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About Today's News Clips
"Today's News Clips" is published into your e-mail box on normal Citadel business days, and contains links to recent news about The Citadel, the state of South Carolina, and other topics of interest to professionals working at institutes of higher education.
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The Citadel in the News

Most Recent

PUBLISH DATE STORIES
Wednesday
November 22, 2017
1. Speaker recounts details of ‘Final Salute’ to Kennedy

The “Final Salute” is the story of a nation in mourning following the assassination of President John F. Kennedy on Nov. 22, 1963, and on the morning of Nov. 14 — 54 years after the tragic events in Dallas – that story was shared with an audience at the Howell Library. U.S. Army Lt. Col. Carl V. Lillvik (retired), who spoke at the library, was a classmate and military acquaintance of 1st Lt. Samuel R. Bird, the Officer-in-Charge of the president’s casket bearing team. Lillvik and Bird both graduated from The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, Charleston, S.C., in June 1961. Lillvik told captivated audience members details of the days that followed Kennedy’s assassination. His account of the events is an amalgam of firsthand accounts related to him by his military colleagues. He related how a Secret Service agent was overheard asking a nurse at Parkland Memorial Hospital, “Where is the nearest white funeral home?” “I mention this because you go back to the idea that the Secret Service agents were very close to him, they were part of the family,” Lillvik said.

Published in: centraljersey.com - Online
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Wednesday
November 22, 2017
2. Mitchell Lee's journey on 'The Voice' has come to a close

We've been cheering for Citadel graduate Mitchell Lee ever since he made the blind auditions on hit NBC TV show "The Voice." However, his time on the popular singing program has sadly come to a close. The episode to end our hopes and dreams for the Charleston representative aired Monday, Nov. 13, during which the coaches had to eliminate half of their teams in preparation for the live shows. Lee was one of three out of six members to be eliminated on Blake Shelton's team after singing "Heaven" by Bryan Adams. Despite praise from several of the judges, including Shelton, Lee was ultimately cut in what was the biggest elimination of the show thus far. "This is my absolute favorite by you," said Jennifer Hudson. "It showed everything you need to show at a playoff," added Miley Cyrus. "He can valuable for my team because he really knows how to work the stage," said Blake Shelton. "He's a full package, a great performer; no reason this guy can't be a success in the music industry." After being eliminated, Lee showed appreciation for all the show had done for him. "I can't tell you how happy you've made this Carolina boy," said Lee. And we were happy to watch him during the journey.

Published in: The Post and Courier - Onlline
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Wednesday
November 22, 2017
3. Patriots Point Development Authority Welcomes Two New Members to the Board of Directors

Mount Pleasant Mayor Will Haynie is a 1983 graduate of The Citadel and has served as chief executive officer for several non-profits, including the Lowcountry Open Land Trust and the South Carolina Maritime Foundation. Haynie is a former congressional press secretary and op-ed newspaper columnist.“I have had the pleasure of serving with two former Mayors of Mount Pleasant who are people of the highest caliber that bring a tremendous amount to the table in building a relationship between our museum and the wonderful town of Mount Pleasant,” said Chandler. “We welcome the opportunity for this new mayor to join us in carrying on that great tradition.”

Published in: patriotspoint.org - Online
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Wednesday
November 22, 2017
4. Resistance movement must fight hypocrisy to survive

Steve Bannon's recent visit to Charleston as the guest speaker for the Citadel Republicans' annual Patriot Dinner sparked a lot of controversy for good reason. He is the proclaimed leader of the "Alt-Right" movement which is just a more socially acceptable term for white supremacy. The fact that the "largest club on campus," along with political leaders of South Carolina would rally behind a bigot like Bannon is a disgusting reminder of the racial stagnation in the state. The sad truth is that, while aligning with racism would usually be political suicide, it will probably win them votes here. However, the evil nature of popular racism and the people who support it is nothing new. McMaster, Templeton, the Citadel Republican Society and all the attendees have publicly denounced equality in favor of the new Republican power surge that is the Alt-Right. The idea of Democracy, or Republicanism if you want to get technical, is that the philosophy of the majority will win out. The hope is that the majority of people would rather live together in harmony and rally against the sewage of society.

Published in: Charleston City Paper - Online
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Wednesday
November 22, 2017
Citadel football has eight players honored on all-SoCon teams
The Citadel landed five players on the all-Southern Conference football team selected by coaches and media, and three more on the league's all-freshman squad. Center Tyler Davis and defensive back Kailik Williams made the coaches' first team, with linebacker Myles Pierce and defensive back Aron Spann on the second team. Davis and Spann made the media's first team, with Pierce and defensive lineman Ja'Lon Williams on the second team. Offensive linemen Jonathan Cole and Jon Barrett Lewis, who started every game for the 5-6 Bulldogs, made the coaches all-freshman team along with fullback Brandon Rainey. Kailik Williams, the SoCon defensive player of the year last season, made 49 tackles with 3½ sacks despite missing the final three games with injury. Pierce had team-high totals of 91 tackles and 13 tackles for loss. Spann was third on the team with 57 tackles, and tied for first in the SoCon with five interceptions. Ja'Lon Williams had 36 tackles and 8½ tackles for loss.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Wednesday
November 22, 2017
The Citadel easily defeats Trinity Baptist
The Citadel basketball team eclipsed the 100-point mark for the second time this season Tuesday night as the Bulldogs cruised to a 116-66 win over the Eagles of Trinity Baptist College inside McAlister Field House. As a team, the Bulldogs (3-2) tallied 32 assists on their 45 made field goals, marking the fourth-most assists ever by a Bulldog team in a single game. The Dogs also recorded 25 steals off 38 turnovers by the Eagles (3-3), the third most steals by a Citadel basketball team. "I thought the guys did an awesome job getting (the ball into Zane), but more importantly just sharing the ball as a team," said head coach Duggar Baucom. "I thought we did a great job with that and making the extra pass. But we did make an extra effort to get the ball into Zane because he hasn't been the Zane of last year and part of that is our fault because we've changed the offense just a touch, but we wanted to get it in there to him tonight." The Bulldogs never trailed in the game and led by double figures with 11:17 to go in the first half when Hayden Brown hit a layup, putting The Citadel up 26-15. With 4:26 to go in the opening half, the Bulldog lead was 20, 46-26.
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV 5 (Charleston) - Online
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Tuesday
November 21, 2017
1. Tommy Baker Veterans Fellowship recipients named for the 2017-18 academic year

The Tommy Baker Veterans Fellowship recipients for the 2017-18 academic year include seven veteran students studying at The Citadel in a variety of undergraduate and graduate programs. The fellowships are one part of The Citadel’s commitment to serving those who served America. One of the new fellows, Cherié Doney, is an evening undergraduate student in the inaugural class of the college’s Bachelor of Science in nursing program. “Cherié Doney is an excellent student and a leader in classroom activities, arranging study groups for her classmates, and is a natural mentor for cadets and other students,” said Amelia Joseph, Ph.D., RN, nurse administrator for the Swain Department of Nursing at The Citadel. “It was an honor to nominate her for the Tommy Baker Veterans Fellowship.” Doney served in the U.S. Navy training as a nuclear-power electrician for two and a half years before receiving a medical discharge. The wife of an active duty military officer and mother of two was onboard as a student when The Swain Department of Nursing at The Citadel was launched in early 2017. “It’s a big jump from engineering to nursing, but I have never once regretted the switch. The curriculum has been eye opening in that nursing is absolutely, without a doubt, what I want to dedicate my time and energy to in fulfilling my desire to serve others,” Doney said.

Published in: Lowcountry Biz SC - Online
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Tuesday
November 21, 2017
2. Thanksgiving: Celebrating the Birth of American Free Enterprise

This time of the year, whether in good economic times or bad, is when Americans gather with their families and friends and enjoy a Thanksgiving meal together. It marks a remembrance of those early Pilgrim Fathers who crossed the uncharted ocean from Europe to make a new start in Plymouth, Massachusetts. What is less appreciated is that Thanksgiving also is a celebration of the birth of free enterprise in America. The English Puritans, who left Great Britain and sailed across the Atlantic on the Mayflower in 1620, were not only escaping from religious persecution in their homeland. They also wanted to turn their back on what they viewed as the materialistic and greedy corruption of the Old World. In the New World, they wanted to erect a New Jerusalem that would not only be religiously devout, but be built on a new foundation of communal sharing and social altruism. Their goal was the communism of Plato’s Republic, in which all would work and share in common, knowing neither private property nor self-interested acquisitiveness. What resulted is recorded in the diary of Governor William Bradford, the head of the colony. The colonists collectively cleared and worked the land, but they brought forth neither the bountiful harvest they hoped for, nor did it create a spirit of shared and cheerful brotherhood.

Published in: The Future of Freedom Foundation - Online
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Tuesday
November 21, 2017
3. S.C. Highway Patrolman saves baby’s life during routine traffic stop

A young South Carolina State Trooper saved the life of a three-month-old boy during what started out as a routine traffic stop. “It was just a normal day, you know, spotting violations,” said Trooper First Class Benjamin Crocker. Crocker, 26, graduated from The Citadel in 2013 and is in the Army National Guard. He pulled a car over on the side of Interstate 26 near mile marker 211 just before 10 a.m. on November 8. Crocker said he was explaining the reason for the stop to the first driver when a car came up behind him. A woman jumped out of the driver seat and began yelling, according to Crocker. “She starts screaming 'my baby, my baby he's not breathing.’,” Crocker recalled. “At that point, I just went into action. He said he jumped into the woman’s car. That’s where he found her daughter and the woman’s grandson barely breathing. "I kicked into lifesaving mode I guess,” he said. “I just started doing gentle light, sternum rubs with my two fingers. Once I got a response out of him and he started crying, I knew he was breathing again."

Broadcast on: WCIV-TV 4 (Charleston) - Online
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Tuesday
November 21, 2017
3.1 SC trooper saves unresponsive baby on I-26 in North Charleston

A South Carolina trooper is sharing how he helped save a 3-month-old baby who stopped breathing. As a state trooper almost everyday on the job is different. But, Nov. 8 stands out to Trooper First Class Benjamin Crocker. "I just kicked into lifesaving mode," Crocker said. Crocker said his day started out normal. He was making a traffic stop on I-26 near the Hanahan exit 211. "Then a vehicle came up behind my car which normally doesn't happen," Crocker said."It kind of got my attention." So he went to go check it and saw a mother with an infant who was in trouble. "She started screaming, 'My baby, my baby! He's not breathing.' So at that point I just went into action," Crocker said. His trooper and National Guard training was put to the test.

Broadcast on: KFVS-TV 12 (Paducah, KY - Cape Girardeau, MO - Harrisburg-Mt Vernon, IL) - Online
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Tuesday
November 21, 2017
4. Dubious donations at issue in Lowcountry legislative race …

As we reported last week, Lowcountry businesswoman Nancy Mace came within a half of a percentage point of winning the GOP primary election for South Carolina House District 99 (map) on November 14. Mace won 49.5 percent of the vote last Tuesday, nearly double the amount of support received by the second-place finisher in the race – Mount Pleasant, S.C. undertaker and town councilman Mark M. Smith. Because no candidate received a majority of votes on the first ballot, Mace and Smith are headed for a runoff election on November 28 – although our guess is Smith might be wishing Mace had beaten him outright at this point. How come? Last weekend, The (Charleston, S.C.) Post and Courier published a report implicating Smith in a deceptive campaign finance scheme. From reporter Caitlin Byrd’s story …

Published in: Fits News - Online
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Tuesday
November 21, 2017
Adams committed to The Citadel in football
Science Hill quarterback Jaylan Adams announced on twitter that he is committed to The Citadel to play football next season. Adams accounted for over 3,000 all-purpose yards his senior season in leading the Hilltoppers to a 7-3 regular-season record and to the TSSAA Class AAA playoffs. “It’s an honor ... can’t wait to serve for this amazing country,” Adams said with a photo of himself in front of a Citadel football helmet on his twitter account. Adams went 103 of 169 passing 1,630 yards with 12 touchdowns and five interceptions his senior season. Adams was also the team’s leading rusher with 170 carries for 1,431 yards with an average of 8.4 yards per carry and 22 touchdowns.
Published in: Johnson City Press - Online
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Tuesday
November 21, 2017
Citadel searching for new volleyball coach
The Citadel has fired volleyball coach Craig Mosqueda and begun a search for a new coach, athletic director Jim Senter announced Monday. Mosqueda, hired from Anderson University in January 2015, had a three-year record of 23-79. This season, the Bulldogs were 8-26 overall and 2-14 in the Southern Conference. Freshman Sharlissa De Jesus became the first Bulldog to make the SoCon all-freshman team. "We have decided to make a change in the leadership of our volleyball program," said Senter, who hired Mosqueda. "This morning, I met with Craig and let him know, per the terms of his contract, he has been terminated without cause. "I am most appreciative of the effort that Coach Mosqueda put into the volleyball enterprise at The Citadel. We wish Craig the best in his future endeavors. We will begin a search for a new head coach immediately."
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Tuesday
November 21, 2017
H. BECKMAN SCHRODER '56
A memorial service to honor the life of H. Beckman “Beck” Schroder, 83, of Camden, SC, will be held at 2 p.m, Today, November 21, 2017 at Lyttleton Street United Methodist Church. The Reverends Steve Patterson, Frank Griffith and David Weaver will officiate. Following the service, the family will receive friends at the church in the Family Life Center. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to the Wounded Warrior Project, 7020 AC Skinner Parkway, Suite 100, Jacksonville, FL 32256 or Shriners Children’s Hospital, 2900 Rocky Pt. Drive, Tampa, FL, 33607. Beck died Friday, November 17, 2017 surrounded by his family. He was born in Rock Hill, SC, and is the son of the late Mary Louise Thomas Schroder and Herman Beckman Schroder, Sr. Beck was a graduate of the Citadel, a member of Band Company, the Brigadier Club and the Citadel Alumni Association. He was a US Army Veteran, and retired from E.I. DuPont after 35 years as a Senior Research Chemist. Beck was a member of Lyttleton Street United Methodist Church, a member of the Golden Club and a former member of the Camden County Club.
Published in: The Chronicle Independent - Online
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Monday
November 20, 2017
1. Baker Veterans Fellowship recipients named for the 2017-18 academic year

The Tommy Baker Veterans Fellowship recipients for the 2017-18 academic year include seven veteran students studying at The Citadel in a variety of undergraduate and graduate programs. The fellowships are one part of The Citadel’s commitment to serving those who served America. One of the new fellows, Cherié Doney, is an evening undergraduate student in the inaugural class of the college’s Bachelor of Science in nursing program. “Cherié Doney is an excellent student and a leader in classroom activities, arranging study groups for her classmates, and is a natural mentor for cadets and other students,” said Amelia Joseph, Ph.D., RN, nurse administrator for the Swain Department of Nursing at The Citadel. “It was an honor to nominate her for the Tommy Baker Veterans Fellowship.” Doney served in the U.S. Navy training as a nuclear-power electrician for two and a half years before receiving a medical discharge. The wife of an active duty military officer and mother of two, was onboard as a student when The Swain Department of Nursing at The Citadel was launched in early 2017.

Published in: Citadel News Room - Online
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Monday
November 20, 2017
2. How Capitalism Saved Entire Generations from Crippling Poverty

The free enterprise, or capitalist, system has done more to improve the material condition of humanity than any other economic arrangement in all of recorded history. Yet, “Capitalism” is constantly condemned and accused of being the cause of humanity’s woes, while in reality, nothing is further from the truth. In a mere two hundred years, the economic condition of humankind has dramatically transformed. In 1820, the world population was barely one billion people and had only grown to 1.5 billion by 1900. Now, in 2017, the global population has increased to over 7.4 billion people. Has this huge increase in world population led to abject material misery and human despair? Not at all; instead, it has been very much the opposite. In 1900, global Gross Domestic Product stood at around one billion dollars, while today it stands at nearly $80 trillion. In 1820, world per capita GDP was estimated to have been about $1,000; by 1900 it doubled to $2,000 per person on average. By 2017, per capita GDP is approaching $16,000, an eight-fold increase in little over a century and with a world population seven times larger than a little over a hundred years ago.

Published in: Panam Postr - Online
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Monday
November 20, 2017
3. The new Miss SC USA and Miss SC Teen USA have been crowned

The new queens have been crowned. Miss SC USA Tori Sizemore, representing Golden Corner, and Miss SC Teen USA Elizabeth Self, representing the Upstate, will move on to represent South Carolina in the national Miss USA pageants next year. As the winner was announced for Miss SC USA, a hush came over the crowd at the North Charleston Performing Arts Center. Peacock feathers, fairy wings and flower crowns were among eccentric wear for the contestants' opening outfits as audience family members and friends cheered for their favorites, holding up signs, shaking noisemakers and waving glowsticks. Some Citadel cadets even made an appearance, lending the heel-wearing women an arm as they climbed the stage steps, transitioning from opening outfits to sports and swim wear to evening gowns.

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Monday
November 20, 2017
4. The Citadel rallies past High Point 79-77

Preston Parks hit three 3-pointers and scored 16 points and The Citadel rallied in the second half to turn back High Point 79-77 on Saturday.Andre Fox sank a 3-pointer with 6:33 left in the game to give High Point a 65-58 lead, but the Bulldogs (3-2) put together a 15-0 run to seize control. Parks and Kaelon Harris turned steals into layups to begin the run and Parks buried a 3-pointer to cap the run and give The Citadel a 73-65 lead with 2:20 left to play. Fox finished with 24 points for the Panthers (1-2). He knocked down 7 of 11 shots from the floor, including all four of his 3-point attempts, and was 6 of 6 at the free-throw line. Fox added five rebounds. Brandon Kamga tossed in 13 points, Jahaad Proctor scored 11 with five rebounds and reserves Ricky Madison and Justyn Mutts scored 11 and 10, respectively for High Point.

Published in: Madison Sports - Online
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Monday
November 20, 2017
Clemson clobbers The Citadel in celebration
It was a celebration from start to finish for Clemson on Saturday afternoon against The Citadel. The Tigers opened the day by recognizing seniors during pregame, honored the military throughout the day and clobbered The Citadel 61-3 on the field in their final tuneup before traveling to South Carolina. Clemson improved to 27-1 over the past four years at home, which is a record number of wins over a four-year period. “It was an awesome day all the way around. To see our seniors go out like that was really special,” Tigers coach Dabo Swinney said. “Our goal today was, really, to create some momentum. We’ve talked a lot about finishing strong. It’s all right there, and we wanted to start today as we get into this last little phase here of playing our best football.”
Published in: The State - Online
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Monday
November 20, 2017
State report: College of Charleston advances to CAA Tournament championship in volleyball

Devon Rachel had a career-high 24 kills and added 15 digs and three blocks to propel top-seeded College of Charleston past fifth-seeded Hofstra 3-2 on Friday night in the second semifinal match of the CAA Tournament at James Madison’s Sinclair Gymnasium. The Cougars (27-4), won their 15th straight match to earn a spot in Saturday’s championship final versus third-seeded James Madison (22-5) at 4:05 p.m. It will be the fourth title match appearance for CofC since 2013 – which was the first CAA crown the program captured during its inaugural season in the league. Jane Feddersen and Krissy Mummey both reached double-digit kill totals with 12 and 11, respectively, for the Cougs, whose 27 wins are their most in a single season since 2012. Fedderson hit a whopping .611 percent and chipped in seven blocks, while junior Allison Beckman, the CAA Setter of the Year, collected 55 total assists and 16 digs for the double-double.

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Friday
November 17, 2017
1. 'Just doing my job': Trooper saves unresponsive infant on roadside

It seemed like a typical day of shift work for Tfc. Benjamin Crocker. The South Carolina Highway Patrolman said he had just pulled over a car traveling westbound on Interstate 26, near mile marker 211, when a second vehicle came barreling up behind him. “I was talking to the driver and explaining the reason for the stop, and another car pulled up behind my car, and it caught my attention because that normally doesn’t happen,” Crocker said. It was around 10:45 a.m. on Nov. 8, and the 26-year-old officer didn’t expect he would have to put his life-saving skills to work. Shortly after stopping, the driver of the second vehicle ran to Crocker, looking for a hero in uniform—and that’s what she found. She told him her 3-month-old grandson wasn’t breathing. “I said, ‘OK, time to go to work,’” Crocker said. Inside the car he immediately spotted the infant in his mother’s arms. The child was sitting upright with his head tilted to the side—his appearance alarming. Though Crocker never determined the root cause of the medical incident, he said he did learn the infant had been in the hospital with a fever the previous night. Crocker has been a trooper since 2013, completing trooper school after graduating from the Citadel. He’s part of the agency’s Target Zero team and said law enforcement runs in his blood—his father a former cop in Massachusetts, where Crocker was raised.

Published in: Journal Scene - Online
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Friday
November 17, 2017
1. The Citadel holds 80th annual Christmas Candlelight Services
The 2017 Christmas Candlelight Service will be held at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Dec. 1, through Sunday, Dec. 3, in Summerall Chapel. Cadets from the Protestant and Gospel Choirs, together with The Citadel Chorale and members of The Citadel Regimental Band make the program a wonderful celebration. Visitors may purchase poinsettias for $12 each in memory or in honor of someone dear to them. The Chapel uses the poinsettias each night of the Christmas Candlelight Service and they may be picked up for your own decoration on Tuesday, 5 December, after 9:00 a.m. 7:30 p.m. Friday, Dec. 1 – Sunday, Dec. 3 Summerall Chapel Free and open to the public; media invited to attend
Published in: Lowcountry Biz SC - Online
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Friday
November 17, 2017
2. Husband accused of setting Citadel graduate on fire arrested in New York

After nearly two months on the run, a man accused of setting his wife, a Citadel graduate, on fire in Florence County has been arrested. The Florence County Sheriff's Office announced Thursday that 32-year-old Charles Durell Nethercutt was arrested a day earlier in Yonkers, N.Y. He was wanted on an attempted murder charge in a Sept. 19 domestic violence incident near Florence. Deputies said Mandie Brillhart Nethercutt, 27, suffered severe burns to her arms, torso, legs and feet during an argument with her husband. She told authorities he grabbed a jug of gasoline, poured the fuel on her and set her ablaze after accusing her of cheating on him. Her 14-month-old child was at the home on Longfellow Drive at the time but was not harmed. Donations poured in for Mandie Nethercutt after friend and mentor Doug Bridges started a GoFundMe.com page, which has raised over $82,800 to help pay for medical expenses.

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Friday
November 17, 2017
Citadel relishes moment in Clemson spotlight, despite obvious disadvantages
Clemson coach Dabo Swinney said this week that he'd make sure his players are aware that it was just two years ago that The Citadel went in to Williams-Brice Stadium and beat South Carolina. “Absolutely. We better remind them,” Swinney said of the Bulldogs' 23-22 upset of the Gamecocks in 2015. “I’ll make sure. In fact it’s in my notes ... I’ll make dang sure they know.” Given the huge disparity in finances, facilities, resources and scholarships between Power 5 schools such as Clemson and USC and FCS programs such as The Citadel, such upsets should probably never happen. But that disparity also makes it special when they do. "You live for those days as a coach," said The Citadel head coach Brent Thompson, who was the Bulldogs' offensive coordinator when they beat USC in 2015. Thompson, whose first game as a head coach against an FBS team was last season's 41-7 loss at North Carolina, said he relishes the opportunity presented by games like Saturday's at Clemson. "I love it," Thompson said. "I love it for our players and our fans and for myself, just for the experience of it. "I've got no problem with it," he said. "I think it's one of the best things we do, and I'd love to see it carried on. You never know when you might run into one of those days like we had at South Carolina."
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Friday
November 17, 2017
No. 4 Clemson hosts Citadel, wants to stay on playoff track

No. 4 Clemson has secured another spot in the Atlantic Coast Conference title game. Now, the Tigers are looking to keep their College Football Playoff hopes alive. That starts Saturday against Citadel, an FCS opponent that has lost 15 straight to Clemson dating back to 1931. After that is the annual state tussle with resurgent rival South Carolina, and the Gamecocks are eager to make amends for last year’s humbling 56-7 rout. ”People talk about wanting an expanded playoff,” Clemson co-offensive coordinator Jeff Scott said. ”We’re in the playoffs. We lose, we’re out.” It’s a fine line the Tigers (9-1, No. 2 CFP) have walked successfully the past two seasons. They had clinched the ACC Atlantic Division after nine games in 2015, then finished 3-0 down the stretch before heading to the ACC title game. Last season, Clemson needed to win its final ACC game at Wake Forest in week 11 to wrap up another trip to the championship game and followed that up with its rivalry beat down.

Published in: FOX Sports - Online
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Thursday
November 16, 2017
1. The Value of Grant-Funded Scientific Research

Second, research addresses community-based issues to help improve quality of life and solve practical problems. For example, the S.C. Sea Grant Consortium, a state agency, uses federal dollars from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, leveraged with private and state dollars, to fund research projects addressing critical issues affecting South Carolina’s coastal environment and economy. One such funded research project involving engineering faculty at The Citadel is addressing coastal resiliency by developing localized flood models to plan infrastructure improvements in the Charleston region. Another funded project examined the status of horseshoe crab populations to support a local multimillion dollar industry involved in collecting horseshoe crab blood, which, believe it or not, is used to detect bacterial contamination of medical equipment in the healthcare industry. Such funding from S.C. Sea Grant has also resulted in patents for innovative products that impact local businesses, including the development of a protein analog that is being tested as a safe and effective alternative to copper-based products preventing marine invertebrates from fouling the hull of boats.

Published in: Charleston Business Magazine - Online
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Thursday
November 16, 2017
2. 600 elementary students build to learn

For many adults, the thought of building a structure is intimidating and complex, but for 600 elementary students from schools with Richland County District Two it’s something they’ve already accomplished. In September and October, fourth- and fifth-graders from 16 schools near Columbia traveled to the Clemson Design Center in Charleston (CDC.C) to tour the facility and build a room of their own. Ray Huff, associate architecture professor and director of the CDC.C., and senior architecture lecturer David Pastre worked with the visiting students, parents and teachers in groups of 50 during one of three, three day sessions. The students are all part of Richland County School District Two’s ALERT program, a one-day-a-week pullout program that provides active learning experiences on a two-year cycle for gifted and talented students. During the first year, students study architecture and sustainability and the second year, students learn about engineering through research units. One of the primary goals of Richland County District Two’s ALERT program is to make college palpable and attainable. By partnering with institutions, students have the opportunity to see first-hand what college programs look like and, more specifically, get a glimpse into the academic life of college students. District Two has had a partnership with The Citadel for their engineering and research unit for more than a decade.

Published in: Clemson.edu - Onlline
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Thursday
November 16, 2017
3. Letter: Steve Bannon visit

Last Friday night Steve Bannon stood on a stage at The Citadel and spouted his foul rhetoric unchallenged, except by one protester who was expelled. A self-described Republican Citadel cadet who was interviewed on TV described Bannon as an “interesting” speaker. That “interesting” speaker was one of those who cheered those torch-bearing, flag-carrying thugs as they tore through the campus and town of Charlottesville, Va. So, did the audience at The Citadel make any attempt to challenge Bannon’s disgusting rhetoric? No, they didn’t. Did they get up and walk out of the room? Again, no. Did they hiss or boo his angry propaganda? No, they did not. What they did do — and what I find absolutely repugnant — was give him standing ovations. I find it deeply disturbing that there are people in the area I call home who are patting themselves on the back for cheering and supporting the despicable and abhorrent values of that trashy man. This has to be Charleston’s worst hour.

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Thursday
November 16, 2017
4. Olujobi shoots North Carolina A&T past The Citadel, 92-73 (Nov 15, 2017)

Femi Olujobi hit 13 of 15 shots from the field to post 29 points to go with nine rebounds and North Carolina A&T built a double-digit lead in the first half and made it stand up in a 92-73 win at The Citadel Wednesday night. Olujobi has been the Aggies go-to player through their first three games, posting totals of 34 and 20 to go with his effort against the Bulldogs. Devonte Boykins hit 7 of 15 shots to finish with 18 points and grabbed 11 rebounds for the Aggies (2-1), whose lone loss came at Clemson. North Carolina A&T shot 37 of 65 from the field (56.9 percent), including 7 of 22 from behind the three-point arc. The Aggies built a 48-36 lead in the first half and stretched it in the second. Preston Parks had 19 points to lead The Citadel (1-2), with Frankie Johnson adding another 13.

Broadcast on: FOX Sports - Online
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Thursday
November 16, 2017
5. Tigers preparing for high-stress Citadel

The Clemson Tiger defense will have its hands full this week with the triple-option attack of The Citadel Bulldogs. For the first time since the 2013 season, the Tigers will welcome the Bulldogs and their powerful triple-option attack to Death Valley for a showdown Saturday (12:20 p.m., ACC Network). The good news for the Tigers is they have already experienced the triple-option attack this season, against cross-division rival Georgia Tech, who the Tigers held to 133 rushing yards. The bad news for the Tigers is that The Citadel is a different animal than Georgia Tech. "It definitely helps as opposed to starting from scratch,” defensive coordinator Brent Venables said. “There's some similarities, but there's a lot of differences — schemewise, formationally, motion, a lot of things that they do that are different. There are some things that certainly help you just having done it three or four weeks ago. There will be some carryover."

Published in: Half Moon Bay Review - Online
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