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About Today's News Clips
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The Citadel in the News: Archive

December 2015

PUBLISH DATE STORIES
Monday
December 21, 2015
1. Christmas at The Citadel
The 4th Annual "Christmas Day at The Citadel" illustrates the true meaning of the holiday season, gGiving back to the community by helping others in need. Hundreds of volunteers give out hot meals, warm clothes, bikes, and toys to local families.
Broadcast on: WCIV-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
December 21, 2015
2a. Many women welcome chance for combat duty
Allise Berry wants to be a battlefield soldier but as a woman has been denied the chance. Now, though, that is changing as the military moves to implement the directive of Defense Secretary Ash Carter to open all combat jobs to women. Berry, 32, a Manchester, N.H., native, is an active-duty senior attending The Citadel under a military contract. She will be commissioned as an Army lieutenant when she graduates in May. She feels that combat fits her personality. "I think that's just what I would be good at. I like being out there and doing things. If it's dangerous that's better," she said. Carter last week announced that women could apply for front-line battle jobs. "As long as they qualify and meet the standards, women will now be able to contribute to our mission in ways they could not before," he said. Allowing women in combat is long overdue, supporters say, but critics such as U.S. Rep. Mark Sanford question whether it is best for the nation. "I think that the political pressures to gender-modify standards will prove to be overwhelming, and this will weaken the readiness of elite teams like the Navy SEALs," he said. Putting women on the front lines of battle could have other long-term consequences, too, he said. "It will lead to women being included in the Selective Service system and future drafts without a national debate on the merits of doing so," Sanford said.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
December 21, 2015
2b. The Citadel says goodbye to a loyal friend
The Citadel's retired mascot Boo IX died this past week at 12 years old. For many cadets, Boo and his co-mascot, General, who died earlier this year, were an integral part of The Citadel experience. The college's news release announcing Boo's death showed the depth of feeling The Citadel family has toward its mascots, which can be traced to the late 1920s. "Boo IX was never bothered by anything. He patiently let mobs of children and adults alike pet him and fuss over him," said Mike Groshon, assistant athletics director for facilities and caretaker of the bulldogs, in the news release. Groshon also said Boo was a constant sight at football games and wanted to be involved in the action. "Boo IX was known for following the ball and trying to get it at football games. He wanted to be out on the field," Groshon said. Boo retired from active duty two years ago. Groshon said the bulldog had been suffering from health problems over the past few months. His co-mascot, General Thomas Curtis Metsker, died in February.
Published in: Charleston Regional Business Journal
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Monday
December 21, 2015
3a. The Citadel crawls into the modern era
On his chest, near his heart, Justin Osborne bears a fading scar in the shape of a backward L. Tracing the ridge of hardened skin with his finger, he remembers his two years in Lima Company, one of The Citadel's 21 cadet companies. He and eight other Lima Company cadets gave the scars to themselves in 2005, he said. After filing down a letter pin from their uniforms until it shone, they held it in the flame of a cigarette lighter and then pressed it to their own flesh, branding themselves like livestock. With a decade's distance, Osborne scarcely recognizes the young man he was in the barracks. At the time, he said, he embraced the tradition of hazing so completely that he even brought it on himself. "It was done as a symbol of the Old Corps, of you being really one of the group," Osborne said. "So you welcomed the hazing, and it sucked, but you welcomed it... and they knew you wouldn't tell on them." Osborne's experience at The Citadel can hardly be called an isolated incident. Troubling stories and images have leaked out of The Citadel for decades, most recently when photos of freshman cadets wearing KKK-like white hoods surfaced on social media this month. The pictures were posted the same week as the six-month anniversary of the Emanuel AME church shooting, stirring up questions about the racial climate at the quintessentially Southern military college and placing it back in the national spotlight four years after it drew criticism for failing to catch a serial child molester in its ranks.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
December 21, 2015
3b. History and perception are The Citadel's problem, not Rosa
It's a good thing civil rights activists backed off their call for Citadel President reitred Lt. Gen. John Rosa's resignation. Especially since they shouldn't have asked for it in the first place. Gen. Rosa is not the problem here; in fact, given enough latitude and freedom, he's probably the solution. Earlier this month, The Citadel suffered another public relations nightmare when a group of cadets were photographed wearing pillowcases like, well, hoods. There were some lame excuses - they claimed to be dressed as ghosts of Christmas past or the Great Pumpkin or something - but anyone of college age should realize that such a get-up is strikingly reminiscent of a Ku Klux Klan outfit. And if they don't, then schools across the country are failing. Of course, this is the last thing the military college needs - particularly during these times and during this year. We are veterans in the war for civil rights, and we've suffered casualties. We have shed blood and tears because some idiot believed he was better than other people on account of his skin color. So anyone with half a brain should know that dressing up like a bunch of racist rednecks is not funny anywhere. Especially in Charleston. When Rosa found out what had happened on his campus, he took swift action. He sent a message that such behavior would not be tolerated. As he should have. So why would anyone call for his firing?
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
December 21, 2015
3c. Sharpton: Citadel upperclassmen asked cadets to remove pillowcases
Citadel cadets photographed wearing white pillowcases resembling hoods were asked to remove the costumes by upperclassmen, according to statements made by the Rev. Al Sharpton following his meeting with Citadel President Lt. Gen. John Rosa. Citadel officials and a representative from the National Action Network have confirmed Sharpton's comments. Prior to the almost two-hour meeting, The Citadel released a statement, saying the school has completed the initial stages of its investigation. The military college press release also noted that eight cadets involved with the photos have been temporarily suspended, but the students have been allowed to take final exams. They will resume classes with the rest of the Corps of Cadets on Jan. 13, as the administrative process proceeds, according to school officials. According to a statement released by The Citadel, the cadets involved with the incident have provided statements, and the school will conduct hearings to determine what disciplinary action, if any, will be taken following the school's holiday break. A final decision on the students' fates should be made by late January or early February. In addition to discussing the controversial photos, Sharpton also spoke with Rosa regarding the removal of the Confederate Naval Jack from The Citadel's Summerall Chapel, which is protected under the state's Heritage Act. "The good news I did hear from the president is that the upperclass white students in the room told them to take them off, so I'm glad that upperclassmen did that," Sharpton said, "but I would be even more happy if the state legislature would complete their job by letting state institutions do what was done on the state capitol grounds and by mandating the flag anywhere is a symbol of hate everywhere and that we see that there be due process or justice at the end of due process to these eight students that think that hate and supremacy are funny."
Published in: Charleston City Paper
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Monday
December 21, 2015
3d. Letter: Pride in The Citadel
I am responding to the recent incident at The Citadel. My first thought was how sophomorically stupid these cadets were. My second thought was about the many stupid things I and we did in our four years at the college. My third thought was this doesn't define the institution, and I will not give in to the race-baiters who control the media, colleges, and government today. If anyone wishes to define The Citadel, I would refer them to the thousands who have served, and the 670 alumni who have given their lives for this nation in every conflict from the Mexican War to the War on Terror. I would refer them to the leaders from military, government, medicine, science, and industry who have graduated and served their nation with distinction and honor. I would refer them to thousands of men and women graduates whose lives are forever marked by the honor and integrity learned at The Citadel. To the graduates who come from almost every state, economic status, race, and many foreign nations. I would refer them to contrast one sophomoric, stupid act at The Citadel to the chaos of once proud institutions of learning across this nation that are now shells of political correctness run amok.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
December 21, 2015
3e. Letter: The Citadel has lost its traditions
Just as another recent writer did, I also took off The Ring. The only difference is - I took mine off more than 20 years ago. I took it off not because the threat of a female cadet becoming part of the Corps was becoming more and more of a probability, or because of the perceived problem of hazing being debated in public, or because of the harm to some group's psyche. I took it off because for too long, true Citadel men (and now women) have kept quiet while the traditions and institutions of the school have been undermined which has encouraged cancerous influences both inside and outside The Citadel to work for the destruction of the unique nature of the Corps of Cadets. Today - as at probably any time in its history - there are members of the Corps who because of their irresponsible behavior, public actions, public complaining, and improper use of social media and technology bring discredit to the institution that they are a part of. Through the years, the ideals of honor, loyalty, and duty upon which The Citadel was founded, have been undermined by the need for political correctness. The fourth-class system has been radically changed and compromised and with it discipline and pride, which are among the first building blocks of leadership.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
December 21, 2015
4. Ryne Sandberg Meet & Greet Auction goes live
The Charleston RiverDogs have announced they will hold an online auction for the unique opportunity to rub shoulders with Hall of Famer Ryne Sandberg. Fans can bid on the chance to join Sandberg on Friday, Jan. 22, for a private Meet & Greet, presented by The Kickin' Chicken. The online auction for the Ryne Sandberg Meet & Greet is currently open for bidding at www.riverdogs.com/auctions and will continue weekly through 12 noon on Thursday, Jan. 21. Fans can bid all week (every week) with the bidding closing at 12 noon each Friday. There will be two weekly winners, and there is a cap of 30 individuals who can participate. Winners will be notified by email. During the Meet & Greet, winning bidders will have the opportunity to secure autographs, photos and visit with one of the premier infielders of all-time. The minimum bid is $50, and $150 will get you a "buy it now" guarantee. Refreshments will be provided by The Kickin' Chicken.
Published in: Moultrie News
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Monday
December 21, 2015
4b. C.E. Murray's Smith named Morning News Coach of the Year
Brian Smith was an all-state football player in Massachusetts and scholarship linebacker at The Citadel. "I was a good player, but that was a long time ago," Smith said. With a business administration degree, Smith found financial success as a Boston commodities broker but little personal fulfillment. So, he began a journey to be a head football coach that eventually led to C.E. Murray High School three years ago. It was a job not many advised him to take. Yet he took it and also took this year's 12-2 team to a Class A Division II state runner-up finish. After guiding the War Eagles past the devastation of an early October flood and still achieving every team goal except winning that state title, Smith is the Morning News Coach of the Year. "It was an amazing year," Smith said. "I've got to thank everybody who was involved with it. I had such a wonderful time this year with these guys not just because we were winning, but also because of the close family atmosphere we created throughout the community." Because of schedule changes related to catastrophic flooding in C.E. Murray's town of Greeleyville, the War Eagles were even required to play three games in the span of 11 days. And, they won them all. "They were warriors," Smith said. It could have been worse because the South Carolina High School League was originally not planning to extend the regular season by one week to allow more time between possible makeup games. At the time, it was as simple as this: Either get the games in within the originally planned season or lose those games.
Published in: SCNow.com
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Monday
December 21, 2015
5. Agenda for a Freer and More Prosperous Country
There is little that happens in society in general and the market economy in particular that most on the political "left" do not think needs more government intervention, regulation, and redistribution to make "better." One recent example of this is a lengthy "report" primarily prepared by Nobel Prize-winning economist, Joseph E. Stiglitz, for the Roosevelt Institute. Released in June 2015, Stiglitz and his co-authors present an agenda for, Rewriting the Rules of the American Economy: An Agenda for Growth and Shared Prosperity. "Progressive's" Agenda for Bigger Government: Running for 100 pages, it is based on the premise that markets are inherently likely to be unfair when left on their own without pervasive government oversight and regulation; that income inequality must be cured through various fiscal and interventionist policies; that America's economic system is persistently biased against ethnic and related minority groups; and that sustainable growth and stable financial markets require more intrusive government intervention, including making "full employment" a higher priority for the Federal Reserve in setting monetary policy. In the grab bag of policy proposals are included federal laws restoring union power to control labor markets and hold businesses hostage to their wage and benefit demands; even heavier environmental regulations on business and industry in the name of saving the planet; higher marginal tax rates on the classified "rich," and increased capital gains and dividend taxes to pay for all the things the Roosevelt Institute authors think government should be doing more of.
Published in: NassauInstitute.org
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Monday
December 21, 2015
6. Harry Grimshaw Bowers, '35
Born in 1914 and a native of Americus, Georgia, Harry G. Bowers graduated from The Citadel in 1935 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in History. He went on to the University of Georgia to study law and was the Historian of the Wilson Inn Chapter of Phi Delta Phi, the International Legal Fraternity. He obtained his law degree in 1938, was admitted to the Georgia Bar, and then practiced law in his hometown until 1940 when he entered active service with the US Army and received a commission. He attended Command and General Staff School at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas and then served in England until October 1942. On November 8, 1942, Major Bowers went ashore in the invasion of North Africa. An Intelligence Officer with the 12th Air Force, he also participated in the landings on Sicily and Italy. Having made it through three campaigns unscathed, Maj. Bowers died on December 21, 1943, in an accident when the B-24 in which he was traveling crashed in England. He was buried in Brookwood Cemetery, at London, England, and an announcement of his death was published in the Americus Times-Recorder on December 29, 1943. Captain, later Supreme Court Justice, Lewis F. Powell, Jr. wrote to Major Bowers' mother to inform her of the location of her son's grave after he had paid his final respects. Major Powell had recruited Captain Powell to join the 12th Air Force's intelligence staff.
Published in: The Citadel Memorial Europe
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Monday
December 21, 2015
7a. The Citadel's Delaney, Frye Named Walter Camp All-Americans
Dee Delaney and Sam Frye have been named Walter Camp All-Americans, it was announced Friday. Delaney and Frye are the second and third Walter Camp All-Americans from The Citadel, joining offensive lineman Mike Sellers, who was named to the team in 2012. The recognition is the fourth All-America team for Delaney this season and the second for Frye. Delaney was a first-team All-American by STATS and the Associated Press and a second-team selection by College Sports Madness, which also selected Frye as a third-team All-American. Delaney started all 13 games at cornerback and registered 46 tackles, including 1.0 for loss, five interceptions, eight pass breakups, two forced fumbles, one fumble recovery and one blocked kick. The sophomore from Seabrook, South Carolina, was a first-team All-Southern Conference selection. His interception total led the SoCon, tied for eighth in FCS, and tied for sixth on The Citadel's single-season list. His 13 passes defended also tied for sixth on the program's single-season list. He led the Southern Conference in total passes defended and in passes defended in conference play with nine. Delaney has seven interceptions in his career and already is tied for ninth on The Citadel's all-time career list.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
December 21, 2015
7b. The Citadel Basketball Falls to Campbell
The Citadel fell to Campbell 101-82 on Saturday afternoon at Gilbert Craig Gore Arena. The Bulldogs dropped to 7-5 on the season and 2-4 in true road games. Senior Derrick Henry led The Citadel in scoring for the third consecutive game, matching his career-high with 30 points off the bench. Henry has now reached double figures in all of the Bulldogs' first 12 contests and tallied at least 21 points in each of the past three games. The Citadel was hot early, jumping out to a quick 10-3 lead after three-pointers from Henry and Warren Sledge. Senior point guard P.J. Boutte was the driving force for the Bulldogs' offense in the opening minutes. He made three tough buckets in the paint and finished with 16 points, five rebounds and five assists. Following another layup from Boutte and a basket down low by junior Brian White, The Citadel held a 21-13 lead at the 12:11 mark. Campbell responded with a game-changing 22-4 run to seize a 35-25 advantage. Camels' point guard Chris Clemons captained the momentum swing and recorded a game-high 31 points. Campbell took a 47-38 lead into the halftime break. Trailing by 11 with 16:44 left, The Citadel sliced its deficit on the back of Henry. The graduate senior drove to the tin for a basket and hit a three-pointer two possessions later. The Bulldogs then turned a defensive stop into a transition bucket and cut Campbell's lead to 52-47. Henry scored 18 of his 30 points in the second half.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
December 21, 2015
7c. Bulldogs Top Saints in Friday Dual
The Citadel wrestling team picked up its third victory of the season on Friday afternoon, defeating Limestone 28-10 inside McAlister Field House. Sawyer Root (9-5) led things off for the Bulldogs at 184 pounds, taking a 10-4 decision over Limestone's Steve Decius to give The Citadel an early 3-0 lead. Marshall Haas (7-3) added to the lead at 197 pounds after earning a 5-1 decision giving the Bulldogs a 6-0 lead as junior Joe Bexley (5-4) took to the mat for the 285 bout. Bexley won easily, giving The Citadel a 12-0 lead after winning by technical default. At 125 pounds, Patrick Kearney (1-5) lost in a close match by a 7-5 decision to make the score 12-3 heading into the 133-pound match. Limestone would add another four points to its team score after Caleb Smith (7-7) dropped the 133-pound match by an 11-2 major decision but the Saints then forfeited at 141 pounds, giving Ty Buckiso (7-4) the win. With four weight classes remaining, The Citadel held an 18-7 lead. Matt Frisch (4-1) was the next Bulldog to take to the mat at 149 pounds. The senior took a 5-2 win by decision to increase The Citadel's lead to 21-7. In the 157-pound bout, Aaron Walker (9-3) held an 8-2 lead over Deandre Johnson heading into the third period. The junior had no trouble in the third period, cruising to a 17-5 win and effectively clinching the team win for the Bulldogs.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Monday
December 21, 2015
8a. Lexington seniors Hopper, Graves hope to go out with win
Jayson Hopper and Nick Graves didn't have much time to dwell on their championship game defeat. Less than a few hours after Lexington's 63-13 loss to Northwestern in the Class 4A, Division II title game, the two Wildcat seniors were on their way to Spartanburg to take part in practice for Saturday's 79th annual Shrine Bowl. "We went to sleep early and got up at like 4:30 in the morning and just focused on the Shrine Bowl," Hopper said. "It was tough being with a group of guys for four years and that being your last game going out with a loss. Life goes on and we woke up and got ready for the Shrine Bowl." "It was tough to see the season end in a way like that. Winning 13 straight games was a huge accomplishment for our team," Graves said. "It was sad to see it end, but I love all those guys. But it also was good, waking up in the morning and having a mindset for the Shrine Bowl." Both Graves and Hopper hope to go out with a win Saturday and said playing together one last time as teammates also is extra special this week. The two have been friends since they were in elementary school and played at Lexington the past four years. Graves, a defensive back, remains committed to The Citadel and finished the year with 38 tackles and two interceptions.
Published in: The State
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Monday
December 21, 2015
8b. Stewart humbled to be part of Daniel football tradition
Sure there are a lot of really good players at the Shrine Bowl, but they all make mistakes. It's just that Daniel offensive tackle Cade Stewart has no margin for error, not with Greer coach Will Young - a Daniel graduate and former Shrine Bowl lineman for the Lions - serving as his offensive line coach. "The way it works is if you mess up, he knows exactly how you were coached, because he was coached the same way," Stewart said, "so you can't really tell him how you were coached, because he is basically your coach, so there is no messing up." It's a price Stewart is more than willing to pay for being the latest in a long line of Daniel standouts at the Shrine Bowl... Stewart went from that to an "eye-opening experience" when he arrived at the Shriners Hospital. "When you walk in and you see people who are barely able to walk, and you're able to run, jump and play the sport you love, it just makes you take a step back and be grateful for everything you have," he said. Stewart has offers from Furman, Presbyterian College, The Citadel, Coastal Carolina, Mercer, Western Carolina and Charlotte. He said he'll wait until after the Shrine Bowl to decide on official visits. He's been getting a taste of what's to come this week, and that, too, has been an eye opener.
Published in: GreenvilleOnline.com
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Monday
December 21, 2015
8c. Wando's Noonan, Brown sharing Shrine Bowl experience
Nearly 30 years after playing in the Shrine Bowl, Jimmy Noonan will get a chance to participate in the all-star high school football game once again - this time as a coach. Noonan, a fullback out of Sumter High who played in the 1987 game, said he remembers vividly many of the details of the game, including the fact that he scored a touchdown in a 24-13 South Carolina victory. Noonan, now the head coach at Wando High School, also recalls the total experience and the friendships made during the week of practices leading up to the game. He said the game itself has changed somewhat, with the move from downtown Charlotte to Wofford College in Spartanburg among the biggest changes. The skill level of today's players is another major difference. "When I played, everyone was two backs in the backfield, two tight ends, and a lot of the game was played between the tackles so a fullback like me had a chance," Noonan said. "Now, the game is all played in space and the players are a lot faster, stronger and bigger nowadays. If I was a player today, I most likely would not have been selected to play in this game." Noonan parlayed his all-star experience into a scholarship to The Citadel. The coach is hopeful that this year's game can benefit his star player at Wando - running back Kevin Brown.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
December 9, 2015
4. USC a leader in improving minority graduation rates, Citadel dinged
While one South Carolina public university was recognized as a national leader for improving minority graduation rates, a second university was tabbed as one where the gap between white students and minorities has widened. The University of South Carolina in Columbia was recently recognized by The Education Trust as one of 26 universities that have made the largest gains in the past decade to close the graduation gap between minority and white students. The Education Trust study, titled "Rising Tide," looked at graduation rates among students at public colleges and universities from 2003 to 2013. Researchers wanted to see how minority graduation rates compared to white students at four-year public colleges with significant numbers of minority students whose overall graduation rates improved over that time period. The Citadel did not. It was listed among 17 institutions that had declining graduation rates for minorities while graduation rates for white students improved. Its graduation rate for minorities fell from 62.4 percent in 2003 to 55.2 percent in 2013. "We're conscientious that that gap is not acceptable," said Connie Ledoux Book, The Citadel's provost and dean of the college. "We're working every day to try to close that gap."
Published in: Greenville Online
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Wednesday
December 9, 2015
5a. EHS cadet accepted to Citadel
Elkin High School JROTC Cadet Maj. Grant Lloyd, the son of Jimmy and Pam Lloyd of Elkin, was recently accepted to the Citadel Military Academy in Charleston, South Carolina. Lloyd also was awarded the Army ROTC scholarship, valued at around $80,000. Lloyd has attended Elkin City Schools since kindergarten, but was not really sure about his chosen career until his sophomore year of high school when he enrolled in the JROTC program at Elkin High School. He soon began to consider a career in the military. In his junior year, Lloyd became Raider team leader and called commands as a leader for the drill team. He then became the battalions executive officer. As a senior, Lloyd took over as the battalion commander of Elkin High School's JROTC program, and has served well as the highest ranking cadet in JROTC at the school. Lloyd will begin courses at The Citadel in the fall of 2016, majoring in engineering. Upon graduation, he will be commissioned as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army.
Published in: Elkin Tribune
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Wednesday
December 9, 2015
6. Ellis Johnson to join Will Muschamp's USC staff
Ellis Johnson, who presided over one of the most successful defensive runs in South Carolina football history, is rejoining the Gamecocks coaching staff as an assistant to new head coach Will Muschamp. Johnson's role has not been identified. He could be Muschamp's linebackers coach or he could fill another defensive position. Johnson's imminent hiring was confirmed to The State through a source on the condition of anonymity. Johnson, 63, is a Winnsboro native who has coached everywhere from Spartanburg High School to The Citadel (his alma mater) to Alabama and Clemson and Auburn. He served as Steve Spurrier's defensive coordinator at South Carolina from 2008-2011. The Gamecocks finished third in the SEC in scoring defense and total defense in 2011. He left South Carolina in 2012 to become the head coach at Southern Miss, where he was fired after one season.
Published in: The State
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Wednesday
December 9, 2015
7a. The Citadel escapes pesky NAIA-member Voorhees 89-85
Derrick Henry scored 21 points and Brian White had 16 points and eight rebounds, and The Citadel escaped pesky NAIA-member Voorhees for an 89-85 victory on Tuesday night. Desmond Louis' 3-pointer from the corner got Voorhees within 86-80 with 1:50 left and James Williams' 3 less than a minute later made it 88-83. Williams had a steal on The Citadel's next trip and Denzel Bolden made a fast-break layup for a three-point game with 31 seconds left. Warren Sledge hit 1 of 2 free throws for a two-possession game and Jeffery Mack missed a 3-pointer on Voorhees' final shot. Quinton Marshall added 18 points for The Citadel (6-4). The Citadel took a 59-58 lead for its first advantage since it was 17-15. Quayson Williams' go-ahead basket came during an 18-0 run for a 67-58 lead as Voorhees went scoreless for five-plus minutes. Voorhees was led by Louis' 22 points.
Published in: USA Today
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Tuesday
December 8, 2015
1. A day that will live in infamy...
James Bacon King, Class of 1941, was a freshly commissioned lieutenant serving in the US Army Coastal Artillery Corps. He was stationed in Hawaii when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, and his Artillery Battalion was one of the first to fire on the Japanese Zero's as they bombed the island, and the battleships in the harbor. He survived the attack, and, fortunately, no Citadel Men were lost that day. Lieutenant Colonel King, U.S. Army, Retired, (January 18, 1920 - November 26, 2008), graduated from The Citadel in May, 1941, with a Bachelor degree in Political Science. He was a member of the Bond Volunteers and Summerall Guards, the Junior and Senior Rifle Drill Platoons respectively. William Crosswell Croft, Class of 1939, was stationed aboard the USS California at Pearl Harbor. A native of Aiken, S.C., William Croft (January 8, 1918 - March 21, 2009) attended The Citadel from 1935 - 1936 and then proudly accepted an appointment to the U.S. Naval Academy, where he graduated in 1940. Back in those days, The Citadel only offered Army ROTC training, and only the top two or three graduates would be offered a direct commission into the Army. If a college student wished a guarantee of receiving a direct commission upon his graduation, he would have to attend one of the two service academies at West Point or Annapolis.
Published in: The Citadel Memorial Europe
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Tuesday
December 8, 2015
2. The Citadel's Mike Houston, Eric Goins earn honors
The Citadel football coach Mike Houston has been named the Region 2 FCS coach of the year by the American Football Coaches Association. In his second season, Houston led the Bulldogs to a 9-4 record and their first Southern Conference championship and FCS playoff berth since 1992. That mark included a 23-22 upset at South Carolina, just the third win over an SEC team by a SoCon school, and a 41-38 win at Coastal Carolina, the program's first FCS playoff road win. The AFCS regional coaches of the year, and five national coaches of the year, will be recognized at the group's awards dinner on Jan. 12 in San Antonio. Meanwhile, Citadel kicker Eric Goins has been named a finalist for the Fred Mitchell Award for the top kicker in FCS and lower classes. Goins broke the school record with 16 field goals this season, and was 42 of 42 on extra points. Goins kicked five field goals in a win over VMI, a crucial 48-yarder in the win at USC and a 49-yarder to beat Coastal Carolina on the game's final play.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
December 8, 2015
3. Goins Named Fred Mitchell Award Finalist
The Citadel junior kicker Eric Goins is one of 10 finalists for the Fred Mitchell Award, it was announced Monday. Goins broke The Citadel's single-season made field goals record with 16 and also was a perfect 42-of-42 on PATs while adding 32 touchbacks on 74 kickoffs. The junior from Herndon, Virginia, ranked second in the Southern Conference with 42 PATs made and ranked third in the conference in made field goals and in kick scoring with an average of 6.9 points scored per game. Goins also broke the school's single-game records for made field goals and kick scoring with five and 17, respectively, in the Bulldogs' 35-14 victory over VMI. He has two field goals among the top 10 longest in school history, a 49 yarder at Coastal Carolina that is tied for eighth on the program's all-time list and a 48 yarder at South Carolina that is tied for 10th and is the longest made field goal by a Bulldog against an FBS opponent. His career totals of 90 points and 25 made field goals rank second in school history, and his 150 career points scored are fourth on the program's all-time list.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Tuesday
December 8, 2015
5b. National Christian's Mohammed Kabir will take versatile skill set to The Citadel
When National Christian senior Mohammed Kabir first heard The Citadel men's basketball team had offered him a scholarship, he immediately assumed the South Carolina military college was just "a strict military school, like we don't have a chance to do stuff," he said this past weekend. But a visit there changed Kabir's mind and reminded him of his upbringing in Nigeria, when he went to an elementary school sponsored by the police department, because his father is a retired police officer in Lagos, Nigeria. So in November, he officially signed on to play basketball for the Bulldogs, joining All-Met Christian Matthews as a Division I recruit at National Christian. "I figured out it was a good school and good surroundings and good people around it," Kabir said Saturday night after leading the ninth-ranked Eagles to a 70-64 win over No. 17 Bowie as part of the DMV Elite Tip-Off at Largo. That versatility came in handy in a tightly contested game with the Bowie Bulldogs on Saturday, when Kabir scored a team-high 24 points, grabbed 10 rebounds, dished out four assists and also had three steals. His ability to handle the ball and get into the lane in crunch time proved to be a deciding factor as National Christian and Bowie went back-and-forth during an exciting fourth quarter. "Anywhere you put me on a basketball court, I'll produce," Kabir said. "Basketball nowadays, it doesn't matter the position you play. Just get on the court and play hard all the time."
Published in: Washington Post
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Tuesday
December 8, 2015
5c. Two Bishops headed to The Citadel
Two Bishop England baseball seniors will follow the path of their coach to become Bulldogs next year. Bishops outfielder Jeffrey Brown and left-handed pitcher Gunnar Finneseth have both signed to The Citadel, where Bishop England head coach Mike Darnell played catcher in the 90's. "Knowing what The Citadel did for me, beyond just baseball, I encourage as many kids and I can to go there," Darnell said. "It's not for everybody but what it can do for you after baseball prepares you for life. I consider all of their coaches good friends of mine. It's a great program and I think it's a good opportunity for Jeffrey and Gunnar." Brown was a 2014 all-state selection, hitting .402 with 27 stolen bases and 25 runs scored at the top of the Bishops' lineup last season. The left-handed hitter is a ranked as the 27th best senior outfielder in the state by Diamond Prospects. He's the cousin of Minnesota Twins third-base coach Eugene Glynn. "Jeffery was a player we heard a good bit about and then he came to camp and really opened our eyes," The Citadel associate head coach and recruiting coordinator David Beckley said. "We are excited about his athleticism. He will be able to put a lot of pressure on the defense with his speed and is also very capable of being a plus defender."
Published in: Moultrie News
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Tuesday
December 8, 2015
7b. The Citadel hosts Voorhees on Tuesday
The Citadel basketball team hosts Voorhees College at 6 p.m. Tuesday at McAlister Field House. It will be the final chance for fans to see the Bulldogs in action at home until they open Southern Conference play vs. Chattanooga on Jan. 2. ­ The Bulldogs (5-4) are seeking their third win of the season when coming off a loss. Voorhees is the third and final non-Division I opponent that The Citadel faces this season. In two previous wins over non-DI Mid-Atlantic Christian and Bob Jones, the Bulldogs recorded the two highest scoring outputs in the Southern Conference this season with 132 points and 121 points, respectively. The Citadel is 1-0 all-time against Voorhees and the last time the two teams squared off was a 95-60 blowout in 2004. The Bulldogs boast the highest scoring offense in the nation with 94.1 points per game and lead the Southern Conference in assists per game (21.0), assist/turnover ratio (1.5), three-pointers per game (13.1), total field goals made (301), steals per game (10.7) and turnover margin (5.1) heading into Tuesday's contest.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Tuesday
December 8, 2015
8. Flipping the Field: Which team has the most momentum entering the College Football Playoff?
Around here we love the title "Championship Drive." Every Monday night this season, I've been on an ESPNU show by that name. There's another one that airs on ESPN every weekend. I'm also lucky enough to be in the rotation for the daily Championship Drive podcast. And as soon as I hit "send" on this column, I'll start working on a couple of feature stories for the College Football Playoff preview edition of ESPN The Magazine. You can probably guess what we've titled it by now. The team you should know about but probably don't: Charleston Southern - If you look at the FCS playoff bracket, you'll quickly recognize three of the teams. Jacksonville State pushed Auburn into overtime. Portland State beat Washington State. North Dakota State beat Iowa State, has won four straight FCS titles and has hosted College GameDay. But the best story is Charleston Southern, which knocked off archrival The Citadel. Yes, the same Citadel that beat South Carolina two weeks ago. Just four years ago, the Buccaneers were 0-11. Now they're 10-2, Big South champs and will face top-ranked Jacksonville State in an FCS quarterfinal on Friday (8 p.m. ET, ESPN2). They won't be intimidated by the No. 1 team either. Earlier this year they knocked off Coastal Carolina in a 33-25 thriller. The Chanticleers were No. 1 that day, too.
Published in: ESPN.com
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Tuesday
December 8, 2015
9. Robert 'Rob' Nathan Mayer, tried to put the 'home' in nursing home, dies at 66
Rob Mayer enjoyed the company of senior citizens. He loved his elderly grandparents. And when his parents traveled, he followed the family's European butler and cook around the Mayers' Winnetka home, listening to their stories and wisdom. His great-uncle and great-aunt, Maurice L. and Hulda Rothschild, owned Rothschild's clothing stores. Upon her death, Hulda Rothschild requested that Mr. Mayer oversee the funds the couple designated for charity. He established a foundation that dispensed grants and funded research and conferences on enhancing the lives of the elderly by ensuring they were comfortable - whether in their own houses or in long-term care facilities. Under his leadership for the past 25 years, the Hulda B. and Maurice L. Rothschild Foundation worked with architects on innovative design, promoted homelike settings in residential communities, and advocated with the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services. The foundation also convened regulatory task forces that brought together government officials, designers and nursing-home companies... A summer program at The Citadel, South Carolina's military college, kindled an interest in the Civil War. He collected ceremonial Civil War swords.
Published in: Chicago Sun-Times
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Monday
December 7, 2015
1a. Charleston Southern tops The Citadel 14-6 in FCS playoffs
Mike Holloway rushed for 120 yards and two second-quarter touchdowns and Charleston Southern won its first-ever FCS playoff game 14-6 over The Citadel on Saturday.The Buccaneers (10-2) play at top-seeded Jacksonville quarterfinals next weekend. Holloway scored from 41 and 32 yards after two of the five Bulldogs turnovers in the crosstown rematch and had 100 yards at the half. Charleston Southern rallied from a 17-6 halftime deficit to win 33-20 early in the season. Holloway had 172 yards and three touchdowns in the previous matchup. The two touchdowns came on drives that produced 108 of the 199 of total offense for the Buccaneers. The Bulldogs (9-4), which closed the regular season with a huge 23-22 upset of South Carolina, had 267 yards of offense, 199 on the ground, after piling up 524 in its opening win over Coastal Carolina. The Citadel took a 3-0 lead in the first quarter on an Eric Goins 43-yard field goal and he added a 39-yarder early in the fourth.
Published in: USA Today
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Monday
December 7, 2015
1b. football
football
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
December 7, 2015
1c. football
football
Published in: WFXG-TV Augusta, GA
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Monday
December 7, 2015
2. Faculty honored for excellence, innovation and service
Nine Citadel faculty members have been honored for their contributions to scholarship, teaching and service. The fourth annual event recognizing The Citadel's Faculty Excellence Awards and Spotlight Awards highlights the accomplishments of The Citadel's dedicated faculty. A committee of Citadel faculty annually chooses recipients who showcase innovative teaching in the graduate and undergraduate colleges, creative scholarship and research projects, and dedicated service to The Citadel community. The recipients of the Excellence Awards will receive $2,000 and the recipients of the Spotlight Awards will receive $500 thanks to The Citadel Foundation.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Monday
December 7, 2015
3a. Citadel professor brings the story of Braddock's Defeat to life
Equipped with 18th-century British Army uniforms, Dr. David Preston, an award-winning historian, had the full attention of a large group of teens watching him in person, and on closed-circuit television, from several high schools in the Pittsburgh area. He was speaking in animated fashion about a 1755 battle so far from victorious it is described as "ill-fated", "disastrous", and "catastrophic." Braddock's Defeat, or the Battle the Monongahela, ranks as one of the worst disasters in the British Army's history. Two of every three British soldiers who crossed the Monongahela River on July 9, 1755 were killed and wounded. One of the survivors was the young George Washington, who acted as an aide to General Braddock: "The setting sun brought an end to the day of slaughter. But Washington's ordeal-like that of the battle's survivors-was just beginning. Braddock ordered Washington to undertake a mission that the utterly spent aide must have thought impossible...," Preston writes in his book Braddock's Defeat: The Battle of the Monongahela and the Road to Revolution. Preston, a professor of history at The Citadel, was invited to speak to the more than 100 high school students, following the 2015 release of Braddock's Defeat; one of numerous invitations for appearances related to the highly-lauded book.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Monday
December 7, 2015
3b. Man Who Captured World's Most Iconic Images of the Citadel Retires
Russell Pace was hired by The Citadel in 1986 to take pictures. Since then, Pace has produced perhaps half a million images - of the military college's dress parade (homecoming), sports matches and campus life. Some of those photographs have been published in the Los Angeles Times, Washington Post, Time, Newsweek and Sports Illustrated. Hundreds have appeared in the pages of The Post and Courier. On Jan. 1, Pace will retire, relocating with his wife to Hilton Head Island where the couple will live by the beach and work on building up a health care-sector nonprofit, he said. He's remained at The Citadel for 30 years "because of the cadets, faculty, staff and administration," who have made him feel welcomed, who have valued his contributions - for whom his affection swells. "It's been a fun place," he said. Lt. General John W. Rosa, president of The Citadel, lauded Pace's visual panorama accrued over three decades. "The remarkable photographs taken by Russ Pace have become iconic images documenting the rhythm of life for the Corps of Cadets, the beauty of our campus, the achievements of our athletics teams and the city of Charleston itself," Rosa said in a statement. "His extraordinary talent combined with his dedication to visually record almost every parade, game or event over a period of 30 years is commendable. In his photographs, Russ leaves a visual legacy that will last for lifetimes to come."
Published in: HighBeam.com
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Monday
December 7, 2015
4. Celebrate the season and park for free
'Tis the season for the Lowcountry to light up for the holidays! The City of Charleston is hosting their annual Holiday Magic in Historic Charleston with free family-friendly activities, live performances and decorations decking the halls...er, streets. Click on the events below for more information. Candlelight Services at the Citadel: Dec. 4 - 6, 7:30 p.m. One of Charleston's longest and most memorable holiday traditions is the Christmas Candlelight Service at The Citadel's historic Summerall Chapel. The services, which are held for the community and for visitors to Charleston, feature Christmas music performed by members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets.
Broadcast on: WCIV-TV Charleston, SC
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Monday
December 7, 2015
5. Wide gaps in minority, white graduation rates at The Citadel, report shows
Although The Citadel boasts one of the highest graduation rates among South Carolina public colleges and universities, not all students are leaving campus with a degree in hand. Underrepresented minority students enrolled at The Citadel graduate at a rate more than 15 percentage points lower than their white peers. And the gap between minority and white students has increased by nearly 9 percentage points over a recent 10-year span. A new report released this month has found that despite the fact that graduation rates have risen at more than two-thirds of U.S. public institutions in the past decade, "underrepresented minority" students, including those who are African-American, Latino and Native American, are still graduating at much lower rates than whites. For their report, researchers at Education Trust, a national education advocacy nonprofit, identified 255 public colleges and universities with improving six-year graduation rates and sizable minority student populations. To account for year-to-year fluctuations in the data, they used the three-year averages to determine the changes in graduation rates among minority and white students between 2003 and 2013. "Our first key thing that we found was that underrepresented students at public institutions were improving slightly more than white students," said Kimberlee Eberle-Sudre, one of the report's authors. "But when you look at the change in gaps of achievement between white and underrepresented students, that had barely changed."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
December 7, 2015
6. Associate Citadel professor arrested for DUI after tailing vice president's motorcade
A Citadel associate professor was arrested and charged with DUI after ignoring barriers and driving up behind Vice President Joe Biden's motorcade Thursday night, according to the Charleston County Sheriff's Office. Catherine Elizabeth Burton, 48, of Renee Drive in North Charleston, an associate professor of criminal justice at the military college, was charged with driving under the influence and failure to stop for blue lights. The Citadel had not made a decision on her status at the school. "A decision has not been reached on Ms. Burton's teaching duties going forward," Col. Brett Ashworth said Friday afternoon. "The welfare of our cadets, students, faculty and staff is our first priority. She is being offered support through the college's Employee Assistance Program." Burton was arrested about 8:30 p.m. Thursday after being observed driving on Interstate 26 toward North Charleston after the motorcade had passed, according to the incident report. The interstate was closed to traffic while Biden was escorted from downtown Charleston to the airport.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
December 7, 2015
7a. Floyd Named SoCon Defensive Player of the Month
The Citadel's Tevin Floyd has been selected as the Southern Conference Defensive Player of the Month for November, it was announced Thursday. Floyd recorded a team-high 31 tackles, including 2.0 for loss with 1.0 sack, one interception and one forced fumble in the Bulldogs' four November games. The junior linebacker from Tallahassee, Florida, returned his interception 75 yards for a touchdown against VMI for his FCS-leading second interception return touchdown of the season. His 132 interception return yards are first in the SoCon and second in FCS, and his three interceptions this season are tied for third in the conference. Floyd tied his single-game career highs with 1.0 sack and one forced fumble as part of a seven-tackle performance in The Citadel's 41-38 win at No. 9 Coastal Carolina in the first round of the NCAA FCS Playoffs. His forced fumble came on a strip-sack with 44 seconds remaining in a tied game and gave The Citadel the ball back, allowing the Bulldogs to convert the game-winning 43-yard field goal and claim their first road playoff win in school history.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Monday
December 7, 2015
7b. Inside The Game: The Citadel at Charleston Southern
Charleston Southern and The Citadel meet for the 10th time, and never have the stakes been higher between the Lowcountry rivals - the winner moves on to the elite eight for the FCS playoffs and keep its hopes for a national championship alive. The Bulldogs hold a 5-4 lead in the series, which began in 2002, but the Buccaneers have won the last three meetings, including a 33-20 win this season at The Citadel's Johnson Hagood Stadium. Standing-Room Only: There's been some consternation this week, especially among Citadel fans, about the NCAA holding a second-round playoff game between rivals located 16 miles apart at a stadium with a capacity of just 4,000. There were almost twice that many at last year's game between the Bulldogs and Bucs at Bucccaneer Field, and almost 12,000 at this year's game at 21,000-seat Johnson Hagood Stadium. But CSU earned a No. 8 national seed, a first-round bye and the right to host a second-round game with a minimum bid to the NCAA of $40,000, and the chairman of the FCS playoff committee says he expects a "great atmosphere" at the game.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
December 7, 2015
7c. Charleston Southern, The Citadel keep eyes on FCS prize
Only 16 teams remain in the hunt for the FCS national championship. The two teams that make it to the title game on Jan. 9 in Frisco, Texas, will have slogged through three or four playoff games at the end of a long, hard regular season, a total of 15 or 16 college football games for the finalists. That title game is "the light at the end of the tunnel," said The Citadel quarterback Dominique Allen. "I see it kind of like being a cadet at The Citadel," Allen said this week. "You hate it while you are going through it, but there's a light at the end of the tunnel. We've been playing football for a long time, for almost a third of the year. But we have to stay focused, and just keep our eyes on the prize." The light at the end of the tunnel will disappear for either The Citadel or Charleston Southern on Saturday, when the two Lowcountry teams meet in the second round of the FCS playoffs. Game time is at 1 p.m. at CSU's Buccaneer Field. The 9-3 Bulldogs will be playing their 13th game of the season, 10th in a row without a week off and fourth straight road game. The 9-2 Bucs, the No. 8 seed in the playoffs, earned a first-round bye last weekend and haven't played since a 55-6 loss at Alabama on Nov. 21.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
December 7, 2015
8a. College of Charleston pulls away from The Citadel 82-74
Canyon Berry led a balanced attack with 16 points and College of Charleston pulled away down the stretch to defeat The Citadel 82-74 on Saturday for the Cougars' ninth straight win in the cross-town rivalry. Derrick Henry's layup with 2:37 to play but the Bulldogs up 74-73 but from there they had three turnovers and missed four 3-point attempts. Jarrell Brandley gave the Cougars (5-2) the lead for good with a 3-point play at the 1:50 mark, James Bourne made a layup with a minute left, followed by a Cameron Johnson free throw then a layup at 33 seconds that made it 81-74. Nick Harris had 13 points, Bourne 12, Brantley 11 and Payton Hulsey 10 for Charleston, which shot 59 percent, despite going 2 of 13 from 3-point range, and made 20 of 30 free throws.
Published in: FoxSports.com
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Monday
December 7, 2015
8b. Cross-town rivalry: College of Charleston plays at Citadel on Saturday
The college basketball fraternity is a small one. Case in point, when first-year Citadel head basketball coach Duggar Baucom was an assistant coach at Mars Hill in the mid-1990s, he went to look at a tough, tenacious undersized point guard at Spartanburg Methodist Junior College. That point guard in question was current College of Charleston basketball coach Earl Grant. Baucom picked up Grant in Spartanburg and made the 90-minute drive up I-26 to Mars Hill. "I was on to Earl early in his career," Baucom said. "I was at Mars Hill and he was at Spartanburg Methodist, and I went down to get him and brought him up for an official visit." Grant remembers the visit well, but the Stall High School graduate turned down Baucom, telling him "“coach, I'm not sure the mountains are for me." Grant, who would go on to be an assistant basketball coach at The Citadel, eventually signed with Georgia College and led the Bobcats to two Peach Belt Conference titles and two NCAA Division II Tournament appearances.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
December 7, 2015
9. Bulldogs Add Twelve to 2016 Class
The Citadel baseball team recently announced the addition of 12 student-athletes to the class of 2016 on Friday. "We are excited that these 12 student-athletes have selected The Citadel to continue their education and their baseball experience," head coach Fred Jordan said. "We look forward to seeing them on campus next fall." The new student-athletes are: J.D. Davis, Jr., Will Abbott, Will Pillsbury, Zach Taglieri, Austin Todd, Jonathan Sabo, Jared Firmstone, Bryce Leasure, Chase Kinney, Michael "Bo" Gobin, Jeffrey Brown and Gunnar Finneseth.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Friday
December 4, 2015
1. Citadel football season turned around by 'best open date'
The scene was grim that night at Johnson Hagood Stadium, at least from a Citadel perspective. While Charleston Southern players celebrated a 33-20 win on Sept. 26, the Bulldogs undressed in a silent locker room. Coach Mike Houston was tight-lipped and brief as he assessed the damage. Houston's team had won its first two games, including an impressive victory over Southern Conference contender Western Carolina. But then came a blowout loss at Georgia Southern, in which rookie quarterback Dominique Allen threw two interceptions and the Bulldogs fumbled seven times, losing three. That was followed by a crushing third straight loss to CSU, a game in which the Bulldogs were outscored 27-3 in the second half; The Citadel rushed for just 15 yards after halftime. "We were all very disappointed," said Allen. "We had the lead in the fourth quarter of that game, but we couldn't move the ball and things didn't go our way. But we came back the next week, and we knew we had a job to do."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Friday
December 4, 2015
2. Crochet named First-team Academic All-American
The Citadel's Joe Crochet has been named a first-team CoSIDA Academic All-American, it was announced Thursday. Crochet has graduated from The Citadel with a bachelor's degree in business administration and is pursuing his MBA. The junior defensive lineman from Stone Mountain, Georgia, earned an undergraduate grade-point average of 3.82 and was named the team's Defensive Player of the Year last season. This year, he has recorded 37 tackles, including 5.5 for loss with 3.0 sacks, two fumble recoveries, three pass breakups and one quarterback hurry. His fumble recoveries total is tied for first in the Southern Conference and for 25th in FCS, and his 3.0 sacks in conference play ranked sixth in the SoCon. He recorded a career-high 2.0 tackles for loss as part of a career-high-tying five tackles in The Citadel's 23-22 win at South Carolina to end the regular season. Crochet is the first Bulldog to earn first-team CoSIDA Academic All-America honors since 1989 and is the eighth Academic All-America selection for The Citadel. The last time The Citadel earned Academic All-America recognition was 2001 when Travis Stephens was a second-team selection. Crochet is one of two from the Southern Conference on the first team this season and gives the conference at least one first-team honoree for the third straight year.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Friday
December 4, 2015
3. Allen, Citadel win first playoff
Richmond Hill native Dominique Allen's big day led The Citadel to a last-second 41-38 win over Coastal Carolina in an opening-round Football Championship Subdivision playoff game Saturday in Conway, South Carolina. According to ESPN.com, Allen ran for 174 yards and two touchdowns for the Bulldogs (9-3), who won on kicker Eric Goins' 43-yard field goal as time expired. Allen had three carries for 15 yards on the final drive, which started after the Chanticleers (9-3) lost a fumble at their own 41 with 44 seconds left. The Citadel will play No. 8 Charleston Southern at 1 p.m. this Saturday in Charleston, according to NCAA.com. Richmond Hill native Ronnie Harris is a freshman running back for Charleston Southern.
Published in: BryanCountyNews.com
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Friday
December 4, 2015
4. U-M staffer Partridge to coach linebackers in bowl game
Michigan is moving on quickly after losing defensive coordinator and linebackers coach D.J. Durkin. U-M coach Jim Harbaugh announced tonight that player personnel director Chris Partridge will coach Michigan's linebackers for the bowl season. No replacement was announced for defensive coordinator duties. "Chris has a proven track record as a successful coach," Harbaugh said in a statement. "He brings a lot of energy and enthusiasm to his work as our Director of Player Personnel. I know that same passion will be exhibited on the field." A large part of Partridge's current role involves organizing the program's recruiting efforts and now, as an assistant taking Durkin's spot, he can be on the road recruiting during the current contact period. Whoever was named to the spot likely could have taken that role. Michigan will find out its bowl destination Sunday, but many expect it to be either the Citrus or Outback bowls, both on Jan. 1. Partridge has coaching experience, having led a New Jersey high school, Paramus Catholic, for five years, taking it from a nondescript program, ranked 4,250th nationally, to the No. 4 team in the nation ranked by USA Today. Among his 30 Division I products, U-M star defensive back Jabrill Peppers and U-M offensive lineman Juwann Bushell-Beatty. Though Partridge left after last season and came to Michigan, one of the players he coached at Paramus, defensive tackle Rashan Gary, is the No. 1 high school player in the country and considering Michigan. He has college coaching experience working with the defensive line at The Citadel and was a secondary coach at Lafayette (Pa.) College, his alma mater.
Published in: Detroit Free Press
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Thursday
December 3, 2015
1. Community Connections: Citadel Veterans Association
As the country finds more and more ways to help those who have put their lives on the line to keep our nation safe, The Citadel is definitely doing its part. Alfonso Rogers stopped by the FOX 24 Morning News with details about the many opportunities offered at The Citadel through the Veterans Association.
Published in: Fox Charleston
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Thursday
December 3, 2015
2. Silicon 2.0 promises superpowered chips and solar cells
IT'S a material so good they named a valley after it. And no wonder. Today's connected society would be impossible without silicon. Chips made from it run everything from smartphones to pacemakers, with some 6.5 million square metres of the stuff rolled out every year. And the solar industry relies on vast quantities of silicon to make the photovoltaic cells that convert light into electricity... Silicon belongs to the semiconductor family of materials, whose ability to carry an electric current lies somewhere between that of a metallic conductor and an insulator. In a computer chip, applying a small voltage is enough to flip silicon’s state between conducting and insulating, producing the binary 1s and 0s of digital information. This control over the flow of electrons, combined with its low cost, stability and high availability, has made silicon the material of choice in electronics for over 60 years. The trouble is, conventional silicon chips are about as good as they are going to get. A top-of-the-range chip today squeezes in around 5 billion transistors - the basic on-off switches that control the flow of electrons. That's close to the upper limit. Try to pack in many more, and material defects combined with the heat produced by all the transistors switching simultaneously start to adversely affect a chip's efficiency. This is the main reason why processor speeds have more or less stalled in the past decade. "Electronics has pretty much reached the peak of its performance," says Lok Lew Yan Voon, a semiconductor physicist at The Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina in Charleston.
Published in: NewScientist.com
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Thursday
December 3, 2015
3. Letter: Honor Sen. Hollings at The Citadel
In a recent column Brian Hicks praised Sen. Fritz Hollings for his unselfish advocacy for changing the name of the Hollings Judicial Center in downtown Charleston to the J. Waties Waring Judicial Center in honor of the Charleston judge whose rulings paved the way for the U.S. Supreme Court civil rights decision in 1954. Hicks, among others like Mayor Joe Riley, also supported the decision to erect a statue to honor Sen. Hollings for his distinguished career. As governor of South Carolina, Hollings pioneered the creation of the state's technical college system, and is widely regarded as one of its most successful chief executives. Many consider him to be the state's most important federal officeholder of the 20th century. He is a graduate of The Citadel class of 1942, which is famous for its roster of distinguished military and civilian leaders. Among his acts of service to his alma mater is his successful effort to secure federal funding that proved indispensable to rebuilding Padgett-Thomas Barracks, the most prominent landmark on the campus. Beyond his portrait displayed in the library, one can find on campus no visible or otherwise prominent recognition of his service to his nation, state and alma mater. A tribute commensurate with his significance could entail naming part of the new building housing the school of humanities and social sciences as the "Hollings Center for the Humanities and Social Sciences," or a major academic program in his honor. The Citadel recently created an endowed chair named for Citadel alumnus Mayor Joe Riley. The retiring mayor himself will occupy it. Surely the college should create a permanent testimony at The Citadel to the life and career of Sen. Hollings.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
December 3, 2015
4. Palmetto Sunrise: Carson visits South Carolina today
Dr. Ben Carson is barnstorming across York County and the Upstate today, capping a week of visits by GOP presidential candidates. Carson starts the day with a town hall meeting at Sun City Carolina Lakes in Fort Mill at noon. He'll attend another town hall at Winthrop University Coliseum in Rock Hill at 1:45 p.m. Carson then heads to Spartanburg with a 5:15 p.m. news conference at Sports/Star Center in Spartanburg, followed by the 7 p.m. Commander-in-Chief Presidential Forum at Wofford College. Carson's visit comes after campaign stops by Carly Fiorina, Florida Sen. Marco Rubio and former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum, this week. Fiorina wraps up her three-day trip through the Palmetto State with a stop in North Charleston today. She talked business in Columbia with business men and women yesterday and later military issues at The Citadel.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
December 3, 2015
5. Fort Mill High's Dee Christopher named 'Principal of the Year'
Fort Mill High School Principal Dee Christopher was named the South Carolina Secondary Principal of the Year by the South Carolina Association of School Administrators in a surprise presentation at the district office Wednesday. Christopher's parents, wife and children were all on hand for the presentation. Christopher's dad, Reggie Christopher, spent 40 years in public education and was awarded the same honor in 1986. "He has worked hard and done a wonderful job," Reggie Christopher said. "His strongest point is relationship development and his love for the kids. He really loves the kids." The South Carolina Association of School Administrators uses an application and interview process to select the Secondary Principal of the Year. Recommendation from the district's superintendent is also required. Dee Christopher graduated from Wren High School in 1986 and received his bachelor's degree from Furman University in 1990 and a master's degree from The Citadel in 1999.
Published in: The Herald
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Thursday
December 3, 2015
6. Citadel basketball falls at Air Force, 97-93
Playing its fifth straight game away from home, The Citadel basketball team lost by 97-93 at Air Force on Wednesday night. The Bulldogs led by 11 in the first half and by six at halftime, but could not rally in the final minutes and fell to 5-3 on the season. Trevor Lyons scored 22 points to lead Air Force (5-2), which made 29 of 45 free throws to 13 of 15 for The Citadel. Warren Sledge scored a career-best 18 points to lead The Citadel, which shot 18 of 50 from 3-point range. Derrick Henry added 16 points and Quinton Marshall 15 for the Bulldogs, while P.J. Boutte had 13 points and 11 assists. The Citadel trailed by just 90-87 with a minute left after a free throw by Henry. But the Falcons' Hayden Graham, who scored 20 points, spun in a reverse layup for 92-87, and scored again after a Citadel turnover for a 94-87 lead. Henry hit treys with 9.1 and 3.9 seconds left to whittle the lead back down to 96-93. Air Force's Kyle Broekhuis made one free throw for the final margin. "I thought the guys played their guts out," said Citadel coach Duggar Baucom, whose team was called for 32 fouls to 13 for Air Force. "There were a lot of 50-50 balls in the second half which we needed to get. They attacked our pressure and they really paraded to the foul line."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
December 3, 2015
7. Sapakoff: Coach of the year in S.C.? Dabo Swinney, Jamey Chadwell, Mike Houston salute each other
So who is the college football Coach of the Year in South Carolina this season? Dabo Swinney seems like the obvious choice. Clemson is a consensus No. 1, and 12-0. The Tigers with a win over North Carolina on Saturday night in the ACC Championship Game get a precious playoff berth, probably as the top seed. If relative accomplishment is the standard, Charleston Southern's Jamey Chadwell is hard to beat. The Buccaneers not only made the FCS playoffs for the first time in school history, they earned a national seed. Wins over Coastal Carolina and The Citadel are highlights of a 9-2 record. CSU was picked to finish third in the Big South preseason poll. But Mike Houston might be the leader in the clubhouse. The Citadel was picked seventh - that's one spot above last-place VMI - in the Southern Conference preseason poll. The Bulldogs finished tied with Chattanooga atop the SoCon standings. They are 9-3 with back-to-back wins at South Carolina and Coastal Carolina going into a second-round playoff game at Charleston Southern on Saturday. Who better to talk about Swinney, Chadwell and Houston than the three coaches themselves.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
December 3, 2015
8. Despite early season antics, Charleston Southern not done with The Citadel just yet
Charleston Southern literally brought out the broom following its comeback victory over The Citadel in late September, proud to have swept what appeared to be the final three games in a local rivalry turned sour. Turns out there's a little more housecleaning left to do before this series hits the shelf. The stakes have never been higher between these schools separated by 16 miles of I-26, with Saturday's winner at Buccaneer Field not only advancing to the FCS quarterfinals but also holding some provincial bragging rights for the foreseeable future. Jamey Chadwell inherited a Charleston Southern program that was one season removed from going 0-11 when he took over in 2013, and the turnaround didn't take long. The Buccaneers went 10-3 in his first season at the helm, barely missed the playoffs while going 8-4 in 2014 and finished the job this season by rolling through all six Big South games and going 9-0 against FCS competition. Arguably the stiffest FCS challenge Charleston Southern faced came Sept. 26 at Johnson Hagood Stadium, The Citadel's 21,000-seat facility in the Hampton Park neighborhood on Charleston's downtown peninsula. The Buccaneers trailed by 11 at halftime and by four going into the fourth quarter before ripping off the game's final 17 points in a 33-20 victory.
Published in: FoxSports.com
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Thursday
December 3, 2015
9. Charleston Southern ready for rematch with Citadel in FCS playoffs
Amidst all the talk about a perceived lack of respect and seating issues for Saturday's FCS playoff game between The Citadel and Charleston Southern, there is indeed a football game to be played at Buccaneer Field. Charleston Southern (9-2) will host The Citadel at 1 p.m. in the Buccaneers' first-ever playoff game. The visiting Bulldogs bring with them a 9-3 record that includes an upset at South Carolina and a first-round playoff victory at Coastal Carolina in the past two weeks. CSU has won the last three meetings with The Citadel, including a 33-20 victory at Johnson Hagood Stadium in September. After that victory, CSU head coach Jamey Chadwell raised the ire of many Bulldogs' fans when he indicated that his program feeds off a lack of respect from its downtown rival. Earlier this week, Chadwell reiterated, but also clarified, his thoughts. "I believe wholeheartedly that the majority of their people - their football staff, their players, many in their athletic department - respect what we're trying to do here at CSU," said Chadwell, who is 27-9 in three seasons at CSU. "There also are a lot of people who have a perception of CSU that may not be entirely accurate and they certainly don't respect who we are and what we are about."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
December 2, 2015
1. Man who captured the world's most iconic images of The Citadel retires
Russell Pace was hired by The Citadel in 1986 to take pictures. Since then, Pace has produced perhaps half a million images - of the military college's dress parade (homecoming), sports matches and campus life. Some of those photographs have been published in the Los Angeles Times, Washington Post, Time, Newsweek and Sports Illustrated. Hundreds have appeared in the pages of The Post and Courier. On Jan. 1, Pace will retire, relocating with his wife to Hilton Head Island where the couple will live by the beach and work on building up a health care-sector nonprofit, he said. He's remained at The Citadel for 30 years "because of the cadets, faculty, staff and administration," who have made him feel welcomed, who have valued his contributions - for whom his affection swells. "It's been a fun place," he said. Lt. General John W. Rosa, president of The Citadel, lauded Pace's visual panorama accrued over three decades. "The remarkable photographs taken by Russ Pace have become iconic images documenting the rhythm of life for the Corps of Cadets, the beauty of our campus, the achievements of our athletics teams and the city of Charleston itself," Rosa said in a statement. "His extraordinary talent combined with his dedication to visually record almost every parade, game or event over a period of 30 years is commendable. In his photographs, Russ leaves a visual legacy that will last for lifetimes to come."
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Wednesday
December 2, 2015
2a. Fiorina in Midlands during 3-day SC swing
Republican presidential hopeful Carly Fiorina will meet with business leaders and a conservative group in the Midlands Tuesday - part of a three-day swing through the Palmetto State. Fiorina will speak to the S.C. Chamber of Commerce at noon in Columbia. At 1 p.m., she will speak to the First Tuesday Republican Club in West Columbia. Later Tuesday, Fiorina will meet with a veterans group at The Citadel in Charleston. Fiorina had stops Monday in Greenville and Anderson, and meets privately Wednesday with credit union professionals in North Charleston. The visit is an opportunity for Fiorina to connect with S.C. GOP primary voters. A once-rising star in the GOP presidential field, Fiorina peaked in September in national polls and surveys of early primary states - including South Carolina - coming in second and third place at the time.
Published in: The State
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Wednesday
December 2, 2015
2b. Photo gallery: Fiorina at The Citadel
Republican presidential candidate Carly Fiorina spoke at a Concerned Veterans for America town hall event at The Citadel's Holliday Alumni Center on Tuesday. View the article for photos of Fiorina's visit.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
December 2, 2015
2c. New Jeb Bush TV ad stars Medal of Honor recipients
Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush is airing a new television ad in New Hampshire that stars four Medal of Honor recipients. Collectively the four recipients of the military's highest honor argue that Bush is best prepared to serve as the next commander-in-chief, criticize President Obama as a leader who needed "training wheels" and suggest other contenders like businessman Donald Trump are unfit for the job. "This is no reality show. This is serious business," says retired Marine Maj. Gen. James Livingston. "This is about the livelihood of our kids and grandkids. This commander-in-chief requires training wheels." Livingston adds later that Bush "represents the beliefs of this country. He'll have the American people's confidence and he will be respected on the world stage." The ad also stars retired Marine Col. Jay Vargas, retired Army Master Sgt. Leroy Petry and retired Air Force Col. Leo Thorsness. Their comments are juxtaposed against images of Bush greeting veterans and other supporters and from his recent speech at The Citadel military college in South Carolina. The ad is designed to expand and amplify a message Bush and his team have been pushing in recent weeks: That he's a steady, sober alternative in a GOP field packed with less-experienced options.
Published in: Washington Post
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Wednesday
December 2, 2015
3a. The Citadel's 78th Christmas Candlelight Services
One of Charleston's longest and most memorable holiday traditions is the Christmas Candlelight Services at The Citadel's historic Summerall Chapel. The 2015 services will take place Dec. 4 - 6. The services, which are held for the community and for visitors to Charleston, feature Christmas music performed by members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. This will mark Chaplain Joel Harris' final services as he is retiring at the end of the year. Harris joined The Citadel in 2009 as the director of religious activities after serving more than 20 years on a variety of assignments for the U.S. Army. A 1972 graduate of the United States Military Academy in West Point, New York, Harris' last assignment before retirement was as chief of operations for the U.S. Army Europe Chaplain. When he was selected for promotion to colonel in September 2008, he chose instead to retire and accept the opportunity to lead religious activities at The Citadel.
Published in: ChristmasinCharleston.com
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Wednesday
December 2, 2015
3b. Test launches and registration underway for Storm the Citadel 2016
Eggs are flying through the air at Ft. Johnson Middle School where students studying physics are working to test and perfect the trebuchet they will use in the sixth Storm The Citadel Trebuchet Competition. The event, which has been sponsored by Google since its inception, is designed to encourage school-aged children to consider careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields. Registration for the popular competition is underway and will continue until Dec. 15. Fort Johnson Middle School was among the record number of K-12 competitors in the event at The Citadel last February. The team has already designed and built their version of the medieval-style launching devices and now their teacher is incorporating the physics involved with launching eggs and other objects, into their lessons as they prepare for the 2016 competition which will be held Feb. 13. Teams from Florida, Georgia, South Carolina and North Carolina have already signed up to join the more than 3,000 people from elementary, middle, and high schools, colleges, professional clubs and STEM-related businesses, who will come to the iconic Charleston campus to compete, mentor students, or to cheer on a team.
Published in: TheDigitel.com
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Wednesday
December 2, 2015
3c. Things to Do Tuesday, December 1, 2015
Cadets on Film What: Short films by cadets in filmmaking and English drama courses. When: 6:30-8 p.m. Where: Bond Hall Auditorium at the Citadel, Military College of South Carolina, 171 Moultrie St., downtown Charleston Price: Free
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
December 2, 2015
4. Post and Courier Foundation contributes to the Ken Burger Athletic Memorial Scholarship
The Post and Courier Foundation will make a $25,000 gift to the Ken Burger Athletic Memorial Scholarship at The Citadel in recognition of Burger's contributions to the newspaper and the Charleston community. The scholarship is named for Burger, who served as the newspaper's executive sports editor and metro columnist for more than two decades. The scholarship was initiated by Burger's wife, Bonnie Grossman, who established the fund Oct. 22, which would have been his 66th birthday. He passed away Oct. 20 after a lengthy battle with cancer. "Ken made a big impact on our overall community and particularly in the area of sports. We are delighted to play a part in extending his legacy through an athletic scholarship at The Citadel," said Rebecca Gilbreth Herres, president of The Post and Courier Foundation. "Ken wasn't really a sports fan and he didn't cheer for any particular school," said Grossman. "But because of the impact Ken had on sports journalism nationally, I thought it was imperative to establish an athletic scholarship in his name. I chose The Citadel because it tends to recruit and compete regionally in football, basketball and baseball, as well as others including seven women's sports. Having spent 20 years in the Air Force Reserve, Ken was an admirer of the military tradition at The Citadel and he felt at home there."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
December 2, 2015
5a. Citadel at Charleston Southern: 'No one will be turned away,' CSU AD says
Some local fans are calling Saturday's second-round FCS playoff game between Charleston Southern and The Citadel the biggest college football game to be played in the Lowcountry. Saturday's meeting will be the 10th overall in the series. Charleston Southern has won the last three contests, including a 33-20 win earlier this season. Thousands of fans will want to see the history-making affair between the two programs, which are quickly developing quite a rivalry. Most of the early talk surrounding the game, however, does not center on the matchup but more so on how CSU will handle what should be the biggest crowd in school history. For the record, the largest crowd to witness a CSU home football game came last September when The Citadel made its first-ever trek down I-26 to 4,000-seat Buccaneer Field. The listed attendance for that game was 7,934. That included about 3,000 fans who were left to stand or sit in lawn chairs around the end zone or along the fences in the corners.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
December 2, 2015
5b. Citadel coach: Charleston Southern earned right to host playoff game
Some Citadel fans may have a problem with where Saturday's FCS playoff game against Charleston Southern will be played, but Bulldogs coach Mike Houston does not. And neither does the head of the FCS playoff committee. Charleston Southern, as the No. 8 national seed in the 24-team playoffs, will host Saturday's 1 p.m. game at 4,000-seat Buccaneer Field, which will be able to seat about 6,000 with temporary seats brought in, CSU officials say. Through e-mails to The Post and Courier and in social media posts, Citadel fans have wondered why the game can't be moved to the Bulldogs' 21,000-seat Johnson Hagood Stadium, or to a larger high school stadium. Houston said Tuesday he understands why CSU would not give up a home-field advantage that its players earned during a 9-2 season that included a 33-20 win over The Citadel at Johnson Hagood. "They earned the right to host this ball game with their performance on the field this season," said Houston, whose own team is 9-3 after last week's 41-38 win at Coastal Carolina. "(CSU) did not lose an FCS game, they won their league and they earned the right to host this game. That's a credit to them."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
December 2, 2015
5c. Start time for Saturday Citadel-College of Charleston game moved to 11 a.m.
The starting time for Saturday's basketball game at McAlister Field House between The Citadel and College of Charleston has been moved up to 11 a.m. because The Citadel's football team is competing in the NCAA FCS playoffs. The Citadel's football team will travel to Charleston Southern for a second-round playoff game at 1 p.m. Saturday. The Citadel is off to its best basketball start since 2004-05, winning five games in November for the second time in school history. The Bulldogs are 5-2 heading into a Wednesday contest at Air Force. The College of Charleston is 3-2 heading into a Monday contest against LSU. Tickets for the Saturday game are available 843-953-3647 visit CitadelSports.com/tickets.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
December 2, 2015
6a. Citadel Bulldogs brush off Charleston Southern's broom celebration
Late in Charleston Southern's 33-20 victory over The Citadel on Sept. 26, Buccaneers coach Jamey Chadwell sent for the brooms. Chadwell and his players wielded the brooms during their post-game festivities at Johnson Hagood Stadium, celebrating a third straight victory over the Bulldogs in what looked to be the final meeting between the Lowcountry rivals for quite a while. Ten weeks later, the rivals will meet again at 1 p.m. Saturday at CSU's Buccaneer Field, courtesy of brackets arranged by the FCS playoff committee. The 9-3 Bulldogs are brushing off any idea that the 9-2 Bucs' prior use of house-cleaning implements will impact Saturday's game, which will send the winner to the quarterfinals of the FCS playoffs. "I really didn't pay attention to the brooms," Citadel linebacker Tevin Floyd said Tuesday. "I didn't even notice they were out there until somebody told me after the game. But I think we've done a good job this year of handling wins and losses, of taking them for what they are and moving on to the next week."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
December 2, 2015
6b. Sapakoff: At this rate, Citadel-CSU football future is GameDay, SEC
Jamey Chadwell found himself in unfamiliar territory Monday, in front of television cameras for his first mid-week news conference of the season. "If my phone rings and it's (South Carolina athletic director) Ray Tanner, I'll have to take it," the Charleston Southern head coach joked. The Buccaneers (9-2) on Saturday will host The Citadel (9-3) in a second-round FCS playoff game with a trip to the quarterfinals on the line. It's the biggest college football game ever played in Charleston, testament to the whirlwind of progress for traditionally depressed programs. "Whether you're a fan of us or them, how special is it to have two FCS teams in the top 16 in the country and they're both here in the city of Charleston?" Chadwell said. "So we're excited about hosting and letting our kids experience that and seeing if our stadium can hold all the people that are going to be coming." This Citadel-CSU rivalry has more sizzle than an animated dinosaur film project.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
December 2, 2015
6c. The Citadel vs. Charleston Southern: Rivalry or not?
As hard as Charleston Southern head coach Jamey Chadwell may try, The Citadel head coach Mike Houston and his Bulldogs aren't biting this week. Charleston Southern (9-2) will host The Citadel (9-3) in the second round of the FCS Playoffs Saturday at Buccaneer Field in North Charleston. The postseason Lowcountry matchup would seem to be a perfect next chapter in the budding rivalry but ask Houston and his players about the familiar opponent to the north and they're quick to downplay it as simply the next game on the schedule. "This is the most important game of the year because it's the next one," Houston said. "They are the opponent so we're very excited to play them." "We see it as, we're in the second round of the playoffs," Bulldogs quarterback Dominique Allen said. "That's enough motivation for us." Chadwell has attempted to raise the profile of the rivalry in recent years with postgame quips and antics. Last year there was his "Charleston, It's Southern's City" t-shirt in the postgame press conference. This season there was the broom, out on the sideline of Johnson-Hagood for everyone to see as Chadwell and his players claimed a sweep. But Houston still won't bite.
Published in: Moultrie News
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Wednesday
December 2, 2015
7. Top performances by local college football players from the weekend of Nov. 28
Mitchell Jeter, The Citadel: former Rock Hill High Bearcat had a big game during The Citadel's 41-38 last-second win over Coastal Carolina in the Football Championship Series playoffs. Jeter made two tackles, split a half-sack and forced a fumble in the third quarter that led to a field goal, and then recovered a separate fumble with 44 seconds left in the fourth quarter. That set up Eric Goins game-winning field goal. Jeter and the Bulldogs face crosstown rivals Charleston Southern this weekend in the second round of the FCS playoffs.
Published in: The Herald
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