group is one of 40 chapters across the United States. Meetings are held at The Citadel with a social at 5:15 and the meeting at 6 p.m. The WACC membership, representing a cross-section of individuals from business, education, and civic backgrounds, seeks to inform and attract participants of all ages. Through thought-provoking presentations and discussions, participants are challenged to foster their understanding of the world. The WACC is a member of the World Affairs Councils of America.
Published in: Moultrie News
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Wednesday
October 26, 2016
5. For kicker Cody Clark, 'the only Citadel I know is 7-0'
A 16-game losing streak to Wofford? Repeated Citadel heartbreak at Gibbs Stadium? Cody Clark knew nothing of all that when he booted a 21-yard field goal in overtime to lift The Citadel to a 24-21 win over Wofford last week, the Bulldogs' first victory in Spartanburg since 1998. "The only Citadel I know," Clark said after the game, "is 7-0." Clark, who transferred to The Citadel as a graduate student from Middle Tennessee State during the offseason, is a big reason the Bulldogs are one of two undefeated teams left in FCS and ranked No. 7 in the coaches poll heading into Saturday's game against ETSU at Johnson Hagood Stadium. He's made 7 of 9 field goal tries this year, leading the Southern Conference at 77.8 percent, and some of those kicks have been huge. His 35-yarder with 2:20 left - on his first field goal try as a Bulldog - provided the winning points in the season-opening win at Mercer. And in narrow wins over Gardner-Webb and Chattanooga, Clark booted field goals of 45 and 32 yards in the final minute of each game to seal the victories. The Bulldogs' success has been especially gratifying for Clark, whose career at MTSU was marred by a troubled relationship with coach Rick Stockstill.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
October 26, 2016
6. Myrtle Beach football standout settles on The Citadel
Since Keyonte Sessions arrived on the scene as a freshman, Myrtle Beach head football coach Mickey Wilson has raved about his willingness to do whatever necessary to help the team win. As a senior, such has been put on full display, the Seahawks' all-purpose man lining up at quarterback, running back and wide receiver on offense. He's also done his part on defense and special teams, playing linebacker and defensive back, in addition to fielding punts. But when it came time to make a college decision, it was time for Sessions to be a little selfish for once. Possessing quite the game-breaking ability whenever the ball is in his hands, the idea of playing on the offensive side of the ball appealed to the versatile Myrtle Beach standout. So when The Citadel and its ball-control offense came to call, it made for quite the easy choice. Sessions committed to The Citadel on Monday, choosing the Bulldogs over North Greenville, Presbyterian and a few other schools. "The biggest thing was, that he visited and liked what he saw and felt about the situation," Wilson said. "They're going to use him on offense, and that was something he was looking for."
Published in: Myrtle Beach Online
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Wednesday
October 26, 2016
7. Former Lt. Gov. Burnet Maybank Jr. dies at age 92
Burnet Rhett Maybank Jr., of Charleston, an Army veteran, former S.C. lieutenant governor, retired attorney, General Assembly member, Charleston County Council member and widower of Marion Mitchell Maybank, died Tuesday. He was 92. Maybank was born in Charleston, May 2, 1924, to the late S.C. Senator and Governor, Burnet Maybank Sr. He enrolled at The Citadel in 1941, but dropped out to serve in the U.S. Army Air Force as a B-17 bomber pilot during World War II. After the war, he graduated from the University of South Carolina in 1950 with bachelor degrees in science and law. While practicing law in Greenville, he was elected to his first public office as a member of the House of Representatives in 1952. He was reelected in 1954 and 1956. While part of the house, he served on the Judiciary Committee and other special committees. Deciding it was time to go statewide, he ran and won in the 1958 election to serve as lieutenant governor from 1959-1961. He was elected as a democrat but later switched to the Republican Party. After serving as lieutenant governor, he returned to his law practice in Charleston, but he returned to politics in 1982 when he was elected to the Charleston County Council. He continued his legal and political career until his retirement.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
October 26, 2016
8. Lisa Boone Lowe Obituary
Lisa Boone Lowe died unexpectedly on Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2016. She is the daughter of James Flake and Carolyn Hansen Boone, and the wife of Barret Lowe. Services will be held on Saturday, Oct. 15, at The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Pioneer Park Chapel in Snowflake, with a viewing at 9 a.m. and the funeral service at 10 a.m. She will be interred to rest at the R.V. "Mike" Ramsay Cemetery in Snowflake. She was born Oct. 19, 1975, in Ogden, Utah. She is the mother of six wonderful children, Tiffany Fox, Donald Lee Tisdale III, Cassandra Tisdale, Daniel Boone Howard, Elizabeth Howard and Angela Howard, and sister to James Russell Boone, David William Boone, Jared Hansen Boone, Rachel Boone Gardner, Natalie Boone Lundberg and Heather Boone Brimhall. Lisa had a great love of her Savior Jesus Christ and was a faithful member of the LDS church. She diligently strived to instill the gospel in her children's lives. Next to her love for her children, Lisa had a drive toward educating herself. She earned three associate degrees, a bachelor's degree and most recently completed a master's degree from The Citadel Military College of South Carolina in May 2016.
Published in: The Tribune News
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Tuesday
October 25, 2016
1. Globally recognized Citadel professor and economist addresses The Nassau Institute; publishes new book
Distinguished Professor Richard Ebeling frequently requested speaker at learning institutions around the world - One of The Citadel's most sought after speakers and contributors, Richard Ebeling, Ph.D., BB&T Distinguished Professor of Austrian Economics and Public Policy The Citadel Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership, has a new book to add to his extensive repertoire of publications. In Austrian Economics and Public Policy: Restoring Freedom and Prosperity, Ebeling contends that general citizens can do a better job of managing their own lives than governments, which he says lack the knowledge, wisdom and ability to direct the lives of multitudes of people. "The book explains the central ideas of the Austrian School of Economics in the context of discussing a wide variety of public policy issues, including money and the business cycle, income inequality in American society, government regulation of business, deficit spending and the national debt, crony capitalism and the welfare state, free trade versus political protectionism, and entrepreneurship and the market process," Ebeling said. Ebeling recently returned from Nassau, Bahamas, where he shared his ideas with economists and students participating in a research institute event exploring capitalism and free markets.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom - Faculty News
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Tuesday
October 25, 2016
2. Citadel slips one spot to No. 7 in FCS Coaches Poll; Charleston Southern holds at No. 9
Despite a 24-21 overtime victory at Wofford on Saturday, The Citadel slipped one spot to No. 7 in the FCS Coaches Poll released Monday. At 7-0, the Bulldogs remain one of just two unbeaten teams in FCS, along with No. 1 Sam Houston State (7-0). Two other Southern Conference teams are ranked, with Chattanooga (7-1) at No. 8 and Samford (6-1) at No. 19. The Citadel hosts Samford on Nov. 5. Charleston Southern (4-2) is ninth in the poll. The Bucs are 4-2 after Saturday's 38-3 victory over Presbyterian College. James Madison (6-1) - led by former Citadel coach Mike Houston - is at No. 5. In the FCS Stats media poll, The Citadel remains at No. 5. Williams honored - Citadel safety Kailik Williams has been named the Southern Conference defensive player of the week for his performance in the Bulldogs' victory at Wofford on Saturday. Williams, a junior from Ormond Beach, Fla., had 11 tackles and returned an interception 13 yards for a touchdown to tie the game at 21-21 and force overtime. Williams was named the SoCon defensive player of the month for September.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
October 25, 2016
3. Three Grand Strand football standouts picked for North-South game
It's fair to say Monday was a good day for Myrtle Beach standout Keyonte Sessions. Committing to play football at The Citadel earlier in the day, the Seahawks all-purpose man received more good news a few hours later, being selected to play in the Touchstone Energy Cooperatives North-South Bowl. The annual all-star game pitting 88 of the state's top senior players will be contested on Saturday, Dec. 10 at Doug Shaw Memorial Stadium. For Sessions, his final prep football game will be played at the same venue he's called home his entire career. Listed as a defensive back on the roster, Sessions has done much more this season for the Seahawks, rushing for 236 yards on 52 carries and catching 11 passes for 106 more. For the 2016 football campaign, he has 14 touchdowns. On the defensive side of the ball, he's served as a key part of a solid Myrtle Beach unit, making 26 solo tackles while assisting on 22 more. He has an interception, a fumble caused and a defensive touchdown to his credit.
Published in: Myrtle Beach Online
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Tuesday
October 25, 2016
4. Williams named SoCon defensive player of the week
The Citadel's Kailik Williams has been named the Southern Conference Defensive Player of the Week, it was announced Monday. Williams recorded 11 tackles, 1.0 for loss, and one interception returned 13 yards for a touchdown in The Citadel's 24-21 overtime victory at Wofford. The junior from Ormond Beach, Florida, authored the "Pitch Six", pulling off one of the most athletic defensive plays of the season to tie the game at 21-21 with 5:57 remaining in regulation. As the Terriers attempted a 3rd-down option play to the right side, Williams blitzed into the backfield and positioned himself between the quarterback and running back. When the quarterback attempted the pitch, Williams jumped up and grabbed the ball with one hand before sprinting into the end zone. Williams recorded his fourth double-digit tackle game of the season and grabbed his second interception of 2016. He has a team-leading 62 tackles, including 4.5 for loss, with two interceptions and five pass breakups. His average of 8.9 tackles per game ranks eighth in the Southern Conference, and his seven passes defended are tied for third in the SoCon. Williams' recognition is the seventh from the conference for The Citadel this season, and Williams, who also earned September's Defensive Player of the Month, is the first Bulldog to be recognized twice. B-Back Tyler Renew was named Offensive Player of the Week after the season opener at Mercer, defensive back Dee Delaney was named Defensive Player of the Week for week two, DeAndre Schoultz picked up Special Teams Player of the Week in week three, linebacker Joe Crochet earned the week five SoCon Defensive Player of the Week honor and kicker Cody Clark was the conference's Special Teams Player of the Week in week seven.
Published in: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Tuesday
October 25, 2016
5. Bulldogs Take Second Behind No. 19 North Georgia
The Citadel rifle teams both recorded season-best cumulative scores Saturday at North Georgia. "Our scores continue to improve, but we continue to have small mistakes that cost us a much better score" head coach William Smith said. "Next week we have North Carolina State and Navy for a tough home match." The 19th-ranked and host Nighthawks claimed the team victory with a score of 4,575. The Citadel co-ed team was second with 4,487, slightly ahead of Georgia Southern's 4,467, and The Citadel women's team scored 4,201 to take fourth. Junior Morgan Long led the Bulldogs and finished third overall with a cumulative score of 1,134. The Sanford, North Carolina, native recorded a season-best 580 to take third in air rifle and finished seventh in smallbore with 554, only two points shy of his season-best score. Senior Richie Parra registered a season-best 573 and finished eighth in air rifle, and sophomore Allison Auten claimed second in both disciplines. Junior Colton Poole finished 11th in air rifle and 12th in smallbore and was followed by freshman Alexander McAlear, who took 13th in smallbore and 16th in air rifle. Freshman Faith Totherow scored a season-best 545, nearly a 30-point improvement from her previous best, and placed 14th overall in smallbore. Sophomore Leah Wallace posted season-best scores of 563 in air rifle and 531 in smallbore and placed 17th in both.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Tuesday
October 25, 2016
6. Mickey E. Marinko Obituary
Mickey E. Marinko of Kingsland died Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2016. at Hospice of the Golden Isles. He was 63. He was born on Feb. 20, 1953, in Florence, S.C. He was a graduate of The Citadel in Charleston, S.C., and a lifelong Citadel Bulldogs fan. Mickey worked as a shipwright at both Charleston Naval Shipyard and Trident Refit Facility in Kings Bay. He was a union steward who dedicated himself to representing and defending the interests of his fellow employees. He served as a proud member of the National Rifle Association and the Elks Lodge. A unique soul, Mickey was very funny and didn't have a mean bone in his body! He will be greatly missed. A lifelong bachelor, Mickey is survived by his brother, John A. Marinko and his wife Kathy; his niece, Jennifer Marinko Clayton and husband, Alan, of Summerfield, N.C.; and many good friends. A celebration of life announcement will be upcoming. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Mickey's name to the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network.
Published in: Tribune & Georgian
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Monday
October 24, 2016
1. Civic engagement and events highlight Citadel's 2016 Leadership Day
The members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets study leadership and ethics in the classroom operate a leadership laboratory where they manage the undergraduate student body of The Citadel throughout the school year. On Oct. 19, they dedicated the entire day to service learning, leadership and ethics by performing community service, shadowing business leaders or attending ethics training as part of Leadership Day 2016. Over 1,200 cadets spread over the Lowcountry, with sophomores leading freshmen, to participate in service projects including STEM and literacy classroom activities, cleaning up parks, and preparing and delivering meals. Junior cadets attended a full-day ethics seminar and seniors spent the day listening to business leaders from the Charleston area including Boeing South Carolina, Google Charleston, Hollings Marine Laboratory, the Medical University of South Carolina, and SCANA/SCE&G. Soldiers' Angels, a mobile food pantry that feeds veterans, joined a partnership with the cadets for the first time this year. They will join the Cadets once a month to run a food pantry on the Citadel campus.
Published in: Palmetto Business Daily
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Monday
October 24, 2016
2. CPA ninth graders attend leadership conference
Colleton Prep ninth-graders Clay Griffin, left, and Nick Harvey were among elected student leaders from members of the South Carolina Independent Schools Student Association who attended the group's fall conference in the Summerall Chapel on the campus of The Citadel in Charleston. The students attend 39 different SCISA schools, including Colleton Preparatory Academy.
Published in: WalterboroLive.com
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Monday
October 24, 2016
3. Savannah's Al Kennickell named Citadel Alumni of the Year
The Citadel Alumni Association has chosen Al Kennickell as the 2016 Citadel Alumni of the year. Al attended The Citadel on a football scholarship after graduating from Jenkins High School in Savannah, GA in 1973. After graduating from The Citadel in 1977, he returned to Savannah to enter his family's printing business. In 1981 he purchased Kennickell Printing Company from his family and built the business, now called The Kennickell Group, into an internationally recognized company doing business worldwide. Using leadership skills learned at The Citadel, Al has been very active in the business community in Savannah. Al has been chairman of the Savannah Area Chamber of Commerce, the Greater Savannah Sports Council, the Savannah Executives Association, the Savannah Foundation, and the National Museum of the Mighty Eighth Air Force. He has also been the president of the Chatham Club, the Savannah Shamrocks Rugby Club and Senior Warden of St. Thomas Episcopal Church. For twelve years he was the chairman of the PGA Tour's Liberty Mutual Legends of Golf and is currently a trustee for the Heritage Classic Foundation, the organization that runs the RBC Heritage Classic on Hilton Head Island.
Published in: SavannahNow.com
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Monday
October 24, 2016
4. Editorial: A boy and his dog
Once again, just 10 days after Hurricane Matthew ravaged much of South Carolina's coastal region, another hero has emerged with Aiken ties, to shine through the shadow cast by the second hurricane to hit the state in two months. Sgt. Fernando Rodriguez, a graduate of South Aiken High School and a member of the S.C. National Guard, is now regarded as his dog's best friend, when he rescued the 3-month-old puppy chained to a fence in the small town of Nichols, in Marion County, northwest of Myrtle Beach, while on storm damage observation maneuvers with his unit... This act will accompany The Citadel graduate, still considering career choices after he re-upped for a second six-year tour of duty with the National Guard. In this Information Age of fact checking, a future employer will Google Rodriguez when considering the Bachelor degree recipient for a job. Fernando is an Administration major with a focus on Finance, for a position. They will find this story. Not a bad resume item. Former Charleston Mayor Joe Riley called Aiken's residents its most treasured natural resource. Meet the latest member of Aiken's most treasured natural resource, Sgt. Fernando Rodriguez. And Trooper of course.
Published in: Aiken Standard
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Monday
October 24, 2016
5. The Citadel 7-0 after winning a thriller at Wofford
Citadel quarterback Dominique Allen sat on the bench near the end of regulation Saturday, his head covered by a towel and his team's undefeated season on the brink. Wofford had the ball and a touchdown lead with six minutes to play, attempting to run out the clock on what yet another Citadel heartbreak in Gibbs Stadium, where the Bulldogs had not won since 1998. "I looked up on the big screen, and I saw Kailik running into the end zone and everyone is jumping up and down," Allen said. "I was like, 'Oh, wow!'" Citadel safety Kailik Williams made what might be remembered as The Citadel's play of the year, snatching a Wofford pitch out of mid-air and racing 13 yards for a tying touchdown with 5:57 to play. That set up a dramatic finish, as Jonathan King blocked a potentially game-winning field goal by Wofford; Cody Clark kicked a 21-yard field goal in overtime; and Joe Crochet forced a Terriers' fumble, recovered by Ben Roberts, that finally ended it. Citadel players rushed the field and the packed visitors' side – including some 500 knobs bused in from Charleston - exploded with cheers as the sixth-ranked Bulldogs celebrated a 24-21 overtime win that made them 7-0 for the first time in program history. "It was a rollercoaster," said coach Brent Thompson, who has yet to lose as the Bulldogs' coach. "One thing I've always said about this team is they find a way to win. That's what they did today." The victory improved The Citadel's record to 5-0 in the Southern Conference, strengthening their grip on a second straight league title. Wofford slipped to 4-3 overall and 2-2 in the SoCon, and felt the heartbreak The Citadel has so often in Gibbs Stadium, where a homecoming crowd of 11,102 saw Saturday's game.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
October 24, 2016
6. Citadel's Kailik Williams piling up big plays
Kailik Williams made a tackle near the sideline against Wofford on Saturday, and let out a whoop. "Count 'em up," The Citadel's junior safety shouted. Williams has made as many plays as any Bulldog this season, helping The Citadel win its first seven games for the first time in program history, and rise to No. 6 in the FCS Coaches Poll. The 5-11, 185-pounder from Ormond Beach, Fla., is the Bulldogs' top tackler, with 62 stops, on a defense that ranks among the best in the Southern Conference. Williams, named the SoCon defensive player of the month for September, does it all – penetrate the backfield, with 4.5 tackles for loss, and cover receivers downfield, with two interceptions, five passes broken up and seven passes defended. But no play Williams has made this season was bigger than the spectacular "Pitch Six" that saved the Bulldogs in a 24-21 overtime victory at Wofford on Saturday. With the Terriers up by 21-14 and attempting to run out the clock, Williams blitzed on 3rd and 12 as Wofford quarterback Brandon Goodson started to his right on an option play. Williams somehow deked Goodson into making the pitchout, then snatched the ball out of the air and raced 13 yards for a touchdown that tied the game at 21-21 with 5:57 to play. The play went into the statistics as interception, and into Citadel lore as a miracle.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
October 24, 2016
7. Citadel tries to go where no Bulldogs team has gone before
The 1992 season remains a touchstone for Citadel football. The Bulldogs won 11 games that year, rising to No. 1 in the nation in Division I-AA and winning the second Southern Conference title in program history. Last year's Citadel team wrote its own chapter, winning a third SoCon title, claiming an FCS playoff victory and knocking off South Carolina in a historic upset. Now, the 2016 Bulldogs have a chance to go where no Citadel team has gone before: 7-0. No Citadel team has ever started a season with seven straight victories, which the Bulldogs - ranked No. 6 in the FCS Coaches Poll - can do with a win at Wofford on Saturday at Gibbs Stadium in Spartanburg. First-year coach Brent Thompson, already off to the best start of any coach in Citadel history, is very interested in 7-0. He's not quite as focused on what that means for his place in Citadel history. "I think it means a lot more for The Citadel community and players than it does for me," he said. "I'm just happy to be here at this point, and if we can make some history on the way, that'd be fabulous and wonderful. "But I also know that it won't always be this way for me. But for The Citadel faithful who have been here for so many years, and who may not have always had a great season to cheer about, that's what its more about. And these players who have put so much into it."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Friday
October 21, 2016
1. Citadel cadets serve the Lowcountry on Leadership Day 2016
On Leadership Day 2016, the entire South Carolina Corps of Cadets was solely dedicated to service learning and ethics education. The annual event is one part of a cadet's four years of required leadership development - but it is a favorite for cadets, their professors, and for the community agencies they serve. View the article for photos and video of Leadership Day 2016.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Friday
October 21, 2016
2. Army ROTC at The Citadel celebrates 100 years of producing principled leaders
The Citadel applied to the U.S. Department of War in 1882, requesting that an Army officer be assigned to the college as Professor of Military Science and Tactics. That application laid the groundwork for what would eventually become an Army ROTC program at the college. In the coming years, The Citadel was classified as an Essentially Military College - meaning students were housed in barracks, constantly in uniform, and bound to a disciplinary system. As a result, the war department's college division inspected The Citadel annually from 1904-27, during which time the college earned the distinguished college title 20 times until the program was suspended. In 1916 and 1917, the designation allowed The Citadel to recommend honor graduates for second lieutenant appointments in the Army. That resulted in in the commissioning of 25 graduates as officers during those years. As World War I raged in Europe, Congress took action to strengthen the nation's defense by initiating a training program for reserve and volunteer officers. The Defense Act of June 1916 established the Reserve Officers' Training Corps, better known today as ROTC. The Citadel along with the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas (today's Texas A&M), Maine University, the University of Arkansas, St. Johns College, and The College of St. Thomas comprised the Army's original list of colleges designated to establish an ROTC unit.
Published in: The Charleston Digitel
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Friday
October 21, 2016
3. East Side native, Citadel grad rises in rank to an Army general
An Army officer who grew up on Charleston's East Side and graduated from The Citadel has been promoted to a brigadier general. Congress approved the one-star rank promotion on Sept. 28 for Brig. Gen. David Wilson, who is the first African-American Citadel alum to wear the rank. He graduated from the military school in 1991. The honor came about a month after Wilson was named chief of ordnance and commandant at the U.S. Army Ordnance School in Fort Lee, Va. He's the third black officer to lead the training school since its establishment in 1812. A brigadier general is the 25th rank in the army, directly above colonel and below major general. Wilson, who grew up on Isabella Street and attended Burke High School, has served three tours in Iraq, along with postings in South Korea and Fort Bragg.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Friday
October 21, 2016
4. Al Kennickell Named Citadel Alumni of the Year
The Citadel Alumni Association has chosen Al Kennickell as the 2016 Citadel Alumni of the year. Al attended The Citadel on a football scholarship after graduating from Jenkins High School in Savannah, GA in 1973. After graduating from The Citadel in 1977, he returned to Savannah to enter his family's printing business. In 1981 he purchased Kennickell Printing Company from his family and built the business, now called The Kennickell Group, into an internationally recognized company doing business worldwide. Using leadership skills learned at The Citadel, Al has been very active in the business community in Savannah. Al has been chairman of the Savannah Area Chamber of Commerce, the Greater Savannah Sports Council, the Savannah Executives Association, the Savannah Foundation, and the National Museum of the Mighty Eighth Air Force. He has also been the president of the Chatham Club, the Savannah Shamrocks Rugby Club and Senior Warden of St. Thomas Episcopal Church. For twelve years he was the chairman of the PGA Tour's Liberty Mutual Legends of Golf and is currently a trustee for the Heritage Classic Foundation, the organization that runs the RBC Heritage Classic on Hilton Head Island. Al is currently in the middle of a two year term as president of the Brigadier Foundation of The Citadel, where he was instrumental in hiring current executive director Rob Hoak, a former banker in Savannah. Working with Rob and his staff, they have made many positive changes in the organization that have led to unprecedented success at the Brigadier Foundation with records set in money raised and membership levels.
Published in: WhatTheyThink.com
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Friday
October 21, 2016
5. Supreme Court appoints Chief Judge Self toJQC
The Supreme Court of Georgia has appointed Chief Judge Tilman E. "Tripp" Self, III of the Macon Judicial Circuit to the Judicial Qualifications Commission (JQC). Self replaces Chief Judge Brenda Weaver of the Appalachian Circuit, who resigned from the Commission in August. The Judicial Qualifications Commission is a seven-member constitutional body that educates Georgia judges about their ethical duties and conducts investigations and hearings regarding judges' ethical misconduct. The state Supreme Court makes two appointments to the Commission. The Court appointed Judge Patsy Y. Porter of the Fulton County State Court to the Commission in August 2013. Judge Porter remains on the Commission and recently took over as its chairperson following Chief Judge Weaver's resignation. Chief Judge Self, 47, was elected to the Superior Court bench Dec. 5, 2006, and was reelected in 2010 and 2014 without opposition. He is the third generation of his family to be elected to a judicial office. A former U.S. Army Field Artillery Officer, Chief Judge Self is the President-Elect of the Council of Superior Court Judges. He has served as the co-chair of the Council's Bench and Bar Committee and as a member of its Budget and Legislation Committees. Prior to his service on the bench, he was a partner with the law firm of Sell & Melton in Macon. He is a former President of the Macon Bar Association. In addition to his other judicial duties, Chief Judge Self presides over the Macon Judicial Circuit's Veterans Treatment Court. Chief Judge Self serves on the Museum of Aviation Foundation Board of Directors at Robins Air Force Base and the Executive Board of the Central Georgia Council of the Boy Scouts of America. He is a member of the Downtown Macon Rotary Club. In his free time, Chief Judge Self officiates college football in the NCAA's Southern Conference. Judge Self is a magna cum laude graduate of The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, and he graduated cum laude from the University of Georgia School of Law.
Published in: CoosaValleyNews.com
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Friday
October 21, 2016
6. Student leaders hold conference at The Citadel
Elected student leaders from members of the S.C. Independent Schools Student Association held their Fall Conference in the Summerall Chapel on the campus of The Citadel in Charleston. The students attend 39 different SCISA schools including Conway Christian School. Conway Christian students who attended were Bryant Barnhill, Chandler Todd, Rachel Hogue and Lexie Hill. Generally, the Fall Conference is held in the House Chamber at the State House in Columbia. The chamber was not available due to a current renovation project. Cmdr. Joe Molina, chaplain to the Corps of Cadets, was in charge of the opening prayer and devotion. The president of The Citadel, Lt. General John Rosa, welcomed the participants to The Citadel and gave a brief talk. While in session on the campus, the students held their general meeting, which included discussions on the Student Exchange program, the Student Council of the Year, the Honor Society of the Year and the 2017 Spring Convention. Additionally, during a development session, resolutions, which will be debated during the 2017 Spring Convention, were introduced. Students interested in running for an SCISSA office during the 2017 Spring Convention could speak with and question the present elected officials of the association. "These student leaders had an opportunity to participate in a democratic process," Larry Watt, SCISA executive director, said. "This activity, along with the education they are receiving at their schools, will go a long way in preparing them to become good, productive citizens of the state when they graduate."
Published in: MyHorryNews.com
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Friday
October 21, 2016
7. The Citadel Offers First Responders Free Tickets
As a thank you for their hard work before, during and after Hurricane Matthew, The Citadel Athletic Department is offering a free ticket to all emergency management personnel in the tri-county area for the Oct. 29 football game against ETSU sponsored by Live 5 News. The Citadel football team is currently 6-0 and ranked No. 5 in the country. The Bulldogs and Buccaneers are set for a 2 p.m. kickoff inside Johnson Hagood Stadium on Oct. 29. Emergency management personnel eligible for a free ticket include police, fire, EMS, hospital workers, South Carolina Electric & Gas, South Carolina Department of Transportation, municipal public works, municipal parks and urban forestry. In addition to the free ticket, a discount of 50% off regular ticket price is available to the immediate family of emergency management personnel redeeming the free ticket offer. Tickets for emergency personnel can be claimed at The Citadel Athletic Ticket Office located on the first floor of McAlister Field House or by calling the ticket office at 843-953-DOGS (3647). Identification will be necessary either at the time of purchase or when picking up the ticket.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Friday
October 21, 2016
8. The Juice: Citadel defense winning with swagger
Call if confidence. Call it swagger. The Citadel defense just calls it juice. There's a palpable spirit flowing through the Bulldogs defense this season. It's a trust that the players have in themselves and faith in the men lining up beside them. Big plays are expected. Big stops will be celebrated; Big wins even more so. "You've got to bring the juice when you come play," Bulldogs defensive lineman Jonathan King said. "Add that excitement. Be the most excited team to play. It makes the game that much more fun, makes it that much more meaningful." The origin of juice at The Citadel traces back to last season. Linebacker Gregory Pappas, then a sophomore, became known for igniting the sideline during practice whenever the first-team defense faced the first-team offense in third-down situations. "He would be on the sideline dancing and just turning up," cornerback Dee Delaney said. "So we just always said he had the most juice on third down." The juice is no longer relegated to third downs in practice. It's groomed in the locker room before games as players prepare certain ways. It spills onto the field as the Bulldogs storm out during pregame introductions. You see it in every turnover, every sack, every big hit, every stop, every celebration; the juice flows. "Juice is just basically knowing what you're doing and feeling so good about it that you have a little swag about yourself," Delaney said. "They're going to smash you in the mouth and stop the run. With the defensive backs, we know we have to come down and make tackles but overall the ball is the main focus. So if it's in the air, we feel like it's meant for us."
Published in: Moultrie News
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Thursday
October 20, 2016
1. Citadel Cadets, faculty aim to make difference on annual Leadership Day
Over 1,000 Citadel cadets participated in a day of volunteering Wednesday. According to a news release, more than 1,200 cadets - freshmen and sophomores - boarded buses and spread across the Lowcountry to learn by serving. Hundreds of cadets and many faculty and staff took part in community service. Upperclassman shadowed business leaders or attended ethics training from a global organization, the release states. Underclassmen helped clean up parks, prepare food, deliver meals and lead STEM and literacy classroom activities. At Mary Ford Elementary, sophomore Adrian Beaput and his team challenged kids to become heroes in their own neighborhood. "It sort of motivates them so they can change people's lives, they can help the community. They can be that spark that light for other people," he said. Hosted in partnership with Soldiers' Angels, the Cadets hoped to feed nearly 200 at-risk and homeless veterans. "In order to be able to lead you have to follow first. In order to be able to follow you have to serve under other people," Braeden Bartrum said.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Thursday
October 20, 2016
2. Citadel cadets serve community on Leadership Day
More than 1,200 cadets fanned out across the Lowcountry to learn by serving on the Citadel's Leadership Day 2016 held Wednesday, Oct. 19. View the article to see the many pictures from The Post and Courier.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
October 20, 2016
3a. Over 1,000 Citadel cadets start day of service
Over 1,000 Citadel cadets will participate in a day of volunteering Wednesday. According to a news release, more than 1,200 cadets - freshmen and sophomores - will board buses as the sun rises and spread across the Lowcountry to learn by serving. All cadets and many faculty and staff will either take part in community service, shadowing business leaders or attending ethics training from a global organization, the release states. Underclassmen will help lead STEM and literacy classroom activities, clean up parks, prepare food and deliver meals. On Leadership Day, and once a month going forward as the release states, cadets will help run a food pantry for homeless veterans on campus. Hosted in partnership with Soldiers' Angels, the Cadets hope to feed nearly 200 at-risk and homeless veterans. Takeaway meals will be provided from noon until 3:30 at the Altman Athletic Center end of The Citadel's Johnson Hagood Stadium parking area. The next event will be held Nov. 10. Freshman and sophomore cadets are also set to visit 18 Charleston County schools to assist with STEM and literacy activities, work on school improvement projects and build relationships with students.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Thursday
October 20, 2016
3b. 1000 cadets
1000 cadets
Published in: KAUZ-TV Wichita Fall, TX
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Thursday
October 20, 2016
4. 1,200 cadets to volunteer for Leadership Day Wednesday
Cadets from The Citadel are spending time with local elementary and middle school students during their annual Leadership Day. Freshman and sophomore Citadel cadets will visit 18 schools on Wednesday, where they will lead literacy classroom activities, and work with students in an effort to show leadership through service in the community. Juniors will attend a full day ethics seminar, and seniors will spend a full day learning from the leaders of more than 20 businesses in the Charleston area, including Boeing South Carolina, Google Charleston, Hollings Marine Laboratory, the Medical University of South Carolina, and SCE&G. Leadership Day is held from 10:00 a.m. to noon on Wednesday. Leadership Day is planned and managed annually by The Citadel's Krause Center for Leadership and Ethics. Cadets are required to study leadership and ethics in the classroom, and they are dedicated to learning through service to the community, directed by the college's Krause Center for Leadership and Ethics.
Broadcast on: WCBD-TV Charleston, SC
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Thursday
October 20, 2016
5. Mike McCurry to Speak at The Citadel about the 2016 Election
The Citadel's Department of Political Science will host Former White House press secretary, Mike McCurry in a discussion and analysis of upcoming 2016 election and the recent debate. McCurry is a veteran political strategist and spokesperson with nearly 35 years of experience in Washington, D.C. He served in the White House as press secretary to President Bill Clinton from 1995-98. He also served as the spokesman for the Department of State from 1993-95 and director of communications for the Democratic National Committee from 1988-90. McCurry serves on numerous boards of advisory councils including Share Our Strength, the Junior Statesmen Foundation, the Children's Scholarship Fund, the Wesley Theological Seminary, and the United Methodist Commission on Communications.
Published in: CharlestonCEO.com
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Thursday
October 20, 2016
6. For Citadel quarterback Dominique Allen, clutch is nothing new
The southern rasp in Lyman Guy's voice spikes when the conversation shifts to Dominique Allen. He pauses for a moment, thinking back on his former quarterback, before enthusiastically starting again. "Well, you remember the touchdown he threw against Florida State, don't you?" Allen's high school football coach asks rhetorically. "And when they beat South Carolina? "That kid, he's got it. He understands it. He's a natural leader and he's comfortable in those situations. It's the fruits of his leadership and labor. And he's been doing that since Day 1." Allen has been a paradox of sorts for The Citadel this season. Not a starter but certainly a finisher. The past two weeks the junior quarterback has led game-winning touchdown drives in the final minutes of the fourth quarter against both Furman and Gardner-Webb. He's directed the late-game rallies like a poised, third-year veteran. But he's yet to start a game for the Bulldogs this season. After starting all 13 games under center last season - one of the Citadel's best ever - Allen was suspended for the Bulldogs' season opener because of an offseason violation of team rules. He made his season debut Week 2 in the second quarter against Furman and went on to score the game-winning touchdown. Despite delivering the win, Allen again watched from the sideline the following week as redshirt freshman quarterback Jordan Black received the start against Gardner-Webb. Once again, Allen waited until the second quarter for his chance to play. And once again, with the game on the line in the fourth quarter, Citadel coach Brent Thompson trusted Allen to secure the win. Allen ran in the go-ahead touchdown with less than three minutes remaining, just as he had the week prior.
Published in: Moultrie News
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Wednesday
October 19, 2016
1. Leadership Day 2016 includes over 100 civic engagement and leadership events
Members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets live and learn in what is considered a leadership laboratory at The Citadel. Cadets learn to lead by managing the undergraduate student body as officers and staff in the Corps. They are required to study leadership and ethics in the classroom, and they are dedicated to learning through service to the community, directed by the college's Krause Center for Leadership and Ethics. During the 2015-16 academic year, the Corp provided more than 19,000 hours of community service in total. But on one particular day each October is dedicated solely to service learning, and leadership and ethics education. Whether it is participating in community service, shadowing business leaders, or attending ethics training from a global organization, every cadet, as well as many faculty and staff, participates. Leadership Day 2016 will be held Wednesday, Oct. 19. As the sun rises more than 1,200 cadets - freshmen led by sophomores - will board buses to fan out across the Lowcountry to learn by serving. They will help lead STEM and literacy classroom activities, clean up parks, prepare food and deliver meals. Juniors will attend a full day ethics seminar, and seniors will spend a full day learning from the leaders of more than 20 businesses in the Charleston area, including Boeing South Carolina, Google Charleston, Hollings Marine Laboratory, the Medical University of South Carolina, and SCANA/SCE&G. New this year is a partnership with Soldiers' Angels mobile food pantry, a program that originated in Texas to fight veteran hunger. On Leadership Day, and once a month going forward, cadets will help run the pantry on campus. On Oct. 19, the Soldiers' Angels Veteran Mobile Food Pantry and cadets will provide takeaways meals from noon until 3:30 at the Altman Athletic Center end of The Citadel's Johnson Hagood Stadium parking. The next event will be held Nov. 10.
Published in: LowcountryBizSC.com
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Wednesday
October 19, 2016
2. 1,200 cadets to volunteer for Leadership Day Wednesday
Cadets from The Citadel are spending time with local elementary and middle school students during their annual Leadership Day. Freshman and sophomore Citadel cadets will visit 18 schools on Wednesday, where they will lead literacy classroom activities, and work with students in an effort to show leadership through service in the community. Juniors will attend a full day ethics seminar, and seniors will spend a full day learning from the leaders of more than 20 businesses in the Charleston area, including Boeing South Carolina, Google Charleston, Hollings Marine Laboratory, the Medical University of South Carolina, and SCE&G. Leadership Day is held from 10:00 a.m. to noon on Wednesday. Leadership Day is planned and managed annually by The Citadel's Krause Center for Leadership and Ethics. Cadets are required to study leadership and ethics in the classroom, and they are dedicated to learning through service to the community, directed by the college's Krause Center for Leadership and Ethics. During the 2015-16 academic year, the Corp provided more than 19,000 hours of community service to the Lowcountry in total.
Published in: WCBD TV-2 (Charleston) - online
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Wednesday
October 19, 2016
3. Election insights from former White House Press Secretary, Mike McCurry
The Citadel's Department of Political Science will host Former White House press secretary, Mike McCurry in a discussion and analysis of upcoming 2016 election and the recent debate. McCurry is a veteran political strategist and spokesperson with nearly 35 years of experience in Washington, D.C. He served in the White House as press secretary to President Bill Clinton from 1995-98. He also served as the spokesman for the Department of State from 1993-95 and director of communications for the Democratic National Committee from 1988-90. McCurry serves on numerous boards of advisory councils including Share Our Strength, the Junior Statesmen Foundation, the Children's Scholarship Fund, the Wesley Theological Seminary, and the United Methodist Commission on Communications.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Wednesday
October 19, 2016
4. Kearney Leaves Assistant Director of Student Involvement Job
In the latest staffing change for the Office of Student Involvement, Alexandra Kearney, assistant director of student affairs, stepped down from her position earlier this month. She has taken a position at The Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina. Her former responsibilities will be shared by various members of the Office of Student Involvement in the interim, according to Cody Arcuri, assistant dean of student involvement. The search for a new assistant director is already underway. "We are currently actively reviewing applications and will be interviewing candidates to fill the Assistant Director for Student Organizations and Programming position shortly," said Arcuri. Arcuri said the office is working to fill her position "as quickly as possible" so that the new candidate is hired before the start of the spring semester. Kearney was the third assistant director hired in three years, tasked with the job of overseeing more than 130 Fordham clubs and organizations on campus. She began working at Fordham in October 2015 following the departure of former Assistant Director Shannon Driscoll. Jennifer Lackie, who served as assistant director prior to Driscoll, moved into a new role of Director for the Transition Year Experience in August 2013.
Published in: The Fordham Ram
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Wednesday
October 19, 2016
5. When The Citadel and Wofford meet, there are few secrets
When Brent Thompson was coaching at Lenoir-Rhyne, he made the drive from Hickory, N.C., to Spartanburg to consult with Wofford coach Mike Ayers and his veteran offensive coordinator, triple-option guru Wade Lang. "We wanted to talk to them about their offense and the way they ran their program," said Thompson, now the head coach at The Citadel. "We figured we'd model ourselves on what they did at Wofford - very fundamental, very physical. We had to do things a little differently at L-R, with a high academic kid, and that's what they do there. They really helped us out a lot." No surprise, then, that Thompson's Citadel team - 6-0 and ranked No. 6 in the FCS Coaches Poll this season - bears more than a passing (or rushing) resemblance to the Wofford team the Bulldogs will face at 1:30 p.m. Saturday in Spartanburg. A glance at Southern Conference statistics confirms the impression. The Citadel is No. 1 in rushing offense, Wofford No. 2. The Terriers lead in rushing defense, just head of the Bulldogs. And they both like to play keep-away with each team averaging almost 36 minutes per game in time of possession.
Published in: The Post and Courier - online
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Tuesday
October 18, 2016
1. Leadership Day 2016 includes over 100 civic engagement and leadership events
Members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets live and learn in what is considered a leadership laboratory at The Citadel. Cadets learn to lead by managing the undergraduate student body as officers and staff in the Corps. They are required to study leadership and ethics in the classroom, and they are dedicated to learning through service to the community, directed by the college's Krause Center for Leadership and Ethics. During the 2015-16 academic year, the Corp provided more than 19,000 hours of community service in total. But one particular day each October is dedicated solely to service learning, and leadership and ethics education. Whether it is participating in community service activities, shadowing business leaders, or attending ethics training from a global organization, every cadet, as well as many faculty and staff, participates. Leadership Day 2016 will be held Wednesday, Oct. 19. As the sun rises more than 1,200 cadets - freshmen led by sophomores - will board buses to fan out across the Lowcountry to learn by serving. They will help lead STEM and literacy classroom activities, clean up parks, prepare food and deliver meals. Juniors will attend a full day ethics seminar, and seniors will spend a full day learning from the leaders of more than 20 businesses in the Charleston area, including Boeing South Carolina, Google Charleston, Hollings Marine Laboratory, the Medical University of South Carolina, and SCANA/SCE&G.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Tuesday
October 18, 2016
2. Upcoming Lecture: Professor Richard Ebeling on "Entrepreneurship, the Market Economy and Human Betterment"
Join The Nassau Institute & The College of The Bahamas Thursday, October 20, 2016 for a lecture by Professor Richard Ebeling on "Entrepreneurship, the Market Economy and Human Betterment" in lecture hall at the Harry C. Moore Library at College of The Bahamas starting at 6:30pm. Summary of lecture: "We easily take for granted the continuous and wondrous material and cultural improvements in our everyday lives. But they are neither guaranteed nor certain. Instead, they are due to the entrepreneurial mind and spirit that, in fact, is potentially in any one of us. But the innovations, creativity and alertness to market opportunities from which human betterment comes is dependent upon a political and economic environment of freedom and competitive openness, without which prosperity and rising standards of living would be impossible."
Published in: NassauInstitute.org
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Tuesday
October 18, 2016
3. Economic Ideas: The Institutions and Economics of the Middle Ages, Part 2
The Catholic Church was the one institution in the Middle Ages that was outside of the Feudal Order of both the rural Manors and the town Guilds. The Church, at various times, may have formed alliances, made political compromises, and sanctioned conduct and laws that were contrary to the spirit and the letter of the Church's doctrine. But these were argued to be "expediencies" of the short-run to preserve the independence and moral authority of God's institution on Earth so that it might serve the long-run purpose for its existence - the salvation of souls before the final Day of Judgment. Earthly Purposes of the Church - There was also the fact that the Catholic Church and its leaders often had their own "Earthly" ambitions for wealth, power, and political control, including declaring and participating in wars of conquest with the Church's own armies under the command of the Pope. Rudolf Rocker, in his book, Nationalism and Culture (1947), explained, for example, the use of Church power during the Papal reign of Innocent III (1198-1216): "Innocent forced the whole temporal power of Europe under his will. He not only interfered in all dynastic affairs, he even arranged the marriages of the temporal rulers and compelled them to obtain a divorce in case the union did not suit him... Dr. Richard M. Ebeling is the recently appointed BB&T Distinguished Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel.
Published in: The Future of Freedom Foundation
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Tuesday
October 18, 2016
4. J. Harold Chandler elected president and CEO of Milliken
Spartanburg-based Milliken & Co. announced a change in leadership Monday. J. Harold Chandler was elected chairman, president and CEO, effective immediately, following the resignation of Joseph M. Salley as president and CEO and as a member of the board of directors, the company announced. Chandler has served on Milliken's board of directors for 14 years and as chairman the past five years. He retired in May as chairman of the Wofford College board of trustees. "We sincerely thank Joe Salley for his service to Milliken, which covers a span of 20 years, the past eight as president and CEO" Chandler said in a statement. "I am honored to take on the additional roles of president and CEO."... Salley formerly served as chairman of the S.C. Chamber of Commerce board and has served on the boards of the Citadel Foundation, the Society of Chemical Industrial Executive Committee and the American Chemistry Council. He could not be reached for comment Monday. Chandler is a 1971 graduate of Wofford College, where he served on its board of trustees for 24 years, the last five as its chairman. He received his masters of business administration degree from the University of South Carolina and later completed post-graduate studies at Harvard Business School.
Published in: The State
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Tuesday
October 18, 2016
5. Thomas Olin Monts, III Obituary
Thomas Olin Monts, III is no longer suffering from fighting the battle against cancer. He went to heaven to be with Jesus on Friday, October 14, 2016. He was a strong Christian man, serving on the Saluda UMC Pastor-Parish committee and volunteering at the weekly Welcome Table. A 1992 graduate of The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, and a Summerall Guard, he was an avid Bulldog sports fan, always ready for a good game. He volunteered regularly for the WNC Citadel Club, even serving a term as their club president. A young boy at heart, he was fascinated with heavy equipment, making that his adult career choice. Most recently, he owned his own business, Allgood Logistics, for which he managed many a load of heavy equipment. He named his company after one of his favorite college bands. He loved listening to music and going to see a good concert. He also enjoyed hiking, kayaking, and ultimate Frisbee. He was happy to live in the mountains of Western North Carolina, and to be a part of the Saluda community for two decades.
Published in: Tryon Daily Bulletin
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Monday
October 17, 2016
1. National Guardsman jumps out of moving truck to save puppy found after Hurricane Matthew
At first, the soldier did not know what he saw out of the corner of his eye. But there it was again: Something white. Something small. Something that he had to rescue. "It was just my instinct," said South Carolina Army National Guardsman Sgt. Fernando Rodriguez. "It was muscle memory at that point: Get the dog." For nearly two weeks, The Citadel graduate had been doing damage assessments in the small town of Nichols with the 178th field artillery and local law enforcement agencies. On Thursday, he was riding in the back of a truck taking pictures to document the wreckage. That's when Rodriguez spotted the 3-month-old puppy. He tapped on the truck a few times and jumped out while the truck was still trying to stop. When it did stop, Rodriguez noticed something. "His tail started wagging," he said. After jumping over a fence, Rodriguez managed to scoop up the dog. His unit started calling the dog "Spot" because of the one black spot surrounding the dog's right eye. The 24-year-old had no idea that the dog he was cradling in his arms would become a new member of his family. He just knew he had to protect him. Derrec Becker of the state's Emergency Management Division said hundreds of animals, like Spot, have been rescued in South Carolina during the aftermath of Hurricane Matthew.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
October 17, 2016
2. Muslim Woman Settles in at Vermont Military College
Despite being the first woman allowed to wear a Muslim headscarf beneath her military uniform at the nation's oldest private military college, Sana Hamze says she doesn't feel like a pioneer. Her focus is on learning details of life as a "rook" at Vermont's Norwich University, in the school's Corps of Cadets and not running afoul of the many rules and customs new students are required to master. As do all aspiring members of the corps, she's learned to walk at the side of the pathways, make square corners when turning, line up before eating and sleep when she is told. Like her freshman classmates, she yearns for the time when her class is "recognized" and they become official members of the Corps of Cadets and the rook restrictions end... Hamze's college plans made headlines this spring when The Citadel - the Charleston, South Carolina, military college she had hoped to attend - refused to change its uniform policy to accommodate her hijab. Norwich was quick to agree to make the accommodation, which will also apply to Jewish men who wish to wear a yarmulke along with their uniforms. Norwich, located in the town of Northfield, about 10 miles south of the Vermont capital of Montpelier, is the nation's oldest private military college. Last spring, it hosted a celebration of the 100th anniversary of the Reserve Officers Training Program. Of its total on-campus student body of about 2,250, about two-thirds of students are in the Corps of Cadets, its military program, while the rest are civilians who don't participate in military training. Ali Shahidy, a Muslim senior civilian student at Norwich from Afghanistan, said he had met Hamze and attended a religious service with her at a nearby mosque, but did not know her well. Nevertheless, he thinks she's a leader even if she doesn't see herself that way.
Published in: ABCNews.com
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Monday
October 17, 2016
3. Clarendon Hall, LMA students attend fall conference at The Citadel
Elected student leaders from members of the South Carolina Independent Schools Student Association held their Fall Conference in the Summerall Chapel on the campus of The Citadel in Charleston. The students attend 39 different SCISA schools, including Clarendon Hall and Laurence Manning Academy. Generally, the Fall Conference is held in the House Chamber at the State House in Columbia. The chamber was not available due to a current renovation project. Cmdr. Joe Molina, chaplain to the Corps of Cadets, was in charge of the opening prayer and devotion. The President of the Citadel, Lt. General John Rosa, welcomed the participants to The Citadel and gave a brief talk. While in session on the campus, the students held their general meeting, which included discussions on the Student Exchange program, the Student Council of the Year, the Honor Society of the Year and the 2017 Spring Convention. Additionally, during a development session, resolutions, which will be debated during the 2017 Spring Convention, were introduced. Students interested in running for a SCISSA office during the 2017 Spring Convention could speak with and question the present elected officials of the association. "These student leaders had an opportunity to participate in a democratic process," Larry Watt, SCISA Executive Director, said. "This activity, along with the education they are receiving at their schools, will go a long way in preparing them to become good, productive citizens of the state when they graduate."
Published in: ManningLive.com
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Monday
October 17, 2016
4. Sapakoff: Citadel wins a big game, creates a new SoCon rivalry with Chattanooga
Brent Thompson grabbed Citadel quarterback Dominique Allen for a final word Saturday before sending the Bulldogs' offense on the field with 5:18 remaining. "Let's finish this game right here," the first-year head coach said. All aboard the Chattanooga chew-chew. No problem. The Citadel's tripe-option offense promptly accomplished a double-feat, sealing a "SoCon Showdown" victory over No. 3 Chattanooga and giving birth to a rivalry with a 22-14 win. Most people in the committed Johnson Hagood Stadium crowd of 14,590 loved it. The Citadel (6-0, 4-0 in the Southern Conference) is on top in the standings. Chattanooga (6-1, 4-1) is now the chaser and the Bulldogs will move up from their No. 9 ranking. All week, Thompson and his staff downplayed the Chattanooga storyline, preferring to sell the "every game is important" thing. But there was no doubt who was standing between the Citadel and first place as the yards piled up and the seconds ticked away. Chattanooga and the Citadel were SoCon co-champs last season, but the Mocs by virtue of a 31-23 victory over the Bulldogs earned the league's automatic FCS playoff bid. The Citadel made the playoffs but had to open on the road, winning at Coastal Carolina before losing at Charleston Southern.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
October 17, 2016
5. Citadel won a big one, but more big ones remain
A popular postgame question among Citadel fans Saturday was this: Where does the 22-14 win over third-ranked Chattanooga rank in Bulldogs history? Some pointed to a 20-3 win over Marshall in 1988, when the Thundering Herd was ranked No. 1 in Division I-AA. And it was just four years ago that the Bulldogs upset a No. 3-ranked Georgia Southern team by 23-21, snapping a 39-game losing streak against Top 10 FCS squads. The 1980s and '90s, of course, saw victories over FBS teams such as Navy, South Carolina, Army and Arkansas, And it was just last season that the Bulldogs knocked off the Gamecocks again at Williams-Brice Stadium. But this Citadel team - 6-0 for the first time since 1992, and 4-0 in the Southern Conference - knows Saturday's win won't amount to much unless the Bulldogs finish out the season in similar style.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
October 17, 2016
6. After grappling years at AHS, The Citadel, Hartsell pins Hall of Fame honor
Before he became known as president of Hartsell Funeral Homes, Jeff Hartsell was known for his prowess on the mat. More than 50 years after winning careers at Albemarle High and The Citadel, Hartsell has been selected to be inducted into The Citadel Athletic Hall of Fame for wrestling. The induction ceremony will be at the Holliday Alumni House at The Citadel Friday night. One of six inductees, Hartsell, a 1962 graduate of The Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina, will be recognized at the dress parade of cadets and will take review of the cadets with Lt. Gen. John Rosa, president of The Citadel. Hartsell will receive a plaque commemorating the induction at the beginning of the football halftime Saturday at Johnson Hagood Stadium at The Citadel. Albemarle High was without a wrestling team until the beginning of Hartsell's senior year in 1957. He became interested in wrestling at an early age. "I was born that way," Hartsell, now 75, said. "When I came along, the boys had to establish a pecking order, more or less. "It was just something we did, only I went further with it than most people did." Having always loved to wrestle with friends and test his strength and endurance by running through country woods and dodging trees and other obstacles, Hartsell jumped at the opportunity to wrestle for AHS.
Published in: The Stanly News & Press
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Monday
October 17, 2016
7. Bulldogs End Streak, Defeat SC State in 4 Sets
Coming back from a 1-0 deficit, The Citadel volleyball hit a season best .298 from the field, defeating South Carolina State in four set 23-25, 25-8, 25-16 and 25-21 on Thursday night. The Bulldogs (7-16, 0-6 SoCon) ended a six-match losing streak in the victory, led by double-digit kills by three players. Filling in for leading hitter Moriah Smith, middle blocker Sumerlyn Carruthers entered the starting lineup and paced the team with 13 kills. Right side hitter Megan Sowell recorded 11 kills and middle hitter Sarah Dobrich posted 10 with a .471 hitting percentage. "We got off to a slow start offensively, but picked it up in the last three sets," said head coach Craig Mosqueda. "Sumerlyn came in and did a great job and Dominique (Williams) and Sarah were unstoppable in the middle." The Bulldogs finished with six team blocks, led by Dobrich's one solo and four block assists. Outside hitter Carla Bruce added a season-high four block assists. In the first set, the Bulldogs finished with seven attack errors and a .125 hitting percentage, but still had an opportunity to win the set late. Down 23-20, The Citadel rallied to tie the set at 23 apiece after a kill by Bruce. South Carolina State went on to claim the set, however, after back-to-back Bulldog errors.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Monday
October 17, 2016
8. The Citadel Falls in SoCon Contest
The Citadel women's soccer team fell to UNCG 3-1 on Friday afternoon at W.L.I. Field. With one half of play in the books, the score stood at 0-0 with neither team able to get much of anything going. UNCG (6-8-2, 3-2-1 SoCon) had two shots early in the half that appeared on line but Logan Leask made two great saves to keep the game scoreless. The Bulldogs (4-10, 1-6 SoCon) finished the half with four shots. After the halftime break, the second half got off to a quick start with both teams scoring in the first five minutes. UNCG struck first in the 47th minute after Diarra Simmons was able to head the ball to Georgia Brown who was then able to find the back of the net over Leask's left shoulder. Caroline Cashion answered for the Bulldogs less than two minutes later, rocketing the ball from 25-yards out over the goalie's outstretched arms to even the game at 1-1. Samara Nche provided the assist on Cashion's first career goal. Both teams continued to play physical as the clocked ticked down in the second half and the score remained 1-1. But in the 69th minute, the Spartans took the lead after Cienna Rideout snuck one past Leask to take a 2-1 lead. UNCG took control of the game for good 19 minutes later as Rideout tallied another goal to clinch the 3-1 win.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Friday
October 14, 2016
1. Celebrating The Citadel's Homecoming 2016
The Citadel will welcome alumni, family and friends from around the world Nov. 4 - 6 for the college's annual homecoming weekend. Graduates of The Citadel have been holding reunions on campus since as early as the Class of 1886 and in 2016 the tradition continues with a full schedule of fun and events. View the article for the full schedule.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Friday
October 14, 2016
2. Weapons of Mass Destruction: Challenges and Solutions
Mr. Landon Poe and Ms. Sreelekshmi Rajeswari Poe wrote Qatar's National Action Plan for implementation of 1540. They met on a research fellowship program in London, are married Cambridge University students and live at Wolfson College. Mr. Poe was born and raised in Charleston, South Carolina, USA, and graduated from the Citadel Military College of South Carolina in May 2016 upon commissioning as a 2nd Lieutenant in the Army National Guard. He received a dual undergraduate degree in Political Science and Business Administration. He is now pursuing a master's degree in Land Economics at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom to study the relationship between government and private industry with regards to land development and investment. Ms. Poe is an undergraduate student at the University of Cambridge pursing a degree in psychology. Following graduation from Cambridge, Ms. Poe aspires to attend an Ivy League graduate school to better understand how psychology can influence successful public policy measures. Despite neither of the two having an education specific to international relations, Landon and Sree found numerous parallels between anti-proliferation measures and business negotiation, psychology, positive incentives, and public health.
Published in: Stimson.org
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Friday
October 14, 2016
3. The Citadel, Chattanooga meet with league title likely on the line
There's no Wi-Fi at the Look Up Lodge in Travelers Rest, South Carolina, but there's paintball, a bouldering wall and a giant swing that looks like it would comfortably hold three average teenagers or about half an offensive lineman from The Citadel. All in all, it doesn't sound like a bad place to wait out a hurricane. Except for that pesky one shower per cabin that houses up to 16 people. The Bulldogs probably feel like they've spent more time this season at the Christian retreat nestled in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains than they have back home in Charleston. The Citadel (5-0, 3-0 Southern Conference) has taken the field at Johnson Hagood Stadium for a grand total of one game since Nov. 7, playing its final four contests on the road last season and four of five outside of the Lowcountry in 2016. The latest trip wasn't planned. With Hurricane Matthew baring down on Charleston, the Bulldogs moved their game against Division II's North Greenville upstate - a typical three-hour trip that took the team buses nine with their fellow South Carolinians planning similar evacuations.
Published in: FoxSports.com
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Friday
October 14, 2016
4. The clash of the unbeatens
An unbeaten college football team from our state will play a big home game Saturday against an unbeaten team from another state. No, that's not a reminder of the Death Valley battle at high noon between Clemson and North Carolina State for first place in the Atlantic Coast Conference's Atlantic Division. Yes, Clemson is 6-0 overall and 3-0 in the ACC. Yet while N.C. State is 1-0 in the league, it's 4-1 overall. So the only clash of football unbeatens within S.C. borders Saturday will be at Johnson Hagood Stadium: The Citadel, 5-0 overall, 3-0 in the Southern Conference and ranked No. 9 in the Football Championship Series Coaches Poll, plays host to No. 3 Chattanooga, 6-0 overall, 4-0 in the league. The 3 p.m. game, which will be televised by Fox Sports Southeast, has become part of The Citadel's rescheduled Parent's Weekend. Hurricane Matthew forced the postponement of those festivities, which were initially set for last weekend. The Bulldogs' scheduled home game against North Greenville was moved up to Thursday night on the Crusaders' home field, where The Citadel rolled to a 38-14 victory.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Friday
October 14, 2016
5. Citadel HC Brent Thompson hoped for this match up all season (AUDIO)
Citadel head coach Brent Thompson looked at the schedule before the season and was hoping he'd get chance to prove himself against an undefeated Chattanooga team. Thompson said the roads and the stadium are in fine shape before the game and the only thing left to get ready for is a great match up. The #3 ranked Chattanooga Mocs will face the #9 ranked Citadel Bulldogs at 3pm on Saturday. The game will be broadcast on Fox Sports Southeast and ESPN3.
Published in: SportsTalkSC.com
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Friday
October 14, 2016
6. Citadel's Ryan Bednar: From 'miserable knob' to cadet captain
When Brent Thompson and the rest of Mike Houston's coaching crew arrived at The Citadel in January of 2014, one particular knob stood out for Thompson. Ryan Bednar was already halfway through his knob year at the military school, and had earned playing time as a freshman center, appearing in 11 games during the 2013 season. But that didn't seem to help his disposition. "He was miserable, a miserable knob," said Thompson, now the Bulldogs' head coach. "Every time you saw him, he was just like, 'Grrrrrr.'" Said offensive line coach Ron Boyd, "He was about ready to fly the coop." Misery is hardly an unusual state of being for a knob, the hairless freshmen (males, anyway) who are struggling through the rigors of The Citadel's fourth-class system. But Bednar's misery index seemed to be off the charts. "It was very brutal," Bednar says now. "I went through a lot of tough times." At 3 p.m. Friday, Bednar will be one of 19 football players who will receive their class rings in The Citadel's traditional ring presentation and ceremony, part of the Parents Weekend that includes a Southern Conference showdown between No. 3 Chattanooga and No. 9 The Citadel on Saturday at Johnson Hagood Stadium. As a cadet captain, he's among the highest ranking football players in the Corps of Cadets, and serves as the adjutant for Fourth Batallion, calling the cadets to attention for morning formation and taking charge of weekend duty rosters. "He's come such a long way, and now he really loves the Corps," Thompson said. "He has embraced the Corps and is one of our highest ranking guys right now. He's one of our go-to guys and has a lot of respect among the Corps."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
October 13, 2016
1a. A Conversation with Lt. Gen. John W. Rosa, President, The Citadel
Lt Gen John W. Rosa became the 19th president of The Citadel on January 3, 2006. His presidency has been marked by a keen focus on strategic initiatives that will enhance The Citadel's mission of developing principled leaders. His concern for keeping a Citadel education relevant in the 21st century while holding to the values that make the college unique has strengthened the college in significant ways. Since Rosa became president, The Citadel has increased the size of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets to full capacity and completed a $100 million capital campaign - two benchmarks of a vibrant institution. View the article to see the complete Q&A session with Lt. Gen Rosa.
Published in: LowcountryBiz.com
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Thursday
October 13, 2016
1b. lowcountrybiz
lowcountrybiz
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Thursday
October 13, 2016
2. Muslim student is a trailblazer at Vt. military school
As a freshman at Norwich University, Sana Hamze is focused on the rigors of military college just like her fellow cadets: showering in less than five minutes, not looking superiors in the eye, and hiking up a mountain with a 50-pound pack. But whether she thinks about it every day or not, the 18-year-old is also making history at the country's oldest private military college. She is the first student at the school to ask for a religious accommodation to wear the headscarf that is central to her Muslim faith, a request the school granted. Now, with the fall semester underway in the hills of this central Vermont town, the fact that one student wears the hijab is turning out to be what Hamze hoped it would - not a big deal. The quiet milestone contrasts with the uproar that greeted Hamze last spring when she asked The Citadel, the historic South Carolina military school, for the same accommodation. The school admitted her, but denied her request, saying the hijab would interfere with its goal of uniformity.
Published in: Boston Globe
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Thursday
October 13, 2016
3a. A study of studies finds that yoga may fall short on daily physical activity guidelines
If yoga is your activity of choice, it may not be enough to satisfy recommended guidelines for daily physical activity. A systematic review, which is a study of studies, published in the American College of Sports Medicine's journal in August analyzed data from 17 prior studies evaluating energy expenditures. It found that yoga poses tended to fall in the level of light to moderate activity. Both ACSM and the American Heart Association recommend at least 30 minutes of moderate to vigorous activity on most days... So I asked Dr. Daniel Bornstein, an assistant professor of exercise science at The Citadel who is chairman of the physical activity section of the American Public Health Association, what he thought of the review. "It sends a bad message," says Bornstein. "The evidence remains inconclusive." As the review itself acknowledged, Bornstein found that the review had its limitations, namely on the sample sizes of studies. Most were small and, in all, totaled about 200 people. He added, too, that those in the studies tended to be young adults. "The real take-home message of this review is that we don't have enough data to draw any conclusions," says Bornstein. "It's a disservice that we can't count yoga for daily energy expenditure because we don't know conclusively that it's not significant." He says that yoga, like any activity, features different styles and ability levels, which will affect energy expenditure. That's true. Running a 6-minute mile is entirely different than a 12-minute mile. More athletic "power yoga," the cornerstone of the hugely popular Charleston Power Yoga, will require more energy than "gentle yoga."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
October 13, 2016
3b. yoga
yoga
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Thursday
October 13, 2016
4. The Citadel launching Swain Department of Nursing - as seen in The Post & Courier
The S.C. Board of Nursing has approved a nursing program at The Citadel, according to a news release. The newly created Swain Department of Nursing is now accepting applications to an evening nursing program for students to complete their bachelor's degree and a four-year, daytime program for the S.C. Corps of Cadets, the news release said. The Citadel's goal is to eventually have 96 cadets and students in the newly created Swain Department of Nursing, which was launched with a seven-figure donation from the Swain family. The evening nursing program is scheduled to begin in January, and the Bachelor of Science in nursing daytime program will start in the fall of 2017. The college's goal is to eventually have 96 cadets and students in the program, the news release said. "The Swain Department of Nursing will help offset the projected need for nurses in the Lowcountry, the state and especially in the United States military through a traditional classroom- and lab-based nursing education curriculum," Citadel provost Connie Book said in the news release. "The evening program will serve veterans and others who work during the day, as well as students already holding an associate of science degree. Additionally, the college has seen strong interest in nursing from prospective cadets planning military careers through ROTC scholarships, which is why the full, four-year cadet program is being offered beginning next fall," Book said.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Thursday
October 13, 2016
5. 'Old-fashioned' Coble vies to strengthen reading, thinking in schools
Stephen Coble is OK with the label "old-fashioned." A Republican running for the Lee County Board of Education this year, Coble has 35 years of practical education experience. He has a personal library of more than 3,000 books and is a strong advocate for educating students to think and read well. Technology can be helpful, but not at the expense of reading and growing a child's mind. If that's not "old-fashioned" when it comes to education, what is? "Old-fashioned is not necessarily a bad word." he said. "But I'm old enough to appreciate that." He was born in Brawley, California, the son of a Navy father who Coble said was the third man to test the ejection seat parachute. Growing up in a military family, Coble went to schools from "New Mexico to clear across the south," he said, but his family always called North Carolina, particularly the Rockingham area, home. Coble dropped out of high school in 1966 - "some children are perfect and others are less than that," he said - to join the U.S. Navy. He spent seven years, including one in Vietnam, in the service, then left the Navy to attend The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina. During his freshman year, he realized the need for strong education. "I think the thing that struck me in '73 was the preparation that my 10th-grade teacher had given me in writing paragraphs, single papers, essays, was as good or better than most of the freshman coming into The Citadel in '73 who had finished high school," he said. "There was a drop, if you will, along some of the expectations of academics. Of course, there were some social upheavals with the war and what-not. But there was a concern in my heart for what people were not getting that I received so freely from a system that had served me and had served so many others."
Published in: The Sanford Herald
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Thursday
October 13, 2016
6. Custer's Last Stand
Almost every American school kid is familiar with the story of Custer's Last Stand, that infamous day in June, 1876 when George Armstrong Custer divided his cavalry force into three parts, then foolishly led one of those small contingents against an enormous Lakota Sioux village camped on the banks of the Little Bighorn River in what was then the eastern portion of the Montana Territory. Custer failed to perform even the most rudimentary reconnaissance of his adversary that day, and managed to get himself, two of his brothers, his brother-in-law, a nephew, not to mention the rest of his command, slaughtered as a result. Almost everyone is familiar with that story. But what many people are unfamiliar with, is that during the Civil War, that same, rash George Armstrong Custer had managed to put himself and his entire outfit into exactly the same predicament - getting his Michigan brigade cut off and surrounded by Confederate cavalry to the point that, had not timely reinforcements broken through to his relief, Custer's entire force might well have been destroyed. Jim Stempel is the author of seven books, including military nonfiction, historical fiction, spirituality, and satire. His articles have appeared in numerous journals including North & South, Concepts In Human Development, and the New Times. He is a graduate of The Citadel, Charleston, South Carolina, and lives with his wife and family in Western Maryland. His latest book is the novel, Windmill Point, where he brings to life the dramatic story he relates here.
Published in: HistoryNet.com
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Thursday
October 13, 2016
7. Sapakoff: Big-game SoCon fun at The Citadel, missing at the College of Charleston
It's hard to say boots are any shinier at The Citadel this week. Mess hall food probably doesn't taste any yummier. Sadly, the ESPN GameDay crew has opted for Madison, Wis., and some mundane Ohio State-Wisconsin game instead of setting up on the Citadel parade ground to take advantage of a barracks backdrop. But what an exciting football week at The Citadel: undefeated Chattanooga (No. 3 in the FCS poll) vs. the No. 9 Bulldogs on Saturday in a battle for Southern Conference supremacy and probably a sweet seed in the FCS playoffs. The SoCon Showdown. October madness. "We're definitely excited to have the fans with us," Citadel head coach Brent Thompson said. "We know it's going to be a packed house." Whether or not Johnson Hagood Stadium is sold out, a big game with major postseason implications is guaranteed to draw more fans than a middle-of-the-pack matchup. And this is a good time to show what might have happened for College of Charleston basketball had the school stayed in a watered-down SoCon instead of bolting for the Colonial Athletic Association three years ago.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
October 13, 2016
8. Citadel basketball playing catch-up after hurricane timeout
Citadel football coach Brent Thompson was able to keep his team together during Hurricane Matthew, and even managed to win a game while on the road during the storm. Bulldogs basketball coach Duggar Baucom was not quite as fortunate. His team was less than a week into practice when the military school shut down its campus last week in anticipation of the hurricane, and the Bulldogs missed six days of practice. They returned to practice Monday. "Crazily enough, after all those days off, it was our best practice so far," said Baucom, preparing for his second season at The Citadel. "But a lot of them went different places (during the storm) and got up shots, because we shot the ball very well." With nine freshmen on board this season, every practice counts between now and the Nov. 11 opener at rival College of Charleston. "I just hope by Nov. 11 that they know each other and know what each other can do," Baucom said. "Practice is a lot like last year, in that you can't always keep the tempo you want because you have to stop and teach a lot. So we are probably about where I thought we’d be at this point."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
October 12, 2016
1. U.S. Special Operations commander to address South Carolina Corps of Cadets
One of the nation's top military commanders will address the South Carolina Corps of Cadets at 11a.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 18, as part of the college's Greater Issues Series. Gen. Raymond A. Thomas III will speak about his duties and leadership responsibilities as the 11th commander of the U.S. Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) headquartered at MacDill Air Force Base near Tampa, Florida. It will be held on campus at McAlister Field House, which can be located as item 21 on the college's virtual map. Thomas' other assignments as a general officer include: associate director for military affairs at the Central Intelligence Agency; commanding general, NATO Special Operations Component Command - Afghanistan; deputy commanding general, JSOC; deputy director for Special Operations, the Joint Staff in the Pentagon; assistant division commander, 1st Armor Division in Iraq; and assistant commanding general, JSOC. Prior to assuming command of USSOCOM, Thomas served as commander of the Joint Special Operations Command at Ft. Bragg, North Carolina. Thomas is a native of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and a graduate of the U.S. Army War College in Pennsylvania as well as the Naval Command and Staff College located in Newport, Rhode Island. He attended the U.S. Military Academy at West Point and was commissioned as an infantry second lieutenant upon graduation in 1980.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Wednesday
October 12, 2016
2. The Citadel launching Swain Department of Nursing
The S.C. Board of Nursing has approved a nursing program at The Citadel, according to a news release. The newly created Swain Department of Nursing is now accepting applications to an evening nursing program for students to complete their bachelor's degree and a four-year, daytime program for the S.C. Corps of Cadets, the news release said. The evening nursing program is scheduled to begin in January, and the Bachelor of Science in nursing daytime program will start in the fall of 2017. The college's goal is to eventually have 96 cadets and students in the program, the news release said. "The Swain Department of Nursing will help offset the projected need for nurses in the Lowcountry, the state and especially in the United States military through a traditional classroom- and lab-based nursing education curriculum," Citadel provost Connie Book said in the news release. "The evening program will serve veterans and others who work during the day, as well as students already holding an associate of science degree. Additionally, the college has seen strong interest in nursing from prospective cadets planning military careers through ROTC scholarships, which is why the full, four-year cadet program is being offered beginning next fall," Book said. The evening program will accept students who have completed general elective credits at another institution or who have earned an associate degree in science. Those students will then take two more years, or 60 credit hours, of study at The Citadel to earn a bachelor's degree. The four-year program totals 137 credit hours, the release said.
Published in: Charleston Regional Business Journal
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Wednesday
October 12, 2016
3. Vermont Military College Accommodates Muslim Student's Dress
A policy change pertaining to uniforms at a Vermont military college has enabled a Muslim student to feel welcome on campus. "I'm just a normal college student," said military recruit Sana Hamze. "I'm very happy here." Hamze is of Lebanese heritage, from Florida. She said she was born in the United States to parents who were, too. The 18-year-old recently started her first year at Norwich University in Northfield. Before Hamze enrolled, Norwich allowed a change to its uniform policy to enable her observance of the hijab, a form of modest dress by Muslim women. "A lot have had questions," Hamze said of her fellow students. "Many have asked what's it called? What does it mean?" Hamze's hijab must be in muted tones to match the camouflage of her recruit's uniform, she explained. Over her hijab Wednesday, Hamze was wearing a school cap designating her as a recruit. Another part of her uniform that reflects her Muslim faith is how Hamze wears long sleeves and pants, she explained. Other students may have short sleeves. Hamze said she hopes to one day join the Navy, aiming to keep the U.S. safe, including from ISIS. "Muslims believe in peace," Hamze said. "I love my country and I love my religion. And Norwich allowing me to come here and wear my hijab with my uniform just perfectly shows how I can love both at the same time." Hamze was a part of national headlines earlier this year when South Carolina's famed Citadel would not make such uniform accommodations. "They wanted me to come to the school, just not with it on," Hamze said of her hijab. "They wanted me to look like everyone else did." In May, NBC News reported president of the Citadel, Lt. Gen. John Rosa, pointed out that the Citadel accommodates students' religious beliefs in other ways, connecting incoming cadets with local houses of worship and meeting prayer and dietary needs. "The standardization of cadets in apparel, overall appearance, actions and privileges is essential to the learning goals and objectives of the college," Rosa said, according to the NBC report. "This process reflects an initial relinquishing of self during which cadets learn the value of teamwork to function as a single unit."
Published in: NECN.com
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Wednesday
October 12, 2016
4. Citadel home at last, with nation's best 4 road wins
If any Division I football team in America deserves the title "Road Warriors," it might be The Citadel. The Bulldogs have played just one of their last nine games in their home stadium, dating to last season. With four victories on opponents' home fields this season, The Citadel leads all of Division I. And due to Hurricane Matthew, the Bulldogs spent much of the last week encamped in the Blue Ridge Mountains of upstate South Carolina, communing with nature and waiting on their turn to take a shower. No wonder the 5-0 Bulldogs, ranked ninth in FCS, are eager to get back to Johnson Hagood Stadium on Saturday -- even if the opponent is No. 3 Chattanooga. "We're excited to get back in front of our fans," senior linebacker Tevin Floyd said Tuesday. "We love it, we love the energy they bring. And the Corps (of Cadets) in the corner, we love that as well."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
October 12, 2016
5. Updated options for North Greenville Ticket Holders
Fans who have tickets for last week's rescheduled football game against North Greenville can use them for this week's top-10 matchup against Chattanooga. "Because The Citadel's Parents Weekend has been rescheduled to this weekend, we felt we needed to offer fans who purchased tickets because of Parents Weekend the opportunity to still use those as originally intended," Athletic Director Jim Senter said. "We understand many plans were changed due to the hurricane, and we want to allow those who planned to attend our football game as part of their Parents Weekend activities to still be able to do that." Anyone with a ticket to the North Greenville game that was not used last Thursday night at North Greenville can use that ticket for admission to Saturday's home game against Chattanooga. If a ticket has already been sold in that seat for this week's game, the North Greenville ticket holders will be reseated to the best available location. Every effort will be made to keep seat locations as close to the original location as possible. Fans unable to attend this week's game will have their ticket honored with an additional ticket in general admission seating at The Citadel's home game against ETSU on Oct. 29 or can donate their ticket to the Junior Bulldog program, which benefits orphanages and foster families in the Lowcountry.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Wednesday
October 12, 2016
6. A conversation with Westminster head coach Gerry Romberg
We live in a time where commitment to a high school football program is negotiable. Coaches and players have left neighborhood schools to chase championships at moment's notice. At the high school level, it isn't how it used to be. Loyalty sometimes takes a backseat. This is not the case at Westminster. The Westminster School community knows what loyalty means. It starts with head coach Gerry Romberg, who is midway through his 25th season at the helm. Romberg is the third-longest tenured coach at one school in the state behind Charlton County's Rich McWhorter (27 years) and Marist's Alan Chadwick (32 years). Chadwick, interestingly enough, coached Romberg for one season at Marist. Chadwick's example apparenty stuck. Romberg grew up in Atlanta and attended Marist. After graduation, he attended Springfield College in Massachusetts. Shortly after college, Romberg was hired as an assistant football coach at the Maret School in Washington, D.C., from 1983 to 1985. From 1985 to 1989 Romberg was an assistant coach at the United States Coast Guard Academy and then at The Citadel in Charleston for one season.
Published in: Atlanta Journal-Constitution
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Wednesday
October 12, 2016
7. Lise Boone Lowe Obituary
Lisa Boone Lowe died unexpectedly Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2016. She was born Oct. 19, 1975 in Ogden Utah, the daughter of James Flake and Carolyn Hansen Boone and the wife of Barret Lowe. Lisa is the mother of six wonderful children: Tiffany Fox, Donald Lee Tisdale III, Cassandra Tisdale, Daniel Boone Howard, Elizabeth Howard and Angela Howard; and is the sister to James Russell Boone, David William Boone, Jared Hansen Boone, Rachel Boone Gardner, Natalie Boone Lundberg and Heather Boone Brimhall.) Lisa had a great love of her Savior Jesus Christ and was a faithful member of her church, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. She diligently strived to instill the gospel in her children’s lives. Next to her love for her children, Lisa had a drive toward educating herself. She earned three associate degrees, a bachelor's degree and most recently completed a master's degree from The Citadel Military College of South Carolina in May of 2016. Lisa graduated from Snowflake High School in 1994 and since then had lived in St. George, UT, Norfolk, VA and Summerville, SC. Just two months ago she returned to Snowflake to be close to her family and raise her kids near their many cousins.
Published in: WMICentral.com
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Tuesday
October 11, 2016
1a. Citadel starts accepting applications for new nursing program
The Citadel is accepting applications for its new nursing program, the school announced Monday. The Swain Department of Nursing, established with a $4 million gift, will accommodate evening and daytime students. The S.C. Board of Nursing gave provisional approval for the program last week. "The nursing program is being made possible through the vision and generosity of the Swain family, which has been a part of The Citadel family for many years," said Connie Book, Citadel provost and dean of the college. "The Swain family's confidence in The Citadel and the belief in the importance of nursing education will address the critical shortage of nurses in the armed forces and the Lowcountry." The Swain family donation will fund a simulation lab with patient rooms, six beds, a home health area, two low-fidelity and two high-fidelity mannequins, a general lab space and a control room, according to a press release about the program.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
October 11, 2016
1b. Zucker Family School students meet artists and authors
The Zucker Family School of Education has hosted award-winning artists and authors at local schools as part of the organization's literacy initiative "Authors in Schools." One guest was James Ransome, an award-winning illustrator. His visit to Goodwin and Mitchell Elementary Schools launched the 2017-18 school year. He also visited Sanders-Clyde Creative Arts School in September, explaining the creative processes behind some of the illustrations in their favorite books. "When students have strong literacy skills doors open for their futures," Judy Beard, principal for Sanders-Clyde Creative Arts School, a Zucker Family School of Education partner school, said. "Getting to meet the people behind the books, like James Ransome, helps grow their love of reading making a connection between literacy and careers. We can't do this alone, so our partnership with The Citadel is really important." Ransome has illustrated over 30 children's books. He was recently included as one of the 75 "must know" authors and illustrators by the Children's Book Council. His awards include the Coretta Scott King Award for Illustration, a Coretta Scott King Honor Award, the IBBY Honor Award, and an ALA Notable Book award.
Published in: Palmetto Business Daily
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Tuesday
October 11, 2016
1c. Citadel among top five in nation on President's Honor Roll for community service
The Citadel is now listed on the President's Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll for the top five colleges and universities for civic service in America in the category of General Community Service. Announced this week by the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS) recently, the designation is the highest honor bestowed upon colleges and universities that demonstrate exemplary community service and achieve meaningful outcomes in their communities. "This is very exciting for The Citadel's cadets, students and the entire campus community. It is the first time we have been named as a finalist on the President's Honor Roll, putting us in the top five institutions of higher education in the nation for community service out of more than 650," said Col. Thomas Clark, USMC (Ret.), director for The Citadel's Krause Center for Leadership and Ethics. "The Citadel prides itself on being a proven producer of principled leaders through a military learning structure that integrates service learning, leadership and ethics training into the curriculum and culture for all four years of a cadet's college career." Adler University won the category. Woodbury University, Centre College, The Citadel, and Virginia Commonwealth University were recently named finalists on the 2015 list.
Published in: LowcountryBizSC.com
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Tuesday
October 11, 2016
1d. Citadel planning to build new School of Business
The Citadel will start construction next year on a new School of Business building. It will be the first entirely new academic building added to the campus since 1974, according to a news release. Rick and Mary Lee Bastin donated $6 million to the military college for the new building, which will be named Bastin Hall. Rick Bastin graduated with a bachelor's degree in business administration from The Citadel in 1965 and now serves on The Citadel Foundation Board of Directors, the news release said. "The discipline I acquired at The Citadel laid the groundwork for my business career, so it is important for me to give back," he said in the news release. "A new home for The Citadel School of Business will enhance the prospects of cadets as they seek internships and establish successful careers. A modern facility with new technology and office space will also help attract and retain the best professors, providing cadets and graduate students with even more opportunities to learn from our faculty of professionals who are leaders in their field." The building is expected to cost between $20 million and $21 million, according to Jarret Sonta, executive director of communications for The Citadel Foundation.
Published in: Charleston Regional Business Journal
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Tuesday
October 11, 2016
2. Matthew's winds reach Charleston, at least 78,000 without power in South Carolina
With blistering winds, Hurricane Matthew arrived at Charleston's doorstep, pounding the region with torrential rains and flooding the area with a massive surge of seawater. Matthew's eye was expected to move within 10 to 20 miles of Charleston by 8 a.m. today, although even late Friday night forecasters were hedging their bets. The city's fate was tied to a cavalry of air sweeping in from the northwest, they said. If the two weather systems meet in time, Matthew's deadly eye would remain off the coast. If not, the eye could make landfall, and with it, carry much higher winds and surge. More clear is that Matthew was likely to bring the most destructive combination of wind, rain and floods since Hurricane Hugo in 1989 - a new name in the state's long roster of destruction. As Matthew scraped up the Florida coast Friday, officials across South Carolina warned residents to head for safety. An estimated 355,000 South Carolinians fled the coast, state officials said. Colleges were shuttered, football games delayed, the National Guard activated.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
October 11, 2016
3a. Economic Ideas: The Institutions and Economics of the Middle Ages, Part 1
In attempting to understanding the ideas and institutions of the period of history that is usually called the "Middle Ages" it must be kept in mind that this covers a time frame that easily is divided up into smaller periods, each of which can be seen to have its own unique characteristics and qualities. Furthermore, each part of Europe had its own historical development in terms of traditions and customs. Only one institution encompassed the entire European world through most of this time - the Catholic Church. The Middle Ages is usually defined as beginning with the fall of the Roman Empire in A.D. 476, to invading Germanic tribes. The "close" of the Middle Ages is commonly said to be around 1500. After this date momentous changes occurred in European history that transformed the face of European society, and the development of the whole world, as well. Fifteen hundred was the eve of the Great Religious Reformation known as Protestantism. It marks the beginning of the "discovery" of the "New World" by Christopher Columbus in 1492 and a sea route around Africa to India in 1498. Dr. Richard M. Ebeling is the recently appointed BB&T Distinguished Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel.
Published in: The Future of Freedom Foundation
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Tuesday
October 11, 2016
3b. Economic Ideas: The Ancient Romans, Who Went from Rule of Law to Corrupting Inflation and Price Controls
The ancient Romans failed to leave any systematic body of thoughts on economics, just like the ancient Greeks had failed to. Indeed, many of whatever ideas the Romans expressed on such economic themes they took from the Greeks. The Romans were mostly concerned with "practical" matters, and have sometimes been referred to as "doers" rather than philosophers on these matters. The area in which they did leave a body of thought, and one that has had lasting influence and significance for future generations, especially in the West up until our own time was in the area of law and contract. Their main contribution has been seen to be the legal order upon which is founded part of the Western economic traditions of property and exchange. Respecting the Local Laws of Diverse Peoples - As the Roman Empire expanded, it increasingly incorporated a growing number of peoples and cultures very different from Rome's own culture and ideas. Indeed, at its maximum, the Roman Empire included much of Western, Central and Southern Europe, nearly all of the Middle East, and last portions of northern Africa including Egypt down the Nile River. It became important to develop conceptions and codes of law that could be broad and general enough to encompass the diversity of the empire, yet have a degree of uniformity for all its members. Dr. Richard M. Ebeling is the recently appointed BB&T Distinguished Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel.
Published in: The Future of Freedom Foundation
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Tuesday
October 11, 2016
4. Crawford appointed by Governor to serve on the Renewable Water Resources Board of Commissioners
Local attorney John T. Crawford, Jr. was appointed by the Governor of South Carolina to serve on the Renewable Water Resources (ReWa) Board of Commissioners. A Connecticut native who grew up in South Carolina, Crawford graduated from The Citadel with academic and military honors. He earned his law degree from the University of South Carolina School of Law, where he was a Carolina Scholar. He began his legal career with the construction practice group of a large national law firm in Greenville, and joined Kenison, Dudley & Crawford, LLC in 2005. He is the co-author of: Defenses in Construction Defect Case, which was published in the ABA Construction Law Journal, South Carolina Mechanics' Liens and Bonds, and South Carolina Construction Law Update. "We are excited to have someone with John's skills and ideas become a part of our team," said Graham W. Rich, Executive Director at Renewable Water Resources. "His vast knowledge and experiences will be a valuable asset to our future endeavors as an Agency."
Published in: Greenville Business Magazine
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Tuesday
October 11, 2016
5. On day of veep debate, a tribute to Adm. James Stockdale
The vice presidential debate (which occurs tonight between Sen. Tim Kaine and Gov. Mike Pence) makes me think about Adm. James Stockdale, Ross Perot's running mate who shared the stage with Al Gore and Dan Quayle in the 1992 veep debate. Stockdale was a great and honorable man, a scholar and a war hero, but a lousy living-room candidate. His life of national service and of taking a beating for America had not prepared him to stand on a stage and spin words for 90 minutes next two much younger men, both career politicians. It horrifies me to think that Stockdale, who is remembered for his opening remarks in the debate ("Who am I? Why am I here?") became a laughingstock. He deserved much better. He should be remembered as a hero, almost a martyr. To me, what happened to Stockdale symbolizes much that is cruel, stupid and wrong about our TV culture and our political culture... He received the Congressional Medal of Honor and spent much of rest of his remaining Navy years as a teacher and administrator at the Naval War College, ultimately rising to president of that institution. After his retirement from the military, Stockdale served briefly as president of The Citadel in South Carolina. As a scholar, based at the conservative Hoover Institution at Stanford, he wrote about the Stoic philosophers of ancient Greece and Rome. He is the author at least seven books.
Published in: MinnPost.com
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Tuesday
October 11, 2016
6. Citadel football returns from hurricane ordeal, ready for Chattanooga showdown
After five days on buses and at camp in the Blue Ridge mountains, The Citadel football team arrived home Sunday, ready to put Hurricane Matthew behind it. Ahead of the ninth-ranked Bulldogs - a Southern Conference showdown with No. 3 Chattanooga on Saturday at Johnson Hagood Stadium. The team left Charleston last Wednesday ahead of Hurricane Matthew, enduring a nine-hour bus trip to Lookup Lodge in Travelers Rest. The Bulldogs defeated North Greenville, 38-14, on Thursday night, worked out at Furman on Friday, then returned to Charleston by bus on Sunday, arriving on campus about 3:15 p.m. after a six-hour trip. After the travails of the last week, coach Brent Thompson said the Bulldogs (5-0, 3-0 SoCon) are eager to get back to a routine. "I think we'll be able to get back into a rhythm now," Thompson said Sunday. "We'll give them about 24 hours off and get them back at about 3 o'clock on Monday. We don't usually practice on Monday, but we've missed some time on fundamentals and special teams, so we'll do a lot of that."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
October 11, 2016
7. Citadel moves to 5-0 with 38-14 win at North Greenville
A nine-hour bus trip, one hour of practice and a camp in the mountains with no Wi-Fi. That's how The Citadel football team is roughing it this week as the Bulldogs try to escape the wrath of Hurricane Matthew along with the rest of the Lowcountry. Despite the unusual week, the ninth-ranked Bulldogs were able to pull away for a 38-14 win over Division II North Greenville on Thursday night. An overflow record crowd of 5,435 turned out to see a Division I FCS team visit NGU's Younts Stadium for the first time since 2007. Citadel quarterback Dominique Allen ran for a 15-yard touchdown and threw a 30-yard TD pass to Reggie Williams in the third quarter as the 5-0 Bulldogs set up a Southern Conference showdown next week with No. 3 Chattanooga. "It's been a crazy week," said slotback Cam Jackson, who ran for 107 yards, including a 52-yard TD for the go-ahead score. "Everybody's been keeping their eye on the hurricane. We even had to cut practice short (Tuesday) when we got the call that everybody had to evacuate."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
October 11, 2016
8. The Citadel's Crochet Earns SoCon Defensive Player Award
The Citadel's Joe Crochet has been named the Southern Conference Defensive Player of the Week, it was announced Monday. Crochet had a career day in the Bulldogs' 37-14 win at Western Carolina, leading The Citadel's defense that held the Catamounts to 122 yards of total offense and just 31 yards rushing. Crochet recorded a career-high 2.5 sacks, tied for the 11th-highest single-game total in FCS this season, for a career-high 2.5 tackles for loss and a career-best two fumble recoveries. The senior from Stone Mountain, Georgia, finished the game with four tackles and also forced a fumble on a strip-sack where he forced and recovered the fumble. The Citadel defense held Western Carolina to the ninth-lowest offensive output in FCS this season and the fewest total yards by the Catamounts since 2014. The Bulldogs recorded eight sacks, tied for the most in an FCS game this season, and held Western Carolina to 0-for-8 on third down. At halftime, the Bulldogs had allowed only 21 yards on 24 plays, including negative-18 yards rushing. Crochet earned the conference's weekly award for the first time in his career, and his recognition marks the fourth straight conference weekly honor after a game for the Bulldogs. B-Back Tyler Renew was named Offensive Player of the Week after rushing for 146 yards and one touchdown in the season opener at Mercer, defensive back Dee Delaney was named Defensive Player of the Week after grabbing two interceptions in week two against Furman and DeAndre Schoultz picked up Special Teams Player of the Week after gaining 120 punt return yards, including an 81-yard punt return touchdown, at Gardner-Webb in week three. The Citadel had its bye in week four.
Published in: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Tuesday
October 11, 2016
9a. John Lefferts Ramsey Obituary
The earthly travels and adventures of John Lefferts Ramsey are complete, but he surely wanders in another realm; one which the prophet says cannot be corrupted by man! For the trumpet sounds, John has been summoned and is truly now at peace. John is survived by his wife of 48 years, Johanne Dunbar-Forbes Ramsey, daughter Ashley Lupo (David), three grandchildren, Ethan, Chase, and Reese, of Marco Island, and many cousins. He is predeceased by his parents, Sarah Lefferts Ramsey of Leesburg, Virginia, Reginald P. Ramsey of Cleveland, TN, his brother, Edmond R. Ramsey, of Miami, Florida and his son, Andrew Lefferts Ramsey of Charleston. John was born in Miami, Florida, a descendant of Dutch, English, and Scot pioneer families from the 17th and 18th centuries of New Amsterdam and the James River. His love of nature and travel was born in his childhood adventures in the Florida Keys, the Everglades, and in summer trips around the United States with his family. John was a graduate of Coral Gables High School ('63). He attended The Citadel in Charleston, SC, before receiving an appointment to West Point. A boxing injury led him to the University of Miami ('67), where he met his wife Johanne. His education continued at the University of Neufchatel, Switzerland and Georgetown University (M.A. '68). Beginning in 1969, John began working for the newly formed Postal Service where he served in management positions at the national, regional, district, and sectional center levels, retiring after 32 years while serving as Postmaster of Summerville, SC in 2001.
Published in: The Summerville Journal Scene
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Tuesday
October 11, 2016
9b. Marc Godwin Saunders Obituary
Marc Godwin Saunders died July 1, 2016 in Dorchester County, SC. He is the son of and is survived by Percy Leo Saunders of Alamance County, NC, and Inez Reagan Saunders of Reidsville, NC, and his siblings, Percy Leo Saunders, Jr., Susan Paige Saunders and David Patrick Saunders. His grandparents are the late Walter Spencer Reagan and Pearl Page Reagan of Reidsville and Lofton Jordan Saunders and Susie Faucette Saunders of Caswell and Alamance Counties, NC. Marc was a very unique person - very mechanically- and scientifically-minded, he appeared in his hometown paper, the Reidsville Review, in the early 1960s after putting together a bicycle at the age of five. He later achieved the rank of Eagle Scout, was in the Honor Society in high school and was awarded bachelor's and master's degrees in physics from the Citadel in Charleston, SC, and the University of South Carolina, respectively. He continued learning and was always taking courses to improve his mind and discover new things. He was a deep thinker and enjoyed reading, writing and even drawing. He loved words and would often make puns and wordplays to make people laugh.
Published in: The Summerville Journal Scene
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Monday
October 3, 2016
1. Citadel starts accepting applications for new nursing program
The Citadel is accepting applications for its new nursing program, the school announced today. The Swain Department of Nursing, established with a $4 million gift, will accommodate evening and day-time students. The South Carolina Board of Nursing gave provisional approval for the program last week. "The nursing program is being made possible through the vision and generosity of the Swain family, which has been a part of The Citadel family for many years," said Connie Book, Citadel provost and dean of the college. "The Swain family's confidence in The Citadel and the belief in the importance of nursing education will address the critical shortage of nurses in the armed forces and the Lowcountry." The Swain family donation will fund a simulation lab with patient rooms, six beds, a home health area, two low-fidelity and two high-fidelity mannequins, a general lab space and a control room, according to a press release about the program.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
October 3, 2016
2. Citadel's new nursing department made possible by Swain family
The Citadel's new Swain Department of Nursing is being established through the generosity of a gift from the Swain family, which has been a part of The Citadel family for decades. The seven-figure gift was initiated by brothers David C. Swain, Jr., Citadel Class of 1980, and his wife Mary, as well as Dr. Christopher C. Swain, Citadel Class of 1981, and his wife Debora. The Swain family's desire to help build a nursing program at The Citadel stems from both personal and professional interests. Together, the Swain brothers founded the Ob Hospitalist Group (OBHG) in Mauldin, South Carolina, in 2006 with a vision to elevate women's health care by providing quality medical care to expectant mothers. More than a decade later, OBHG is the single largest dedicated OB/GYN hospitalist provider, partnering with more than 450 board certified physicians nationwide. Dr. Chris Swain, a veteran OB/GYN doctor himself, founded the company as the result of his passion for women's health care and his strong commitment to seeing the industry elevated to provide improved safety and care. After graduating from The Citadel with a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology, he attended the University of South Alabama College of Medicine and completed his OB/GYN residency training at Bayfront Medical Center in St. Petersburgh, Florida. He currently serves as OBHG's Chief medical officer and resides on Isle of Palms, South Carolina, with Debbie and their two sons, one of whom is currently a sophomore in the South Carolina Corps of Cadets at The Citadel.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Monday
October 3, 2016
3a. Zucker Family School of Education introduces kids to artists and authors
As part of its literacy initiative, Authors in Schools, The Zucker Family School of Education hosted award-winning illustrator James Ransome at three local partner schools to help kick off the 2017-18 school year. Ransome spoke to children at Goodwin and Mitchell Elementary Schools and Sanders-Clyde Creative Arts School in late September to help them understand the processes involved in creating the captivating pictures in some of their favorite books. "When students have strong literacy skills, doors open for their futures. Getting to meet the people behind the books, like James Ransome, helps grow their love of reading making a connection between literacy and careers," said Judy Beard, principal for Sanders-Clyde Creative Arts School, a Zucker Family School of Education partner school. "We can't do this alone, so our partnership with The Citadel is really important." Ransome is a nationally recognized illustrator of more than 30 children's books. The Children's Book Council recently named him one of 75 "must-know" authors and illustrators. Currently, a member of the Society of Illustrators, he has received both the Coretta Scott King Award for Illustration and the IBBY Honor Award for his book, The Creation. He has also received a Coretta Scott King Honor Award for illustration for Uncle Jed's Barbershop which was selected as an ALA Notable Book and is currently being featured on Reading Rainbow. "What I love about James Ransome's books are that he captures the stories of real people and then his illustrations help you imagine what was like for them, African Americans particularly, and the pioneering work they did, and it's inspirational to these elementary children about who they can be and the work of those who have gone before them," said Connie Book, Ph.D., provost and dean of the college for The Citadel.
Published in: The Charleston Digitel
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Monday
October 3, 2016
3b. zucker
zucker
Published in: CharlestonCEO.com
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Monday
October 3, 2016
4a. Leading American ADHD scholar joins forces with Alberta colleagues for research exchange
The statistics vary, but any way you look at it, Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is becoming increasingly prevalent in school-age children. In recent years, it has become one of the most commonly diagnosed disorders in children. Some suggest that in a typical classroom of 30 students, anywhere from one to three will be diagnosed with ADHD. A child with ADHD often faces stigma associated with the perception of how they might behave, what they are incapable of doing, and how their disorder might affect the people around them. Lloyd "Chip" Taylor, a professor of psychology at The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, has focused much of his work on the study of ADHD. Four thousand kilometres to the northwest, at the University of Calgary, Emma Climie is also researching ADHD, as she works to discover what children diagnosed with the disorder can do well rather than focusing on their deficits. Soon the two will be working together. Exchange brings together experts from Canada, U.S. Taylor has been awarded a prestigious Fulbright Canada-Palix Distinguished Visiting Research Chair to come to UCalgary to work on a project that builds upon the ongoing research conducted by Climie and her team within the Werklund School. The goal - to more deeply understand the relationship between parent, teacher, and student knowledge of ADHD and resilience, particularly as it pertains to bullying and ostracism. For Climie, an assistant professor in the Werklund School of Education, the chance to work with Taylor is the kind of opportunity that doesn't come up very often. "Chip and I share a mutual interest in supporting children with ADHD and bringing in his expertise to UCalgary is a nice compliment to the work my lab is doing on knowledge and stigma," says Climie.
Published in: UToday.com - University of Calgary
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Monday
October 3, 2016
4b. chip taylor
chip taylor
Published in: Citadel Faculty News
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Monday
October 3, 2016
5. President's Honor Roll includes The Citadel in top five list for community service
The President's Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll recently included The Citadel in its list of the top five universities and colleges for the General Community Service category. The Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS) announced this honor. It is the highest honor that universities and colleges can receive for their exemplary community service. It shows that these universities and colleges have made some meaningful results in their local communities. "Congratulations to The Citadel, its faculty and students for its commitment to service, both in and out of the classroom," Wendy Spencer, CEO of CNCS, said. "Through its work, institutions of higher education are helping improve their local communities and create a new generation of leaders by challenging students to go beyond the traditional college experience and solve local challenges." Officials at The Citadel were pleased by the honor. "This is very exciting for The Citadel's cadets, students and the entire campus community," Colonel Thomas Clark, USMC (Ret.), director for The Citadel's Krause Center for Leadership and Ethics, said. "It is the first time we have been named as a finalist on the President's Honor Roll, putting us in the top five institutions of higher education in the nation for community service out of more than 650. The Citadel prides itself on being a proven producer of principled leaders through a military learning structure that integrates service learning, leadership and ethics training into the curriculum and culture for all four years of a cadet's college career."
Published in: Palmetto Business Daily
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Monday
October 3, 2016
6a. Education News: Sunday, Oct. 2, 2016
The Summerall Cup, named for The Citadel's president from 1931-53, is donated by the European Citadel Association. It is awarded annually to the cadet company with the best overall academic achievement. Companies are rated on average grade point ratio for the fall and spring semesters. India Company achieved an overall company grade point ratio of 3.2. The following cadets from India Company have been recognized for their outstanding academic achievements during the 2015-16 school year: Sumter - John Baker; Colby Harker; Keelan Kane-Yearman; and John ShaddrickThe Milton A. Pearlstine Award is presented annually by The Citadel Alumni Association in honor of Milton A. Pearlstine, Citadel Class of 1919 and past president of the CAA, to the cadet company achieving the highest freshman class grade point ratio for the previous school year. Jared Hair of Olanta was among 65 other cadets in Romeo Company that were recognized for their outstanding academic achievements and peer leadership during the 2015-16 school year. Papa Company has been awarded the President's Cup for the 2015-16 school year. The President's Cup was established by General Hugh P. Harris, president of The Citadel from 1965-70. It is awarded annually to the cadet company that establishes the highest combined score in academic achievement, military performance, extracurricular participation and fourth class retention during the previous academic year and is the highest honor that can be bestowed upon a cadet company. William Richardson of Sumter was among 67 other cadets in Papa Company that were recognized for their contributions to the company's success during the 2015-16 school year. For the year after the company's achievements, this group of cadets is designated as the honor company for the Corps of Cadets, serving as ambassadors of The Citadel at special functions.
Published in: The Sumter Item
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Monday
October 3, 2016
6b. College honors - The Citadel
At The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina, Papa Company has been awarded the President's Cup for the 2015-16 school year. The President's Cup is awarded annually to the cadet company that establishes the highest combined score in academic achievement, military performance, extracurricular participation, and fourth-class retention during the previous academic year. Sierra Maki, of Deltona, was among the 67 cadets in Papa Company.
Published in: The West Volusia Beacon
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Monday
October 3, 2016
7a. The Future of Farming
When farmer Monty Rast drives past his acres of row crops in Calhoun County, he sees more than parcels of land. When Ansley Turnblad, branding and program coordinator for the South Carolina Department of Agriculture, walks through the produce section of a local grocery store, she sees more than vegetables. And when president and CEO of the South Carolina Farm Bureau Harry Ott looks around a fifth-grade classroom, he sees more than a group of kids who might not know the first thing about agribusiness... Like many farmers, Monty's story begins with tradition. "My family has farmed for several generations," he says. Monty was raised on land near Cameron, South Carolina, where his father and former Army man, served at Fort Campbell astride the Kentucky-Tennessee border before taking up the plow. A young Monty helped pick cotton and run errands before he officially started working on his family's farm in high school. After graduation, he attended The Citadel where he earned a degree in business management in 1977. Three years later, Monty returned to Cameron to farm with his father, and three years after that, he struck out on his own, determined to build a new farm to support his young family. "It was always a desire and a dream because that's what I knew best," he says of starting Rast Farms, where he grows strawberries, blueberries, cotton, corn and peanuts. Over the past nearly four decades, Monty has continually expanded his agribusiness resume to include uniting and educating the state's peanut growers and mentoring budding farmers and their families. In 2012, he was named the South Carolina state winner of the Swisher Sweets/Sunbelt Expo Southeastern Farmer of the Year, acknowledged for his efforts to modernize farming and expand agribusiness potential in the state. Monty's enthusiasm for developing South Carolina's agriculture industry is contagious: several of his adult children have pursued education and careers in agribusiness, including his daughter Ansley, who has made waves in her 10 years with the South Carolina Department of Agriculture's marketing department.
Published in: Columbia Metropolitan
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Monday
October 3, 2016
7b. Superintendents honored by CVB for outstanding public service
Bartow County's two school superintendents have been recognized for their work as public servants. Bartow County Superintendent Dr. John Harper and Cartersville Superintendent Dr. Howard Hinesley received The Grant Award for Community Service with a Smile from the Cartersville-Bartow County Convention and Visitors Bureau at the annual Rose Lawn Arts and Crafts Festival Sept. 17. The Outstanding Public Service Award was part of the CVB's Annual Hospitality Heroes Awards that were first presented in 2005 to honor individuals who have contributed to local tourism and have positively impacted their community. The award is intended to honor an employee of a municipality in Bartow County or the county government who exemplifies "service with a smile" in his or her dealings with the public and exemplifies the utmost in customer service and congeniality, "thus casting a favorable impression of Bartow County on visitors and residents alike," according to a CVB press release. Harper, who has been the county superintendent since 2008, said he was "honored" to receive the award. "It is a direct result of our staff's endeavors to develop innovative ideas to improve the education we offer and the ability to transform those ideas into reality," he said. "Preparing students for a successful life after their school career is our core business, and I am so pleased to work alongside many dedicated professionals who are advancing education. Dr. Hinesley is one of those exceptional individuals. I am grateful for his friendship and the unity we have worked to build between our two school systems. I could not have been more pleased to receive this award with him." Hinesley echoed Harper's sentiments. "I am extremely honored to have been recognized with this community service award and honored to share it with my colleague, Dr. Harper," he said. The CVB presented the public service award to the two superintendents because of their efforts to prepare the future workforce to fill the estimated 5,000 jobs coming to Bartow County in the next five years, according to the release. CVB Executive Director Ellen Archer said in the release that the award was given on behalf of the Cartersville-Bartow County Tourism Council's board of directors "in appreciation and recognition of steering the systems which take our students from crayons to careers." Harper earned his undergraduate degree from the Baptist College in South Carolina, his specialist degree from The Citadel and his doctoral degree in curriculum and instruction from the University of South Carolina.
Published in: The Daily Tribune News
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Monday
October 3, 2016
8. The Citadel dominates Western Carolina 37-14
The 9th-ranked Citadel football team improved to 4-0 for the fifth time in program history on Saturday afternoon, defeating Western Carolina 37-14. Head coach Brent Thompson is now the second head coach in The Citadel history to begin his career 4-0 and second coach to win his first three Southern Conference games. The Bulldogs struck first in the game with 2:49 left in the first quarter as Rod Johnson scored on a 31-yard touchdown run to put the Bulldogs (4-0, 3-0 SoCon) on top 7-0. Johnson added to The Citadel's lead with 10:50 left in the second quarter, scoring his second touchdown of the day from 3-yards out. The drive was set up by an interception by Malik Diggs on Western Carolina's (1-3, 0-2 SoCon) first drive of the second quarter. Four minutes later, Jordan Black and Rudder Brown connected on a 5-yard pass to make it a 20-0 game after the Bulldogs' two-point conversion failed. The Citadel continued to pour it on in the second quarter after Cam Jackson and Tyler Renew hooked up for a 75-yard touchdown with 3:11 left in the half. The five-play, 90-yard drive gave the Bulldogs a 27-0 lead. In the second half, The Citadel wasted no time and scored on its first possession of the third quarter on a 15-yard touchdown rush by Johnson to make it 34-0. The score was the third of the day for Johnson, marking the first multi-touchdown game of the sophomore's career.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
October 3, 2016
9. The Citadel Athletics Announces Staff Promotions
The Citadel Athletic Director Jim Senter announced the promotions of Robert Acunto and Kathy Kroupa on Friday. Acunto and Kroupa have both been elevated to Senior Associate Athletic Director positions. Acunto's new title is Senior Associate Athletic Director for External Operations, while Kroupa is now the department's Senior Associate Athletic Director for Internal Operations. "I am excited to be able to recognize the work and effort Rob and Kathy give us," Senter said. "Along with Geoff Von Dollen and Mike Capaccio, they make up our executive team and the four of them have worked tirelessly to provide exceptional experiences for our cadet-athletes. Their passion, teamwork and leadership will continue to benefit our cadet-athletes and move our athletic department forward." Acunto is in his seventh year at The Citadel and second overseeing the external operations group. He is responsible for all areas of external communication that includes ticketing, corporate sales and sponsorships, marketing and promotions, athletic communications, video productions and licensing. He also is the sport administrator for football and soccer. He previously was the Bulldogs' associate athletic director for administration and compliance and also served as interim athletic director in the summer of 2015. He has previous administrative experience at American and Cornell and before that spent a decade coaching soccer on the collegiate level, including as the men's head coach at Bard College and an assistant men's coach at Vanderbilt.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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