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About Today's News Clips
"Today's News Clips" is published into your e-mail box on normal Citadel business days, and contains links to recent news about The Citadel, the state of South Carolina, and other topics of interest to professionals working at institutes of higher education.
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PUBLISH DATE STORIES
Wednesday
January 18, 2017
1. Citadel's New Nursing Department Made Possible By Swain Family
The Citadel's new Swain Department of Nursing is being established through the generosity of a gift from the Swain family, which has been a part of The Citadel family for decades. The seven-figure gift was initiated by brothers David C. Swain, Jr., Citadel Class of 1980, and his wife Mary, as well as Dr. Christopher C. Swain, Citadel Class of 1981, and his wife Debora. The Swain family's desire to help build a nursing program at The Citadel stems from both personal and professional interests. Together, the Swain brothers founded the Ob Hospitalist Group (OBHG) in Mauldin, South Carolina, in 2006 with a vision to elevate women's health care by providing quality medical care to expectant mothers. More than a decade later, OBHG is the single largest dedicated OB/GYN hospitalist provider, partnering with more than 450 board certified physicians nationwide. Dr. Chris Swain, a veteran OB/GYN doctor himself, founded the company as the result of his passion for women's health care and his strong commitment to seeing the industry elevated to provide improved safety and care. After graduating from The Citadel with a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology, he attended the University of South Alabama College of Medicine and completed his OB/GYN residency training at Bayfront Medical Center in St. Petersburgh, Florida. He currently serves as OBHG's Chief medical officer and resides on Isle of Palms, South Carolina, with Debbie and their two sons, one of whom is currently a sophomore in the South Carolina Corps of Cadets at The Citadel.
Published in: Island Eye News
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Wednesday
January 18, 2017
2. Meet the Beaufort County man leading the South Carolina Corps of Cadets
The almost 175-year-old military structure at The Citadel comprises much of what is essentially a leadership laboratory: the cadets manage the undergraduate student body called the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. Cadets can work to attain a variety of leadership opportunities during their four years in the Corps, with the highest position being that of regimental commander. It is a demanding job and a very visible role. Cadet Kevin MacDonald, who is from Hilton Head, South Carolina, holds that position for the 2016-17 academic year. MacDonald commands approximately 2,300 cadets. His main job is to train the cadets in The Citadel's four pillars: academics, military, physical effectiveness and moral/ethical. He was selected after a long and rigorous process, as all of the regimental commanders have been for more than a century. MacDonald is a Business Administration major who attends The Citadel on an Army scholarship and is expected to commission as an officer in the Army upon graduation. He is also a member of the elite Summerall Guards. The following interview with MacDonald (KM) was conducted by Regimental Public Affairs NCO Tristan Arrowood (TA).
Published in: TheDigitel.com
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Wednesday
January 18, 2017
3. How these Citadel cadets went from Dickies and Chuck Taylors to Trump's inauguration
Before the rifle is passed, both cadets have their hands on it, and the newest guard must wrest it from the veteran's grip. With a firm tug, the rifle comes free like meat off a tough rib. It's a ceremonial gesture, as is the one that follows: the outgoing guard makes a fist with the right hand - covered with a white glove that hides a class ring from The Citadel - and taps on the chest of the newest member of the Summerall Guards. Ring-tapping is a sign of approval at The Citadel, South Carolina's military college, founded in 1842 and located in Charleston. Tapping the breastplate of a fellow cadet conveys pride. After the new Summerall Guards - 61 of them every year - take their rifles on Corps Day, they perform publicly for the first time. They're rising seniors, soon to be called first-class cadets, and they're known for their silent precision drill. On Friday the guards will march in the inauguration parade of Donald Trump, the 45th president of the United States. Some 8,000 people in more than 40 organizations will participate in the parade, according to the Washington Post. It will be the fifth time the Summerall Guards have marched in one, according to The Citadel.
Published in: Myrtle Beach Online
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Wednesday
January 18, 2017
4. Ramsey Native Will March In Presidential Inaugural Parade
A Ramsey native will march in the 2017 Presidential Inaugural Parade Friday. Sophie-Leigh Baxter-Clark will march with The Citadel Regimental Band and Pipes. She is a Ramsey High School alumnus and was a member of the school's Big Blue marching band. Baxter-Clark is a senior and cadet major at The Citadel, majoring in history, with a minor in criminal justice, intelligence and homeland security. She also represented the school at the Edinburgh Military Tattoo in Scotland. Friday will be the seventh time the Citadel Regimental Band and Pipes will participate in a presidential inauguration. The band also performed at the inauguration of presidents John F. Kennedy, George H.W. Bush and George W. Bush. About 100 cadets perform in the band.
Published in: Ramsey Patch
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Wednesday
January 18, 2017
5. Citadel student from Warren marches at 2017 Presidential Inauguration
A Warren student currently attending the Citadel, Military College of South Carolina will be marching in the 2017 Presidential Inauguration Parade on Friday, Jan. 20 in Washington, D.C. Matthew Ransom, of Warren, is a part of the Citadel's Regimental Band and Pipes and Color Guard that was selected to perform. The 2017 Presidential Inaugural Parade represents the 7th inaugural parade in which The Citadel Regimental Band and Pipes, Color Guard and/or Summerall Guard have been selected to participate. They jointly represented The Citadel together in the 1953 and 1985 inaugural parades. Unfortunately, inclement weather forced the cancellation of President Reagan's 1985 parade. The regimental band was also a participant in President Kennedy's 1961 parade. The Summerall Guard participated in President George H. W. Bush's 1989 inaugural parade and President George W. Bush's 2005 inaugural parade. (1953; 1961; 1985; 1989; 2005; 2017) The Citadel Regimental Band and Pipes is the only U.S. military college band to ever be invited to the exclusive Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo, and has been selected to participate as the one American military band in the globally known event three times: 2015, 2010, and 1991.
Published in: Echoes-Sentinel
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Wednesday
January 18, 2017
6. Economic Ideas: David Ricardo on Wealth, Inflation, and Freedom
David Ricardo (1772-1823) was one of the most influential economic theorists of the first half of the nineteenth century. Born in London, England, his father's family were orthodox Jews originally from Portugal who had moved to England from Holland. His father was a highly successful stockbroker. David Ricardo learned the family business, and most likely would have inherited it from his father. But he fell in love with an English Quaker, converted from Judaism to Christianity, and at the age of 21 eloped without his family's knowledge. His father disowned him and his mother never spoke to him again. He, therefore, had to go out on his own and set up his own brokerage company. He soon showed himself to be an expert at all financial and brokerage dealings. Making a fortune, including dealing in British government securities during Britain's long war with Revolutionary and then Napoleonic France, Ricardo retired from business in his early 40s to an estate in the English countryside. Ricardo became interested in economics when he read Adam Smith's The Wealth of Nations during a holiday in 1799. He began to write on economic topics in 1809 with a series of articles and a monograph on the causes for inflation in Great Britain that gained him wide notoriety. The publication of The Principles of Political Economy and Taxation in 1817 soon established his permanent reputation as one of the leading economists in the world. Dr. Richard M. Ebeling is the recently appointed BB&T Distinguished Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel.
Published in: The Future of Freedom Foundation
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Wednesday
January 18, 2017
7. Citadel football recruiting nets trio of heavyweights
A second wave of verbal commitments followed The Citadel's latest official-visit weekend, bringing to at least 21 the number of players committed to the Bulldogs. The latest commitments include a pair of defensive backs from the Columbia area; a trio of 300-pound defensive linemen; and a couple of all-state players from Texas. Coach Brent Thompson cannot comment on individual recruits until the Feb. 1 signing day, and verbal commitments are non-binding. Among The Citadel's latest commitments are: Lane Botkin, a 6-0, 195-pound defensive back from A.C. Flora High in Columbia. The son of of former South Carolina assistant Kirk Botkin chose The Citadel from among Georgia Southern, Georgia State and Charleston Southern. Also a baseball standout, Botkin was a North-South All-Star and had 80 tackles last season. He also rushed for 621 yards and 13 touchdowns on offense. "I chose the Citadel because I feel like I have a good connection with all of the coaches and players from there," Botkin told The State. "It is a really close team and I enjoy being around them. It also helps that they are back-to-back SoCon champs. I have a good chance of going in and playing early, that was a big factor of why I chose them." Cole Brown, a 6-0, 190-pound defensive back from Blythewood High near Columbia. Brown is the brother of fellow Citadel commitment Micah Byrd-Brown, and was chosen for the Blue-Gray All-American Game. A trio of 300-pound defensive linemen that includes Jabauri Garner, a 6-3, 300-pounder from Florence (Ala.) High School who, according to scout.com, had offers from Army, Navy and Jackson State.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Friday
January 13, 2017
1a. Professor Joe Riley returns to the classroom at The Citadel
It was Charleston's coldest winter, so cold it killed the oleanders. The men and women who made their beds under bridges or in abandoned buildings appeared without warning at store fronts and church vestibules. An invisible problem was suddenly in plain view. So in the first of his four decades in office, Charleston's mayor joined forces with civic, business and religious leaders to form the city's first homeless shelter, now One80 Place. Joe Riley begins class by telling this story, inside a cavernous lecture hall on The Citadel campus Thursday afternoon, in part he said, because it explains why he was so eager to serve Charleston for so long. "It's because it gives so many opportunities to do important things to make things happen that maybe wouldn't have otherwise happened," he said. "You have the opportunity every day to help people." The city's longest-serving mayor now teaches his first course as a professor - a weekly class titled "Old South City, New South Revival: Political Leadership in Charleston, South Carolina" - this semester on "the city's transformation," as the syllabus says, "from a sleepy, coastal backwater into an international tourist destination, a major economic engine for the region, and a center for global trade." He returned to his alma mater a year ago this month as the college's first occupant of the Joseph P. Riley Jr. Endowed Chair of American Government and Public Policy.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Friday
January 13, 2017
1b. 'America's Mayor' begins career as professor on Charleston's history at The Citadel
It's been one year since America's longest-serving mayor retired from office, and now former Charleston Mayor Joe Riley is teaching his first full course at The Citadel. The class, titled "Old South City, New South Revival Political Leadership in Charleston, South Carolina," will focus on the way the Holy City turned from a small beach community into an internationally recognized tourist destination and hub of business and trade in the Southeast. The class started at 2:30 p.m. Thursday and featured an hour lecture from Riley followed by another hour of guest speakers and community members. It's how the rest of the semester will go. "Working with this generation of young people is thrilling and I never thought I would have the opportunity, and I'm sure I'll learn from them and hopefully I'll have something valuable for them to consider," Riley said. Much of the course will focus on his 40 years as mayor, covering a range of topics and issues Riley encountered in his political career. "There's lots of lessons here," said Riley. "It's going to lessons in civic leadership, lessons in understanding the needs and challenges of the city, lessons of human and race relations. Really, it's chocked full."
Broadcast on: WCIV-TV Charleston, SC
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Friday
January 13, 2017
2. Health care's perfect storm and the critical need for nurses
The phrase "perfect storm" is often used to describe a phenomenon resulting from an exceptionally rare combination of circumstances. Although the term is overused, I believe it accurately portrays the challenges facing the health care industry over the next 10 years. At the center of this metaphorical storm is America's aging population and the demand for registered nurses. The country has experienced nursing shortages before; however, the circumstances surrounding the looming shortage are fundamentally different. Experts agree that this shortage could result in a national crisis, and health care in the Lowcountry stands in the direct path of this approaching storm. According to Rebecca Grant in an article that appeared earlier this year in The Atlantic, the nursing profession will be influenced by four major factors over the next decade. The first factor, and primary driver of the gathering storm, is America's aging baby boomers. It has been estimated that the number of senior citizens (aged 65 or older) in the U.S. between 2010 and 2030 will increase 75 percent to 69 million. By 2050, that number is expected to grow to 88.5 million. As the population ages and experiences more health-related problems, the demand for nurses will increase. But that demand will primarily be driven by care for the chronically ill, which is ongoing care that becomes increasingly complex as illnesses and health problems become multi-layered. So, it may not only be diabetes that a patient is dealing with, but heart disease, renal failure, amputations, and a decrease in vision - all of which multiply the complexity of care.
Published in: Charleston Business Mag
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Friday
January 13, 2017
3. Citadel marching band to participate in Trump inauguration
The Citadel Regimental Band and Pipes and the Summerall Guards are participating in the 2017 Presidential Inaugural Parade. Approximately 150 cadets will head to Washington, D.C. On Friday, January 13, the group will hold a dress rehearsal from 4:15 - 5:30 p.m. The public is invited to attend. To attend, head over to Summerall Field and park in the general parking areas.
Published in: WCBD-TV Charleston, SC
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Friday
January 13, 2017
4. Native bagpiper to play in Inauguration Day parade
Mohawk Area High School graduate Derek Waddington will perform in the Presidential Inaugural Parade with The Citadel Military College of South Carolina's Regimental Band and Pipes and the Summerall Guards. Waddington, a sophomore cadet, is one of 35 bagpipers and drummers in the ensemble who will perform in the parade on Jan. 20. The Regimental Band was selected by the Presidential Inaugural Committee from 200 applications from parade hopefuls, according to the Associated Press. The Regimental Band has about 80 cadet musicians. Throughout its history, The Citadel has maintained a tradition of duty, pride and excellence as part of the cadet experience, and "America's Band" - The Citadel Regimental Band and Pipes has been a part of that tradition since 1909. As one of the 21 companies comprising the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, the Regimental Band and Pipes leads the way and sets the tempo that all other cadets follow. The Summerall Guards, a 61-member silent precision drill platoon, will perform a series of movements based on the old German close order drill, the exactness and thoroughness with which a cadet is trained.The drill, which has never been written down, is performed to a silent count. Each year's guards take responsibility for teaching the next year's unit the precise drill.
Published in: New Castle News
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Friday
January 13, 2017
5. Lowcountry Graduate Center adding health care management MBA
The Lowcountry Graduate Center is adding another degree program to its list of offerings. Classes for S.C. State University's health care management MBA are being taught at the center in North Charleston starting this year, according to a news release. Current students in the MBA program were able to enroll in the first class offered in the new concentration this semester, and new students will be able to enroll in the summer. Classes are held in the evenings and on weekends, as well as online. S.C. State University is now offering its health care management MBA at the Lowcountry Graduate Center. "The health care industry in the United States is experiencing dramatic growth and now represents the nation's largest private industry sector," graduate center director Nancy Muller said in the news release. "We are delighted to be able to support S.C. State University in serving the health care management talent needs in the Charleston area and welcome them as our newest academic partner." The Lowcountry Graduate Center offers graduate degrees and certificates through other institutions, including the College of Charleston, The Citadel, the Medical University of South Carolina, the University of South Carolina, Clemson University, Anderson University, and now S.C. State. The new MBA program with a health care management concentration teaches health care policy, law and ethics, organizational behavior, human resource management, quality assessment and the structure of the health care delivery system, the news release said.
Published in: Charleston Regional Business Journal
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Friday
January 13, 2017
6. Michael Livingston, The Gates of Hell, and Writing Secret Historical Fantasy
An award-winning writer and professor, Michael Livingston holds degrees in history, medieval studies, and English. He teaches at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina. He has also added a pair of fantasy novels to that impressive C.V.: last year's The Shards of Heaven and the just-released sequel, The Gates of Hell. We recently got a chance to talk to Michael about secret histories, name changes, and the challenges of writing the second novel in a series. For those readers not familiar with you, could you please introduce yourself? For those who don't know me, in my day-job I'm a professor of medieval matters at The Citadel, where among other things I do a lot of research on the military history of the Middle Ages. In my spare time, though, I write fiction. My first novel came out last year from Tor Books: The Shards of Heaven, a historical fantasy set against the war between the future Caesar Augustus and the famed lovers Mark Antony and Cleopatra. And now here we are with its sequel, The Gates of Hell-an amazing journey!
Published in: Barnes & Noble Sci-Fi Fantasy Blog
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Friday
January 13, 2017
7Epic Fantasy Meets Ancient Rome: An Interview with Michael Livingston, Author of "The Shards of Heaven" and "The Gates of Hell"
What happens when a historian brings his love of the fantasy genre to crafting a trilogy? In the case of Michael Livingston's adrenaline-pumping Shards novels, what you get resembles a cross between HBO's Rome and Game of Thrones. Set in the era of the Roman Empire, featuring such famous figures as Cleopatra and Augustus, Livingston's novels are cinematic in their immediacy, bringing historic characters and battle scenes to life. The addition of magical artifacts, known as the Shards, makes for an intriguing take on what determines the fate of empires. The Shards of Heaven and The Gates of Hell, the first two installments in the trilogy, are out now from Tor Books. I caught up with Michael to talk about the intertwining of magic and history, his unparalleled rendering of ancient Alexandria, his inspirations, and more... Michael Livingston's historical fantasy novel The Shards of Heaven was published by Tor Books in 2015; the sequel, The Gates of Hell, appeared in November 2016. An award-winning writer and professor, Livingston holds degrees in History, Medieval Studies, and English. He teaches at The Citadel, specializing in the Middle Ages and speculative literature.
Published in: HuffingtonPost.com
(view article) (no cache available)

Friday
January 13, 2017
8. Citadel's football commitments include two Shrine Bowl players
Early commitments for The Citadel's 2017 football recruiting class include two Shrine Bowl players and an offensive MVP of the North-South All-Star Game The Bulldogs have at least nine players committed thus far, according to announcements on social media and reports on recruiting websites. Citadel coach Brent Thompson has said he plans to sign about 20 players on Feb. 1. Coaches are not allowed to comment on individual recruits until signing day, and verbal commitments are non-binding. Here's a rundown on some of the players committed thus far: Jon Barrett Lewis is a 6-2, 296-pound lineman from Lenoir, N.C., who was named to the North Carolina Shrine Bowl team. He played both offense and defense for Hibriten High School, and was at one time committed to Western Carolina. Jalen Barr is a 5-11, 190-pound receiver and defensive back from Lake City High School. Barr was named offensive MVP for the South team in the North-South All-Star Game, catching five passes for 124 yards, including a 51-yard touchdown. Barr reportedly also had offers from Army, Presbyterian and Western Carolina. Ken'Darius Frederick is a 6-1, 173-pound defensive back from South Pointe High School in Rock Hill. Frederick was picked for the Shrine Bowl and helped South Pointe win a third straight state title last season. His commitment to The Citadel was reported by sportstalksc.com on Thursday. Willie Eubanks is a 6-2, 215-pound linebacker and running back from Laney High School in Augusta, Ga. Eubanks was selected to play in the Border Bowl all-star game.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
January 12, 2017
1. Former Charleston mayor Riley to lead first class at The Citadel
Former Charleston mayor Joe Riley and graduate of The Citadel Class of 1964 will lead his first class at the public military college Thursday afternoon. Riley took a position at his alma mater after serving as mayor of Charleston for 40 years. His class is called "Old South, New South Revival Political Leadership in Charleston, South Carolina." According to a statement from The Citadel, cadets are buzzing about having a nationally-renowned politician and alumnus on campus. “The Citadel is proud to have former Mayor Joe Riley return to his alma mater after four decades of leading the city of Charleston,” said Citadel President, Lt. Gen. John W. Rosa, USAF (Retired). “He epitomizes the leadership and service before self we seek to instill in our cadets.”
Broadcast on: WCSC-TV 5 - Online
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Thursday
January 12, 2017
1.1 Former Mayor Joe Riley to teach first class at The Citadel
Former Charleston Mayor Joseph P. Riley, Jr., is preparing to teach his first course at The Citadel. Old South City, New South Revival Political Leadership in Charleston, South Carolina, will dive into Charleston’s transformation from a sleepy coastal town into an international tourist destination, a major economic engine for the region and a center for global trade, according to the military college. Riley’s first class will be held from 2:30 – 5 p.m. on Thursday, January 12. Classes will be held on Tuesday afternoons at various locations on campus and throughout the city, including Riviera Theater, City Hall and Emanuel AME church. Each class session will include remarks by Riley, guest speakers, and a discussion with 15-20 cadets as well as members of the public who will be invited to attend classes based on their areas of interest, according to the course description
Broadcast on: WCBD-TV 2 (Charleston) - Online
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Thursday
January 12, 2017
2. Native bagpiper to play in Inauguration Day parade
Mohawk Area High School graduate Derek Waddington will perform in the Presidential Inaugural Parade with the Citadel Military College of South Carolina’s Regimental Band and Pipes and the Summerall Guards. Waddington, a sophomore cadet, is one of 35 bagpipers and drummers in the ensemble who will perform in the parade on Jan. 20. The Regimental Band was selected by the Presidential Inaugural Committee from 200 applications from parade hopefuls, according to the Associated Press. The Regimental Band has about 80 cadet musicians. Throughout its history, The Citadel has maintained a tradition of duty, pride and excellence as part of the cadet experience, and “America’s Band” — The Citadel Regimental Band and Pipes has been a part of that tradition since 1909. As one of the 21 companies comprising the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, the Regimental Band and Pipes leads the way and sets the tempo that all other cadets follow. The Summerall Guards, a 61-member silent precision drill platoon, will perform a series of movements based on the old German close order drill, the exactness and thoroughness with which a cadet is trained. The drill, which has never been written down, is performed to a silent count. Each year’s guards take responsibility for teaching the next year’s unit the precise drill.
Published in: New Castle News - Online
(photo included) (view article) (no cache available)

Thursday
January 12, 2017
3. Video: The Citadel's Carl Jensen on Opportunities for Graduating Students in the Intelligence World
Carl talks about his role as Professor and Director of Intelligence and Security Studies at The Citadel. There are numerous opportunities in this area, not just in government but also in the private sector with significant growth.
Published in: Charleston CEO - Online
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Thursday
January 12, 2017
Chattanooga holds off Citadel, 83-73
With five senior starters at his disposal, Chattanooga coach Matt McCall has a veteran team well-equipped to handle the havoc that The Citadel basketball team hopes to cause in each game. The Mocs did just that Wednesday night, managing the Bulldogs' pressure and fast pace for an 83-73 victory at McKenzie Arena in Chattanooga, Tenn. Jonathan Burroughs-Cook scored 20 points to lead Chattanooga (13-4, 4-1), the defending champion and preseason favorite in the Southern Conference. Sophomore forward Zane Najdawi played through an ankle injury and led the Bulldogs (9-10, 2-4) with 15 points. Considering that The Citadel was without freshman standout Preston Parks for a third straight game and had lost by 40 on its last trip to Chattanooga, the result was not terribly frustrating for coach Duggar Baucom, who started three freshmen. “I'm unbelievably proud of them,” Baucom said. “The last time in this building, we got beat badly. Tonight, it was a 10-point game with six minutes to go, and then a questionable call ends up costing us three points.” The Bulldogs were within 68-58 when a scramble for the ball in front of the Chattanooga bench ended with the ball out of bounds, and the referee pointing the Mocs' way.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Wednesday
January 11, 2017
1. Statement on Dylann Roof sentence from Joseph P. Riley, The Citadel
"The unspeakable acts of this individual to some of the finest members of our community have been addressed by our civilization's system of justice. The judgment was equal to the horrific nature of the crimes. My hope is that this verdict gives some small measure of closure to the families of our beloved Emanuel nine," said Professor Joseph P. Riley, Jr., The Citadel, Mayor of Charleston, 1975-2016 Joseph P. Riley, Citadel Class of 1964, was the mayor of Charleston at the time of the Emanuel shooting and is widely credited with helping the city respond in a peaceful manner. Riley is the first occupant of the Joseph P. Riley, Jr. Endowed Chair of American and Public Policy at The Citadel. He assumed the seat in January 2016, upon his retirement from public office as the Mayor of Charleston, South Carolina, for 40 years. He begins teaching his first full course as Professor of American Government & Public Policy at The Citadel on Thurs., Jan. 12, 2017, one year from the date of his retirement from office.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Wednesday
January 11, 2017
2. The Citadel Board of Visitors to consider allowing beer sales at baseball games
As early as this spring, Citadel fans may be able to enjoy a cold one as they cheer on their beloved Bulldogs at Riley Park. With approval from the Board of Visitors, The Citadel would join dozens of universities across the country, including the College of Charleston, that sell alcohol at sporting events - a growing trend among athletic programs vying to boost revenue and game attendance. "I would probably say five years ago, you would be hard pressed to find (any college) that was selling alcohol at an athletic venue," said athletic director Jim Senter. "The trend is now moving back in the other direction." The college's proposal, presented to the Board of Visitors' operations and risk management committee on Tuesday, would allow RiverDogs concessions stands to sell beer to both the public and cadets alike at Citadel baseball games starting in the 2017 season - with a few caveats. Imbibers would be limited to beer - no wine, cocktails or hard liquor. And they only would be permitted to purchase three 12-ounce clear plastic cups per game, which concessions staff would track using tear-off tabs on their 21-and-over wristbands. Beer sales would stop at the end of the seventh inning. The Citadel would staff games with ushers, who would monitor the stands for any unruly, drunken behavior. The college would also carve out an alcohol-free "family friendly" section of the stands and offer free soda to wristband-identified designated drivers.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
January 11, 2017
Local Entrepreneurs Acquire Valpak of Greater Columbia in South Carolina
Valpak, a leader in local print and digital coupons, announced today that Valpak of Greater Columbia has been acquired by Daniel Bedenbaugh and Trey Bruner. The large South Carolina territory, which includes Lexington, Newberry and Richland counties, has served local businesses and residents since 1994. The entrepreneurs plan to mail their first Valpak Blue Envelope later this month to approximately 100,000 households in the Palmetto State with the potential to expand to 250,000 households per month. First-time franchisee Daniel Bedenbaugh is a ninth-generation Newberry County native. Prior to franchising with Valpak, Bedenbaugh graduated from The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, in Charleston with a degree in business administration. He has worked in the manufacturing industry, both in process improvement and sales management. "Leading up to this opportunity with Valpak, I discovered my passion for marketing and sales and had the ultimate goal to build my own business," said Bedenbaugh. "I was very attracted to Valpak's proven business model and reputation for being one of the leading direct marketing companies in the country. Valpak gives me the necessary tools to successfully own and build my own business, while allowing me to do something I am passionate about." Trey Bruner joins Bedenbaugh as his business partner. Bruner, who is also a first-time franchisee, owns the weekly community newspaper The Twin-City News and has strong ties in the local business advertising community. As a 14-year service member in the U.S. Army, Bruner continues to serve as a Captain in the South Carolina Army National Guard, in addition to being a financial advisor with Edward Jones.
Broadcast on: WWTV - Northern Michigan
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Wednesday
January 11, 2017
The Citadel Ranked In Top 10 In Both Final Polls
The Citadel football team has finished the 2016 season ranked in the top 10 of both major FCS polls, it was announced Monday. The Bulldogs are ranked 9th in the Coaches poll and 10th in the STATS poll. This is the team's highest final poll ranking since 1992 when the Bulldogs tied for 1st in the final regular season poll and is the third time The Citadel has finished inside the top 10, joining the 1988 squad's 9th-place position in the final regular season poll. The Citadel, which finished the 2015 season ranked 13th by STATS and 15th by the coaches, is ranked in the final poll in consecutive seasons for the first time since 1990-92 when the team was ranked 15th, tied for 20th and tied for 1st, respectively. The Citadel completed a 10-2 campaign in the first season under head coach Brent Thompson, who broke the program's 100-year-old record for wins by a first-year head coach. The Bulldogs earned their second straight Southern Conference championship and tied the record for most SoCon wins in a season by completing only the seventh 8-0 conference mark in SoCon history. The Citadel broke the program's single-season program record with six road wins, the most in FCS in 2016, and finished with the second-highest single-season wins total in school history. The Citadel was awarded the No. 6 seed in the FCS Playoffs, earning a national seed for the first time under the current 24-team format, and hosted a playoff game for the first time since 1992. The Bulldogs made their fifth postseason appearance and advanced to the playoffs in back-to-back seasons for the first time while Coach Thompson became the only first-year head coach to lead the Bulldogs to the postseason.
Published in: WCSC-TV Charleston, SC
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Wednesday
January 11, 2017
Waccamaw football coach steps down
After seven seasons as head football coach at Waccamaw High School, Tyronne Davis has stepped down to spend more time watching his sons play the sport he loves. "I love it and love the kids, but I just thought it was my time," said Davis, who will continue to be an assistant principal at the school. "Now is the time that I really want to focus on being a parent." Tyler Davis, a Waccamaw High graduate, is a sophomore on The Citadel football team. Trey Davis is a sophomore on the Waccamaw football team. Waccamaw High Principal David Hammel called Davis and excellent football coach, mentor and role model. "I can't say enough good things about Coach Davis," Hammel said. "He has elevated our program." Davis was hired in 2010 and compiled a record of 24-51. In his seven seasons the Warriors made the postseason five times and won two playoff games. His best season was 2014, when the Warriors finished the regular season 5-5 and advanced to the second round of the Class AA playoffs. "I just felt that I wanted to do something different," Davis said. "I'm at a point now where I've done mostly what I wanted to do." Before making his decision to step down, Davis said he sought advice from former Waccamaw softball Coach Scott Streiffert and former Georgetown High basketball Alvin "Stitch" Walker, both of whom retired in 2016 after long coaching careers.
Published in: South Strand News
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Tuesday
January 10, 2017
Experts argue mental health played large role in Fort Lauderdale shooting
(This piece also appeared on more than 150 TV stations nationally). Esteban Santiago, the 26 year-old man suspected of opening fire in a baggage claim area at a Florida airport Friday, killing five people and wounding six, made his first appearance in federal court on Monday, where he faces multiple charges including murder, airport violence, and firearms offenses. If convicted, Santiago could face the death penalty. The suspect's questionable mental stability and recent history of a psychiatric crisis has brought renewed interest in laws that prevent a person who could be a danger to himself or others from owning or obtaining a firearm. The suspect took a one-way flight from his home in Anchorage, Alaska and caught a connecting flight before arriving at the Fort Lauderdale airport. Anchorage airport police confirmed that Santiago had only one checked bag, a hard-case which contained his gun, a 9mm semi-automatic pistol. TSA regulations allow passengers to check their unloaded firearms and up to 11 pounds of ammunition in a locked, hard-case bag. As of Saturday, the suspect's motive for the killing still wasn't clear. George Piro, the FBI's special agent in charge in Miami, told reporters that authorities "have not identified any triggers that would have caused this attack," adding that they have not ruled out terrorism as a motive for the shooting. Dr. Carl Jensen is a retired FBI special agent and director of the intelligence and security studies program at the Citadel Military College of South Carolina. He explained that during his time in the field it was "very common" for individuals with mental problems to reach out the FBI. "Very often, it involved people who heard voices, often times involving the CIA telling them to do something," he said. According to Jensen, the FBI office in Alaska followed the correct procedure by turning Santiago over to local authorities who then conducted his mental evaluation. "FBI agents are not psychologists, they cannot diagnose mental illness."
Broadcast on: WZTV (Nashville, TN) - online
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Tuesday
January 10, 2017
Local Entrepreneurs Acquire Valpak of Greater Columbia in South Carolina
Valpak, a leader in local print and digital coupons, announced today that Valpak of Greater Columbia has been acquired by Daniel Bedenbaugh and Trey Bruner. The large South Carolina territory, which includes Lexington, Newberry and Richland counties, has served local businesses and residents since 1994. The entrepreneurs plan to mail their first Valpak Blue Envelope later this month to approximately 100,000 households in the Palmetto State with the potential to expand to 250,000 households per month. First-time franchisee Daniel Bedenbaugh is a ninth-generation Newberry County native. Prior to franchising with Valpak, Bedenbaugh graduated from The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, in Charleston with a degree in business administration. He has worked in the manufacturing industry, both in process improvement and sales management. "Leading up to this opportunity with Valpak, I discovered my passion for marketing and sales and had the ultimate goal to build my own business," said Bedenbaugh. "I was very attracted to Valpak's proven business model and reputation for being one of the leading direct marketing companies in the country. Valpak gives me the necessary tools to successfully own and build my own business, while allowing me to do something I am passionate about."
Published in: Yahoo! Finance - online
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Monday
January 9, 2017
1a. Former Charleston Mayor Joe Riley to teach highly anticipated history course
On the one-year anniversary of the retirement of one of America's longest serving mayors, Joseph P. Riley, Jr., begins teaching his first full course at The Citadel. The highly anticipated class, Old South City, New South Revival Political Leadership in Charleston, South Carolina, will dive into Charleston's transformation from a sleepy coastal town into an international tourist destination, a major economic engine for the region and a center for global trade. The course will be Riley's first systematic and comprehensive public discussion of his years as mayor of Charleston—years in which the city was transformed from a stagnant, Southern community into a vibrant, international destination of choice. Renowned labor relations expert and history professor, Kerry Taylor, Ph.D., will also be presenting part of the course. Riley's first class will be held from 2:30 - 5 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 12 in Bond Hall room 295. The course will advance The Citadel's primary mission of developing principled leaders. Classes will be held on Tuesday afternoons at various locations on campus and throughout the city, including Riviera Theater, City Hall and Emanuel AME church. Each class session will include remarks by Riley, guest speakers, and a discussion with 15-20 cadets as well as members of the public who will be invited to attend classes based on their areas of interest.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Monday
January 9, 2017
1b. Palmetto Politics: The return of professor Joe Riley
One year after his retirement, former Charleston Mayor Joe Riley begins his new role Thursday as a professor at The Citadel. Riley, Charleston's mayor of 40 years and a 1964 Citadel grad, will teach a new history course called "Old South City, New South Revival: Political Leadership in Charleston, South Carolina." He'll be joined by Associate Professor Kerry Taylor, a labor historian who most recently made the news when police arrested him alongside workers protesting for a $15 minimum wage while on the Crosstown in December. "It will be his first, systematic and comprehensive public discussion of his years as mayor of Charleston - years in which the city was transformed from a stagnant, Southern community into a vibrant, international destination of choice," said Bo Moore, dean of The Citadel School of Humanities and Social Sciences. Post and Courier columnist Brian Hicks' "The Mayor: Joe Riley and the Rise of Charleston" is required reading for the course, as is Steve Estes' "Charleston in Black and White" and the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s Letter from a Birmingham Jail. Guest speakers during the course will include Police Chief Greg Mullen, Spoleto Festival USA General Director Nigel Redden and former S.C. Supreme Court Chief Justice Jean Toal.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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