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About Today's News Clips
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The Citadel in the News: Archive

January 2016

PUBLISH DATE STORIES
Friday
January 29, 2016
1. 2016 Greater Issues Series presentations: David McCullough and Gov. Haley
Two Greater Issues Series presentations will be held in coming weeks at The Citadel. The first will feature two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize, author David McCullough. The presenter for the second address will be Governor Nikki Haley. Both speeches will be attended by the South Carolina Corps of Cadets and are also open to the public with limited seating available. This is the 62nd year the Greater Issues Series will present nationally and globally-known thought-leaders. Seating for the public at the addresses will be available on a first-come, first-served basis. There is no fee to attend. Per the colleges safety regulations, no boxes, alcohol, weapons, firecrackers, noise makers, umbrellas, beverage containers of any sort, backpacks, large handbags, coolers, thermoses or similar items will be allowed in the field house. Food and drink are prohibited. Cameras and video cameras are permitted; however, guests will not be permitted on the floor of the field house during the presentations.
Published in: Lowcountry Biz - online
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Friday
January 29, 2016
2. The plastic ocean: Worldwide pollution drives local research
In 30 years, more tons of plastic will drift in the ocean than fish will swim in it. Startling? It gets worse: If all the plastics manufactured in the past few decades were cling wrap, it would be enough to wrap the entire planet. The two findings, in recent reports by the World Economic Forum and Leicester University, are among a ream of disquieting research results on just how widespread and problematic the petroleum product pollution has become in the sea as well as on land. The plastics already have been shown to kill marine life. No one knows yet what the impacts will be on the food chain and human life. Jay Brandes, marine biogeochemist at the Skidaway Institute of Oceanography in Savannah, called the double whammy “the nexus of two worrisome trends,” the increasing use of plastics and the drop in numbers of fish to overfishing and other causes. Only 20 to 30 percent of the fish swim in the ocean today that swam 100 years ago, according to estimates, Brandes said. “We’re not necessarily going to get better with either one for a while,” he said, but better recycling potentially would improve the situation. The findings are extrapolations based on the amount of plastic produced and the amount surveyed at sample sites in the oceans. Nearly 1 billion tons of plastic are manufactured each year, according to Jan Zalasiewicz, Leicester University palaeobiology professor. “Plastics were more or less unknown to our grandparents, when they were children,” Zalasiewicz said in a recent Science Daily story about university’s report. The international research is the prod behind emerging regional research at Skidaway, The Citadel, College of Charleston and other institutions, trying to get a grip on just what impact the waste will have on the Lowcountry marine ecosystem and humans lives.
Published in: The Post and Courier - online
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Friday
January 29, 2016
3.0 On campus news
Colton Price of Mercer was recognized for outstanding academic achievement and earned dean’s list recognition for the fall 2015 semester at The Citadel in Charleston, S.C. Recognition is given to cadets registered for 12 or more semester hours and whose grade point average is 3.2 or higher with no grade below a C for the previous semester’s work. The Citadel, founded in 1842, is a public, coeducational military college that offers a classic military education for men and women.
Published in: Allied News - online
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Friday
January 29, 2016
4. Mike Pitts Proposes Higher Education Privatization
While the rest of the state (and plenty of people from around the country) were paying attention to S.C. Rep. Mike Pitts last week for his nifty head fake on the question of constitutional liberties, the Upstate lawmaker quietly filed a bill that would seriously reconfigure the structure of state government. Pitts has filed legislation – H. 4621 – which would transfer several of the state’s institutions of higher learning from government ownership “to a not-for-profit organization authorized below for the purpose of operating it as a private and not a public institution.” Pitts’ bill even has a timetable for transferring the ownership of ten of these government-run institutions over the course of the coming decade. From his bill … (B) The following dates apply to the below-named institutions of higher learning for purposes of the transfer of the institution to the not-for-profit organization: (1) July 1, 2017 – the University of South Carolina and affiliated branches or campuses, including USC Upstate, USC Beaufort, and USC Sumter; (2) July 1, 2018 – Clemson University; (3) July 1, 2019 – Medical University of South Carolina; (4) July 1, 2020 – The Citadel; (5) July 1, 2021 – South Carolina State University; (6) July 1, 2022 – Winthrop University; (7) July 1, 2023 – Lander University; (8) July 1, 2024 – Francis Marion University; (9) July 1, 2025 – College of Charleston; and (10) July 1, 2026 – Coastal Carolina University.
Published in: FITSNews - online
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Friday
January 29, 2016
4.1 Lawyers’ Committee Launches Campaign to Eliminate Barriers to Educational Opportunity
Today, the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law (Lawyers’ Committee) launched a national initiative to eliminate barriers to educational opportunity for applicants who have been stopped, detained or arrested by police. The first phase of the initiative seeks information from 17 colleges and universities that include inquiries on their applications regarding contact with the criminal justice system, including arrests that did not lead to conviction, sealed or expunged youthful offender records, or pardoned records. “All people deserve a fair chance to access the educational opportunities offered by our nation’s colleges and universities,” said Kristen Clarke, president and executive director of the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law. “However, inquiries regarding stops, detentions and arrests pose unnecessary barriers for vast numbers of African Americans given the racial disparities that we see across the criminal justice system. Colleges and universities should provide access to educational opportunity for all people, regardless of whether or not they have been subject to mere contact with a police officer.” The Lawyers’ Committee sent inquiries to 17 schools across seven states, including Auburn University, Auburn University-Montgomery, the University of Alabama, the University of Alabama at Birmingham and the University of Mobile in Alabama; Florida International University, Florida State University, and the University of North Florida in Florida; Clark Atlanta University and the University of Georgia in Georgia; Catawba College in North Carolina; The Citadel in South Carolina; Louisiana State University in Louisiana; and Emory & Henry College, Hampton University, Virginia State University and Virginia Tech University in Virginia.
Published in: Afro.com - online
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Friday
January 29, 2016
5. UNCG races past The Citadel, 102-95
Two Bulldogs scored 20 points each, four more scored in double figures and The Citadel piled up 95 points against UNC Greensboro on Thursday night at McAlister Field House. But all that offense means nothing without at least a little defense and rebounding, and the Bulldogs could not muster enough of either in a 102-95 loss to UNC Greensboro. The Spartans, led by 30 points from senior Kayel Locke, shot a blistering 62 percent in the first half, racing to a 60-53 edge at halftime. That’s as many points as UNCG (8-13, 4-4 Southern Conference) had scored in four games this season. “We scored 95 points; we’ve got to win that game,” said senior Quinton Marshall, who along with Derrick Henry scored 20 points for the Bulldogs (9-12, 2-6). “We’ve got to stop them, point blank.” The Citadel especially could not stop Locke, a 6-5, 240-pounder who made 11 of 14 shots — including all three of his 3-pointers — and grabbed eight rebounds.
Published in: The Post and Courier - online
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Friday
January 29, 2016
6. Houston's staff taking shape
Amid the excitement and chaos that comes with hiring a new football coach, JMU’s Mike Houston hasn’t wasted any time finalizing his team of assistants for the upcoming season. Houston made it abundantly clear at the welcoming press conference Jan. 19 that his first priority is to hire coordinators on both offense and defense. Among those recently added to his staff are Bob Trott, Tripp Weaver, Bryan Stinespring, Byron Thweatt and Donnie Kirkpatrick. Trott joins the Dukes this season after spending the last six seasons as the University of Richmond’s defensive coordinator. Along with head coach Danny Rocco, Trott helped lead the Spiders to the Football Championship Subdivision semifinals last season, where they were downed by five-time defending champion North Dakota State University. Trott and Houston have had a tight-knit relationship for nearly 10 years, according to the Daily-News Record. Another familiar face Houston plans to add is Weaver, former outside linebackers coach at The Citadel. Weaver will assume the role of defensive assistant coach. Weaver assisted Houston for the past two seasons in Charleston, South Carolina, and helped lead the Bulldogs to a 9-4 record in 2015 and a share of the Southern Conference title.
Published in: The Breeze - online
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Friday
January 29, 2016
7. Mary M. Richman
Mary Roberta Mitchell Richman, 85, of Quicksburg, passed away Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2016, at her home. Mrs. Richman was born Dec. 21, 1930, in Spring Creek, Va., daughter of the late Charles Gordon and Careta Stoutamyer Mitchell. She was a 1949 graduate of Timberville High School. Mrs. Richman was married Jan. 20, 1951, to Silas Junior Richman. He preceded her in death March 13, 1988. Also preceding are sisters, Ada Depew of Indiana and Jessie Redmon of Georgia. She is survived by a sister, Frances Louise Bowman of Timberville; three daughters, Barbara Etrick of Sacramento, Calif., Corinda Richman of Quicksburg and Jeannie Viveiros of Centreville; a son, Michael Richman of Quicksburg; a grandson, Seth Viveiros of Centreville, currently attending The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina; a brother-in-law, Harold Richman of Quicksburg; a cousin, Dennis Coakley of Harrisonburg; and many beloved nieces and nephews
Published in: Daily News Record - online
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Thursday
January 28, 2016
3. Letter: Remove Confederate flag from Citadel chapel
I am an African-American graduate of The Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina. Last fall I joined other African-American graduates to form the Take It Down Now Campaign. The campaign has now grown to include a diverse group of people from around the country. Its goal is to bring public pressure to the effort to remove the Confederate Naval Jack flag from Summerall Chapel and to address issues of racial inclusion, diversity and equity at The Citadel. On behalf of the campaign I offer this reflection: Once again circumstances have presented The Citadel an opportunity to reflect on its checkered past and to use the wisdom gained from introspection to shape its present and future. The unfortunate recent incident involving cadets dressing in costumes reminiscent of those once worn by the Ku Klux Klan remind some and inform others that there remains a culture of racial insensitivity at The Citadel, which from time to time gives rise to hijinks that cross the line between entertainment and insult. I applaud President Lt. Gen. John Rosa’s plans to convene a task force on diversity and inclusion to better understand why this challenge persists. The task force would do well to begin this important work by examining a tangible symbol of that culture — the Confederate Naval Jack that hangs in The Citadel’s Summerall Chapel.
Published in: The Post and Courier - online
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Thursday
January 28, 2016
3.1 Area Students Earn Citadel Gold Stars
The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, honored the following cadets and active duty military students with Gold Stars for academic excellence during the fall semester of the 2010-2011 academic year. Gold Stars are awarded to students that achieve a 3.7 grade point average or higher. Robert Seabrook Algard of Charleston, SC — Business Administration major. Matthew Ryan Fann of Charleston, SC — Electrical Engineering major. Anthony Gregory Faulk of Charleston, SC — Physical Education major. The Gold Stars are worn on the collars of the full dress and dress uniforms and above the right shirt pocket of the summer leave uniform. Students who earn Gold Stars are also placed on the Dean's List, which recognizes students registered for 12 or more semester hours whose grade point ratio is 3.2 or higher with no grade below a C for the previous semester's work. Gold Star and Dean's List students will be recognized during The Citadel's Jan. 27 military dress parade, which begins at 3:45 p.m. on Summerall Field.
Published in: Charleston Patch - online
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Thursday
January 28, 2016
3.2 Cadet Robert Waldrop takes top honors at The Citadel in fall 2015: Dean's List
Members of The Citadel South Carolina Corps of Cadets earned top honors in the fall 2015 semester. Dean's List recognition is given to cadets registered for 12 or more semester hours and whose grade point average is 3.2 or higher with no grade below a C for the previous semester's work. Robert Waldrop of South Plainfield, New Jersey (07080), was recognized for outstanding academic achievement and earned Dean's List recognition for the fall 2015 semester. The Citadel, founded in 1842, is a public, coeducational military college in Charleston, S.C., that offers a classic military education for men and women seeking a college experience that is meaningful, academically strong and is focused on educating and developing principled leaders for a strong military and a global workforce.
Published in: South Plainfield News - online
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Thursday
January 28, 2016
3.3 Fairfax Schools & Military, 1/28/16 edition
Richard Santorum of Great Falls has been named to the dean’s list for the fall semester at The Citadel.
Published in: Inside NOVA - online
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Thursday
January 28, 2016
3.4 Local students earn honors at The Citadel
The Citadel honored numerous local students for their academic achievements in the fall 2015 semester. Evening undergraduate students Dean’s List Dean’s List is a recognition given to students who are registered for 12 or more semester hours and whose grade point average is 3.20 or higher, with no grade of I (Incomplete) and no grade below C for work in a semester. Christopher Ackerman of North Charleston Benjamin Beresky of Summerville Mary Ellis of Summerville Ashton Stover of Summerville Nicholas Sullivan of Summerville Jack Bailey of North Charleston Matthew Hovey of Summerville Elizabeth Rhodes of Summerville Most distinguished cadets named to fall 2015 President’s List The President’s List is one of the most distinguished cadet awards presented by The Citadel. It indicates excellence in academics and military duties. The list is a combination of the Dean’s List and the Commandant’s Distinguished List and is composed of cadets who contribute the most to their companies while maintaining excellent military and academic records. Jordan Abrams of Summerville Kai Clark of Summerville John Cordes of Summerville Veteran students Dean’s List Dean’s List is a recognition given to students who are registered for 12 or more semester hours and whose grade point average is 3.20 or higher, with no grade of I (Incomplete) and no grade below C for work in a semester. Patrick Ayres of Summerville Aaron Bahadori of Summerville Leonard Blado of North Charleston Allen Boyd of Summerville Vennessa Camacho of Ladson Dallin Cook of North Charleston Oliver Culver of Summerville Corey DeChant of Summerville Tyler Hardy of Summerville Joseph Rose of Summerville Zachary Story of North Charleston Nathan Chapman of Ridgeville William Dorsey of Summerville David Jorgenson of North Charleston Douglas Wattier of Summerville Richard Zealy of Summerville Active-duty students earn Dean’s List recognition Dean’s List is a recognition given to students who are registered for 12 or more semester hours and whose grade point average is 3.20 or higher, with no grade of I (Incomplete) and no grade below C for work in a semester. Sean Brennan of Summerville Dexter Ledbetter of Summerville Scott Sam of Ladson Jeffrey Smeriglio of Summerville Emerson Tronchin of Summerville Newest Gold Star cadets announced Gold stars are awarded by The Citadel each semester for outstanding academic achievement. Students that achieve Gold Star recognition are also placed on The Citadel’s Dean’s List. Jordan Abrams of Summerville Nicholas Brace of North Charleston Justin Brownlee of Saint George Chase Goodwin of Summerville Brian Lapchak of North Charleston John McLeod of Summerville Jamie Meyer of Summerville Landon Poe of Summerville Dakota Smith of Summerville Cadets named to Dean’s List Dean’s List recognition is given to cadets registered for 12 or more semester hours and whose grade point average is 3.2 or higher with no grade below a C for the previous semester’s work. Alexander Daiber of Summerville Jordan Abrams of Summerville Nicholas Brace of North Charleston Justin Brownlee of Saint George Chase Goodwin of Summerville Brian Lapchak of North Charleston John McLeod of Summerville Jamie Meyer of Summerville Landon Poe of Summerville Dakota Smith of Summerville Cameron Abell of Charleston Sean Bell of Summerville Richard Blanchard of Summerville James Blocker of Summerville Charles Buehring of North Charleston Chandler Carter of Summerville Donald Chestnut of North Charleston Kai Clark of Summerville Lance Cook of Summerville John Cordes of Summerville William Cranford of Summerville Matthew Davenport of Summerville Tinslee Dilday of Summerville Alexander Grant of Summerville Matthew Halter of Summeville Hannah Holt of Summerville Bryce Hoopes of North Charleston Daniel Ilderton of Saint George Eric Ladson of Summerville Dylan Lilly of Dorchester Evan Maes of Summerville Marc Melfi of Summerville Aaron Moore of North Charleston Johnathan Overcash of Summerville Joshua Richardson of Summerville Thomas Rogers of Saint George Patrick Simmons of Summerville Koree Stillings of Summerville Xiang Wang of Ladson
Published in: Summerville Journal Scene - online
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Thursday
January 28, 2016
3.5 The Citadel Dean’s List
Dean’s List recognition is given to cadets registered for 12 or more semester hours and whose grade point average is 3.2 or higher with no grade below a C for the previous semester’s work. Kannapolis: Logan Miller Rockwell: Thor Wright
Published in: Salisbury Post - website
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Thursday
January 28, 2016
3.6 The Citadel's newest Gold Star cadets announced: fall 2015
Gold stars are awarded by The Citadel each semester for outstanding academic achievement. Students that achieve Gold Star recognition are also placed on The Citadel's Dean's List. Andrew Burckhalter of Florence, South Carolina; Austin Jowers of Florence, South Carolina; Ethan McAllister of Pamplico, South Carolina; Cody Smithey of Florence, South Carolina
Published in: Florence News Journal - online
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Thursday
January 28, 2016
3.7 The Citadel’s most distinguished cadets named to fall 2015 President’s List
The President’s List is one of the most distinguished cadet awards presented by The Citadel. It indicates excellence in academics and military duties. The list is a combination of the Dean’s List and the Commandant’s Distinguished List and is composed of cadets who contribute the most to their companies while maintaining excellent military and academic records. Brian Bilbo of Loganville, Georgia (30052) Spencer Lukas of Loganville, Georgia (30052)
Published in: Loganville Local News - website
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Thursday
January 28, 2016
3.8 The Citadel’s newest Gold Star cadets announced
John Kellahan of Kingstree has been named a Gold Star cadet. Gold stars are awarded by The Citadel each semester for outstanding academic achievement. Students that achieve Gold Star recognition are also placed on The Citadel’s Dean’s List. The Citadel offers a classic military college education for young men and women profoundly focused on leadership excellence and academic distinction. Graduates are not required to serve in the military but about 30 percent of each class commission as officers in every branch of U.S. military service. Graduates of The Citadel have served the nation, their state and their communities as principled leaders since the college was founded in 1842. The Citadel ranks as the No. 1 Public College in the South for five consecutive years by U.S. News & World Report. The Citadel Graduate College offers more than 50 master’s degrees and graduate certificates in a wide range of disciplines, plus six undergraduate programs, through an all-evening schedule. Some graduate courses are available online. To learn more about The Citadel go to www.citadel.edu.
Published in: The Kingstree News - website
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Wednesday
January 27, 2016
1. The Citadel steps up with an honorable response
The Citadel's stated commitment to "honor, duty and respect" has played out in the way it handled a troubling incident last month, when photos surfaced showing freshmen dressed in pointed white hoods. Clearly, dressing in white hoods suggestive of the Ku Klux Klan - even while just singing Christmas songs - shows disrespect. And the punishment dealt the 14 cadets who were involved in the stunt, after a thorough investigation, indicates the school's administration takes the offense seriously. One cadet was dismissed and will have to wait two semesters before reapplying to the school; one was suspended for a semester; 11 will be given restrictions and ordered to walk tours. But Citadel President Lt. Gen. John Rosa wisely didn't stop there. He said he is forming a task force to advance diversity and inclusion. Gen. Rosa said that some cadets who were involved recognized the stunt would be offensive and failed to stop it. That implies some didn't even know it was offensive. In either case, these students - and likely others - could benefit from some information and guidance regarding diversity. Civil rights leaders, who initially called for Gen. Rosa's dismissal, later reversed that demand. They say the punishment for the cadets is satisfactory. They plan to remain involved with The Citadel's diversity efforts and "find out just how sincere The Citadel is," according to the Rev. Nelson Rivers, a local leader in the National Action Network (NAN).
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
January 27, 2016
2a. The Citadel Punishes 14 Cadets Over White-Hooded Photos
One month after photos emerged showing cadets wearing white pillowcases on their heads, The Citadel says its investigation found that while 14 cadets may not have meant to be offensive, their behavior warranted punishments — and in some cases, dismissal. The incident stems from a a string of nights in which freshman cadets were ordered to an upper class cadet's barracks room, the school says — and on one night, they used pillowcases as part of improvised "Ghosts of Christmas Past" costumes. Photos were later posted on social media, sparking both questions and anger about the event. "The investigation found that the cadets did not intend to be offensive. However, I am disappointed some recognized how it could be construed as such but didn't stop it," said Lt. Gen. John Rosa, president of the military college in Charleston, S.C. Eight cadets were suspended shortly after the photos became public. The Citadel says 14 cadets have been disciplined, with some of them dismissed — meaning they must spend at least two semesters away from the school. The school says that within an hour of the incident, "several cadets reported to cadet leadership that they had seen a small group of freshmen dressed in costumes with white pillowcases on their heads."
Broadcast on: NPR
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Wednesday
January 27, 2016
2b. incident and discipline
incident and discipline
Published in: Stars and Stripes
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Wednesday
January 27, 2016
2c. incident and discipline
incident and discipline
Published in: NY Daily News
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Wednesday
January 27, 2016
2d. incident and discipline
incident and discipline
Published in: The Hill Washington, D.C.
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Wednesday
January 27, 2016
3. Free, Family-Friendly Event Exploring Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics scheduled
The 2016 Charleston STEM festival is a free, family-friendly celebration of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) in the Lowcountry. The festival will be held. While the inaugural Charleston STEM Festival in 2014 drew more than 1,500 visitors to 40 interactive exhibits, attendance soared to 7,500 people for the 2015 Charleston STEM Festival, which included over 50 exhibits designed to reflect the community's continued interest in STEM education and activities. "STEM education is important for the economic success of our region and for developing a skilled workforce," says Darren Prevost, Director of the Lowcountry STEM Collaborative. "Festivals like this bring STEM to the community in a new and exciting way so the message about the importance of STEM education and the impact of these disciplines in our community can reach a wider audience." The 2016 Charleston STEM Festival is an initiative of the Lowcountry STEM Collaborative and is funded through donations from Boeing, MWV Specialty Chemicals, SCE&G, The InterTech Group, Berkeley County School District, Charleston Southern University, The Citadel School of Engineering, The Citadel School of Science & Mathematics, Claflin University, Clemson University, The College of Charleston School of Sciences & Mathematics, Google, Lowcountry STEM Collaborative, MUSC, SC Coalition for Mathematics & Science, SC Space Grant and Trident Technical College.
Broadcast on: WCBD-Tv Charleston, SC
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Wednesday
January 27, 2016
4. Cadet Robert Waldrop takes top honors at The Citadel in fall 2015: Dean's List
Members of The Citadel South Carolina Corps of Cadets earned top honors in the fall 2015 semester. Dean's List recognition is given to cadets registered for 12 or more semester hours and whose grade point average is 3.2 or higher with no grade below a C for the previous semester's work. Robert Waldrop of South Plainfield, New Jersey (07080), was recognized for outstanding academic achievement and earned Dean's List recognition for the fall 2015 semester. The Citadel, founded in 1842, is a public, coeducational military college in Charleston, S.C., that offers a classic military education for men and women seeking a college experience that is meaningful, academically strong and is focused on educating and developing principled leaders for a strong military and a global workforce.
Published in: TapInto.net
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Wednesday
January 27, 2016
5. Fellow coaches praise Hall of Famer Joe Turbeville, who passed away
Airport coach Kirk Burnett learned many things being around Joe Turbeville, but two things he remembered most were his leadership abilities and work ethic. Those two characteristics helped Turbeville become one of the winningest high school football coaches in South Carolina. Turbeville, 74, died Monday at Lexington Medical Center after a battle with lymphoma. "He just had such a constant work ethic," said Burnett, who got his first coaching job under Turbeville at Irmo from 1989-93. "It didn't matter how bad or how well you did on Friday. He was back in his office by sunrise on Saturday. And no matter how many titles he had won, everything was new and fresh...Burnett said he still uses things he learned from Turbeville with his teams at Airport. He also appreciated when Turbeville would stop by practice or come to a game, something he did regularly with his former coaches and players when he retired from coaching in the mid-1990s. Before getting into coaching, Turbeville was a standout offensive guard at The Citadel from 1960-62. He was part of the Bulldogs' teams that won the Tangerine Bowl and first Southern Conference championship. Turbeville was inducted into The Citadel Sports Hall of Fame in 2013. Service details are pending.
Published in: The State
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Wednesday
January 27, 2016
6. Football coach Biff Poggi on leaving Gilman after 19 years: 'I felt like it was time'
Gilman football coach Biff Poggi is leaving the program he guided to 13 Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association A Conference championships and a No. 13 national ranking this fall, after 19 years as head coach. Poggi said it was an agonizing decision to leave the Gilman program, where he played, his three sons played and he hopes his future grandchildren might play. "I felt like it was time, because we've done everything we could do," Poggi said. "I thought after the 100th [Gilman-McDonogh] game, it just wasn't going to get any better as a coach at Gilman. I don't know how many thousands of people were there. We brought the whole school together and it was a monumental deal, an unbelievable day. I kind of wanted to go out like that." Poggi said he is considering offers to coach in two college programs, Maryland and Michigan. His son, Henry, is a tight end with two years of eligibility remaining at Michigan and his daughter, Mellie, is a member of the crew team there. Two All-Metro Gilman offensive linemen, Devery Hamilton and Stephen Spanellis, have committed to the Wolverines. "I've been offered an assistant head coaching position at Michigan and if I can work it out, I would like to do a year there," said Poggi, who was an assistant coach at Brown, The Citadel and Temple before he came back to Gilman.
Published in: The Baltimore Sun
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Wednesday
January 27, 2016
7. Bulldogs Take on Camels, All Academy Championships
The Citadel wrestling team has a busy week ahead as it travels to Buies Creek, North Carolina, for a SoCon dual with Campbell and continues north for the All Academy Championships in Lexington, Virginia. The dual with Campbell will begin at 6 p.m. on Thursday and the All Academy Championships will take place over the entire day Saturday. The Bulldogs are currently on a three-match skid but have already faced Campbell once this season, earning the 22-17 win earlier in January at the Virginia Duals. In the first meeting between the two schools, the Bulldogs won seven of the 10 bouts. The Camels are 1-11 and 1-2 in SoCon competition after picking up a 24-15 win over VMI. The 22nd annual All Academy Championships will consist of eight teams with military ties: US Air Force Academy, US Military Academy, US Naval Academy, US Coast Guard Academy, Norwich University, US Merchant Marine Academy and host VMI. Air Force claimed top honors last year with a score of 90.0 and The Citadel finished fourth with a team score of 58.5. Last year's squad earned six top-four finishes and was led by Ty Buckiso and Matt Frisch who took home first place at 141 and 149 pounds, respectively. Marshall Haas, who finished second at 197 pounds, and Joe Bexley, who took third in the heavyweight division, will have another go at the double-elimination tournament this year.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Tuesday
January 26, 2016
1a. Citadel Punishes Students for Costumes Evoking the K.K.K.
Fourteen cadets at The Citadel in Charleston, S.C., were disciplined on Monday after several of them appeared last month in photographs wearing white pillowcases on their heads. The pillowcases evoked a likeness to the hoods worn by the Ku Klux Klan. The president of the Citadel, Lt. Gen. John W. Rosa, announced in December that the military college was investigating "offensive and disturbing" images of cadets wearing white clothes and pointed hoods with eyeholes that were posted on Facebook. On Monday, The Citadel released a statement with the results of that investigation, quoting General Rosa as saying that while the cadets used poor judgment, they "did not intend to be offensive." But he said he was disappointed that some cadets recognized that the pillowcases could be construed as offensive, and yet did nothing to stop it. "It demonstrates that we must integrate an even higher level of diversity education into cadets' daily activities," General Rosa said, "and into the already extensive leadership and ethics curriculum." Of those punished, seven were freshmen and seven were juniors. One junior was dismissed, meaning the cadet must spend two semesters away from campus, and two juniors were suspended, which requires them to spend one semester away from campus. Eleven cadets were given punishments of hour-long marches; such punishments can number from 40 to 120 marches.
Published in: The New York Times
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Tuesday
January 26, 2016
1b. discipline
incident and discipline
Published in: Military Times
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Tuesday
January 26, 2016
1c. incident and discipline
incident and discipline
Published in: The Chronicle of Higher Education
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Tuesday
January 26, 2016
1d. incident and discipline
incident and discipline
Broadcast on: WCBD-TV Charleston, SC
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Tuesday
January 26, 2016
2. The standard that is The Citadel
As chair of The Citadel Board of Visitors and a member of the Class of 1967, I would like to share factual data illustrating the college's efforts to provide excellence in higher education. Lt. Gen. John Rosa, his staff and faculty consistently strive to improve every aspect of The Citadel, and a few accomplishments are particularly noteworthy: For the past five consecutive years The Citadel has been rated by U.S. News & World Report as the No. 1 Public Regional University in the Southeast offering at least a masters degree. In 2014 (the last 10-year accreditation cycle), The Citadel completed re-accreditation by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) Commission on Colleges with no recommendations for improvements or action required. For the significance of this please contact any college president. The ROTC Program was rated No. 1 in the nation by The Washington Monthly in 2014. In eight of the last 10 years The Citadel has the highest four-year college graduation rate in the state of South Carolina. In 2015 The Citadel received the Carnegie Foundation's Community Engagement Award as one of the most civic-minded colleges in the nation. Only about 2 percent of schools have earned this distinction. Rated in 2014 as the fourth fittest college in the country by The Active Times, and perhaps most importantly... The cadet (student)-to-faculty ratio at The Citadel is 13-1.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
January 26, 2016
3. Applause: Week of 1/25/16
DEAN'S LIST: Marcus Harbol of Bothell was recognized for outstanding academic achievement and earned dean's list recognition for the fall 2015 semester at The Citadel in South Carolina.
Published in: The Woodinville Weekly
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Tuesday
January 26, 2016
4. Farewell to Huesman, unexpected rise of The Citadel highlight SoCon
Jacob Huesman did everything he could for Chattanooga while cementing his status of one of the best all-time FCS dual-threat quarterbacks. And as the Mocs prepare to move on without him, The Citadel is ready to move up in the Southern Conference. Everything pointed to the Mocs being the class of the Southern, and they did not disappoint en route to a 9-4 finish. Huesman and running back Derrick Craine combined for 2,495 yards and 26 touchdowns on the ground, while defensive lineman Keionta Davis anchored a stout defense with 13 1/2 sacks and 17 tackles for loss. Chattanooga claimed its third straight conference title, sharing honors with the upstart Bulldogs, and reached the FCS playoffs for the second straight year. But the bitterness of a second-round overtime playoff loss to Jacksonville State in Huesman's final game is somewhat negated considering his senior class left his father - head coach Russ Huesman - the foundation that can sustain this level of success. "I hope we've made a good impression on them, so that (the underclassmen) continue to be good leaders and lead us to a national championship," linebacker A.J. Hampton told Chattanooga's official website. "When we came in, everything was a whole different story... Gradually over the years we started winning, getting support from the city and I feel like we've slowly gotten better and better.
Published in: FoxSports.com
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Tuesday
January 26, 2016
5. Citadel Notes: Bulldogs lose just one assistant to James Madison, so far
A week after he was announced as The Citadel's new football coach, Brent Thompson has retained most of his coaching staff - at least for now. As of Monday, only one assistant - outside linebackers coach Tripp Weaver - has left to follow former head coach Mike Houston to James Madison University. Well-regarded strength coach Donnell Boucher, also an assistant athletic director, announced on Twitter that he will remain at The Citadel, where he's worked for eight years. Boucher apparently was another Houston target. The rest of Thompson's staff remains intact: Maurice Drayton (assistant head coach, defensive coordinator, cornerbacks coach); Blake Harrell (special teams coordinator, inside linebackers); Ron Boyd (offensive line); J.P. Gunter (A-backs, recruiting coordinator); Brian Rucker (wide receivers); Joel Taylor (defensive passing game coordinator, safeties); Roy Tesh (defensive line); and John Ward (tackles, academic coordinator). Thompson, formerly the Bulldogs' offensive coordinator, has yet to hire a new offensive coordinator.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
January 25, 2016
1. Citadel completes investigation into photos of cadets in costumes
The Citadel has completed the investigation into photos of cadets with pillowcases on their heads which appeared on social media after an event in a barracks room on Dec. 9, 2015. "The investigation found that the cadets did not intend to be offensive. However, I am disappointed some recognized how it could be construed as such but didn't stop it," said Lt. Gen. John Rosa, Citadel President. Fourteen cadets have received punishments ranging from on-campus punishments to dismissal. A dismissal requires a cadet to spend two semesters away from campus. The investigation found that within an hour of the event, several cadets reported to cadet leadership that they had seen a small group of freshmen dressed in costumes with white pillowcases on their heads. As the cadet leaders looked into the matter, two photos of the costumed cadets were posted on social media by an upper class cadet who was in the room. The cadet leadership reported the incident to the company tactical officer (a staff member assigned to the commandant's department), who informed the administration. The following morning, Rosa announced that an investigation had been initiated and eight cadets were temporarily suspended. After subsequent interviews with witnesses, seven more cadets were added to the investigation.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Monday
January 25, 2016
2. Trash in the water ends up in the drink; The Citadel studies how much
Tiny squiggles of plastic likely are floating in the juices, sports drinks, sodas and bottled water you drink. Microplastics already have been shown to kill marine life. The tiny bits are turning up virtually everywhere plastics are made, used or discarded on land and in the water; they are being consumed just as widely. No one knows yet what the impact will be for humans. Research at The Citadel, complemented by work at the Skidaway Institute of Oceanography in Savannah, is making new findings about just how pervasive and potentially dangerous a problem it is in the region. More than 7 tons of plastic are estimated to be breaking down to microplastics in the tide and waves of Charleston Harbor at any given time, according to a study led by Citadel physiology professor John Weinstein. Sooner or later, a portion of that 7 tons of waste gets eaten by marine critters, such as shrimp, and works its way up the food chain. On top of that, recent research has shown the plastics pick up toxins in the water before they are eaten. Now Weinstein and his cadets are looking at just how much of the plastics you might be gulping down in orange juice, soft drinks, sports drinks and bottled water, while they study periwinkle snails to see if that marine-life food source is eating them, too. Microbeads - tiny plastic beads used for years as smooth abrasives in faces washes, soaps and toothpastes - were federally banned earlier this month. Use of the beads is being phased out, and the ban is roundly conceded to be little more than a Band-Aid. The Citadel study determined the beads account for only about 1 percent of the plastics out there.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
January 25, 2016
3a. Cadets take top honors at The Citadel
Dean's List cognition at The Citadel is given to cadets registered for 12 or more semester hours and whose grade point average is 3.2 or higher with no grade below a C for the previous semester's work. The following cadets from the Union County area were named to the Dean's List: Jacob Robbins of Union, Daniel Boulware of Whitmire, John Dunllap of Pauline, Corey Gill of Pauline Avery Hyatt of Pauline and Jacob Patterson of Jonesville.
Published in: The Union Times
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Monday
January 25, 2016
3b. Education Briefs: The Citadel
Members of The Citadel South Carolina Corps of Cadets earned top honors in the fall 2015 semester. Dean's List recognition is given to cadets registered for 12 or more semester hours and whose grade point average is 3.2 or higher with no grade below a C for the previous semester's work. Christopher Kegley of Nashville, Ga., was recognized for outstanding academic achievement and earned Dean's List recognition for the fall 2015 semester.
Published in: The Valdosta Daily Times
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Monday
January 25, 2016
3c. On Campus from Jan. 24, 2016
Cadet Colton Price, Mercer, earned top honors in the fall semester at The Citadel South Carolina Corps of Cadets, Charleston, S.C. Colton was also recognized for outstanding academic achievement.
Published in: The Sharon Herald
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Monday
January 25, 2016
3d. School News: The Citadel
Members of The Citadel South Carolina Corps of Cadets earned top honors in the fall 2015 semester. Dean's List recognition is given to cadets registered for 12 or more semester hours and whose grade point average is 3.2 or higher with no grade below a C for the previous semester's work. Ryan Kirby of Gaffney, was recognized for outstanding academic achievement and earned Dean's List recognition for the fall 2015 semester. The Citadel, founded in 1842, is a public, coeducational military college in Charleston, S. C., that offers a classic military education for men and women seeking a college experience that is meaningful, academically strong and is focused on educating and developing principled leaders for a strong military and a global workforce.
Published in: The Gaffney Ledger
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Monday
January 25, 2016
4. National School Choice Week celebrates education
Today marks the beginning of National School Choice Week. During this week, schools across the United States will hold events to celebrate the broad system for learning available to students outside the traditional public school classroom. In Florence, there are several options for students who learn differently or can benefit from a nontraditional education. Two schools that fit that bill are the Montessori School of Florence and Faith Christian Academy. A Faith-based Education: Faith Christian Academy opened in Florence in 2010 after the closing of another private Christian school in the Pee Dee. The independent school operates on property near Tans Bay Baptist Church, a location that housed Tans Bay Elementary School in the 1940s and '50s. Principal Audrey Streit said that when the school was formed, the faculty found there was a need for their specific type of education and environment. "When we had an open house, we thought that we would have around 37 children and we had 70," Streit said. "This building was empty and had been sold to (Tans Bay) church years ago. It was interesting that it had started as an elementary school and it became a school again." Though Streit said she has heard negative things about private Christian schools, she said her school does not lower its standards simply because it is small or faith-based. "We offer a strong academic and spiritual education in a family environment," Streit said. "We are not only educating the children and training them spiritually, but we are also reaching out to the families. We have had students graduate from here and attend colleges like North Greenville University, Francis Marion, Erskine and even The Citadel."
Published in: SCNow.com
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Monday
January 25, 2016
5. CG Junior Leadership program one of only two alike
The Coast Guard Junior Leadership Program at Camden County High School is one of only two U.S. Coast Guard sponsored programs of its kind in the nation. The program began at Camden County High School in 2010, under the direction of retired Coast Guard Capt. Algernon Keith as Senior Maritime Science Instructor. "We started from scratch in 2010, and are in our sixth year now," Keith said, adding that the battalion averages about 76 cadets, which was this year's enrollment. The program began the same year that Billie Berry became principal of the school. JLP is one of only two of its kind in the United States. "We are the only traditional public school in the country with the program," Berry said. The other is at a magnet school, the Maritime and Science Technology Academy, commonly referred to as MAST Academy in Miami, Fla... In addition to attending leadership and academic classes, select cadets attend a week-long joint Air Force and Coast Guard leadership academy known as Cadet Leadership Course at The Citadel in Charleston S.C. each summer. JLP students also tutor other students, perform volunteer services throughout the community, and coordinate the Spring Salute each May to honor county-wide teachers of the year. The goal is for senior student cadets to run a large portion of what goes on in the JLP, Keith said. The instructors teach academic subjects in class, and provide guidance and support to the senior cadre.
Published in: The Daily Advance
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Monday
January 25, 2016
6. Local business calendar
Saturday - QUICKBOOKS: S.C. Small Business Development Center, The Citadel and Software Training Consultants Inc. hold an introductory QuickBooks bookkeeping and accounting software workshop. 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Bastin Lab in The Citadel's Bond Hall, 171 Moultrie St., Charleston. $139. Go to www.citadel.edu/bastinlab to register.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
January 25, 2016
7. Sports teams in the Carolinas show Panthers support using #OneCarolina
Professional, semi-professional and university sports teams across the North and South Carolina are jumping in on a social media movement to show support for the Carolina Panthers ahead of Sunday's NFC Championship Game in Charlotte. Dozens of teams used the hashtag #OneCarolina throughout the day Saturday on Twitter - including Wake Forest, N.C. State, Davidson, The Citadel, Furman, the Durham Bulls and the Charlotte Hounds, among many others. Fans have started using the hashtag in support, too. For each post, each team posted a customized banner with its logo or mascot against an image of the Panthers in the background and the words "One Carolina" in the center. The campaign caught on Instagram, too, and had generated nearly 600 posts by Saturday night. N.C. State didn't join in at first. It posted and later deleted a Tweet that said: "We've got #PackPros on both sides! We want to stay neutral for our guys." The Panthers play the Arizona Cardinals Sunday at 6:40 p.m. at Bank of America Stadium. This is the first time the team has hosted a home NFC Championship game.
Published in: Charlotte Observer
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Monday
January 25, 2016
8a. ETSU beats The Citadel in overtime, 101-92
Ge'Lawn Guyn and Isaac Banks scored 20 points apiece and Eastern Tennessee State defeated The Citadel 101-92 in overtime on Saturday. Guyn's bucket sent the game to overtime and his jumper with 3:18 left broke a tie and started an 11-1 game-ending run. Banks added 11 rebounds. T.J. Cromer and Deuce Bello both scored 14 points and Peter Jurkin added 11 for ETSU (13-7, 6-1 Southern), which shot 54 percent. The Bucs moved into a tie for first with Chattanooga. Quayson Williams made 7 of 10 3-pointers and scored 29 points off the bench for The Citadel (9-11, 2-5). Warren Sledge added 12 points and P.J. Boutte 10. Gyun tied the game at 86-all with 14 seconds left in regulation. Sledge was fouled but missed the front end of a 1-one-1 and the game went to overtime. The Bulldogs and Bucs, the conference's top two scoring teams, were a combined 74-of-156 shooting.
Published in: Myrtle Beach Online
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Monday
January 25, 2016
8b. Three Bulldogs on Coaches' Panel Rankings
The NCAA released the first coaches' panel rankings on Thursday and three Bulldog grapplers were included on the list. Seniors Matt Frisch and Marshall Haas and junior Aaron Walker made the first of four rankings for the 2015-16 season. The rankings are one of the criteria used as part of the selection process for the NCAA Division 1 Wrestling Championships and are compiled by a vote of coaches representing each qualifying tournament. For each weight class, wrestlers are measured on winning percentage, rating percentage index (RPI) and the coaches' rankings. 33 wrestlers are ranked in each weight class and five former national champions headline the list. 17 Southern Conference wrestlers were included in the first ranking. Frisch is the first Bulldog on the list at 149 pounds and is ranked 30th. The Oxford, Michigan, native holds a 15-7 record and is 8-2 in duals this season. The senior has recorded two pins this year and is 2-1 in SoCon competition. Walker comes in at No. 27 in the 157-pound division and has suffered only five defeats this year with an 18-5 record. The junior is 10-0 in duals including a 3-0 mark in SoCon action. Walker has tallied five pins this year and was recently tabbed SoCon Wrestler of the Week. The San Antonio, Texas, native is on a seven-match winning streak.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Monday
January 25, 2016
9. Hooch's Belanger commits to golf team at The Citadel
Chattahoochee High School's Rachel Belanger has signed a National Letter of Intent to play golf for The Citadel, Charleston, South Carolina. A multisport athlete, Belanger plays softball, basketball and golf at Chattahoochee. She has excelled on and off the course at Hooch, earning MVP honors for her golf team twice while receiving the squad's Coach's Award as a freshman. She carded a 68 (4-under-par) at a tournament last season, which is her personal best. Belanger, who has been on the honor roll throughout her high school career, plans to pursue a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering at The Citadel next fall. She is also currently working on a service project that will allow her to sponsor a child in need in Nicaragua.
Published in: Johns Creek Herald
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Friday
January 22, 2016
1a. Thousands Prep for Google/The Citadel's Lowcountry STEM Event
A record number of teams across South Carolina are preparing for the Sixth Annual Storm The Citadel Trebuchet Competition. The word has spread since 2011 when a dozen teams competed. On Feb. 13, more than 100 teams and 700 competitors will arrive in the Lowcountry joining what will become about 3,000 people either participating in the events or cheering from the sidelines. This year's event will feature teams from across the Lowcountry and several teams visiting from Richland, Sumter, Darlington and York counties as well as a team from Clemson University. Each year, teams of K-12, college students, and corporate adult teams gather on Summerall Field to launch their trebuchets. The medieval devices are judged for accuracy, distance, spirit and design. Co-hosted and co-founded by Google and The Citadel's School of Engineering, the event reinforces the importance of science technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM)education. "This event creates a smart, family oriented and fun filled learning environment around STEM education," said Google's Jeff Stevenson, a Citadel graduate who founded the event. "STEM education is crucial in today's job market. We are working to ensure that South Carolina students are prepared to meet the growing needs of tech-based companies, and Storm The Citadel is a great way to encourage students to learn and develop their skills."
Published in: South Carolina Educational TV
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Friday
January 22, 2016
1b. Storm The Citadel
STC
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Friday
January 22, 2016
2. Murrells Inlet man tapped to take the wheel of state transportation commission
Mike Wooten was elected chairman of the S.C. Department of Transportation commission Thursday. His term will last one year. Wooten represents the 7th Congressional District, which includes Horry and Georgetown counties. John N. Hardee of the 2nd Congressional District was elected the new vice chairman. Wooten, of Murrells Inlet, is the founding partner and the principal engineer of DDC Engineers, Inc., a Myrtle Beach-based consulting engineering firm specializing in land planning, landscape architecture, environmental planning, land surveying and civil engineering. Wooten is the second local to serve as chairman in the past six years. Danny Isaac of the Myrtle Beach area was elected chairman in 2010. As chairman, Wooten sets the agenda for the commission. Wooten said sometimes people think the commission can re-prioritize road projects, which is not the case. Wooten has been known to be outspoken on the commission. Late last year, he used statistics to make the case for a gas tax increase when he spoke to the Florence Rotary Club. His presentation was to underscore an annual funding shortfall of $400 million needed to repair the state's weakening infrastructure... He also served as the liaison with the US Army Corps of Engineers and South Carolina Congressional Delegation for the state-owned utility. He received a Bachelor of Science degree in civil engineering from The Citadel in 1977, according to a news release.
Published in: Myrtle Beach Online
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Friday
January 22, 2016
3. How Lithuania Helped Take Down The Soviet Union
This year, 2016, will mark the twentieth-fifth anniversary of the end of the Soviet Union from the political map of the world. A quarter of a century ago, the menace of Soviet-led communism, which had haunted the globe since the time of the Russian Revolution in 1917, disintegrated from within and passed into the dustbin of history. The Soviet Empire in Eastern Europe that Stalin had imposed in the aftermath of Second World War began to crumble in 1989 and 1990, as the communist regimes in Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary and Romania were replaced with democratic-oriented governments. The collapse of the Iron Curtain that had divided the European continent since 1945 was symbolized most dramatically with the tearing down of the Berlin Wall in November of 1989. (See my article, "The Berlin Wall and the Spirit of Freedom.") The, then, head of the Soviet Communist Party, Mikhail Gorbachev, was hailed in the West as an enlightened communist reformer who wished to create a new Soviet "socialism-with-a-human-face." Dr. Richard M. Ebeling is the BB&T Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel in Charleston, SC.
Published in: EpicTimes.com
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Friday
January 22, 2016
4. Companies increasingly using podcasts as communication tool
Last year, President Barack Obama, with Secret Service agents in tow, visited the garage where WTF with Marc Maron is recorded to speak into a microphone about his mother's core values. The year before, Arnold Schwarzenegger talked about the importance of never taking "no" for an answer while recording an episode on Nerdist Podcast, and Marilyn Manson discussed his views on the Bible during The Bret Easton Ellis Podcast. Interested listeners downloaded or streamed those podcasts, along with countless others, to their smartphones, tablets and computers... What Leaders Say: Tony Berenyi, president of Charleston-based Berenyi Inc., launched a podcast titled What Leaders Say in late 2015. He doesn't discuss his company or the architecture, engineering and construction industry it encompasses. Instead, he interviews business leaders - Jim Wigfall, a vice president at Boeing Co.; Lt. Gen. John Rosa, president of The Citadel; Curtis Loftis, South Carolina's state treasurer; and Eric Meyer, founder of Meyer Kapp & Associates Real Estate have been guests - about how they moved up the corporate ladder, their failures along the way and the qualities a good leader should possess. His most recent book, The Code, which is based on six years of leadership research by Berenyi, is occasionally mentioned in the podcast. "It would be selfish to not share my years of wisdom. I'm not saying it's right, but the thing is each individual can form their own opinion of 'I like that concept and that works for me,' or 'I don't like that concept,'" Berenyi said.
Published in: Charleston Regional Business Journal
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Friday
January 22, 2016
5. Things to Do Friday, January 22, 2016
Hot Stove Banquet - What: Join the RiverDogs and the Charleston community to welcome "Hall of Famer" Ryne Sandberg to the 12th Annual Hot Stove Banquet. The banquet, an event designed to bring baseball enthusiasts all together in one room, includes a silent auction, photo and autograph opportunities, a plated dinner and a Q&A with Sandberg. Proceeds benefit The Citadel, College of Charleston and Charleston Southern baseball programs, as well as the Singleton Memorial Fund. When: 6 p.m. Where: Crystal Ballroom, Charleston Marriott, 170 Lockwood Blvd., Charleston Price: $70 per person; $680 for a table of 10
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Friday
January 22, 2016
6. Gamecocks' new assistant coach Lance Thompson moves closer to Citadel roots
To Lance Thompson, the four best things about the Palmetto State are a Lowcountry boil, the Carolina Cup steeplechase, beach music and South Carolina football. "Maybe not in that order," he said with a grin. He may have spent much of his professional life elsewhere, but South Carolina has always called to Thompson - never more than when Will Muschamp became the Gamecocks' new head football coach and hired Thompson as a top defensive assistant. After stints at four other SEC schools, he's finally back in the state where he was a standout defensive end at The Citadel from 1984-87. It didn't take long for the memories to flood back. During Thompson's first days on campus, he chatted with USC athletics director Ray Tanner, a former baseball coach, about facing Citadel legend Chal Port in old College Park. He went driving around Columbia looking for a joint called The Quad where he once saw Hootie and the Blowfish play. Unsuccessfully, as it turned out. "They've gone and knocked it down and built a dadgum building on it," he said. And he's well aware of the legacy left at USC by former head coach Steve Spurrier, who resigned in the middle of a 3-9 campaign just two years removed from the last of three consecutive 11-win seasons.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Friday
January 22, 2016
7. Boutte hits FTs, The Citadel tops Western Carolina 92-91
P.J. Boutte hit two free throws with one second left to lift The Citadel over Western Carolina 92-91 on Thursday night. Justin Browning extended Western Carolina's lead to 89-82 with 2:57 left. The Citadel went on a 6-0 run before Browning's two free throws made it 91-88 with 25 seconds left. Boutte answered with a layup and, after two missed free throws by Western Carolina freshman Elijah Pughsley with eight seconds left, Boutte made two for the win. Western Carolina was just 13 of 27 from the stripe. Quinton Marshall led The Citadel (9-10, 2-4 Southern) with 18 points. He made four of the Bulldogs' 15 3-pointers. Connor Schroeder added three from 3-point range and 15 points. Pughsley had season highs with seven 3-pointers and 26 points to lead Western Carolina (7-12, 2-4). Haboubacar Mutombo had 14 points and 10 rebounds while Browning and Rhett Harrelson each added 12 points.
Broadcast on: CBS Sports
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Thursday
January 21, 2016
1. Dean's List cadets and students announced for fall of 2015
Dean's List is a recognition given to cadets and students who are registered for 12 or more semester hours and whose grade point average is 3.20 or higher, with no grade of I (Incomplete) and no grade below C for work in a semester. In the case of cadets, the medal is worn on the cadet uniform during the following semester. View the article to see the complete list.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Thursday
January 21, 2016
2. Cadets taking top honors in the fall of 2015: Gold Stars
Gold Stars are awarded to cadets who have earned a grade point ratio of 3.7 or higher for the work accomplished in the fall semester of 2015. Members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets who received the honor are included within the article.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Thursday
January 21, 2016
3. Most distinguished cadets named to fall 2015 President's List
The President's List is one of the most distinguished cadet awards presented by The Citadel. It indicates excellence in academics and military duties. The list is a combination of the Dean's List and the Commandant's Distinguished List and is composed of cadets who contribute the most to their companies while maintaining excellent military and academic records. View the article to see the complete list.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Thursday
January 21, 2016
4a. New Citadel coach Brent Thompson wants Bulldogs to 'stick together'
New Citadel football coach Brent Thompson earned a degree in peace, war and diplomacy while at Norwich University, "The Military College of Vermont." Thompson might need all of those skills as he embarks on his tenure as the 25th head football coach at The Citadel. Thompson, 39, was introduced as the Bulldogs' new coach Wednesday, just one day after former Citadel coach Mike Houston was welcomed as the new coach at James Madison University. Thompson came to The Citadel with Houston from Lenoir-Rhyne two years ago, serving as the Bulldogs' offensive coordinator. In Houston's two seasons, The Citadel went 5-7 in 2014 and 9-4 last year with a Southern Conference title, a playoff victory and an upset win at South Carolina. But that momentum has been threatened during the off-season. The controversial "white hoods" photo - which emerged in the midst of recruiting season and caused one basketball signee to seek a release from his letter of intent - preceded Houston's sudden departure.
Published in: The Post and Courier and other media outlets as coverage continues
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Thursday
January 21, 2016
4b. Sapakoff: The Citadel head coach hire, and a larger race issue
Two of the most popular movies of 2015 - "The Martian" and "Concussion" - a space/sports double-feature that handily reflects on American football culture. Imagine someone from another planet beaming down to watch our authentic national pastime. Surely, one of the first questions: "Why are almost all the players one color and almost all the coaches another color?" The beat goes on at The Citadel, where offensive coordinator Brent Thompson officially replaced Mike Houston as head coach on Wednesday. It would have been nice if school management, reeling from fresh battles with racist symbols, seized the opportunity to make defensive coordinator and Citadel alum Maurice Drayton its first black head coach in a major sport. Unfortunately for college football hiring progress, promoting Thompson makes common sense at best or is a convenient excuse at worst. The 39-year-old Citadel play-caller, not Houston, was responsible for running the triple-option offense that is the Bulldogs' bread-and-butter brand. Between a stunningly successful 9-4 season that included trampling all over South Carolina and with national signing day a few weeks away, the triple-option is critical to Citadel recruiting. Hopefully, The Citadel would have made the same offensive coordinator call if Drayton and Thompson were on opposite sides of the ball.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
January 21, 2016
5. This Week In History, January 18-24, 2016
January 20, 1994 - Shannon Faulkner becomes the first woman to attend classes at The Citadel in South Carolina. Faulkner joins the cadet corps in August 1995 under court order but soon drops out.
Published in: Independent Sentinel
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Thursday
January 21, 2016
6. The Citadel's Walker named Wrestler of the Week
The Citadel's Aaron Walker has been named the Arby's Southern Conference Wrestler of the Week for all competition from Jan. 13-19. The selection is made by the league office. Walker went 2-0 at 157 pounds last week, picking up bonus points in both of his bouts. The junior from San Antonio, Texas, picked up a 17-5 major decision over SoCon foe SIUE's Eric Travers on Sunday in Edwardsville, Ill., and followed that up with a pin of Northern Illinois' Andrew Scott in 3:29 in the neutral-site dual. Walker moved to 17-5 on the season, including a perfect 9-0 dual record and a 2-0 SoCon mark. He has four pins on the year. The Citadel (4-5, 1-1 SoCon) returns to the mat when it hosts Appalachian State (8-2, 3-0 SoCon) at 6 p.m. Wednesday for a league dual that can be seen live on the SoCon Digital Network. Also nominated: Austin McNeill (Campbell), John Fahy (SIUE), Michael Pongracz (Chattanooga) and Dalton Henderson (VMI).
Published in: SoConSports.com
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Thursday
January 21, 2016
7. Bulldogs Drop SoCon Dual
The Citadel wrestling team fell to No. 25 Appalachian State 31-13 on Wednesday evening inside McAlister Field House. After a 30-minute delay due to technical difficulties, the match began with Caleb Smith (0-12) and Irvin Enriquez at 133 pounds. Enriquez won by technical default, giving Appalachian State (9-2, 4-0) a 5-0 lead. The Citadel dropped the 141-pound bout by tech fall as well, making it 10-0 Mountaineers. Matt Frisch (15-7) was the next Bulldog on the mat at 149 pounds and got on the board quickly with a two-point takedown. Matt Zovistoski tallied two escapes to even the score at 2-2 in the second period. After two stalls were called on the Mountaineers, Frisch earned another point to take a 3-2 lead into the third period. The senior added to his lead with 1:30 remaining the third period, recording a two-point reversal to make it 5-2 and then securing the riding time point to take the 6-2 decision and put the first points on the board for The Citadel. With three weight classes complete, Appalachian State still held the lead 10-3. At 157 pounds, Southern Conference Wrestler of the Week Aaron Walker (18-5) held a 5-3 lead heading into the third period after recording a two-point takedown right before the buzzer in the second period. The junior then picked up his fifth pin of the season to decrease the Mountaineers lead to just one. Walker is now 10-0 in duals and 3-0 in the SoCon.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Thursday
January 21, 2016
8. GC Hokie Clubhouse: Ok, It's time for Virginia Tech Baseball Season
There is another season of sports about to start off. The balls are round, the field is a diamond, and the game is baseball. Yes, the Virginia Tech Hokies Baseball team starts off their 2016 season with a road trip to Charleston, South Carolina, in the dead of Winter; but the first pitch is February 19th at 5pm. Better roast those peanuts and eat 'em warm. Ok, Folks Football Season is a Wrap and it's time for Baseball. It's time to find the picker, money for peanuts, and a good mechanical pencil for filling out the score card because in less than a month it's time to head to the ballpark for BASEBALL! The Virginia Tech Hokies take to the diamond for the first time in the 2016 season on February 19. They travel to Charleston, South Carolina to play the Citadel in a non-conference three game series. It's always tough to open on the road, and I bet it's going to be tougher this season since even a trip to South Carolina won't do much to help the very late arriving winter weather. So, in an effort to cover other Virginia Tech sports with a more complete schedule of articles, we at Gobbler Country proudly introduce the GC Hokie Clubhouse. We are going to do our level best to cover our baseball team, and keep everyone updated on the goings on over at English Field. Who knows, by April or May we might have a regular presence in the stands.
Published in: GobblerCountry.com
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Thursday
January 21, 2016
9. Rifle Match at The Citadel Canceled this Weekend
Due to the impending weather forecast this weekend for the Mid-Atlantic region, Saturday's rifle match at The Citadel has been canceled. It will be determined at a later time if the match will be rescheduled for another date or canceled from the schedule completely. For updates on the status of the match, continue to check periodically the VMI rifle team schedule pages on vmikeydets.com. The Keydets are slated to host North Georgia in a dual on post next Saturday, Jan. 30, at Kilbourne Hall.
Published in: VMIKeydets.com
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Wednesday
January 20, 2016
1a. Citadel names Brent Thompson new head football coach
The Citadel wasted little time in replacing former football coach Mike Houston. Just a couple of hours after Houston was officially introduced at James Madison on Tuesday - and just a day after his departure - The Citadel announced that offensive coordinator Brent Thompson will be the Bulldogs' new head coach. The school will hold a 9 a.m. news conference Wednesday to formally introduce Thompson, who spent the last two seasons as the Bulldogs' offensive coordinator under Houston. The choice for athletic director Jim Senter and Citadel president Lt. Gen. John Rosa came down to one of two coordinators on staff - Thompson or defensive coordinator Maurice Drayton. Drayton, a 1998 graduate of The Citadel working his second stint as a Bulldog assistant, would have been the first African-American head coach in a major sport at The Citadel. Thompson and Drayton were both interviewed Monday, and both met Tuesday with Rosa. In the end, the pick was Thompson, a 1998 graduate of another military school, Norwich University. "(Thompson) has been the architect of our highly successful triple option offense, which we consider part of our identity here," Senter said in statement. "He has experience as a coordinator at three different institutions and directed one of the best rushing offenses in FCS each of the last two seasons."
Published in: The Post and Courier and as published by multiple media outlets
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Wednesday
January 20, 2016
1b. Citadel head coach Houston leaves for James Madison
Hardly two years since being introduced as head coach of The Citadel, Mike Houston has moved on. Houston was hired Monday as head coach of James Madison University, an FCS school in the Colonial Athletic Association with nearly seven times the enrollment of The Citadel. "We were able to lay the foundation for success, and I have no doubt (The Citadel) will continue building to reach the next level," Houston said in a statement released Monday. "After being approached about the job at James Madison, the more research I did and the more people I met there it became obvious to me that this was a fantastic opportunity." Success came quickly for Houston in his two years leading the Bulldogs. As The Citadel earned it first conference championship since 1992 this season, Houston became the first coach in school history to win a league title within his first two seasons. The 2015 Southern Conference Coach of the Year led The Citadel to a 9-4 overall record this year, its second-best single-season win total in program history. The Bulldogs' six conference wins tied the school record and its road playoff win in the first round of the FCS playoffs was The Citadel's first ever.
Published in: Moultrie News and other media outlets as coverage continues
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Wednesday
January 20, 2016
2. The college where students go on to earn the most money in every state
Salary potential isn't the only factor to consider when narrowing down potential colleges - but with college tuition continually on the rise, it's nice to know which schools are paying off in the long run. In a recent report, the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce looked at the four-year colleges whose students go on to earn the highest salaries after graduating. The report used the US Department of Education's College Scorecard to highlight the median earnings of students from over 1,400 colleges 10 years after starting their studies. Here, we've highlighted the single school from each state where students go on to earn the most, as well as how much students pay annually between tuition, required fees, room, and board, from CollegeBoard. For public colleges, we've listed annual costs for both in and out-of-state students. South Carolina: The Citadel - Charleston, South Carolina - Annual cost (in-state): $19,405 - Annual cost (out-of-state): $39,821 - Median earnings 10 years after enrolling: $52,500
Published in: Business Insider
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Wednesday
January 20, 2016
3. Westview grad Timothy Smith names director of music at The Citadel
The distance from Weakley County to Charleston, S.C., where the world-famous military college The Citadel is located, is around 560 miles. That is normally an 11-hour drive, but it took Westview High School graduate Timothy Smith more than 30 years to get there. Admittedly, he made several hundred stops all over the world before his arrival at the well-known military school, where he became the director of music at the beginning of this year. Lt. Col. Timothy Smith, a 1978 Westview graduate, was recently selected to lead the prestigious Citadel Regimental Band and Pipes. He has served in the U.S. Marine Corps for more than 30 years and held a variety of positions including instrumentalist, officer in charge and director for the Marine Corps bands in New Orleans; Albany, Ga.; Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii; and Twentynine Palms, Calif. He has performed all over the world in those bands, from New Zealand to Russia, and he credits the Martin community and a particular Westview teacher with helping him start his career as a high school musician. "Phil Hatler, who was the band teacher at Westview while I was there, helped me tremendously," said Smith. "When I got to my senior year, I had more than enough credits to graduate. Mr. Hatler took control of my schedule and scheduled me in the band room with him for an hour every day and made me practice. He essentially taught me privately for the whole year. He had such devotion for what he was doing, and apparently he recognized a little something in me, too."
Published in: Weakley County Press

Wednesday
January 20, 2016
4. Outer West Ashley residents blame development for drainage, flooding problems
The city of Charleston says rampant development isn't the cause of flooding in outer West Ashley, but many residents aren't buying it. And Everard "Rod" Rutledge is among them. Rutledge's house in the Hickory Farms neighborhood off Bees Ferry Road filled with 3 1/2 feet of water during the massive flood in early October. He lost everything and still hasn't been able to move back in. Rutledge said he and his neighbors for years have been reaching out to public officials, telling them that drainage and flooding problems were getting worse in the area, which he attributes to more homes being built, the widening of Bees Ferry Road and construction on the West Ashley Circle. But local officials have been condescending, he said, and have told the residents they are overreacting... Michael Woo, a civil and environmental engineering professor at The Citadel who focuses on development, hydrology and flooding, said that when roads, parking lots and other impervious surfaces are built, they create more runoff. But Woo, who has not worked with the city on the Church Creek Watershed, said cities generally have effective master plans for development that require developers to mitigate runoff problems, mostly by building retention ponds. City spokesman Jack O'Toole said the city, under the leadership of Mayor John Tecklenburg, who took office last week, will review the matter. "It's an opportunity for a fresh set of eyes to see what's possible."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
January 20, 2016
5. Letter: It's easy to pretend in a voice mail
While I can fully appreciate that everyone has an opinion about something, one cannot fully expect truth and veracity from "TalkBack," where one leaves voice messages in lieu of a written letter. The poster claims to be a 1981 graduate of The Citadel and isn't familiar with social media. Apparently, as an alleged "graduate," he isn't familiar with The Citadel, either. As a graduate of the Class of 1991, I have no idea what a "Citadel undergraduate" is. Apparently, he hasn't seen the media tempest over the college in the past few months to be suddenly finding this out. I know of no graduate, cadet, or any person who chose to depart the college before graduating who hasn't. As a still-serving Lieutenant Colonel in the USAR, I do not know of any "full Colonels," and work with a whole bunch of Colonels. I fully understand that the posting was a voice message edited for printing in limited space, but we had to have at least one of the same English professors. I can think of three who would have taken him to task for being a whiner. Two of them were actual Infantry officers. I think that the Aiken Standard has recognized another faker. In this day and age of 15 years of endless war, I've seen a lot of people claiming to be what they're not. There's a lot of "Marine Green Beret SEAL Sniper Space Shuttle Door Gunner Medics." Lots of 'em. It's scary easy to claim to be something on the telephone.
Published in: Aiken Standard
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Wednesday
January 20, 2016
6. Friends of the Daniel Library Lecture: Tragedy and Triumph, author Cadet Chad Williams
Date: Tuesday, Jan. 26 Time: 6:45 p.m. Free admission and parking, open to the public Location: Museum Reading Room, Daniel Library, The Citadel Tragedy and Triumph tells the story of Cambodia's genocide through their faces and their stories. It is by giving voice and shedding light on those who have survived that this book aims to give testament to an entire generation of Cambodians and by doing so, show that Cambodia's story is not just one of Tragedy, but also of Triumph. Chad Williams is a freshman, Political Science and French double major, from Kilo Company at The Citadel. Originally from Chapel Hill, North Carolina, Williams has spent the majority of his life growing up overseas and spent a year before coming to The Citadel working and traveling between Dubai and South East Asia. Upon graduation, Williams plans on commissioning in the Army as an intelligence officer. For more information please call (843)953-6902.
Published in: TheDigitel.com
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Wednesday
January 20, 2016
7. Tobacco in Tow
When a 34-foot Airstream trailer popped up on Craigslist in Greenville last winter, Frank Robertson didn't waste a second. "I called the guy at 7 p.m. and said, 'I'd like to see it tonight,'" he recalls. By midnight, he and friend Taylor Bostwick owned the Airstream and immediately began converting it into Southern Smoke, their mobile cigar lounge that's been popping up this fall at weddings and events like the grand opening of The Cedar Room and Mercantile and Mash at the Cigar Factory. Guests can purchase cigars from the six-foot cabinet humidor and relax in the lounge, which features a custom exhaust system and seating for 16 in club chairs and built-in benches. Robertson's love affair with cigars began at age 15, when he puffed on his first-a Padrpn 64 from Nicaragua-in a barn behind his family's home in Texas. They helped him relax while on active duty in the Air Force, and he soon hatched the idea of Southern Smoke as a retirement plan. A friendship with fellow Texan and Citadel student Bostwick (a Naval serviceman) kicked that plan into high gear. By last summer, Robertson had left his job at Benefitfocus to devote himself full-time to his passion. And it's a family affair: his wife, Abbey, handles booking and PR, and Bostwick's wife, Jenna, manages marketing. Robertson and Bostwick will each graduate from The Citadel this spring, but "My goal is to not ever use my degree," Robertson admits. "I'm going to work my fingers to the bone to make sure Southern Smoke thrives."
Published in: CharlestonMag.com
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Wednesday
January 20, 2016
8. Five Teams Still Seeking Their First N.C.A.A. Tournament Berth
For a men's basketball team like Duke, with 20 straight trips, going to the N.C.A.A. tournament is a given. Other teams have waited for a return to the tournament for years: Columbia since 1968, and Rice since 1970. But there are five teams that do not even have ancient history to look back upon with satisfaction. William & Mary, Army, Northwestern, St. Francis of Brooklyn and The Citadel are all original members of Division I that have never played in the tournament. That could change this year; at least three of those teams have a real chance of breaking the jinx. Here is a look at the five teams, in order of likelihood of success (all records and statistics through Monday's games).
Published in: The New York Times
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Wednesday
January 20, 2016
9. Martha Rose O'Brien Willis Obituary
Martha Rose O'Brien Willis, age 93, of 2734 E. Oakland Avenue, Johnson City died January 15, 2016, at Christian Care, Johnson City. Rose's life will be celebrated in a memorial service at the Covenant Presbyterian Church, 605 Sunset Drive on Sunday, January 24, 2016 at 2:30 p.m. The family will greet friends from 1:00 p.m. until the service at the church. Rose was born in Jamesport, MO to Charlie B. O'Brien and Louise Bedford O'Brien and grew up in Omaha, NE. She was predeceased by her sisters, Lila Petersen and Annice O'Brien of Omaha, NE; her brother, Bud O'Brien of Omaha; and her sister, Betty Marshall of Arlington, VA. After high school, Rose and two of her siblings joined the Marines and served in the Pacific Theater. Upon the completion of her military service with the rank of sergeant, she matriculated at the University of Miami where she earned her Bachelor of Business Administration and met her life's companion, C.B. Following their marriage, Rose worked at Holston Ordinance before starting her family and becoming a full time homemaker. Following her husband's transfer to South Carolina, Rose taught accounting in a variety of schools, both public and private. Ultimately she earned her MBA from the Citadel in Charleston, SC and was an accounting instructor at East Tennessee State University for many years.
Published in: Johnson City Press
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Tuesday
January 19, 2016
1. James Madison hires The Citadel's Mike Houston
Mike Houston, who led The Citadel to just the fourth winning season in its history, is the new head coach at James Madison University. JMU Athletics Director Jeff Bourne announced Houston's hiring Monday evening. Houston posted a 14-11 record in two seasons as head coach at The Citadel. His 2015 team was 9-4, including a 23-22 upset of South Carolina in the season finale. The Bulldogs tied for the Southern Conference championship and advanced to the second round of the FCS playoffs. Before joining The Citadel, Houston was 29-8 in three seasons as head coach at Division II Lenoir-Rhyne. At James Madison, he succeeds Everett Withers, who resigned to accept the head coaching job at Texas State.
Published in: The Washington Times and as published by multiple media outlets
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Tuesday
January 19, 2016
2. Learning about Heroes on Leadership Day in Charleston
Please follow the link and click to download the February issue. There is a lot happening in Charleston, South Carolina when it comes to people helping each other. For example, each year, The Citadel, which is The Military College of South Carolina, holds what they call Leadership Day. Everyone in the college's Corps of Cadets spends the day learning about how to be a leader by serving others, and by studying how to make ethical decisions. Team Backpack Journalists got to follow cadets around and participate in the painting of the new Charleston Strong mural. We call these outings, "Cover the assignment." This was our first field trip to The Citadel campus. We were able to choose what we would cover. We decided to go with cadets who were visiting classrooms to lead writing projects with our classmates about heroes. We especially wanted to be a part of the dedication of a community mural The Citadel was creating to honor nine people who were killed last June at a church in our city. There was a lot of briefing going on. We learned that the military uses the term "briefing" instead of the word "explaining." We had lots to accomplish. First, we were met by Lt. Col. Randall Adcock who was in charge of Run for a Reason, one of dozens of Leadership Day events. The cadets in the marathon raised money for local agencies that help people.
Published in: Story Monsters Ink, monthly family magazine featuring award-winning and debut books, profiles on both renowned and newly published authors, upcoming book events, author presentations and more.
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Tuesday
January 19, 2016
3. One-armed Citadel cadet pushes on
As seen in the Greenville News and GreenvilleOnline.com, January 15, 2016 - by Nathaniel Cary - On June 6, 2014, Cameron Massengale's life changed forever. He wouldn't say it then, but today, he says it changed for the better. Massengale, a J.L. Mann High School graduate from Greenville, had just completed his freshman knob year at The Citadel, a rigorous year designed to strip cadets at the military academy of their individuality. He returned to Greenville and took a summer job at a local butcher shop, where one evening he was told to clean the auger on the meat grinder. While his arm was inside the auger compartment, the grinder turned on. Massengale lost his dominant right hand and wrist. Then he fought infection and spent nearly a month in the hospital. He emerged from the hospital a month later having lost more than his hand. He'd lost his career path (he's wanted to fly helicopters in the Army). He'd lost the ability to hunt and fish and lift weights and even to write and dress himself. "I had a lot of frustrations," Massengale said. He was propelled onward by the near-constant encouragement of his "brotherhood" at The Citadel, who wanted him to return to school, and by the new challenge to learn how to use a variety of artificial arms and to re-learn everyday tasks.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Tuesday
January 19, 2016
4. Citadel AD on 'white hoods' photo: 'We'll address it head on'
Citadel athletic director Jim Senter spoke to a group of football recruits and their parents who were visiting the military school's campus on Saturday morning. Yes, the subject of the "white hoods" photos came up. "I addressed it head on," Senter said Saturday. "And that's what we have to do." Those photos - pictures of Citadel cadets wearing pillowcases over their heads while singing Christmas carols - garnered national publicity when they emerged on social media last month. Many believed the cadets resembled members of the Ku Klux Klan, and school president Lt. Gen. John Rosa suspended the cadets involved. A school investigation is ongoing. The incident impacted the athletics department last week when basketball signee Mohammed Kabir asked to be released from his letter of intent with The Citadel. The native of Nigeria cited that incident as his reason. In an interview Saturday, Senter discussed the potential impact of the incident on his department. He said no other recruits in any sports have asked to be released, and that the school is reviewing Kabir's request.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
January 19, 2016
5. Letter: Lessons for Citadel cadets
The behavior of Citadel cadets involved in the recent "ghost" incident was highly reprehensible. It was unworthy of those who are striving to represent the best of our country. Today gentlemen and scholars are not members or imitators of the Ku Klux Klan and its associated white supremacist organizations. When I was growing up, I saw on the television news many reports of their evil. Fortunately that is rarely the case today. When any of my relatives indicated that they might move to the South, a common question was: Is it safe to live there? For 11 years I lived with my parents in Southeast Washington, D.C. After my brother was born, we moved to a bigger apartment in 1949. As a typical five year old, I explored the neighborhood looking for children to play with. This is how I came to meet Jessie, whose father was the building superintendent. For several weeks we had fun together. We exchanged home visits. My parents did not have problems with Jessie being black. But one night my father, with an unhappy look, told me not to play with Jessie again. It was one of those times a small child can only accept what he had been told. After that, even when I played with other children near his parents' apartment, Jessie never appeared. When I was older I learned that KKK groups had been operating in nearby southern Maryland during this period.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
January 19, 2016
6a. For the 2016 race, Charleston proves it's 'a tale of two cities'
When folks talk about this bucolic, quintessentially Southern city, they often do so in terms of its vast contradictions. Its history is steeped in pride and tradition, but also the stain of American chattel slavery. It is home to The Citadel, a shining star that exemplifies the best of our nation's scholar-warriors. But it's also home to the Port of Charleston, from which an estimated 40 percent of African-Americans can trace their ancestors' welcome to this country in bondage. With that history very much part of the fabric of local culture and lore, Charleston was magnanimous last June following the killings of nine black churchgoers at the hands of a young white supremacist who interrupted a Bible study with gunfire. To lean on a well-trod cliche, Charleston truly embodies the "Tale of Two Cities" trope. The same could be said for the city's voters. In the 2012 presidential election between President Barack Obama and his Republican rival Mitt Romney, 50.4 percent voted for Obama and 48 percent voted for Romney. When the Democratic candidates vying for the presidency take the debate stage in Charleston on Sunday night, they'll find in their base of support (and their opposition) a complicated amalgam of ideals.
Published in: MSNBC.com
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Tuesday
January 19, 2016
6b. Rick Santorum To Tea Party: 'Don't Act Out Of Anger'
GOP presidential candidate former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum told the South Carolina Tea Party Coalition Convention attendees to "not act out of anger" when electing the next President of the United States. "I understand you want to fight. You want to do something different," he said, adding "there's a difference between fighting and anger," he told the Tea Party supporters gathered here. "lease pray and do the right thing. Don't act out of anger," he said. The country "is in need of big changes," he said, while urging attendees to pick an experienced conservative. If conservatives are concerned about being disappointed after sending someone to Washington, that "if that is a concern of yours, then why would you for President of the United States support someone who has no record?"... Santorum told the Tea Party supporters to "channel that anger" and elect someone who can fight and win. Before ending his speech, Santorum introduced two of his family members from The Citadel in South Carolina who joined him at the event. "Please pray and do the right thing. Don't act out of anger," he told the crowd before exiting the stage.
Published in: Breitbart.com
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Tuesday
January 19, 2016
6c. King Day celebration no longer in shadow of Confederate flag
For the first time in 17 years, the divisive Confederate battle flag cast no shadow over the thousands gathered at the Statehouse Monday to honor the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. in a moving tribute that included the three Democratic presidential candidates. For Howard Rogers of Cheraw, the sight was something he'd waited for every year that he's attended the South Carolina NAACP's King Day at the Dome event. The battle flag finally came down last summer after a white supremacist fatally shot nine black worshippers at Emanuel AME Church in Charleston in June. "I'm a Vietnam veteran and I do believe whenever you lose the battle you take the flag down," Rogers said. "It always hurt my heart to see that flag still flying because it's assumed that we're still operating under what that flag represents... we're one now." While education equality was the focus of the King Day event, many remarks centered around the inequality that still exists in society. The Democratic candidates for president, fresh from the debate stage in Charleston, all urged the crowd to carry on the work and spirit of the famed civil rights leader, who was killed in 1968. Photo: Dmitri Ford traveled from Charleston to celebrate Martin Luther King and the removal of the Confederate battle flag from the Statehouse grounds during the King Day at the Dome event on Monday at the State House in Columbia. Ford carried a sign calling for the removal of the flag at The Citadel.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
January 19, 2016
7a. Attention to detail keeps Berlin's in business for 133 years
Charleston is full of landmarks. The majority revolve around where something happened or a place that is a remnant of something that once was. There are a few of us "old-timers" around that survived a hurricane in 1989. But what business can claim they not only survived a hurricane, but also the earthquake of 1886? Oh yeah, and that business is still operating in the same location. In 1883, Henry Berlin came from Europe with $1.38 in his pocket and established a store at King and Broad streets. This store is now being run by great-grandchildren. Steve Berlin and his sister, Elaine, took over the business in 2004. They're fourth-generation Berlins. Their father, also named Henry, is now 91. It was Henry, along with brother, Alwyn, who took over the business in 1958. Alwyn died in 1978, leaving Henry to run things until he retired 11 years ago. It was Henry, the grandson of the founder, who gave this store its personality. Even today, Henry stops by to needle old friends, customers and the employees. Nobody is safe or off limits. Steve Berlin, 56, grew up in the store. He cleaned bathrooms, worked in the warehouse and made deliveries. His earliest memory is coming to the store about the age of 8. For some reason, he was mesmerized by the attention to detail of the tailors. He seemed suited for the family business, though he really never thought that's where he'd end up. Part of Steve's reluctance to become part of the family business was a feeling that he could never measure up to his father's outgoing personality. They were different people. Steve was considered "the quiet one." After graduating from The Citadel, Steve was set to leave for Dallas for his first job. His dad's sickness, though, forced him to stay in Charleston and help keep everything squared away in the store.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
January 19, 2016
7b. Highlighting the humor in the paramedic's world of blood and gore
It's the summer of 1997, Kevin Hazzard was leading a Jet Ski tour when he heard two riders collide. Thud. He zipped toward the wreckage, unsure of what to expect, and found the riders floating in red water. One looked surprised. The other was missing his mouth. Hazzard, then a teenager, had never witnessed such gore. He didn't stay calm. He didn't swiftly summon help. He did, instead, what bystanders are asked not to do in an emergency: He panicked. "A Thousand Naked Strangers," his memoir of 10 years as a paramedic in accident-prone Atlanta, is a wild, winding ride toward redemption. The author makes up for his inaction that day. He faces eyeball-eating maggots; an elbow nailed to a plaster wall; skull fragments beneath his tennis shoes; the jagged, crimson smile of a man whose face just met a chainsaw; and a drugged-out patient with wandering hands: "Dude has grabbed my nuts." If these images make you queasy, don't climb into his ambulance. Hazzard, a former reporter with a penchant for expletives, writes trauma how he sees it: up close, unvarnished, at warp speed. Think gonzo journalism meets emergency-room noir. He's a reluctant voyeur of someone's worst day, every day. This coming-of-age story, equal parts earnest and irreverent, begins shortly after Sept. 11, 2001. Hazzard, a graduate of The Citadel, a military college in South Carolina, watches his college buddies deploy to Iraq. They're off risking their lives, testing their manhood. He chose to follow his writing passion and became a journalist, often stuck in snoozy city council meetings, still haunted by the Jet Ski crash.
Published in: Washington Post
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Tuesday
January 19, 2016
7c. Minnesota Super Bowl Host Committee Expands Team Preparing for Super Bowl LII
Alex Tittle joins as Vice President of Business Connect and Corporate Affairs. Alex is charged with heading the NFL's supplier diversity program for Super Bowl LII, Business Connect, as well as outreach to the business community across the state. Since July 2013, Alex has served as the Equity Director for the Minnesota Sports Facility Authority (MSFA), focused on executing an equity plan related to the workforce, small and disadvantaged businesses taking part in construction of U.S. Bank Stadium. Previously, he served as Director for the Office of Civil Rights at the Minnesota Department of Transportation; in the leadership of Summit Academy OIC; and served 10 years in the US Army as an Intelligence Analyst and Transportation Officer, ending his Army career as an Aviation Company Commander. Alex will join the Committee full-time in May; until then, also serving as an independent contractor to the MSFA. Alex grew up a military dependent, earning his BS from The Citadel, Military College of South Carolina; an MA in Management from Webster University, and an MA in Human Resources from Webster University.
Published in: Yahoo Finance and multiple media outlets
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Tuesday
January 19, 2016
8. Beast Fiction: Dying to Save the World
Fiction: He was an all-American boy on a Rhodes scholarship. She was royalty from a dangerous part of the world. He thought he'd lost her... until the CIA showed up on his doorstep. They were waiting for him at the 8.4 mile turnaround of his long run. There the trail came out at the picnic area off of State Highway 40. It was near a marsh and, this time of year, the mosquitos were thick. No one seemed to use the few battered tables and concrete barbecue pit. But they were there when he came out of the woods, sweating hard, looking forward to a drink from the water fountain that was surprisingly cool and strong. On the long runs, he always had a drink at the halfway spot. Both men sat on a picnic table, a cheap Styrofoam ice chest open with a couple of bottles of Gatorade chilling. The older of the two, about 40, held up a bottle. "Governor, you look hot," he said with a smile. The tall man in a Citadel Corps of Cadets tee shirt that hung on him like a dishcloth stopped, surprised, and pulled earbuds out, shaking his head so that sweat could drain out of his ears.
Published in: The Daily Beast
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Tuesday
January 19, 2016
9a. The Citadel survives to beat Furman, 89-86
Brian White and Derrick Henry each scored 16 points and The Citadel survived a late game comeback attempt by Furman to earn an 89-86 victory on Saturday. The win was the first conference win of the season for The Citadel, snapping a four game Southern Conference losing streak and a six game losing streak overall. Henry also added 10 rebounds and P.J. Boutte had 14 points for The Citadel (8-10, 1-4). The Bulldogs led by double digits much of the second half, and a Henry free throw gave them an 87-77 lead with 36 seconds left. But a Daniel Fowler 3-point play sparked a 7-0 Furman run which, after a pair of Devin Sibley free throws, trimmed the lead to 87-86 with four seconds left. Two Boutte free throws however pushed it back to three and sealed the game. Stephen Croone had 22 points for Furman (9-10, 3-3).
Published in: USA Today
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Tuesday
January 19, 2016
9b. Auburn men's tennis takes 2 from The Citadel
Auburn started its spring season Friday with a pair of wins against The Citadel at the Yarbrough Tennis Center. Auburn won the first match 7-0 and captured the second match by a 7-0 score. In the morning match, Auburn made quick work of the Bulldogs in doubles, sweeping all three matches. Joseph Van Dooren and Conner Huertas del Pino defeated Jackson Pride and Connor Grady, 6-3, at No. 3, and Marko Krickovic, paired with Brandon Laubser, topped Artemie Amari and Nicholas Bradley, 6-2, at No. 1 singles to clinch the doubles point. Max Hinnisdaels and Olle Thestrup defeated Matthew Henson and Michael Anzalone, 6-3, at No. 2 doubles. Auburn won every first set in singles. Conner Huertas del Pino was the first to finish, defeating Matthew Henson, 6-1, 6-1, at No. 3. On court five, redshirt freshman Olle Thestrup won his first singles match at Auburn, topping Michael Anzalone, 6-2, 6-3. Freshman Brandon Laubser also picked up his first win as a Tiger, with a 7-5, 6-2 win over Rob Hobson at No. 4 to clinch the match, and Marko Krickovic won at No. 2, 6-4, 6-1 ,over the Bulldogs' Nicholas Bradley. Finishing play, senior Joseph Van Dooren was a 6-4, 7-5 winner at No. 6 over Jackson Pride, and in a competitive match between the top seeds, Max Hinnisdaels outlasted Artemie Amari, 7-5, 6-4.
Published in: OANow.com
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Tuesday
January 19, 2016
9c. Cougars Post Upset Over The Citadel
Dakota Leach's second-period pin at 133 pounds gave SIUE wrestling an early lead as the Cougars clipped The Citadel 18-16 Sunday in a Southern Conference dual at the Vadalabene Center. It was SIUE's first-ever victory over The Citadel in four meetings against the Bulldogs. SIUE improved to 2-8 overall and 1-3 in the SoCon. The Citadel, which was ranked third in the SoCon preseason poll, fell to 4-4 overall and 1-1 in the SoCon. "It was nice to get a win for our team," said SIUE Head Coach Jeremy Spates. "We had a really close dual last night with Northern Illinois but just came up on the wrong end. Today for our guys to get that first SoCon win, that's really going to build some momentum towards the end of the year." Leach pulled out a pin in 3 minutes, 56 seconds over The Citadel's Caleb Smith. After being taken down in the first period, Smith chose the bottom position in the second period only to be caught in a cradle. "He got the crowd back into it," said Spates. "I think that was a big shift in the momentum."
Published in: SIUECougars.com
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Tuesday
January 19, 2016
9d. Rifle team sets new record with wins in Charleston
No. 6 Air Force swept with two wins and set a new team record in Charleston. Air Force, The Citadel and No. 11 Jacksonville State went head-to-head on Jan. 16-17, in Charleston, S.C. The Citadel was the host for the competition at the Inouye Marksmanship Center. Saturday's match featured the Falcons, Bulldogs and Gamecocks, while Sunday was a dual between the Bulldogs and the Falcons. On Saturday, the Falcons scored a 4684 that tide their previous team record, and on Sunday they set a new team record with a score of 4687. Freshman Spencer Cap was the team's top shooter in both matches. Team highlights: On Saturday, Cap led the team with a 584 in smallbore, followed by junior Ryan Jacobs with a 583. The team fired a smallbore score of 2319 and a 2365 in the air rifle. All four shooters (NCAA official scores) scored a 590 or better. Senior Tyler Rico led the team with an outstanding 593, and freshman Anna Weilbacher fired a 591. The team's top individual scores included Cap with an 1174; his 584 in the smallbore and his aggregate are both personal-best scores. Also finishing with personal-best scores were Jacobs, who had an 1173, and Weilbacher with an 1166. Rico scored an 1171. Team scoring on Saturday had Air Force with a 4684, The Citadel (4413), Jacksonville State (4413), and The Citadel women (4334).
Published in: GoAirForceFalcons.com
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Tuesday
January 19, 2016
9e. Citadel football recruits
Notes: Dutch Fork quarterback Cole Douglas visited Dartmouth over the weekend. Douglas will visit The Citadel next weekend. Douglas' father, Jack, is a former Citadel quarterback. Douglas threw for 2,050 yards and rushed for 1,101 yards with 30 total touchdowns this season. Irmo defensive back Phillip Barrett committed to The Citadel over the weekend. Barrett was a North-South All-Star selection.
Published in: The State
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Tuesday
January 19, 2016
9f. High school notebook: Conway's Martin narrows college choices to three
One of the last big pieces of the area's 2016 football recruiting class is approaching a decision on his college choice. Conway running back Jah'Maine Martin said Monday that he has narrowed his final three schools down to Coastal Carolina, The Citadel and Western Carolina. He has already taken official visits to the first two, and he'll round out the list with a trip to Western Carolina this weekend. He'll announce his final decision some point after that trip but prior to National Signing Day on Feb. 3. "My main thing is the degree," Martin said, describing what he was looking for. "When I graduate from college, will I just be sitting around looking for a job or will they help me find a job? What is the level of the degree? The second thing is the environment, talking to people around campus. The third thing is football, what the coach is like, kind of playbook, what's the big idea behind the program." Martin also originally had offers from Army, South Carolina State, Alabama A&M, Gardner-Webb and Old Dominion, although ODU backed off following an early commitment from Myrtle Beach tailback Brandon Sinclair. As for the others, the relatively fast recruiting process didn’t allow him much time to mess around with his options.
Published in: Myrtle Beach Online
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Tuesday
January 19, 2016
9g. Lexington standout Nick Graves commits to Charleston Southern
Nick Graves will play college football in Charleston after all. After decommitting from The Citadel last week, the Lexington Shrine Bowl defensive back committed to Charleston Southern on Saturday after making his official visit. "It has everything I want: a great coaching staff, family environment, academic opportunities and an ability to deepen my faith," Graves said. Graves had 38 tackles and two interceptions for the Wildcats, who advanced to the Class 4A Division II title championship game. CSU is coming off its best season in school history and went 10-3. The Buccaneers finished ranked in the STATS FCS poll and No. 7 in the FCS coaches poll.
Published in: The State
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Tuesday
January 19, 2016
9h. Huesman MVP of Tropic Bowl
Former Mocs quarterback Jacob Huesman, the three-time Southern Conference offensive player of the year who completed his senior season this past fall, was named MVP of the Tropic Bowl on Sunday in Miami, Fla. Stats were not available, but Huesman reportedly threw for a touchdown and ran for another in the senior showcase as his team won 38-14. The first-year game had representatives from the Power 5 conferences along with some of the top Football Championship Subdivision players, and there were reportedly 27 NFL teams scouting talent at the game. Two other SoCon players were on the game's rosters: Samford kicker Anthony Pistelli and defensive end Mitchell Jeter of The Citadel. "I had a blast," Huesman said in a release. "It was fun to get out there and compete. I enjoyed getting to know guys from the other teams and see how I measured up against players from the SEC and ACC."
Published in: TimesFreePress.com
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Friday
January 15, 2016
1a. Upcoming News from The Citadel - end of January, Black History Month and February
Events include: Krause Center and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Week of Service, Friends of the Daniel Library lecture and book signing: State of the Heart: South Carolina Writers on the Places They Love; an evening with editor and writer Aida Rogers, and contributors Herb Frazier, Harlan Greene, Ben Moise and Susan Millar Williams, South Carolina Business Development Center QuickBooks Level I & II Workshops, Blitz Kids and Pack the Mac vs. VMI, Black History Month Bazaar, The Zucker Family School of Education celebrates Black History Month with Authors in Schools Initiative, Dr. Peter Skerry discussion: "Muslim Immigration Today: Facts and Context," Dr. Peter Skerry discussion: "Immigration from Mexico in the Early 21st Century: Trends and Context," Discussion with Angela W. Williams on her book: Hush Now, Baby, Storm The Citadel 2016, Friends of the Daniel Library present Celebrating Black History Month: Requiem for Rice dialogue, Black History Quiz Bowl, Phi Kappa Phi Induction Ceremony, Discussion with Dr. Marcus Cox on the contributions to African American history by those who served in domestic roles, South Carolina Association of Accounting Educators Conference, 2016 Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day and 7th Annual Citadel Directors' Institute.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Friday
January 15, 2016
1b. Celebrating Black History Month 2016 at The Citadel
Events include: Krause Center and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Week of Service, Black History Month Bazaar, The Zucker Family School of Education celebrates Black History Month with Authors in Schools Initiative, Discussion with Angela W. Williams on her book: Hush Now, Baby, Friends of the Daniel Library present Celebrating Black History Month: Requiem for Rice dialogue, Black History Quiz Bowl and a discussion with Dr. Marcus Cox on the contributions to African American history by those who served in domestic roles.
Published in: Moultrie News
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Friday
January 15, 2016
2a. GOP Presidential hopefuls are shifting their attention to South Carolina
With most of the country focused on Iowa and New Hampshire, GOP Presidential hopefuls are shifting their attention to South Carolina - the site of the debate. Weijia Jiang is there with more... "Republican Presidential hopefuls have a lot at stake when they take the stage for tonight's debate in North Charleston. Dr. Scott Buchanan, associate professor of political science at The Citadel says now that we are so close to Iowa, New Hampshire and then we move south to South Carolina, these debates become even more critical. Buchanan is a political expert on voters in the Palmetto State. He says candidates should focus on one group tonight. "In South Carolina, the Republican Primary, about 60 percent of the voters are Evangelical Christians and Trump has lagged behind Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio with Evangelical voters, but take a look at this map... it shows that most searched candidates on Google with a different color assigned to each one, and you're right if you guessed red is Trump's color."
Broadcast on: Norfolk, VA & as published by over 150 CBS stations across the country
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Friday
January 15, 2016
2b. Citadel Cadets In Attendance Get Loudest Cheers At GOP Debate
Around 50 Citadel cadets were in attendance at Thursday night's Fox Business Network GOP presidential debate in Charleston, South Carolina. Former Pennsylvania Senator Rick Santorum asked them to stand and be recognized. The crowd erupted when they arose. Santorum then made his case to the soldiers, contrasting his own foreign policy with that of President Obama's. The current administration, he intoned, has not abandoned our men and women overseas at Benghazi and acquiesces to Iran. The senator made the following pledge: "Let me tell you this, if you choose to serve this country, I will have your back," Santorum said. "I will not let America be trampled anymore by these radical jihadists."
Published in: TownHall.com
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Friday
January 15, 2016
2c. The Reason these Citadel cadets were standing during GOP debate puts it all in perspective
Former Pennsylvania Senator Rick Santorum reminded America of what was at stake during Thursday's Fox Business Network undercard debate. Click to watch the video.
Published in: Independent Journal Review
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Friday
January 15, 2016
2d. Bush Wants to be Conservative Champion in South Carolina Debate
Jeb Bush is framing himself as the champion of the conservative cause heading into the Thursday's Republican primary debate in South Carolina, the state where the former governor has focused more of his campaign's energy in recent weeks. "I'm proud of being a conservative," he said this week. "I want to evangelize about the conservative message." Bush returns to the state just days after attracting one of his largest crowds of the campaign during a town hall in Hilton Head that brought out more than 500 people last Saturday night. The focus on South Carolina includes attracting support from former backers of Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., who suspended his bid for president last month. Bush now touts the backing of 25 former Graham supporters - including two additions just this week - with former state representative Skipper Perry and former president of the Citadel Lt. Gen. Claudius Watts, throwing their support behind the governor.
Published in: NBC News
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Friday
January 15, 2016
3. After Citadel 'white hoods' incident, hoops recruit seeks release from letter-of-intent
A Washington area boys' basketball standout requested a release from his national letter-of-intent at The Citadel in the aftermath of a racial incident at the South Carolina school last month. National Christian senior Mohammed Kabir, an exchange student from Nigeria, sent a letter to the school's athletic department and the NCAA last week in hopes of playing his college basketball elsewhere. Kabir said in an interview he is uncomfortable with the social environment at the elite military college after photos surfaced on social media last month showing cadets singing Christmas Carols while wearing white pillowcases over their heads in costumes that resembled those worn by the Ku Klux Klan. "It was messed up," Kabir said. "I talked to my family and my coach about the situation, and it was not a good move for me because this is not the first time something like this has happened at The Citadel." Kabir signed the letter-of-intent - a binding agreement between a prospective student-athlete and a school - with The Citadel in November during college basketball's early signing period. He must be granted a release to play at another school next season without losing a year of eligibility.
Published in: Washington Post
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Friday
January 15, 2016
4. One-armed Citadel cadet pushes on
On June 6, 2014, Cameron Massengale's life changed forever. He wouldn't say it then, but today, he says it changed for the better. Massengale, a J.L. Mann High School graduate from Greenville, had just completed his freshman knob year at The Citadel, a rigorous year designed to strip cadets at the military academy of their individuality. He returned to Greenville and took a summer job at a local butcher shop, where one evening he was told to clean the auger on the meat grinder. While his arm was inside the auger compartment, the grinder turned on. Massengale lost his dominant right hand and wrist. Then he fought infection and spent nearly a month in the hospital. He emerged from the hospital a month later having lost more than his hand. He'd lost his career path (he's wanted to fly helicopters in the Army). He'd lost the ability to hunt and fish and lift weights and even to write and dress himself. "I had a lot of frustrations," Massengale said. He was propelled onward by the near-constant encouragement of his "brotherhood" at The Citadel, who wanted him to return to school, and by the new challenge to learn how to use a variety of artificial arms and to re-learn everyday tasks. Losing a hand or arm presents psychological challenges in addition to all of the physical challenges, said Jon Nottingham, Massengale's prosthetist at the Hanger Clinic in Greenville.
Published in: Greenville News
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Friday
January 15, 2016
5. Individualism is Battling the Politically Managed Mind in the 21st Century
Wherever we turn we are confronted with politicians, political pundits, television talking heads, and editorial page commentators, all of whom offer an array of plans, programs, and projects that will solve the problems of the world - if only government is given the power and authority to remake society in the design proposed. Written by Richard Ebeling Ph.,D. Even many of those who claim to be suspicious of "big government" and the Washington beltway powers-that-be, invariably offer their own versions of plans, programs, and projects they assert are compatible with or complementary to a free society. The differences too often boil down simply to matters of how the proposer wants to use government to remake or modify people and society. The idea that people should or could be left alone to design, undertake and manage their own plans and interactions with others is sometimes given lip service, but never entirely advocated or proposed in practice. In this sense, all those participating in contemporary politics are advocates of social engineering, that is, the modifying or remaking of part or all of society according to an imposed plan or set of plans. The idea that such an approach to social matters is inconsistent with both individual liberty and any proper functioning of a free society is beyond the pale of political and policy discourse. We live in a time of piecemeal planning and incremental interventionism.
Published in: NassauInstitute.org
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Friday
January 15, 2016
6a. Citadel buzzer-beater misses in 86-83 loss to Wofford
The play was designed for Citadel guard Derrick Henry to knife through an "elevator" screen set by two teammates, take a pass from point guard P.J. Boutte and launch a potential game-tying 3-point shot. Wofford coach Mike Young didn't see that play coming, but his Terriers covered it anyway, denying the ball from Henry and forcing Boutte to settle for a desperation heave at the buzzer. The 30-footer was off target, and Wofford escaped McAlister Field House with an 86-83 win over The Citadel on Thursday night. "It's not a play we run a lot," Citadel basketball coach Duggar Baucom said of that final play. "But credit Wofford, they did a great job of guarding it. We weren't very good at executing it and panicked a little bit. Live and learn, I guess." The Bulldogs have done a lot of painful learning during their current six-game slide, which has dropped them to 7-10 overall and 0-4 in the Southern Conference. The Citadel has trailed by an average of 10.5 points at halftime of their four SoCon losses, including a 35-29 deficit at the break against Wofford (7-10, 4-1). And the Bulldogs have shot better than 26 percent from 3-point range in the first half just once, against Chattanooga. Against the Terriers, The Citadel made just 3 of 16 from 3-point range in the first half, in line with first-half performances in losses to Samford (4 of 19) and Mercer (5 of 19). The Bulldogs are falling into holes they can't climb out of.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Friday
January 15, 2016
6b. Ranking the 10 worst games of the 2015 college football season
8. The Citadel 23, South Carolina 22: It was a tough enough season in Columbia after Steve Spurrier resigned, but then the Gamecocks went and lost to an FCS team running the triple option. It looked like South Carolina was going to survive when Perry Orth hit Pharaoh Cooper for a 94-yard TD... but the play was blown dead for a false start.
Published in: Sports Illustrated
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Friday
January 15, 2016
7. Pee Dee Weekly: Q-A with Carolina Academy boys basketball coach Robert Phillips
Robert Phillips not only works at a Lake City bank, he is head coach of the Carolina Academy boys' basketball team. The Morning News talked with Phillips about what his life is like working those two jobs. Q: How long have you been Carolina Academy's basketball coach? A: I graduated in 2009 from The Citadel, and I became an assistant coach at Carolina Academy in 2009-10. And the year after that, the coach decided to step down, and I became the coach. Q: Where did you go to high school? A: Carolina Academy Q: What sports did you play at Carolina Academy? A: I played football, basketball and baseball. Q: What positions did you play? A: Quarterback my senior year on the football team, point guard in basketball and pitcher/shortstop on the baseball team. Q: What did you major in at The Citadel? A: I majored in health and wellness. Q: How long have you worked at the bank? A: I got started at the bank the summer before I graduated college. They invited me to work part time as a summer employee. Then, around January my senior year in college, they called me and asked if I was interested in joining the bank as a management trainee. So, I talked to my mentor and boss, and he thought that would be a good idea. So, I started in 2009 after I graduated from The Citadel.
Published in: SCNow.com
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Friday
January 15, 2016
8. U-M names Partridge linebackers, special teams coach
A month ago, Michigan football coach Jim Harbaugh said he would do anything he could to keep Chris Partridge on his staff. Today, he proved it. With an open assistant spot following the departure of special teams coach John Baxter, Partridge got that permanent job, adding to his linebackers duties. He had assumed the linebackers role on an interim basis during the Citrus Bowl prep, replacing departed defensive coordinator D.J. Durkin. "Chris has a proven track record as a successful coach," Harbaugh said in a statement. "He has brought a lot of energy and enthusiasm to his work as our director of player personnel. I know that same passion will be exhibited in his work with our student-athletes." Partridge, who was hired as the director of player personnel in recruiting a year ago after serving as the head coach at Paramus (N.J.) Catholic, was reportedly back in New Jersey recruiting today at the opening of the contact period. "I came to Michigan because I wanted to work with the best and learn from the best,” Partridge said in the release. “I couldn't have a better mentor than coach Harbaugh who shares my vision that the student athletes come first. I am honored by his confidence and for the opportunity to continue to serve this incredibility institution." Partridge's last college coaching job was as the defensive line coach and assistant special teams coach at The Citadel prior to Paramus Catholic.
Published in: Detroit Free Press
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Friday
January 15, 2016
9. William Elliott Cuttino III (Elliott) Obituary
William Elliott Cuttino III (Elliott), 59, of Orangeburg, died unexpectedly Monday, Jan. 11, 2016 . A memorial service to celebrate his life will be held at 2:22 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 16, at Dukes-Harley Funeral Home, Orangeburg, with the Rev. Ryan Tucker officiating. Visitation will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. Friday, Jan. 15, at the funeral home. Elliott was born June 22, 1956, in Orangeburg to the late William Elliott Cuttino Jr. and the late Luna Jarvis Cuttino. He will be remembered as a gentle soul who deeply loved his family. He enjoyed being outdoors and spending time working in his shop. He attended Orangeburg public schools. After high school, he attended The Citadel, Montreat Anderson College, and the University of South Carolina. He was a dedicated employee of Cox Industries for over 30 years, where he worked in the sales department and most recently as the receiving manager. Elliott lived most of his life in Orangeburg, except for the time spent away at college. Always the Boy Scout, he was always prepared. He was generous with his time and skills, helping friends and families with their automobile, plumbing, electrical and woodworking. He was a true "jack of all trades," always had a project going. He was an avid outdoorsman. His favorite pastimes included spending time boating with his family on the water, chasing a little white ball around the golf course, vacationing in Currituck, North Carolina, and snow camping in the mountains of North Carolina.
Published in: The Times and Democrat
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Thursday
January 14, 2016
1. Celebrating Black History Month 2016 at The Citadel
MLK Week of Service, nationally recognized authors and more: Krause Center and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Week of Service, Black History Month Bazaar, The Zucker Family School of Education celebrates Black History Month with Authors in Schools initiative, Discussion with Angela W. Williams on her book: Hush Now, Baby, Friends of the Daniel Library present Celebrating Black History Month: Requiem for Rice dialogue, Black History Quiz Bowl, and a Discussion with Dr. Marcus Cox on the contributions to African American history by those who served in domestic roles.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Thursday
January 14, 2016
2. Pentagon: 2 US Navy boats held by Iran but will be returned
Iran was holding 10 U.S. Navy sailors and their two small boats that drifted into Iranian waters after experiencing mechanical problems. Iran accused the sailors of trespassing but American officials said Tehran has assured them that the crew and vessels would be returned safely and promptly. The sailors, nine men and one woman, were being held overnight at an Iranian base on Farsi Island in the Persian Gulf, and were expected to be transferred to a U.S. ship in the region on Wednesday morning local time. Officials said they believe the U.S. had spoken to one of the crew, and all 10 were fine and uninjured. Dr. Jack Porter, associate professor of international relations at The Citadel, was interviewed about the incident. "Now there's normally a protocol for the sailors and the patrol to dismantle, destroy and discard as much and as sensitive information as they can, said Porter. "Any number of tracking type of information or surveillance information and what the U.S. may have been gathering might be a way to tip off the Iranian government to what it is that we're paying attention to."
Broadcast on: WCBD-TV Charleston, SC
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Thursday
January 14, 2016
3. Rick Santorum taking part in constitutional conversation with South Carolina's top prosecutor
Rick Santorum is sitting down with South Carolina's top prosecutor for a conversation on law and the constitution. The former Pennsylvania senator is participating in a forum on Thursday sponsored by the Conservative Leadership Project. The chat with state Attorney General Alan Wilson is being held at The Citadel in Charleston, where two of Santorum's sons are enrolled. Organizers say this is the ninth such conversation the group has hosted with Republican presidential hopefuls. The free event will focus on the Constitution, rule of law, and that the next president will likely make appointments to the U.S. Supreme Court as four of the nine justices were born in the 1930s. Earlier Thursday, Santorum is slated to attend the Palmetto Senior Show in Columbia.
Published in: Greenfield Daily Reporter
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Thursday
January 14, 2016
4. The Citadel's Delaney Earns CFPA Elite Defensive Back Award
Dee Delaney is the 2015 FCS College Football Performance Awards Elite Defensive Back Award recipient, it was announced Wednesday. Delaney adds another honor to a season of multiple recognitions. He was named a Walter Camp All-American, a first-team All-American by STATS and a second-team All-American by the Associated Press and College Sports Madness. Delaney also was a first-team All-Southern Conference selection and the SoCon Defensive Player of the Month in September. The sophomore from Seabrook, South Carolina, started all 13 games at cornerback and registered 46 tackles, including 1.0 for loss, five interceptions, eight pass breakups, two forced fumbles, one fumble recovery and one blocked kick. His interception total led the SoCon, tied for eighth in FCS, and tied for sixth on The Citadel's single-season list. His 13 passes defended also tied for sixth on the program's single-season list. He led the Southern Conference in total passes defended and in passes defended in conference play with nine. Delaney has seven interceptions in his career and already is tied for ninth on The Citadel's all-time career list. Delaney helped lead the Bulldogs' defense, which set a single-season school record with 515 interception return yards. The Citadel ranked first in FCS in interception return yards and tied for the most interception return touchdowns in the nation with five. The Bulldogs led the SoCon and ranked third in FCS with 20 interceptions, the third-highest single-season total in program history, and with 31 turnovers forced.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Thursday
January 14, 2016
5. Letter: Lowcountry football more than just a game
The Lowcountry has two local college football teams that we should all be very proud of -- the CSU Buccaneers and The Citadel Bulldogs. Both teams reached beyond their potential due to hard work, team play, dedication, and superior coaching. Coach Chadwell of CSU and Coach Houston of The Citadel along with their assistant coaches were consistent in maximizing their players' talent. Both Coaches inherited teams that had been struggling and programs that were losing fan support. In spite of these challenges, they provided inspiration, high expectations and pride. I am blessed to have a degree from each institution. I get very frustrated when the alumni of these two colleges will go to Columbia or Death Valley and not attend or financially support their own alma mater. Both of these young, dynamic coaches will move up the coaching ranks to division one jobs. They and their staffs have done more than win football games. They have developed character and positive life experiences for all of their players. Those young men who have been fortunate enough to play under them will reap the benefits of their coaching for the remainder of their lives. Thanks coaches for bringing pride back to college football in the Lowcountry. As a grateful fan I salute all you have done to make football more than a game, but a book of life lessons.
Published in: The Gazette
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Thursday
January 14, 2016
6. Citadel Notes: Bulldogs basketball tries to snap skid against Wofford
The start of The Citadel's Southern Conference basketball schedule had good news and bad news for first-year coach Duggar Baucom. Good news: Four of the Bulldogs' first five leagues games would be at home. Bad news: Those four games are against what might be the four best teams in the league: Preseason favorite Chattanooga, new heavyweight Mercer, defending champion Wofford and last year's finalist, Furman. The Bulldogs have lost the first two of those games and five straight overall heading into Thursday's 6 p.m. clash with Wofford at McAlister Field House. "We've got to keep our energy high and keep talking to each other," point guard P.J. Boutte said after Saturday's 91-80 loss to Mercer dropped the Bulldogs to 7-9 overall and 0-3 in the SoCon. "We've got to focus on making shots and playing our game, getting up and down the floor and scoring lots of points. I feel like once we do that, the sky's the limit." The Bulldogs are still the top scoring team in the nation at 90.1 points per game, but have averaged just 77.3 points in three SoCon games while shooting 38.3 percent from the field and 34.2 percent on 3-pointers. Defensively, the Bulldogs are allowing foes to score 89.7 points and shoot 53.1 percent from the field, both highest in the SoCon.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
January 14, 2016
7. The Citadel set to host weekend competitions
The Citadel rifle team returns to competition by hosting two matches this weekend featuring Jacksonville State and Air Force. "Both teams coming in this weekend are in contention for the NCAA Championships," head coach William Smith said. "This will be a tough match for us coming back from the holiday break."Each of The Citadel's teams picked up a victory during the fall portion of the schedule, with the men's team claiming top honors at SEARC 2 in Milledgeville, Georgia, and the co-ed team earning a win at home against Wofford.Seniors Charles Yeh Jr. and Michael Chen return to action along with sophomores Morgan Long and Colton Poole and freshmen Hunter Ferguson and Tommy Simrill. Chen appeared in one competition during the fall, scoring 538 in air rifle and 525 in small bore at SEARC 2. Yeh's season-best air rifle score of 565 was posted at SEARC 2, and his top small bore score of 543 came at SEARC 3. Long registered a team-best 577 on air rifle at SEARC 3 and a team-high 559 on small bore against TCU. Poole recorded a 557 on small bore against Wofford and 570 on air rifle at SEARC 3. Ferguson and Simrill had season-best air rifle marks of 564 and 561, respectively, against Wofford and season-high small bore scores of 536 and 526, respectively, at SEARC 4.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Thursday
January 14, 2016
8. Goose Creek's Raemond Robinson making most of opportunity at Charleston Southern
He took a roundabout trip to get there, but Charleston Southern guard Raemond Robinson is finally at home and is making the most of his new opportunity. Robinson, an all-state basketball and football star out of Goose Creek High School, spent two years as a member of The Citadel basketball program before deciding to transfer. He ended up a little closer to home at Charleston Southern, sitting out last season due to transfer rules. This season, Robinson is contributing in a big way, averaging 9.7 points per game and making a name for himself as one of the top shooters in the Big South Conference and the nation. Entering Thursday night's home game against Liberty, the 6-2 redshirt junior is ranked 14th nationally and second in the Big South in 3-point shooting percentage (47.3 percent) and is tied for third in made 3-pointers (43). In two seasons at The Citadel, Robinson made 34 3-pointers. Nonetheless, while transferring has been a plus in terms of basketball, Robinson says making the choice to leave The Citadel was difficult. "Toughest decision of my life," Robinson said this week. "It was difficult to leave not only my teammates but also my classmates - those guys from all over the country and the world that I matriculated with..."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
January 14, 2016
9a. Men's Tennis Opens Season Friday With The Citadel
The Auburn men's tennis team opens its spring campaign with a pair of matches Friday versus The Citadel. The Tigers will face the Bulldogs in matches at 11 a.m. and 5 p.m. at the Yarbrough Tennis Center. "We need to get some matches in," said Auburn head coach Eric Shore, beginning his 26th season with the Tigers. "These two matches Friday will be a chance to work on our lineup and take a look at some different combinations, especially in doubles. The season is here and we need to play." In the preseason singles rankings, junior Maxime Hinnisdaels is ranked No. 96, while senior Marko Krickovic is listed No. 100. Auburn as a team is ranked No. 61, one of 12 SEC squads in the Top 75.
Published in: AuburnTigers.com
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Thursday
January 14, 2016
9b. Savannah Tire Hockey Classic: College club teams ready for their 'Super Bowl'
The brightened faces of young children at St. Joseph's/Candler Hospital, the signing of autographs and the roar of 5,000 hockey fans, most of them decked in red and black. The Savannah Tire Hockey Classic is a special experience for the University of Georgia club hockey team, one that's as close to the NCAA or professional levels as most club players get. "We're just average college kids," said UGA team president and sophomore Alex Carey. "It's just a cool experience. And then you get to play in front of 5,000 people, which most people never get to do. We get to do it at least once a year."... This year's Classic is the first time since 2009 South Carolina and the Citadel will not participate. The past five years, those two squads have opened the event with a Thursday-night game. "It really wasn't doing what we wanted it to do, plus South Carolina was having some scheduling issues," Wilder said.
Published in: Savannah Morning News
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Wednesday
January 13, 2016
1. Flags at half-staff to honor the late state Sen. O'Dell
Flags atop South Carolina's Statehouse are flying at half-staff to honor the late Sen. Billy O'Dell. The funeral for the Republican state senator will be Monday afternoon at First Presbyterian Church in Greenwood. Gov. Nikki Haley requested that flags be flown at half-staff from sunup to sundown in O'Dell's memory. The long-time senator died Thursday at his home at age 77. Greenwood County Coroner Sonny Cox says O'Dell's death was related to a heart condition. The Citadel graduate and CEO of O'Dell Corporation first won his Senate seat in 1988. According to Blyth Funeral Home, O'Dell's pallbearers will be members of the Greenwood County Sheriff's Department Honor Guard and the South Carolina National Guard. The honorary escort will include his Senate colleagues.
Broadcast on: WACH-TV Columbia, SC
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Wednesday
January 13, 2016
2. Letter: Citadel affirmation
Recently at Mass at Saint John the Baptist Cathedral on Broad Street, I became dizzy and disoriented by the incense. I have a fragrance allergy. I was afraid I would pass out and disturb the service. There were two Citadel cadets in the pew in front of me. I tapped one of them on the shoulder and asked if they could help me out of the church. His reply was "yes sir, of course, sir." They helped me out of the church and to my car and stayed with me until I was better. They proved to be exactly what I had expected, fine young men from an excellent institution.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
January 13, 2016
3. Major Petra Seipel speaks at the Rotary Club
One of the first women to graduate from the Citadel Military College talked to south Georgians today about the importance of giving back. Marine Corps Major Petra Seipel was born in Prague, but came to the United States as a teenager. She spoke at a Rotary Club meeting in Albany today. She says she would never have become a U.S. citizen, or been able to afford to go to the Citadel without the help of others. Seipel is currently stationed at MCLB, and says she's proud to serve the U.S in the Marine Corps. "I think everybody should always give back to the community, whether it's in a small way or a big way, I was able to accomplish so many things in life because of other organizations, because of people who believed in me. Either through various clubs, for me in was in the Washington D.C. area or in Charleston where I went to school," says Major Petra Seipel, with the United States Marine Corps. This month Seipel celebrates 16 years as a U.S. citizen. She's one of the few to become a U.S. citizen through an act of congress.
Broadcast on: WALB-TV Albany, Georgia
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Wednesday
January 13, 2016
4. Republicans holding local rallies ahead of Thursday debate
Some of the Republican presidential candidates are holding rallies around Charleston ahead of Thursday's North Charleston debate. Florida Sen. Marco Rubio on Wednesday will meet with supporters at noon at the Water Dog Grill, 1035 Johnnie Dodds Blvd., Mount Pleasant. Ohio Gov. John Kasich will hold a meet and greet at 5 p.m. Wednesday at the Cumberland Street Smokehouse, 5 Cumberland St., in Charleston. Texas Sen. Ted Cruz will rally with voters in Dorchester at 6 p.m. Wednesday at The Gatherings, 521 Limestone Road. Businesswoman Carly Fiorina will hold a town hall at 12:30 p.m. Thursday at the Charleston Crab House, 45 Wappoo Creek Drive, Charleston. Former Sen. Rick Santorum will take part in the Conservative Leadership Project's Presidential Forum Series at 2 p.m. Thursday at The Citadel's Bond Hall, Room 165. More events are expected. Fox Business Network will broadcast the debate from the North Charleston Coliseum. The main event begins at 9 p.m. and feature seven candidates on the top stage: businessman Donald Trump, Cruz, Rubio, retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush and Kasich. Invited to the 6 p.m. undercard are Kentucky U.S. Sen. Rand Paul, Fiorina, former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee and Santorum. As of Tuesday, Paul was not scheduled to attend.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
January 13, 2016
5. Recyclers, grocers convene food waste summit in Charleston
Photo: Cadets from The Citadel volunteer for the Lowcountry Food Bank. The amount of food that annually ends up in U.S. landfills is staggering: More than 70 billion pounds of safe, edible food is never consumed. Feeding America, a food bank network, estimates as much as 40 percent of food grown, processed and transported nationwide goes to waste. This month, that scenario will play out again and again at holiday parties, as hosts dispose of barely touched cheese balls, piles of toffee and cut-up vegetables in the mistaken belief that they're legally liable for any food-borne illnesses spread by leftovers. The urban myth is so pervasive that public health officials are now actively trying to dismantle it in hopes of broadening the national food supply. "Liability is one of the top issues that prevents donation," says Richard Chesley, program manager for S.C. DHEC's Office of Solid Waste Reduction and Recycling. "No one has ever been sued for donating food." Under The Bill Emerson Good Samaritan Food Donation Act, signed into law almost 20 years ago, people and companies donating food in good faith are protected from civil and criminal liability. Yet according to a retrospective published by the Seattle Journal for Social Justice in 2006, there is no evidence suggesting the law has stimulated a significant increase in food donations or helped chip away at hunger.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
January 13, 2016
6. Traquair leaves AU for post at The Citadel
After leading the Anderson University women's soccer team to a record number of victories and just its second berth in the semifinals of the South Atlantic Conference Tournament, Trojans coach Ciaran Traquair is moving on and moving up. Traquair on Tuesday was named the head coach of The Citadel, which competes in the Division I Southern Conference. He replaces Bob Winch, who resigned in October but served out his contract with the Bulldogs through Dec. 31 after a 10-year run with the program. "Coach Traquair has been successful at every level, including as a player," The Citadel athletics director Jim Senter said. "He has orchestrated tremendous turnarounds as a head coach and has led each of his programs to new heights. When this search started, we were committed to finding a leader who could help our program rise to the next level on and off the field by embracing everything The Citadel has to offer athletically, academically and socially. Throughout the interview process, it became clear that Coach Traquair was the best person for our women's soccer team, and I'm looking forward to seeing the direction of our program under his leadership." Traquair will have a major rebuilding project on his hands; The Citadel is coming off a 1-19 season and was winless in SoCon play. "I believe I can really impact the campus community and get the program moving in the right direction," Traquair said. "I have a really exciting challenge on my hands, but the program has great potential and I'm very eager to get going and meet the team."
Published in: Independent Mail
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Wednesday
January 13, 2016
7. College Sporting News names Coprich Offensive Player of the Year
Illinois State senior running back Marshaun Coprich was honored Tuesday with the Adrian "AP" Peterson FCS Offensive Player of the Year Award by College Sporting News, capping off a flurry of offseason honors for the Redbird All-American. Coprich was among 50 student-athletes in the NCAA Division I Football Championship Subdivision named to the College Sporting News 2015 Fabulous Fifty FCS All-America Team. An additional 17 players received enough votes to earn honorable mention honors, which included Illinois State All-American wide receiver Anthony Warrum... Unlike other All-American teams, the College Sporting News squad is designed to be like a real team, capable of taking the field and competing in a game. It includes everything from quarterbacks who can run or pass and often-overlooked fullbacks, to long snappers and other special teams performers. The Fabulous Fifty also emphasizes players who have exhibited character and other team-oriented traits, not just lofty statistics, or talent. Five-time reigning national champion North Dakota State led the number of selections of the College Sporting News Fabulous Fifty Division I FCS All-American team, with three major award winners and five total selections. In total, 34 teams and all 13 conferences are represented on the team. Jacksonville State and The Citadel landed three players on the squad, while seven other teams also had multiple selections - Montana, Chattanooga, Charleston Southern, Fordham, Northern Arizona, Eastern Washington, and William & Mary.
Broadcast on: WJBC Radio Central Illinois
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Wednesday
January 13, 2016
8. Lexington's Graves decommits
Lexington Shrine Bowl defensive back Nick Graves announced Sunday he has decommitted from The Citadel and opened up his recruiting. "After a lot of prayer and discussion, I have decided to decommit from The Citadel," Graves posted on Twitter. "I appreciate coach Houston and his staff for offering me the opportunity." Graves had 38 tackles and two interceptions for the Wildcats.
Published in: The State
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Wednesday
January 13, 2016
9a. Former Beaufort County treasurer, councilman integral to banking industry dies at 91
A former Beaufort County councilman and treasurer who played a key role in developing the county's banking industry on both sides of the Broad River died last week. Elrid Moody, 91, died at Helena Place in Port Royal on Friday. Moody served as Beaufort County treasurer from 1980 to 1990 and as a county councilman in 1991 and 1992, but he was instrumental in opening both the Bank of Beaufort and Hilton Head National Bank in the 1960s and 1970s. Born in Dillon, SC, on Sept. 29, 1924, to the late Aaron and Mattie Butler Moody, he spent his childhood and early adult life in Dillon County. Moody graduated from Lake View High School and The Citadel before joining the US Army Air Force, serving in the 8th Air Force as an engineer gunner on a B-17 bomber during World War II. He returned home after the war and began working with the SC National Bank in Charleston in 1949. Moody would transfer to the SC National Bank in Dillon soon afterward, serving as the branch's manager for 10 years. Moody organized the Bank of Beaufort in 1960 after relocating to Beaufort County, serving as president and chief executive officer of the bank for 14 years. In 1964, he moved to Hilton Head Island, opening what would become the Hilton Head National Bank. He served as that bank's president for five years.
Published in: The Beaufort Gazette
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Wednesday
January 13, 2016
9b. Robert Thomas Bob Herrington Obituary
Robert Thomas "Bob" Herrington of Chapel Hill and Cary, 84, passed away on January 10, 2016 at Rex Hospital in Raleigh, NC. He was born in Galveston, Texas on August 11, 1931 to the late COL and Mrs. Russel McKee Herrington. As part of a military family, Dr. Herrington lived in many places across the United States including Washington, DC, California, Oregon and finally Spokane, WA where he graduated from Lewis and Clark High School. He was a 1953 graduate of The Citadel in Charleston, SC and a 1957 graduate of the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle. After medical school, Dr. Herrington came to UNC as a pediatric resident from 1957 to 1959 followed by two years as a fellow in pediatric cardiology. In 1962, he left UNC to serve for four years in the U.S. Air Force. In 1966, upon completion of his military obligation, he returned to UNC for two years of additional fellowship training and subsequently joined the faculty in the Division of Pediatric Cardiology. Over the next 25 years, Dr. Herrington was a respected member of the UNC Department of Pediatrics. A dedicated clinician, he served as a Director of the outpatient pediatric clinics at UNC, established the interdisciplinary Birth Defects Clinic, and played a prominent role in developing, and staffing pediatric cardiology outreach clinics across the state through the Area Health Education Centers.
Published in: Star News
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Wednesday
January 13, 2016
9c. Lewis 'Doc' Emerson Obituary
Lewis C. "Doc" Emerson, a resident of Canterfield of Oak Ridge, passed away Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2016, at the Methodist Medical Center. He was born July 16, 1925 in Columbia, S.C., the son of Marion Sanders and Lewis Azro Emerson. Doc attended The Citadel in Charleston, S.C., where as a freshman he was awarded the coveted Star of the West for the best drilled cadet. Realizing military service was inevitable, he enlisted in the U.S. Army and served with the 397th Regimental Infantry Combat Team of the 100th Infantry Division during World War II in the USA, France, and Germany from 1943 until 1946. Following military service, Doc entered Georgia Tech and was married during his senior year to Jane White. Upon graduating with a B.S. in Electrical Engineering in 1949, he received a Fellowship in Radiological Physics at Oak Ridge National Laboratory from the National Research Council. He attended the Oak Ridge School of Reactor Technology and the University of Tennessee, receiving a Ph.D. in Physics and Mathematics in 1964.
Published in: Oak Ridger
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Tuesday
January 12, 2016
1a. Citadel, Clemson graduates to lead F-35 flyover at national championship game
It is American tradition to kick off a national sporting event with a demonstration from the armed forces showcasing talent and skill. This Monday, Jan. 11 at 8:30 p.m. Maj. Matthew "Diesel" Mayer, Class of 2004, will lead the squadron of fighter jets that will flyover the College Football Playoff National Championship in Phoenix, Arizona. Clemson graduate Capt. Casey Manning will join Citadel grad Maj. Matthew Mayer and two other pilots from nearby Luke Air Force Base in a four-ship, a tight formation of F-35 fighters. "Ever since I was a little kid I have been infatuated with aviation and becoming a pilot because of the movie Top Gun. It's an awesome feeling to be able to do something I love while also serving my country," said Mayer on being a pilot. This will be the Citadel graduate's first flyover of an event and he says he's excited about the opportunity and has been enjoying the planning process for the nationally televised game. The game will pit Clemson versus Alabama for the national title at the University of Phoenix Stadium.
Published in: LowcountryBizSC.com
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Tuesday
January 12, 2016
1b. flyover
flyover
Published in: The State
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Tuesday
January 12, 2016
1c. flyover
flyover
Published in: The Olympian Olympia, WA
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Tuesday
January 12, 2016
1d. flyover
flyover
Published in: WLOS-TV Asheville, NC
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Tuesday
January 12, 2016
2. RealManage's Louis DeCuollo Named Houston Market Director
RealManage is pleased to announce the hiring of Louis M. DeCuollo to lead its Houston, Texas operations. Mr. DeCuollo served in the United States Army as an Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Officer and Ordnance Officer for four years. He has deployed to Afghanistan for Operation Enduring Freedom (2014-2015) in support of the Special Operations Task Force. He provided EOD support to over 300 combat missions and over 20 missions in support of Homeland Defense. Mr. DeCuollo was awarded distinctions such as the Bronze Star Medal as well as the Army Commendation Medal for his military service. Mr. DeCuollo is a graduate of The Citadel, Military College of South Carolina and prior to joining RealManage he was stationed at Fort Stewart, outside of Savannah, Georgia. He was previously stationed in Virginia, South Carolina, as well as Florida. "Louis has a proven track record of service and excellence. We are confident he will lead our Houston market second to none," states Chris Ayoub, President.
Published in: Yahoo Finance
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Tuesday
January 12, 2016
3. Do As You're Told! - The Case For Social Engineering
Wherever we turn we are confronted with politicians, political pundits, television talking heads, and editorial page commentators, all of whom offer an array of plans, programs, and projects that will solve the problems of the world - if only government is given the power and authority to remake society in the design proposed. Even many of those who claim to be suspicious of "big government" and the Washington beltway powers-that-be, invariably offer their own versions of plans, programs, and projects they assert are compatible with or complementary to a free society. The differences too often boil down simply to matters of how the proposer wants to use government to remake or modify people and society. The idea that people should or could be left alone to design, undertake and manage their own plans and interactions with others is sometimes given lip service, but never entirely advocated or proposed in practice.
Published in: EpicTimes.com
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Tuesday
January 12, 2016
4. Charleston Southern No. 6, The Citadel No. 13 in final FCS poll
Charleston Southern finished No. 6 and The Citadel No. 13 in the final FCS STATS media football poll released Monday. FCS national champion North Dakota State was a unanimous choice for No. 1, with Jacksonville State at No. 2. CSU's No. 6 ranking is the highest in school history. In the final FCS Coaches Poll, Charleston Southern was voted No. 7 and The Citadel 15th. Charleston Southern was 10-3 this season, with a Big South Conference title and two wins over The Citadel, including one in the FCS playoffs. The Citadel went 9-4, claiming a share of the Southern Conference title and shocking SEC foe South Carolina, 23-22, in Columbia.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
January 11, 2016
1a. Citadel, Clemson grads to fly jets in formation over football championship
Before the Clemson Tigers take the field at the College Football Playoff National Championship on Monday night in Glendale, Ariz., four Air Force fighter jets will streak the sky during the pre-game show - and two will be piloted by graduates of Clemson University and The Citadel. Clemson graduate Capt. Casey Manning will join Citadel grad Maj. Matthew Mayer and two other pilots from nearby Luke Air Force Base in a four-ship, a tight formation of F-35 fighters. Mayer said he previously flew an F-15 Eagle while stationed in Okinawa, Japan, and he has been impressed by the F-35 since he began flying it in April 2015. "It's a pilot's airplane: easy to fly, smooth, extremely powerful, and it has enormous capabilities taking us into the future battlefield in the next couple of decades," Mayer said. Mayer is a native of Lexington. He entered flight school after graduating from The Citadel in 2004 on an Air Force ROTC contract, starting out as a weapon systems officer before entering training as a pilot. He said The Citadel prepared him for the career path he chose. "I wouldn't trade it for the world," Mayer said. "It basically forces you to set goals in life and focus on those goals."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
January 11, 2016
1b. flyover
flyover
Broadcast on: WIS-TV Columbia, SC
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Monday
January 11, 2016
1c. flyover
flyover
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Monday
January 11, 2016
2. Doing more than before
Citadel cadet and J.L. Mann High graduate Cameron Massengale has a toolbox of prosthetic devices for various activities: weightlifting, cadet training and fishing. One is a bebionic - a carbon fiber, bionic prosthetic hand boasting individually powered fingers and variable grip. Up next is a multi-activity device developed by the Hanger Clinic in Greenville that will allow him to perform both rifle drills and physically demanding activities. "It's my most comfortable prosthesis and I'm excited about it," he said. After losing his right hand in a work accident, Massengale said he thought he would be stuck at home doing nothing. "It was a whole new world, a little crazy and a little depressing," he said. He was soon using a hook prosthetic, a "shroom" for pushups and the powered hand. "I can do more than before... there is no ceiling," he said. Massengale returns to The Citadel this week and training to be a Summerall Guard.
Published in: Greenville Journal
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Monday
January 11, 2016
3. Principled Leadership Symposium and Corps Day Weekend 2016
The Citadel's Principled Leadership Symposium is a nationally-lauded event held in conjunction with Corps Day Weekend each year. The symposium will take place March 17-18, with most of the events to be held at McAllister Field House. It is a cadet/student-centered conference focusing on leadership and ethics, that is open to all cadets and students at The Citadel, alumni, faculty and staff and the public. Approximately 50 invited cadet and student delegates from the U.S. Military Academies, senior military colleges, and South Carolina colleges attend as guests of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. In 2016 symposium theme is Principled Leadership: Character, Courage, Community. This year's theme was selected to recognize and explore the Charleston community's united leadership effort in the wake of the killing of nine people at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church, which is near The Citadel campus. The full program, including breakout sessions and speakers will be available soon by visiting The Citadel's Krause Center for Leadership and Ethics website here. Learn more by talking a look at a video from last year's symposium.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Monday
January 11, 2016
4. Opening shots of the Civil War
Today is an exact date in U.S. military history, and one of the stranger ones. On this date 154 years ago, a few shots were fired that some historians contend were the opening shots of a major war. The shots were unique in that they were from only one side in what would become a war, and they were not fired by a soldier. Explanation follows. In January 1861, tensions ran high in the southern states of the United States. Several of them had threatened to secede if Abraham Lincoln was elected president, which he was... The Star of the West had only recently been chartered by the U.S. Navy and was chosen for the mission because it was an unarmed steamship. Its presence in the area rather than an armed Navy ship was thought less likely to rile up the locals. That reasoning proved to be faulty. It sailed on Jan. 5 and arrived near Charleston Jan. 9. But word had spread it was coming and cadets from the Citadel, a military college in Charleston, along with South Carolina militia troops, were called out to stop it from reaching the fort. Maj. Anderson was not aware of its presence until he heard cannons firing from a battery on Morris Island. The unarmed ship could not fire back and Anderson chose not to support it to hopefully keep tensions down. More faulty reasoning. Cadets from the Citadel manned the cannons on Morris Island and Cadet George E. Haynsworth, who must have been an aspiring artillery officer, is credited with firing three shots at the Star of the West. What happened next depends on which source one uses. One said only one of the three shots hit the ship and another says all three hit it. But the ship must have been hit at least once, causing the captain, John McGraw, to consider the mission too dangerous to continue, and the ship withdrew from the channel.
Published in: Leavenworth Times
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Monday
January 11, 2016
5. Community News & Events for Jan. 9 paper
County library: The Shenandoah County Library will celebrate the 150th anniversary of the publishing of "Alice in Wonderland" along with Lewis Carroll's birthday with a tea party at 4:30 p.m. Tuesday for ages 5 and older. The event will include tea and cookies and a reading about the Mad Hatter's tea party. Those attending are encouraged to wear a silly hat. Owens, originally from South Carolina, is a graduate of The Citadel and commissioned in the U.S. Army. He holds a master's degree with a focus on the American Civil War and did his thesis on the Confederate soldier. Information: www.turnerashbycamp.org.
Published in: The Northern Virginia Daily
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Monday
January 11, 2016
6. Mercer Defeats The Citadel, 91-80
Mercer (12-4, 2-1) defeated The Citadel (7-9, 0-3) 91-80 on Saturday afternoon at McAlister Field House. The Bulldogs scored 50 second-half points and freshman Connor Schroeder recorded career-highs for points (14), rebounds (six) and assists (two) in the loss. Senior point guard P.J. Boutte posted 13 points, six assists and three rebounds in 30 minutes of action and freshman Quayson Williams added 11 points off the bench. The Citadel made 16 three-pointers to stay within striking distance, but a strong performance from Mercer's Stephon Jelks, who posted 24 and 17 rebounds, propelled the Bears to a victory. The Bulldogs used a balanced attack in the first half as eight different players found the scoring column. Three-pointers from Schroeder and Zane Najdawi handed The Citadel a quick 6-2 edge in the opening minutes, but Mercer responded with a 17-3 run to grab a lead it would never surrender. The Bears took a 42-30 advantage into halftime and grabbed a pair of 17-point leads in the second half. Head coach Duggar Baucom's team battled back and caught fire from three-point range each time to cut the deficit to single digits twice. Boutte, Williams and Schroeder combined to make five consecutive field goals from beyond the arc at one point and pulled the Bulldogs within seven (68-61) with 7:01 remaining.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
January 11, 2016
7. Citadel's Derrick Henry making most of final season
"Bulldriver" is the term Duggar Baucom used for Derrick Henry on scouting reports at VMI. "We knew he was going to play hard, but we always considered him more of a defensive stopper than a scorer," Baucom said, describing how VMI coaches viewed Henry during his days as a Winthrop Eagle. "He's a guy who would pick his spots to score, but he was not really known as a jump-shooter." Now that Baucom and Henry are together at The Citadel, the Bulldogs' first-year coach is pleased to see that old scouting report needs updating. Henry, a sturdy 6-3 and 190 pounds, has added some skills to his "bulldriver" rep since transferring from Winthrop to The Citadel for his fifth and final season of college basketball. The native of Covington, Ga., is the top scorer on the top-scoring team in the nation, averaging 18.1 points for a Bulldogs team that is scoring 90.2 per game heading into Saturday's 1 p.m game with Mercer at McAlister Field House. Henry is shooting 35.4 percent from 3-point range and has gotten to the free-throw line a team-best 91 times, making 82.4 percent of his foul shots, and is the No. 2 scorer in the Southern Conference despite coming off the Bulldogs' bench. That's not by accident, Baucom said.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
January 11, 2016
8. Locals rack up USTA annual awards
The Lowcountry was well represented with several top honors at this year's U.S. Tennis Association South Carolina annual awards. Local players, coaches and officials garnered more than a fourth of all the awards given at this year's banquet hosted by the Wild Dunes Resort on Isle of Palms. "These recipients have done more for the sport than we can quantify," said Graham Cox, executive director of USTA South Carolina, the state office of the U.S. Tennis Association. "We're honored to be able to celebrate their accomplishments and what they've achieved with tennis in 2015..." Charleston's Emma Navarro was named Junior Girls Player of the Year. Navarro is currently ranked No. 5 in the state in the girls 18-and-under division after playing through a competitive 2015 schedule that included major tournaments like the Easter Bowl, the Orange Bowl International Championships, the Clay Court Nationals and a women's 10K professional tournament in South Carolina. Isle of Palms' Beau Wise received the Pete Conklin Official of the Year award. Wise has officiated for more than four decades. He worked USC matches for 30 years before moving to the Lowcoutnry where he now works local tournaments and matches, the Junior and Senior Southern Section Tournaments on Kiawah Island as well as collegiate matches, including contests at the College of Charleston, Charleston Southern, and The Citadel.
Published in: Moultrie News
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Friday
January 8, 2016
1. Letter: The Citadel works
A Post and Courier article on The Citadel was grossly biased toward difficulties of the Fourth Class System. Fourth classmen are cadets, not victims. The place is tough, and it culls those who do not want to stay in the system and graduate. If you are against gun control, don't buy a gun. If you don't want your child to be a "victim" at The Citadel, send him to a college that pops tops at 4 p.m. on Friday afternoons. If you want a leader, send him or her to a military college with a perfect weekly parade of 2,500 men and women who are disciplined and well-trained and who know how to follow leaders.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Friday
January 8, 2016
2. Former Citadel Standout Asher Wojciechowski to Participate in Hot Stove Banquet
Former Citadel standout Asher Wojciechowski of Beaufort who now pitches for the Houston Astros, will join headliner Ryne Sandberg at the Charleston RiverDogs' 12th Annual Hot Stove Banquet on January 22 at the Marriott Hotel on Lockwood Blvd. Named the Southern Conference's pitcher of the year in 2010, "Wojo" helped lead Bulldogs to the league regular-season and tournament championships as The Citadel advanced to the Columbia Regionals hosted by the University of South Carolina. That year, Wojciechowski struck out 155 batters over 125.2 innings and averaged 11.1 punchouts per 9 innings. For his three-year career, he won 20 games and struck out 308 batters. The reception begins at 6 pm with the dinner starting at 7. Tickets are $70 per person and include dinner, a table gift and autograph or photo opportunity. Tables of 10 with preferred seating are available for $680. For tickets and additional information, please contact the RiverDogs at (843) 577-DOGS (3647). Tickets may also be purchased online at riverdogs.com or rileyparkevents.com. This past season, Wojciechowski pitched in five regular-season games and started three. He threw 16.1 innings and fanned 16, and remains in the Astros plans for 2016. The Toronto Blue Jays selected Wojciechowski in the first round, with the 41st overall selection, of the 2010 Major League Baseball Draft. He made his professional debut with the Auburn Doubledays of the New York-Penn League and in 2011, Wojciechowski played for the Dunedin Blue Jays of the Class A-Advanced Florida State League.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Friday
January 8, 2016
3. Tony Marcella takes center stage as referee in D-I FCS title game
Tony Marcella has been officiating football games for three decades and has spent the last 13 years as a Division I-Football Championship Subdivision referee. But on Saturday, Marcella will get to make a little bit of college football officiating history. The Dalton native will be the referee for the NCAA Division I-FCS championship game in Frisco, Texas, between North Dakota State and Jacksonville State. "I was extremely surprised" to get the second call, Marcella said by phone from the tarmac at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport, where he was waiting to deplane. "We had a shot at it because Richmond was a semifinalist," he said. Richmond is in the Colonial Athletic Association, where Marcella and his crew work. North Dakota State beat Richmond 33-7 in a national semifinal back on Dec. 18. Had the Spiders won the game instead of the Bison, Marcella and his crew would not be eligible as a neutral officiating crew is required. "To get it two times in four years, it's unheard of," he said. "I'm fortunate to get two times. My supervisor [Jim Maconaghy] has faith in me." Marcella said he got the call the Sunday before Christmas. Marcella and his crew were in Charleston, S.C. back on Dec. 5 when they worked the second-round tournament game between Charleston Southern and The Citidel. Charleston Southern beat The Citadel 14-6, and then lost to Jacksonville State in the national quarterfinal round.
Published in: The Berkshire Eagle
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Friday
January 8, 2016
4. Sen. Billy O'Dell of Ware Shoals dies
Sen. Billy Odell of Ware Shoals, one of the longest serving state senators from the Upstate, has died. The 77-year-old GOP businessman apparently passed away in his sleep, senators said. Senate Majority Leader Harvey Peeler of Gaffney announced O'Dell's death Thursday morning at a workshop of the South Carolina Press Association and said afterward he was in shock. "When I think of Billy O'Dell I think of his support for the Citadel and his great love of South Carolina," Peeler said. "He brought a calmness to the Senate. He was very reasoned. He didn't talk a lot but when he did talk, you listened to him." Senate President Pro Tempore Hugh Leatherman described O'Dell as a close friend and an "exceptional man." "I am deeply saddened to learn of his passing and feel honored to have served our state alongside him," Leatherman said. "I greatly valued my friendship with him, and all that he meant to the Senate and our state since he began serving in 1989. He was a consensus builder and reached across party lines to help move our state forward. The Senate will sorely miss his voice and his leadership. We send our condolences and prayers to his wife, his family, his loved ones and all who knew him.”
Published in: Greenville News
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Thursday
January 7, 2016
1. Microbead ban a big victory
Most people don't consider that they might be damaging the environment when they wash their faces in the morning. But for years, tiny plastic beads in face washes, soaps and toothpastes have been flushed down household drains and into marine ecosystems, with deadly effect. Most people didn't even know it was happening. Once in the environment, however, so-called plastic microbeads can wreak havoc on marine life, killing small creatures that accidentally ingest them and building up levels of certain toxins in larger animals. Not any longer. Last week, President Barack Obama signed the Microbead-Free Waters Act, a bipartisan bill that enjoyed overwhelming support in Congress. The law prohibits the manufacture and sale of any "rinse-off cosmetic that contains intentionally added plastic microbeads." A September study published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology found that upwards of 8 trillion microbeads are flushed into United States waters every day. Those beads, which are by definition smaller than 5 millimeters in diameter, can remain in marshes, rivers and other bodies of water for decades, slowly breaking down and releasing toxins. They can also enter the food chain. Shrimp can mistake microbeads for food, for example. Smaller particles pass through their digestive systems, but some larger beads can get stuck in their guts and sicken or kill them. "They eat them like popcorn," Citadel physiology professor John Weinstein told The Post and Courier in October 2014. Mr. Weinstein and a team of researchers at The Citadel concluded last year that well over seven tons of plastic are currently decomposing in Charleston harbor. And their study didn't even measure microscopic and near-microscopic particles.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
January 7, 2016
2. Citadel Cadet making history with an artificial hand
Greenville's Cameron Massengale is competing to become a Summerall Guard at the school. The 20 year old Junior climbs walls, does push-ups, lifts weights and even plays guitar with his prosthesis. Massengale lost his right hand in a work accident in 2014.
Published in: Yahoo News
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Thursday
January 7, 2016
3. Alliant Enhances Renewable Energy Practice with Addition of Bob Gary
Alliant Insurance Services, the nation's largest specialty insurance brokerage firm, has announced that renewable energy expert Bob Gary has joined its Energy and Marine Group as Senior Vice President. Known throughout the industry for building best-in-class renewable energy insurance programs, Gary will oversee business development and program design for a national portfolio of clients. "Bob is one of the energy industry's foremost innovators, developing products and programs that mitigate risk in an industry that is fast evolving," said John Ludwig, Executive Vice President and Managing Director of Alliant's Energy and Marine Group. "His arrival builds on our team's broad-based energy expertise and expands our capabilities in the growing renewable energy segment." The North Carolina-based Gary joins Alliant with more than 18 years of experience and is well-known for his ability to build customized programs from the ground up. His innovative approach to the renewables market earned him the lauded "Power Broker" designation by Risk and Insurance for 2015. Prior to joining Alliant, Gary was Vice President with a global insurance agency leading a Renewables and Real Estate team, where he employed innovative risk transfer vehicles to de-risk transactions. Among his foremost accomplishments was the delivery of several specialty coverages designed to enhance the financing of solar facilities. Gary is a graduate of The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina. He served 13 years in both the Active Duty Army and National Guard positions, holding various command and staff jobs.
Published in: CNBC.com
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Thursday
January 7, 2016
4. What were the top local sports stories of 2015?
Skylar Hunter sets Citadel save record, gets drafted by Phillies: Skylar Hunter was known more for his catching skills when he made the Hanahan baseball team his freshman year. But by the time he graduated from The Citadel, he was pure pitcher. He appeared in 95 games during his career at The Citadel, recording 147 strikeouts with an earned-run average of 3.49 over 131.1 innings. In his last season, the right-hander broke The Citadel's and Southern Conference records for career saves with 41. As a junior in 2015, Hunter pitched 53 innings for the Bulldogs, collecting 13 saves and striking out 59 opponents with an ERA of 3.74. In June's Major League draft, he was selected in the 12th round as the 354th overall pick. He was assigned to Williamsport of the short-season New York-Penn League and pitched in 22 games - all in relief. He was 3-3 with a 3.48 ERA. He struck out 21 batters in 33 2/3 innings. "It's baseball, baseball, baseball all of the time," Hunter said. "I'm just glad to be living my dream. It's an honor and thrill to make a living by playing baseball. But it is a grind."
Published in: The Daniel Island News
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Wednesday
January 6, 2016
1. Letter: The Citadel has made progress
In his story "The Citadel crawls into the modern era," Paul Bowers offers dated examples of cadet experiences at The Citadel. He refers to a dissertation by a former staff member whose Ph.D. was substantially funded by The Citadel and his area of research on the Corps of Cadets was specifically requested and facilitated by The Citadel. The dissertation author's findings were accurate at the time they were researched. But many strategic actions have been implemented in the years since. I would have hoped the reporter would write a balanced story and provide Post and Courier readers an accurate understanding of campus life today at The Citadel. For the past five years a new, required curriculum in leadership has been implemented on campus. The Krause Center for Leadership and Ethics offers a four-year leadership development program in which cadets prepare during their freshman year, serve the community their sophomore year, lead their junior year and command their senior year. The recent academic accreditation review by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, in which the college received no negative findings or areas needing improvement, was built around a theme of "ethics in action" in which education and military programs merge to produce the principled leaders The Citadel offers to our military and the private sector and whom the world desperately needs.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
January 6, 2016
2. Cash-rich super PACs keep flagging presidential campaigns alive
Republican U.S. presidential candidate Jeb Bush speaks about his plans for the U.S. military at The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, in Charleston, South Carolina on Nov. 18, 2015. Jeb Bush's recent cancellation of advertising plans in Iowa and South Carolina was yet another cost-saving step for a down-in-the-polls presidential campaign that had already thinned its staff. If not for his flush super PAC, the Republican might be gone from the contest by now. That group, Right to Rise, has burned through half of its $103 million - which still leaves it with about as much cash as John McCain spent during the entire 2008 GOP nominating contest. In the 2016 race, money isn't buying love from voters. It is, however, buying some candidates more time. Less than a month before voting begins, the Republican field is still thick with a dozen presidential hopefuls. Super PACs are one reason why. Like Bush, Chris Christie and John Kasich are leaning heavily on these outside groups to communicate with voters. Nearly 96 percent of the money for Bush, Kasich and Christie commercials has come not from their official campaigns, but from their supportive super PACs, according to advertising tracker Kantar Media's CMAG.
Published in: PBS.org
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Wednesday
January 6, 2016
3. Vestal Malone, Class of 1945
On August 9, 1924, Vestal Malone was born in Cienfuegos, Cuba to Mrs. Claire Gerbaulet Malone and Mr. William Adolphus Malone. During his youth, he lived in Cuba, Central America, Colombia, Brazil and the Argentine where his father, an American and Power Executive developed extensive electrical programs in those countries. He graduated from Orlando Senior High in 1941 and entered The Citadel with the Class of 1945 later that year. On November 30, 1942, he enlisted in the U.S. Army, and after basic training joined the 106th Infantry Division at Fort Jackson, South Carolina as it prepared to deploy to the European Theater. He was assigned to Company "G", 424th Infantry Regiment. The 106th Division was only five days on the line when the Germans attacked it in the Schnee-Eiffel / Ardennes at the German-Belgium border on December 16, 1944. Two of the Division's three regiments were surrounded and forced to surrender. Over 7000 GI's of the 106th spent the rest of the war in various POW camps. The 424th Infantry Regiment was further to the south and was not surrounded but beaten back to St. Vith which it held for several days before being forced by the Germans to relinquish it and retreat.
Published in: The Citadel Memorial Europe
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Wednesday
January 6, 2016
4. Hall of Famer Ryne Sandberg will be Hot Stove Banquet speaker
Tickets for the event at the Charleston Marriott are on sale by phone (843-577-3647) or online at riverdogs.com or rileyparkevents.com. The cost is $70 per person and includes dinner, a table gift and autograph or photo opportunity. Tables of 10 with preferred seating are available for $680. Sandberg played in 1981 for the Phillies before becoming a 10-time All-Star for the Cubs. He was the National League Most Valuable Player in 1984 and won nine Gold Glove awards. He hit .285 for his career with 282 home runs and 2,386 hits Sandberg serves as Phillies manager from 2013-2015 with a record of 119-159. Proceeds from the Hot Stove Banquet benefit The Citadel, College of Charleston and Charleston Southern baseball programs in addition to the Singleton Memorial Fund. The Singleton Memorial Fund is in memory of Chris Singleton's mother, Sharonda Coleman-Singleton, who was one of the nine individuals killed on June 17, 2015 at the Mother Emanuel AME Church. Chris Singleton is a member of the Charleston Southern baseball team, and funds will be used to meet Chris' educational expenses.
Published in: SouthStrandNews.com
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Wednesday
January 6, 2016
5. Samford cruises to 94-74 victory over The Citadel
Darius Jones-Gibson scored 26 points with a career-high nine assists and Samford rolled to a 94-74 victory over The Citadel on Tuesday night. Jones-Gibson was 7 of 12 from the floor and made 12 of 13 free throws. Christen Cunningham chipped in 10 points with a career-high nine rebounds and matched a career-best with seven assists for Samford (10-5, 1-1 Southern Conference). P.J. Boutte scored 18 points with four steals to lead The Citadel (7-8, 0-2). Warren Sledge added 15 points and three steals. Samford jumped out with an 11-0 run, had a double-digit lead midway through the first half and never trailed. Jones-Gibson converted a 3-point play to stretch Samford's lead to 54-34 early in the second half. Sledge and Quayson Williams made consecutive 3-pointers to pull The Citadel to 58-48. Samford answered with a 25-15 surge and led 83-63 with four minutes left.
Published in: USA Today
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Wednesday
January 6, 2016
6. Red: Born to coach
There must be something in the soil in those pine woods of south Arkansas, something that produces football coaches. Paul "Bear" Bryant, the greatest college coach ever, came out of the Moro Bottoms and played high school football at Fordyce. Barry Switzer was a product of Crossett. Larry Lacewell likes to say he was "a bug all my life" - a Chigger and Redbug at Fordyce and then a Boll Weevil at what's now the University of Arkansas at Monticello. Tommy Tuberville played high school football at Camden Harmony Grove and college football at Southern Arkansas University in Magnolia. Sam Bailey, who was Bryant's right-hand man for years, came out of rural Union County and played his college football at what was then Magnolia A&M (now SAU) for two years and at Ouachita for two years. Legendary Henderson head coach Ralph "Sporty" Carpenter hailed from Hamburg. I could go on and on. No one worked at it longer, though, than Jimmy "Red" Parker, who died Monday at age 84. Parker coached his last game on the evening of Friday, Nov. 13. His Benton Harmony Grove team lost to Fordyce, 22-8, in the first round of the Class 3A playoffs at Paul "Bear" Bryant Stadium in Fordyce... Parker's climb up the coaching ladder continued when The Citadel, a well-known military school in South Carolina, took notice. Parker coached there from 1966-72, compiling a 39-34 record. Parker was hired to replace Hootie Ingram at Clemson University following the 1972 season.
Published in: Rex Nelson's Southern Fried
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Wednesday
January 6, 2016
7. SEC gets redemption with dominant postseason
The 2015 regular season came with mixed emotions in the SEC. Inconsistent play and average teams wrapped in good records hurt the perception of a league with so much recent success. A conference that earlier this season had a record 10 teams ranked in the AP poll limped to the finish of the season with a handful of lethargic offenses and five teams ranked in the College Football Playoff rankings. A respectable number, yes, but not exactly satisfying for a conference that not so subtly boasted about the prospects of possibly having two teams in the College Football Playoff. There were a few uncharacteristic nonconference losses, including South Carolina losing to The Citadel at home, and sometimes dreadful quarterback play. Chances of the SEC actually getting left out of the playoff were real. With some burying the SEC for a relatively ordinary regular season, the league dominated its bowl slate. The SEC will head into next week's national championship between No. 2 Alabama and No. 1 Clemson with an 8-2 record in bowl games. Those eight bowl wins are the most by any conference in a season.
Published in: ESPN.com
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Tuesday
January 5, 2016
1. Monday ad blitz: 2016ers hit the airwaves
Now that the holiday season has passed, campaigns are starting a blitz of television ads that will blanket the airwaves in Iowa and New Hampshire until the first votes are cast in those two states in early February. At least five new ads were unveiled or started airing Monday. Here's a look at them: Trump up with first ad: Republican front-runner Donald Trump is pumping cash into a television ad buy for the first time -- ordering $2 million this week in broadcast, cable and radio time in Iowa and New Hampshire, according to Kantar Media/CMAG. His 30-second spot focuses on two of his most controversial proposals: Building a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border and banning Muslims from entering the United States. Bush goes after ISIS, too: Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush's campaign plays up the threat of ISIS in a new ad airing in New Hampshire. "The United States should not delay in leading a global coalition to take out ISIS with overwhelming force," Bush says in the spot, which uses audio from his foreign policy speech at The Citadel in South Carolina. "We are at war with radical Islamic terrorism. We have but one choice: to defeat it."
Published in: KCRA-TV Sacramento, CA
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Tuesday
January 5, 2016
2. Dr. Buchanan Named to All-SoCon Faculty Team
Dr. Scott Buchanan, associate professor of political science at The Citadel, was named to the inaugural All-Southern Conference Faculty Team as announced by the league office on Monday. One faculty member from each school was recognized by the Southern Conference. Each recipient of the honor share some of the same characteristics, including a demonstrated service to the institution, a proven record of high scholastic achievement among students, recognition for a research project or written academic piece and contributions to campus life and the local community. Buchanan teaches Southern politics, state and local government, political institutions and elections and is beloved by his students. He earned The Citadel's 2015 James A. Grimsley Undergraduate Teaching Award, which is selected by the senior class and honors the professor that meant the most to them during their careers. Buchanan is the Executive Director of The Citadel Symposium on Southern Politics. He is the author of several revered books and journals and he wrote the only published biography of Georgia Governor Marvin Griffin, "Some of the People Who Ate My Barbecue Didn't Vote for Me." He is trusted by several national, state and local media outlets to provide expert commentary on politics.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Tuesday
January 5, 2016
3. Marion Stuckey, Class of 1945
Born Buddy Marion Skinner on September 12, 1924 in South Carolina, Marion was the adopted son of Mrs. Gussie Crosswell Stuckey and Mr. Charles Wesley Stuckey of Lee County, South Carolina. Mr. Stuckey’s listed profession in the 1940 census was farmer. Marion Stuckey graduated from Bishopville High School and entered The Citadel at Charleston in 1941. A member of Cadet Company "O" his sophomore year (the academic year 1942-43), Cadet Stuckey was inducted into the US Army on June 10, 1943. He received his basic training at Fort Riley, Kansas, University of Missouri, University of Minnesota and Camp Philips, Kansas. On September 1, 1944 he left went overseas. He served with Company G, 71st Infantry Regiment, 44th Infantry Division. According to a weblog post from an unidentified great-nephew, family history tells that Marion studied French at The Citadel and served as an interpreter.
Published in: The Citadel Memorial Europe
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Tuesday
January 5, 2016
4. Letter: Citadel standards
You may think it strange for a Citadel alumnus to encourage criticism of our school, but I do. When we stop getting criticized, I will begin to worry. The reason? The Citadel is different. We believe in duty, honor and country. We believe "duty is the sublimest word in the English language." We have an honor system that really works and states that a cadet does not lie, cheat or steal - or tolerate those who do. Our men and women get up at 6 a.m. and go to class because that is who we are. We are annually recognized as one of the top schools academically in the country. We have an outstanding president and commandant of cadets who get it and are excellent examples to the Corps of Cadets. Now take a minute and count the schools that do this. It will not take a minute because the list is very small. If the recent stupid stunt pulled off by a few of our cadets makes news, whether covered honestly or not, that is a good thing because The Citadel will always strive to live to a higher standard. When we fail to do that, please let it always be news. Hold us to that higher standard and watch us close. Bring it on because we are Citadel strong. We will take it and use it to get even better.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
January 5, 2016
5. Former Citadel, Clemson coach Red Parker dies at 84
Red Parker, who coached football at The Citadel and at Clemson, died Monday morning. He was 84. Parker was head coach at The Citadel from 1966-72 with a record of 39-34, and at Clemson from 1973-76 with a record of 17-25-2. A native of Fordyce, Ark., Parker completed his coaching career of more than 60 years in his home state as the head coach at Harmony Grove High School in Benton. He started the program there six years ago, resigning last October. The field at Harmony Grove is named for him. Parker had an artificial heart installed late in his life, and died of heart complications, his family said. Citadel president Lt. Gen John Rosa played quarterback for Parker with the Bulldogs. "He was a true coach at heart," Rosa said for a story on Parker in 2013. "One thing I took away from him was the importance of finding a passion in life." Parker is the second-most famous coach from Fordyce, just behind his mentor, the legendary Bear Bryant. Parker was hired at The Citadel in 1966 after a successful stint at Arkansas A&M. He followed Eddie Teague as the Bulldogs' coach and compiled a 39-34 record in seven seasons, including a 7-3 mark in 1969 and an 8-3 record in 1971.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
January 5, 2016
6. Citadel grad Lance Thompson hired as defensive line coach at USC
Lance Thompson, a former player at The Citadel who won a pair of national championships as an assistant under Nick Saban, is the newest member of Will Muschamp's staff at South Carolina. Thompson will coach the defensive line and act as assistant head coach for defense, Muschamp announced Thursday. Thompson most recently coached linebackers at Auburn, where Muschamp worked last season as defensive coordinator before succeeding Steve Spurrier at USC. Thompson acted as the Tigers' defensive coordinator in their victory Wednesday over Memphis in the Birmingham Bowl. "He has coached multiple positions throughout his career and has a great understanding of our defensive system," Muschamp said in a statement. "He will be an outstanding addition to our staff." Thompson becomes the third former Auburn assistant to follow Muschamp to South Carolina, after defensive backs coach Travaris Robinson (who will serve as defensive coordinator at USC) and offensive assistant Bobby Bentley (who will work as running backs coach). USC's defensive staff also includes linebackers coach Coleman Hutzler.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
January 5, 2016
7. Samford vs. The Citadel - 1/5/16 College Basketball Pick, Odds, and Prediction
The Samford Bulldogs and The Citadel Bulldogs face off on Tuesday in college basketball action. The Samford Bulldogs are 9-5 this season and they are coming off of a 19-point beat down loss to Mercer I their last game. Samford is averaging 69 points and they are shooting 41 percent while defensively they allowing 69.2 points and their opponents are shooting 44.7 percent. Darius Jones-Gibson leads the Bulldogs averaging 15.1 points per game. Christen Cunningham is averaging 14.3 points, Matt Rose is averaging 10.1 points, and Jamal Shabazz is averaging 7.9 points. Samford is 3-1 at home this season. The Citadel Cadets are 7-7 this season and they have lost their last three games. The Citadel is averaging 86 points and they are shooting 44.1 percent from the floor while defensively they are allowing 96.8 points and their opponents are shooing 53.9 percent. Derrick Henry leads The Citadel averaging 18.9 points per game. Quinton Marshall is averaging 13.6 points, Warren Sledge is averaging 10.4 points, and Brian White is averaging 10.3 points. The Citadel are 2-5 on the road this season. Samford is 4-1 against the spread in their last four games, 11-4 against the spread in their last 15 home games, and 12-5 against the spread at home against a team with a losing road record. The Citadel is 4-1 against the spread in their last five games, 4-0 against the spread against a team with a winning record, and 6-2 against the spread following a loss.
Published in: SportsChatPlace.com
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Monday
January 4, 2016
1a. Lt. Gen. John Rosa - President of The Citadel
For this podcast interview Tony and Lt. Gen. John Rosa discuss what differentiates between the top and bottom third of leaders. Some highlights from the interview are as follows: Do not ask any one to do anything illegal, immoral, or unethical; Being approachable is an important aspect of any leadership position. Allows you to get you know you team; Maintain an even keel throughout the organization; Identify strategic plan for your business and be able to effectively communication that plan; Leaders need to have a vision, delegate, and give the right people authority and "hold them accountable"; Let your people do the work that they were hired to do. Do not overextend yourself; Know your employees: their likes, dislikes, and goals; Team build mentality is critical. Do not think of your self as just an individual; Acquiring the right people that want to be at your institution for the right reasons; Importance of not micromanaging, but need to be micro-informed. Know your organization.
Published in: WhatLeadersSay.com
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Monday
January 4, 2016
1b. Trump targets 'radical Islamic terrorism' in first TV ad
Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump focuses on the threat from the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) in his first television ad, released early Monday. "The politicians can pretend it's something else, but Donald Trump calls it radical Islamic terrorism," a narrator says over images of the San Bernardino, Calif., shooters. That's why he's calling for a temporary shutdown of Muslims entering the United States until we can figure out what's going on." The ad, entitled "Great Again," promises that Trump will "quickly cut the head off of ISIS and take their oil." Trump's campaign said it will spend at least $2 million per week on TV air time, with roughly half of that spent in Iowa and the other half in New Hampshire. The spot will begin airing on Tuesday. "I am very proud of this ad, I don't know if I need it, but I don't want to take any chances because if I win we are going to Make America Great Again," Trump said in a statement. The spot also says Trump will stop illegal immigration by building a wall on the southern border that Mexico "will pay for." The Trump campaign will also launch a new radio ad this week in the first three primary states featuring Kathryn Gates-Skipper, the first female Marine to serve in combat operations. Another new ad, featuring Nancy Mace, the first female graduate of The Citadel, will air in South Carolina.
Published in: The Hill
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Monday
January 4, 2016
1c. Lt. Col. Timothy Smith to lead Citadel Regimental Band and Pipes in 2016
A new director will take the baton to lead the world famous Citadel Regimental Band and Pipes starting in the New Year. On Jan. 4, 2016, Lt. Col. Timothy J. Smith will move into The Citadel Director of Music position, replacing the man who helped build the program into a world class military college band, retired Navy Cmdr. Mike Alverson. A native of Etowah, Tennessee, and graduate of the University of Tennessee, Alverson joined The Citadel in 2004, after serving in the Navy for 30 years. Alverson was a trombone instrumentalist, eventually rising to positions of leadership within the Navy such as directing the U.S. Naval Academy Band. Other assignments included the Navy Band Charleston, the U.S. Pacific Fleet Band, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, and the U.S. Atlantic Fleet Band. While at The Citadel, Alverson took a college with no academic music program and managed to develop a band that was invited to play around the world. He led the band to coveted invitations to the Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo in 2010 and 2015, as well as to the Royal Nova Scotia Military Tattoo in 2013. "He said he would bring an extraordinary military act...and that is exactly what he delivered. Extraordinary music, perfectly timed," said Brig. Gen. David Alfrey, producer and CEO of the Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo. "He's a great leader, and of course young people are not always easy to lead."
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Monday
January 4, 2016
1d. Citadel alumni defend fourth-class system
As administrators at The Citadel seek to reduce hazing within the public military college's ranks, many alumni say they hope the school doesn't scrap its adversarial fourth-class system altogether. Under The Citadel's longstanding class structure, freshman cadets must follow a strict daily routine and obey any lawful order from an upperclassman officer. After a spring 2015 hazing investigation resulted in 11 cadets dropping out or being suspended, and more recently after images surfaced of freshman cadets wearing Ku Klux Klan-like white hoods, college leaders including Commandant of Cadets retired Navy Capt. Geno Paluso have said the school has a long way to go in improving leadership training for upperclassmen. Tom Culler, a 1950 Citadel graduate who frequently returns to campus to volunteer with the regimental band, said he has seen the effectiveness of the fourth-class system wax and wane over the decades. He said it has alternated between levelheaded discipline and outright cruelty. "You can almost put it on a graph," Culler said. "They tend to knock the hazing off, and then those cadets are gone and the new kids, having the mind of an 18- to 21-year-old, they slide back again and it builds up until something happens."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
January 4, 2016
1e. Lowcountry Graduate Center offering additional degrees
Two more graduate degree programs will be offered at the Lowcountry Graduate Center in 2016, according to a news release. The Citadel's Zucker Family School of Education will offer a master's degree in education and graduate certificate in literacy education beginning in the summer, while the College of Charleston's School of Education, Health and Human Performance will offer a Master of Arts in teaching in special education in the fall in North Charleston, the news release said. The Read to Succeed Act, passed by the S.C. Legislature in 2014, requires all K-12 teachers to take courses in reading instruction within 10 years of their next certification renewal. Both programs at the Lowcountry Graduate Center will meet the state requirement. The Citadel's M.Ed. in literacy education also will certify teachers as literacy coaches, the news release said. "We know that the most important variable in the education of a child is the teacher, so if we produce highly effective teachers then we are helping to improve the quality of education here in the Lowcountry," said Fran Welch, dean of the College of Charleston's School of Education, Health and Human Performance, in the news release. The Lowcountry Graduate Center, located at 3800 Paramount Drive in North Charleston, will host an open house from 5 to 7 p.m. on Jan. 14 for interested students.
Published in: Charleston Regional Business Journal
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Monday
January 4, 2016
1f. Thousands expected to enjoy Christmas at The Citadel; volunteers still needed
Thousands are expected to converge at Johnson Hagood Stadium on Christmas Day for a meal, gift giveaway and carnival-like celebration touted each year as a birthday party for Jesus. A mix of volunteers and the needy will comprise the crowd Friday at The Citadel, according to Gordon Cashwell, one of the event's organizers. "Jesus came to serve and he told us that when we have a party, not just to invite friends and family, but to go to the highways and byways and invite people that couldn't pay us back," Cashwell said. "When you do it unto the least of these you do it unto him." Cashwell, the director of Without Walls Ministry - a local union of churches that reach out to economically challenged neighborhoods in Charleston - described the celebration as being Christ-centric instead of focusing on consumerism and Santa Claus. "I'm not anti-Santa Claus," he said, "but I'm thinking we shouldn't outshine the one whose birthday we're supposed to be celebrating." The group works closely with The Citadel to put on the event, which Cashwell said is part of the school's service to the community.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
January 4, 2016
2a. Former Army Col. and Citadel staffer publishes terrorism thriller
Retired Army Col., former Citadel instructor and Mount Pleasant resident James MacArthur Dorton has published an international terrorism thriller titled, "Armageddon Jihad." The book is based upon an actual radio interview of a senior Al Qaeda staff officer with the Al Jazeera news agency circa 2003, which was broadcast only once before it was destroyed - but not before one transcript made its way to the U.S. government. The interview centers on an Al Qaeda plan to launch simultaneous nuclear strikes on seven major American cities. After 12 years of research by Dorton, and six years of writing, "Armageddon Jihad" portrays what could have resulted from the plan. The book mixes fiction with real personas and history, so Dorton calls it "factional." The story centers around the push and pull between two characters: a retired professional military intelligence Army colonel named Franc Ylon Volpe, who is openly on the staff of a military college in Charleston while also covertly heading an extralegal counterterrorism force of global coverage and international direction, and a highly complex deep-cover Al Qaeda operative who was personally picked and groomed by Osama bin Laden 35 years before current days, and placed within American culture and commerce as a "Tier One Sleeper Agent." As the action heats up, the two forces are pitted against one another until the leaders reach a boiling point in an unexpected conclusion. Action ranges from the caves of the Bekaa Valley, Lebanon, throughout the Middle East and into the Orient as well as the streets and locales of several American and European cities.
Published in: Moultrie News
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Monday
January 4, 2016
2b. There is No Social Security Santa Claus
At this annual time of good cheer it might seem Grinch-like to challenge the spirit of Santa Claus, but the reality is that there is no jolly, bearded, rotund man in a red suit who brings us goodies for free. And the Congressional Budget Office has recently reminded us of this in reference to Social Security. The Congressional Budget Office's December 2015 report on "Long-Term Projections for Social Security" makes it very clear that the U.S. government's promise of assuring every American a federally funded retirement pension faces a very uncertain future. Not that this is new news. Critics of the Social Security system have offered warning signals for decades. But the system's financial unsustainability is, now, more likely just around the corner.
Published in: EpicTimes.com
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Monday
January 4, 2016
3a. Afghan stint increases Marine's yen for stress
Austin Booth received the order on Christmas Eve 2014. The Marine Corps captain was being deployed to Kabul, Afghanistan, in July. He would be leaving behind his wife of about six years, Kristen, and their toddler daughter in Quantico, Va., where Booth practiced law as a Marine Corps attorney. Booth, a Scott native who graduated from Catholic High School for Boys in Little Rock in 2004, had several thoughts about the deployment, but one in particular stuck out... He was in the Marine Corps JROTC at Catholic High. He wanted to attend the U.S. Naval Academy but childhood asthma medically disqualified him. He pressed on, though. After high school graduation, Booth attended The Citadel in Charleston, S.C., the only other college he applied to outside of the Naval Academy. It wasn't until his junior year at The Citadel that Booth seriously started considering law. He enjoyed writing and analysis, and he knew law would appease those passions. After his 2008 graduation from The Citadel, Booth entered the University of South Carolina's School of Law. While in law school, he started working out with trainees preparing to take the Marines' physical fitness test. When the trainees took the test, Booth did, too, and passed. "He never really gave up on his dream," Tom Booth said. "It got to come to fruition... The family thinks God had him take a detour to The Citadel to meet his wife and then on to the Marine Corps. I'm so proud he never gave up on that dream."
Published in: Northwest Arkansas Democrat Gazette
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Monday
January 4, 2016
3b. Hugh Vanderveer Batchelder, Class of 1945
Born in New Jersey on February 2, 1925, to Mrs. Jessie P. Hale Batchelder and Colonel Roland C. Batchelder, Hugh grew up in New Hampshire, first in Canaan, then Littleton, and finally Deerfield. He had three brothers, Theodore, Robert and George; and a sister, Jessie. His older brother, Theodore, preceded him to The Citadel by a year. Hugh's father, Col. Batchelder, was a veteran of WWI, a 1921 graduate of Dartmouth college, a high school teacher and principal, served in the Quartermaster Corps during WWII, and later was elected to the New Hampshire state legislature. Cadet Corporal Batchelder was a member of Cadet Company "M" his sophomore year. He was awarded Gold Stars in recognition of his superior academic achievement of earning a 3.7 grade point average or higher over a semester. He was also a member of the International Relations Club which was notable as membership for sophomores was limited to only outstanding Political Science and History majors. Following completion of the 1942-43 academic year, Hugh entered military service in the U.S. Army. His brother, Theodore, had left The Citadel in 1941 after completing his freshman year to attend the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis, Maryland.
Published in: The Citadel Memorial Europe
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Monday
January 4, 2016
3c. Two new police officers start their training in Groton City
Two new police officers began their 10-week field training at the Groton City Police Department after successfully graduating from the police academy on Dec. 16. Officer Alan Chin graduated from Norwich Free Academy. He served for four years in the United States Navy, where he worked as an operations specialist with the ship's radar and navigation systems. He currently is enrolled at Three Rivers Community College, where he is pursuing a degree in business management. Officer Jason Hauptman graduated high school from Wilmington, N.C. He obtained a bachelor's degree in criminal justice from The Citadel in South Carolina.
Published in: The Day
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Monday
January 4, 2016
3d. RealManage's James D. DeCuollo Named San Antonio Market Director
RealManage is pleased to announce the hiring of James D. DeCuollo to lead its South Texas operations. James served in the United States Marine Corps as a Logistics Officer for four years. He deployed to Afghanistan in support Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan during 2013 where he earned the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal for the outstanding combat and logistics support he and his teams provided. Following this deployment, he served as a platoon commander on multiple training evolutions nation-wide. During 2014 he was selected as a Company Commander as a junior officer where he earned the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal. After being selected for promotion to the rank of Captain, James made the decision to separate from the active ranks. A native to New Jersey, James graduated The Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina in 2011 where he majored in English and served on the Honor Committee investigating and leading the prosecution of honor trials. Prior to joining RealManage he was stationed at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. "James is an outstanding leader of character. His motivation, high energy and focus on employee development are second to none," states Chris Ayoub, President.
Published in: Finance.Yahoo.com
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Monday
January 4, 2016
3e. Hires and promotions
Consulting: Sebastian Steadman has joined Knowledge Capital Group as a consultant. Previously, he was with Booz Allen Hamilton. He has a bachelor's degree in business administration from the College of Charleston and a master's in business administration from The Citadel. Real estate: Scott Baskin has been named broker in charge of RE/MAX Advanced Realty's West Ashley office. He has more than 10 years of real estate sales experience. He has a bachelor's degree in real estate from Clemson University and a master's in business administration from The Citadel. Shopping center: Darcy Kuykendall has been promoted to general manager of Citadel Mall by Spinoso Real Estate Group. She has a bachelor's degree from Wingate University. She has 11 years of experience in the commercial real estate industry.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
January 4, 2016
3f. Neely Young: Leading with Humor
It is rare to see a chamber of commerce executive lauded by a senator on the Senate floor in the nation's capital. Yet this has happened to Woody Woodside in honor of his 30 years of service as head of the Brunswick-Golden Isles Chamber of Commerce. Sen. Johnny Isakson recently addressed his Senate colleagues by saying: "We know as politicians serving in the United States Senate, there is not a one of us that doesn't owe our career to community leaders back home who take the time to lend their support to us, bring their community to us and give us the fortification we need to serve our great state. Back in Georgia there is one such person who means a lot to me who meets all those criteria. His name is Woody Woodside."... One day Woody took me on a fishing trip near Woodbine. He picked me up early, and I thought we were going for breakfast. Instead we drove straight to the lake and put in at the first dock. We fished and fished for seven hours. Woody spent the day telling stories of mules, his dealings with politicians, his days when he was at The Citadel in Charleston and later when he worked for congressmen Bo Ginn and Lindsay Thomas. Woody was so worked up that he forget to tell me we had no lunch or snacks. When we pulled into the dock, I thought we would have a meal waiting on us at the fish camp, but the tables were bare. Driving back I thought we would pull over and have barbeque at one of the local restaurants.
Published in: Georgia Trend
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Monday
January 4, 2016
4. This Week in Print - Population projections missed the mark by a landslide
This column came to be two years ago as the Moultrie News began the celebration of our 50th anniversary. It's been a pleasurable walk down memory lane, and a fascinating look at the foundation of East Cooper. The mission of a community newspaper is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through a collaboration between readers, reporters and advertisers. January will mark 52 years of the Moultrie News doing just that. And if the good Lord's willing and the creek don't rise, this community paper will give East Cooper 52 more years. Knob week: That same year, six young men from the East Cooper area were highlighted in the paper for successfully completing knob week at The Citadel. Back then, people said cadets were indoctrinated during a week of, "concentrated training." This enabled new cadets to take their place as members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. During knob week, Paul D. Hufziger, Joseph H. Peele III, Mark S. Tobin, Robert W. Bridges, Jeffrey M. Dillon and Allen H. Varn underwent instruction in drills, college regulations, the honor system, traditions of The Citadel and other training necessary to assist each new cadet in acclimating himself into the classroom and on parade grounds.
Published in: Moultrie News
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Monday
January 4, 2016
5a. Letter: Unbalanced view of The Citadel
The Fourth Class System at The Citadel is an easy target for untalented and lazy journalists. Find one person who had a bad experience with The Citadel and you have a few paragraphs, find a few more and you have a one-sided, highly skewed view of the system. In a story in the Dec. 20 paper "The Citadel crawls in to the modern era," I did not see one opposing view from any alumni, current or past administrator, or current cadet, and you could have had thousands just in the Charleston area. But that would have been a more substantive, balanced view rather than this rabble-rousing drivel. Has the author of the article ever talked to a current cadet in a restaurant or other places outside the gate of The Citadel? Has he taken the time to seek out alumni and discuss their experiences and views? The article cites Kevin Dopf and Gregory Stone, who filled key positions in the commandant's department. Nowhere does it say that in their positions they were responsible for the administration of the Fourth Class System, which is a significant part of their responsibility. The fact that they condemn the system they were responsible for rather than talk about any changes they made to improve it is deeply disturbing.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
January 4, 2016
5b. Letter: Civil disobedience
Is there a place for manmade politics in a house of God? Is it time The Citadel perform an act of civil disobedience in its quest for a safe, unbiased, moral environment for its cadets, alumni and visitors? I propose three options for The Citadel's house of God, Summerall Chapel: 1) In an act of civil disobedience, take the representative flag of the separatist Confederacy down. 2) Take every flag down from inside the chapel. 3) Invite every state governor to vote on whether to fly its state flag in, or remove it from, the same house of God as long as South Carolina mandates a flag, historically representative of union separatism, to be flown. Let the Heritage Act stand up to its own scrutiny. Invite every national and global press agency to witness SLED, under state legislative or executive order, hoisting the removed Confederate flag to enforce the Heritage Act and squelching a leadership act of disobedience - an act, unanimously voted upon by the Board of Visitors, the leaders of The Citadel.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
January 4, 2016
5c. Letter: The Citadel's true spirit
The liberal, "progressive" media want to portray all of The Citadel as racist because of the absolute poor judgment and/or stupidity of a small group of kids. As a testament to the true spirit of The Citadel, the entire football team had a logo on their helmets throughout the season remembering and honoring the victims from Emanuel AME Church. That is a more accurate depiction of what The Citadel represents. The Citadel also offers a scholarship in the name of the Emanuel AME victims, and cadets conduct thousands of hours of community service each year, much of it within minority communities. In addition, many Citadel men have given their lives to defend the freedoms of everyone in this country. Honor, duty, respect. That is the true spirit of The Citadel, and it always will be.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
January 4, 2016
5d. Letter: What flag next?
Lt. Gen. John Rosa is a gentleman and an overly polite one to put up with Rev. Al Sharpton, who wants an old Confederate Navy flag removed from the campus chapel. Why? Sharpton said, "I don't know how people can pray with a symbol of hate and white supremacy and man's inhumanity to man in a chapel." Wow! Looks bad for another poor innocent flag. I wonder how Gen. Douglas MacArthur or Gen. George Patton would have handled the situation. Lastly, if the Navy flag goes, then our own Old Glory should also go because over the years it has waved longer and higher during the time of slavery than any other American flags.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
January 4, 2016
5e. Letter: Citadel ring reminds what graduates stand for
I was saddened to read that a fellow alumnus felt it necessary to take his ring off because of the recent unfortunate events at The Citadel. I am a graduate of The Citadel. I wear my ring because I know what it stands for. We do not lie, steal, cheat or tolerate those who do. We were forged to be deeply committed to travel a road less frequented by others. We are not perfect. We all come from different walks of life. We even have different opinions but ultimately agree that we are to "remember our creator in the days of thy youth." This is The Citadel. This is what the ring represents. It is not an ornament. It was handed to us on the unique journey we all have in common. Life is not easy. When we are faced with adversity the ring reminds us we can conquer it as we have in the past.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
January 4, 2016
6a. College football: 9 of the biggest upsets from the 2015 season
Nov. 21: The Citadel 23, South Carolina 22 - The Citadel ended the regular season in style with its upset on the road against SEC opponent South Carolina. After a 95-yard touchdown pass was called back on a false start penalty, the Citadel forced South Carolina to turn it over on downs to seal the win. The Bulldogs picked up their first win over an FBS opponent since a 15-14 defeat over Army in 1992 and first win over South Carolina since 1990. The Gamecocks hadn't lost a home game to a nonconference opponent since Nov. 24, 2007. The win for the Citadel helped its case for an at-large bid in the FCS playoffs too.
Published in: NCAA.com
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Monday
January 4, 2016
6b. Muschamp adds Thompson to staff at USC
University of South Carolina head football coach Will Muschamp has named Lance Thompson as the Gamecocks' assistant head coach of defense and defensive line coach, it was announced today. A veteran SEC assistant coach, Thompson spent the 2015 season on Gus Malzahn's staff at Auburn where he coached the linebackers. "I'm excited to have Coach Thompson join our staff," said Coach Muschamp. "He did a great job calling the Auburn defense in their bowl win over Memphis. He has coached multiple positions throughout his career and has a great understanding of our defensive system. He will be an outstanding addition to our staff." Ranked as the No. 1 recruiter in the nation on the Ultimate ESPN 300 recruiting power rankings for 2014 when he was coaching at Alabama, and named Rivals National Recruiter of the Year in 2008, also with the Crimson Tide, Thompson was reunited with Muschamp on the Auburn staff in 2015. They also worked together as assistant coaches at LSU from 2002-2003... Thompson is a 1987 graduate of The Citadel, where he was a four-year letterwinner, and earned his bachelor's degree in education and mathematics.
Broadcast on: WCSC-Tv Charleston, SC
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Monday
January 4, 2016
6c. Longtime assistant no longer on Navy football staff
Longtime assistant Keith Jones is no longer a member of the Navy football coaching staff, The Capital has learned. It is unclear whether Jones, who coached in Monday's Military Bowl, resigned voluntarily or was fired. Jones has been a member of the Navy coaching staff for 14 years, spending the last seven seasons working with the secondary. He also coached outside linebackers for seven seasons. Jones is a 34-year veteran of college coaching, having begun his career as a graduate assistant at South Carolina State. The 61-year-old also served stints at North Carolina A&T (1980), Murray State (1981-86), Virginia Tech (1987-1993), North Carolina A&T (1996) and The Citadel (2000). A graduate of The Citadel, Jones earned a master's degree in counselor education while working as a graduate assistant at South Carolina State. He also spent two years as head coach of Potomac High in Dumfries, Virginia. Jones is the second veteran assistant to retire in the span of a week, joining former defensive coordinator Buddy Green. Jones and Green shared secondary coaching duties from 2009 through 2014 and developed such standouts as Wyatt Middleton and Parrish Gaines among others.
Published in: Capital Gazette
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Monday
January 4, 2016
7a. Sharp-shooting Charlotte sprints past The Citadel 111-93
Joseph Uchebo knocked down 9 of 11 field goals to finish with a career-high 19 points, and grabbed 15 rebounds, as Charlotte sped past The Citadel 111-93 on Tuesday night. Andrien White and Curran Scott, both freshmen, had breakout nights with 20 points apiece for the 49ers (3-9). Scott had scored 19 points in the previous four games combined and White reached double digits for the first time in the last six games. Charlotte's 111 points was its largest total in more than a year, and the 49ers shot 60 percent (42-70). Quinton Marshall scored 20 for The Citadel (7-6). Derrick Henry scored 19, and Brian White 14. The teams traded scoring runs in the first half before Uchebo took over in the second, scoring eight straight points as the 49ers stretched a four-point lead to 10, 59-49, in the first two-and-a-half minutes. Jon Davis added 17 points and seven assists for Charlotte.
Published in: FoxSports.com
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Monday
January 4, 2016
7b. Chattanooga Edges The Citadel in Southern Conference Opener
The Citadel (7-7, 0-1) dropped its Southern Conference opener 84-78 to preseason league favorite Chattanooga (12-2, 1-0) on Saturday at McAlister Field House. Five Bulldogs scored in double figures led by 16 points and five rebounds from Derrick Henry and 15 points from freshman Zane Najdawi. The Citadel forced 17 Chattanooga turnovers and made 13 three-pointers in the loss. Head coach Duggar Baucom's team led 72-66 at the last media timeout, but a crucial 10-0 run put together by the Mocs helped Chattanooga hold off The Citadel in the final minutes. A pair of freshmen sparked the Bulldogs' strong first half as Najdawi and Matt Frierson made big plays on both ends of the floor. With The Citadel trailing 13-7 at the 13:32 mark, Najdawi took over. He followed an offensive rebound and putback with a big block on the defensive end. A possession later, Najdawi buried the first of two consecutive three-pointers to surge the Bulldogs in front 14-13. The rest of the first half was a back-and-forth battle as Saturday's contest finished with 18 lead changes. When Chattanooga pushed ahead 27-19, Frierson came through, nailing a huge trey to stop the bleeding. The Citadel finished the first half on a 20-11 spurt. Frierson scored in double figures for the second time this season, adding 12 points on four three-pointers off the bench.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
January 4, 2016
7c. West Ashley's Tre' McLean ready for homecoming at The Citadel
With three Division I basketball programs in the Lowcountry, it's difficult to imagine a homegrown mid-major talent escaping the clutches of The Citadel, College of Charleston and Charleston Southern. But former West Ashley High School star Tre' McLean is definitely one who got away. McLean, now a 6-5 redshirt junior at Chattanooga, will make a homecoming of sorts on Saturday when the high-flying Mocs play The Citadel at McAlister Field House. McLean's mom, Lisa McLean, has been burning up the phone lines to The Citadel's ticket office, and there could be as many as 100 McLean supporters on hand for Saturday's 1 p.m. game. Among them will be West Ashley coach Ronnie DuPre, who watched McLean blossom into an all-state player who led the Wildcats to a 20-6 record and the third round of the Class AAAA playoffs as a senior.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
January 4, 2016
8. Midlands Offensive Player of the Year: Logan Bailey
It was a season Logan Bailey and Chapin fans won't be forgetting anytime soon. Bailey, Chapin's senior quarterback, rewrote the school's record book in leading the Eagles to their first 11-win season since 1987 and a trip to the Class 3A upper state semifinals. Bailey's numbers were off the charts. He threw for 3,029 yards and rushed for 1,259 while accounting for 66 touchdowns this season, including nine in a 63-60 overtime victory over Swansea. Bailey also had plenty of accolades as well. He was named the Class 3A Upper State Back of the Year and was a finalist for South Carolina's Mr. Football. He is The State's Offensive Player of the Year. "Logan Bailey is the best quarterback in South Carolina. Anybody who doesn't think so has never seen him play," Chapin coach Justin Gentry said on several occasions this year. While Gentry and other players and coaches sang Bailey's praises, the quarterback doesn’t say a lot about himself. Instead, he deflects the attention back on his teammates and coaching staff... Bailey now will turn his attention on to recruiting. He has visits lined up next month at Newberry, Presbyterian and The Citadel. Newberry is the only school to offer him at this point.
Published in: The State
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