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About Today's News Clips
"Today's News Clips" is published into your e-mail box on normal Citadel business days, and contains links to recent news about The Citadel, the state of South Carolina, and other topics of interest to professionals working at institutes of higher education.
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The Citadel in the News

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PUBLISH DATE STORIES
Thursday
June 30, 2016
1. Citadel grad located, missing ring found in Florida to be returned
A Citadel graduation ring separated from its owner will soon be reunited. After a day of hunting on social media, The Citadel was able to find Tyson Lee Cater, who apparently lost his 2016 class ring in Florida sometime in the last couple months. According to a post on The Citadel's Facebook page, a vacationer in Cocoa Beach, Florida from the United Kingdom reached out to the university because she found Cater's ring. The university worked with the woman to track down Cater and return the ring.
Broadcast on: WCIV-TV Charleston, SC
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Thursday
June 30, 2016
2. The Citadel's Capers Williamson to compete in Olympic Trials
The Citadel's Capers Williamson will compete for a spot on the U.S. Olympic track and field team in the javelin this weekend at the Olympic Trials in Eugene, Oregon. Williamson, a two-time Southern Conference champion, will begin competition at the Trials' opening round of the javelin at 3:45 p.m. ET Saturday. Williamson's SoCon-record throw of 239 feet, four inches (72.95 meters) earlier this year qualified him for the Olympic Trials as one of the top 24 among eligible Americans who had declared for the Trials. Cyrus Hostetler leads the javelin field with a throw of 83.83 meters (about 275 feet). "This is one of those once-in-a-lifetime moments and we are so excited for him to be able to have this experience," said The Citadel head track and field coach Jody Huddleston. "Eugene is a very special place in the world of track and field, not only getting to experience that but then also to get to throw in the Olympic Trials on top of it is a very special way to end your Citadel track and field career. The coaches, his teammates and The Citadel want to wish him all the best." Williamson, ranked No. 23 in the Trials field, must finish in the top 12 in Saturday's first round to reach the finals, set for 7:25 p.m. on Monday. The top three finishers will compete for the U.S. in the Olympic Games.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Thursday
June 30, 2016
3. School of Humanities and Social Sciences faculty publications
Department of Criminal Justice - Professor Roy Fenoff authored a book chapter titled, "Food fraud detection technologies," which was published in The Routledge International Handbook of Technology, Crime and Justice. Fenoff also had a journal article accepted for publications called "Evaluating the effectiveness of an evidence-based cognitive restructuring approach: 1-year results from Project ASPECT." It will appear in the International Journal of Cognitive Therapy. Department of History - Professor Keith Knapp heads the Early Medieval China Group, which initiated a global project involving more than 60 scholars from around the world, resulting in the publication of Early Medieval Chinese Texts: A Bibliographical Guide, in 2016. It was published by The Institute for East Asian Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. Knapp served as the editor along with three other professors. This work introduces all of the primary sources that are available for the study of early medieval China (AD 100-600). Additionally, Knapp co-edited Early Medieval Chinese Texts: A Bibliographical Guide, published in the spring by the institute. Department of Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures - Professor Juan Bahk has published a critical book review for a poetic anthology entitled, Los Exodos, Los Exilios, written by Peruvian-Spanish poet and professor of Salamanca University, Alfredo Perez Alendart. Bahk's review was published in the book Alencart, Poeta De Todas Parties: Ensayos y Notas. He joined The Citadel in 1991. He has published three critical books, as well as numerous articles that appeared in publications around the world.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Thursday
June 30, 2016
4. Workout honors fallen soldier who was Richland County deputy
Ryan Rawl's mother Diane is happy that Richland County deputies are living up to their promise to remember her late son's sacrifice. "They've kept their word about that," she said. "It means a lot." Their dedication will be on display again Monday at the annual Warrior Challenge named for the deputy killed in 2012 while on military duty in Afghanistan. Those taking part in the event on the 4th of July will join deputies in exercises on the State House grounds in downtown Columbia. Proceeds benefit scholarships in memory of Ryan Rawl. His mother, other family members and friends with be there either to participate or cheer on those taking part. "I love seeing everyone again," she said. Lott's promised that her family will part of his team's circle. "He's kept up with us," Diane Rawl said. In particular, Lott "always lets us know he's thinking of us that day" on June 20, the anniversary of her son's death, she said. Ryan Rawl was a deputy for seven years who worked on patrol and as a school resource officer. Lott kept a letter sent by Rawl asking for the sheriff's approval for a 10-week leave of absence for South Carolina National Guard basic training. "I feel it is my duty to serve my country," The Citadel graduate's request said. "I would greatly appreciate you honoring my request." "OK," Lott wrote at the bottom in reply. "Proud of you for joining."
Published in: The State
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Thursday
June 30, 2016
5. Area students named to Citadel dean's list
The following members of The Citadel South Carolina Corps of Cadets were named to the dean's list for the spring 2016 semester: William Caughman, of Salley; Samuel Douglas, of Aiken; Thomas Griffith, of Aiken; William Hartzog, of Williston; James Strickland, of Aiken; Dane Anderson, of North Augusta; Corey Williams, of North Augusta; Matthew Loveland, of Aiken; DeAndre Schoultz, of Aiken; and Sarah Zorn, of Warrenville.
Published in: Aiken Standard
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Thursday
June 30, 2016
6. The Lohmann Brothers
If you were to ask Greenville, Ohio, residents to name the most famous and accomplished individuals to ever call our town home, you would most likely be given the names of sharpshooter Annie Oakley, journalist Lowell Thomas, and perhaps naval airship captain Zachary Lansdowne. A modern sports fan might even list retired NFL player Matt Light. Few Greenville residents would realize they were ignoring a group of brothers who were among the most respected in their field during their prime. Few Greenville residents have ever heard of the Lohmann brothers and their finely crafted telescopes... William Tyler Olcott, another popular twentieth century astronomer, purchased a 5" Lohmann equatorial refractor, which he installed in an observatory on the roof of his house. The Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina, purchased a 7" Lohmann refractor in 1913. Parsons College in Fairfield, Iowa, used a 9″ refractor telescope from Lohmann Brothers for decades before eventually selling it to the Insights Museum in El Paso, Texas, who them transferred it to HUT observatory in El Paso when the museum was torn down. Taylor University in Upland, Indiana, had a 10 1/4" reflector telescope from the Lohmanns. In 2010, a private owner in Battle Creek, Michigan, reported to Antique Telescopes he was restoring a 4" Lohmann refractor, but no further information is available. Ad in Antique Telescope SocietyThe Dayton Astronomical Society purchased a 6" refractor from the brothers for $2,000 in 1910 (almost $50,000 in today's dollars), which was housed at the Dayton Museum of Natural History (now Boonshoft Museum of Discovery). John Graham of the Miami Valley Astronomical Society confirms the scope is in storage under the Apollo Observatory at Boonshoft, and states he once helped partially restore the antique, though the process was never completed.
Published in: Fourth & Sycamore
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Wednesday
June 29, 2016
1. Full scholarships for master's degree level prospective teachers available
In order to meet the critical need for highly-trained K-12 teachers of science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines (STEM), The Citadel Graduate College (CGC) is accepting applications for full, master's level scholarships. Applications will be accepted through July 25, 2016, for the college's Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarships which are intended to support students and professionals who want to become STEM teachers. "Recent graduates or current college seniors with STEM majors from any college can apply. Additionally working professionals who have STEM undergraduate degrees and want to change their careers to become teachers may apply," said Joel Gramling, Ph.D., grant supervisor, biology professor and curator of The Citadel Herbarium. "Also, STEM majors from the South Carolina Corps of Cadets who are sophomores through seniors can apply." All applicants must have a grade point average of 3.0 or higher. Undergraduates who are cadets, or who wish to transition to The Citadel to complete their undergraduate degrees in science or math with a teaching specialization, and then attend The Citadel Graduate College, may also apply. The students who are selected for the scholarships will receive full tuition (up to 36 credit hours) for a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) in math or biology. Recipients must sign a contract pledging to teach for one year per semester of support and will be provided with professional development opportunities including conferences and networking meetings, as well as the support of a mentor teacher. And, all of the Noyce Scholars will complete a student teaching internship at a local high school.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Wednesday
June 29, 2016
2. Citadel celebrates 20 years of admitting women
Even in the summer, The Citadel is always changing. "Close to 20 years ago I started here at The Citadel," said Nancy Mace, the first woman to graduate from the school. Mace was also among the first four cadets admitted to the school in 1996. "I've got a lot of fond memories," she said. "It was about learning who I am, the value of hard work." While a court battle and board of visitors opened The Citadel's doors for Mace and other female cadets, it was her hard work that pushed her ahead. "When you are the first in any experience, there are going to be challenges," she said. She's reminded of those challenges as she walks through campus. "When my father dropped me off at school, his final words to me were, Nancy, don't go home if you want to quit, just put on your shoes and start walking and he dropped me off on campus that first day." The school's first female provost and dean, Connie Book, says more change is coming. "This fall we're going to bring in our largest class ever of women. Literally jumping 36% in our incoming class of women," Book said. 4937-the citadel really works hard at its commitment to have women in the core. We do that through our admissions process, as well as the support we provide women when they're here.
Broadcast on: WCIV-TV Charleston, SC
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Wednesday
June 29, 2016
3. Public invited to participate in creation of The Citadel's hazard mitigation plan
Happening today: The Citadel is looking for your input during a public meeting at the school. It's an effort to keep their campus up and running post disaster. This is an effort made possible through a grant from FEMA. The Citadel will host its first public meeting tonight to discuss what they call their multi-hazard mitigation plan. It's a way they can identify hazards they have that could hinder a quick response and clean up after a disaster. They want the public to provide input to identify those hazards and to address them. Since this is being done with money from FEMA once the college has their plan in place they can go to the federal agency for funds in the event of a disaster. "Having a plan in place is absolutely critical. With a plan in place we can sit there and get the right resources lined up against it and hopefully mitigate the damage," said Col Ben Wham, vice president for facilities and engineering at the school. Please email Emily DeVoe at edevoe@citadel.edu to request the video clip.
Broadcast on: WCIV-TV Charleston, SC

Wednesday
June 29, 2016
4. Like college tuition, the sun also rises
Welcome to Personal Finance 101, class. Today we'll examine the cost of living for South Carolina college graduates. Pay attention or you'll have to learn this the hard way in four years. Let's say each of you will land jobs straight out of college making $35,000. That's higher than the state average, but some will earn more - mostly those who go on to get advanced degrees... Rolling downhill - That $25 per class-hour is probably about right because, yes, South Carolina colleges and universities have raised tuition again. They do it so regularly now it barely qualifies as news. This year it's 3 percent, for the most part. For in-state tuition, the College of Charleston and USC have topped $11,000 a year, and Clemson is more than $14,000. The Citadel is creeping up near $28,000. If you maintain a B average, you're eligible for lottery help. But tuition is higher now with lottery scholarships than it was before that manna came from Columbia. So the cost of college would be fine if wages had doubled in the past 14 years. Instead, wages are stagnant and - surprise - student debt is going up. As usual, South Carolina is among the top 10 states for that problem.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Wednesday
June 29, 2016
5. Still time to vote in today's runoff elections
Just a friendly reminder, polls close at 7 p.m. Tuesday evening, so there's still time to cast your vote in this year's runoff elections. The ballot for Charleston area voters consists solely of Republican candidates vying for seats in the Statehouse. In state Senate District 41, Roy Maybank and Sandy Senn are competing for a spot as the GOP candidate. Senn is a West Ashley lawyer. As part of her platform, Senn has promised to defend 2nd Amendment rights and encourage more conservation easements to preserve undeveloped land. Maybank, also a West Ashley resident, is a graduate of The Citadel and currently runs Maybank Law Firm. Following this year's primary election, Maybank received endorsements from James Island Mayor Bill Woolsey and former Senate candidate Culver Kidd. This is the first attempt at political office by both candidates, who are running for the seat left vacant by Sen. Paul Thurmond. The choice for the Republican candidate for Senate District 34 comes down to Reese Boyd and Stephen Goldfinch. Goldfinch, a member of the state House of Representatives, is a proponent for small government who sponsored a bill prohibiting federal restrictions on firearms. Runoff opponent Boyd bills himself as a pro-life, pro-2nd Amendment candidate, who has earned an endorsement from Gov. Nikki Haley.
Published in: Charleston City Paper
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Tuesday
June 28, 2016
1. Citadel voted to admit women 20 years ago June 28
Twenty years ago on June 28, the Board of Visitors at The Citadel, a public military college steeped in tradition and history, unanimously voted to begin admitting female cadets, ending 154 years of male-only admittance. Although women represent only 7 percent of enrollment in the Corps of Cadets today, their ranks have slowly but steadily grown. In the fall of 1996, The Citadel's first class of four women joined the Corps of Cadets. Next fall, The Citadel expects to enroll 83 first-year female "knobs," its largest class of women ever - up from 53 last year. "You can really see the impact - the positive impact - of women at The Citadel every day in my work," said Connie Book, who joined The Citadel last year as its first female provost and dean. "They are full members of the Corps of Cadets. They hold leadership roles and positions within the Corps of Cadets. They're going on to stellar careers within the military and in civilian life and graduate school." In August 1995, Shannon Faulkner became the first female cadet to enroll at The Citadel following a two-year legal battle against the college over its male-only admissions policy. She had been admitted in 1993 after deleting references to her gender on her application, but then was denied from starting classes and joining the Corps once officials discovered her gender. Her case reached the U.S. Supreme Court. After the lengthy legal battle, she was admitted to the Corps under a federal court order. She dropped out in less than a week, citing exhaustion from stress and psychological abuse.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
June 28, 2016
2. Open for business: new cadet coin laundry facility
Cadets asked for it and The Citadel has delivered. The Citadel Coin Laundry is now officially open for business 24 hours a day, seven days a week for cadets. Located behind Murray Barracks, The Citadel Coin Laundry will provide the campus with access to 12 energy efficient washers and 12 energy efficient dryers. The updated laundry facility comes after a $565,000 renovation and is complete with video surveillance in order to provide students with a secure means of cleaning laundry. Cadet laundry services are included in tuition and laundry bags can be dropped off at Laundry Services, but now cadets have the option to get that fresh, out-of-the-dryer feel and smell. The renovated facility will be the answer to cadet requests for needing a quick and simple laundry solution. The coin laundry facility will accept two methods of payment - coins and the OneCard. Students will have the ability to load funds onto their OneCard for full access to the facility's machines. The machines will also eventually have the capacity to receive credit cards. Each wash costs $2.25 and the cost for drying is $0.25 for every 6 minutes. For more information please contact the Director of Laundry and Dry Cleaning, Chris Floyd at (843) 953-5087 or chris.floyd@citadel.edu.
Published in: The Citadel Newsroom
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Tuesday
June 28, 2016
3. The Citadel raises tuition, fees for 2016-17 academic year
The Citadel's Board of Visitors has approved the college's budget, which includes the combined tuition and fees rate for the 2016-17 academic year. The Citadel's all-in costs for in-state cadets will increase 2.9 percent for upperclassmen ($648 per year) and 3.0 percent for freshmen ($808 per year). Out-of-state freshmen and upperclassmen will see an increase of 3.1 percent compared to last year, representing an annual increase of $1,310 for upperclassmen and $1,470 for freshmen. "To help families of cadets prepare, The Citadel provides the information below for all-in costs. All members of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets must live on campus due to the military culture, therefore the all-in costs include room and board, uniforms, laundry, dry cleaning, infirmary use, books, and other mandatory expenses not required by most colleges and universities, as well as general tuition," said Col. Joseph Garcia, The Citadel's vice president for finance and business. "Fees for freshmen are higher due to the uniform purchases that year." The all-in costs do not include other fees as determined by the college, such as specific targeted fees or lab fees which vary according to the academic major or schedule of each cadet.
Broadcast on: WCBD-TV Charleston, SC
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Tuesday
June 28, 2016
4. British Say "No" to EU Power and Plunder
The political and financial establishments of Europe and the United States were taken by almost total surprise and sent into apparent shock when 52 percent of the voters in the United Kingdom chose for their country to leave the European Union (EU). But it is not the end of the world as we know it, and can be a positive sign and example of opposition to unrepresentative and centralized bureaucratic control over people's lives. As the June 23, 2016 vote neared on the referendum as to whether or not the United Kingdom would retain its membership in the 28-nation European Union, public opinion polls suggested that the voting result would be very close but with an edge toward remaining within the EU. The financial and foreign exchange markets all were positive, and the political elites in both London and Brussels, the European Union headquarters, appeared to be taking a sigh of relief that the existing order of things would not be threatened by a major participating nation opting out. Hysteria and bedlam are the only words to describe the initial reaction when the votes were being counted, with the clear outcome that a majority of the voters had, in fact, said, "No," to staying under the rule of the Brussels bureaucracies. What is the European Union, and how and why has it brought about such a reaction from not only the people of the British Isles, but sizeable numbers of people in other member countries from one end of the European continent to the other? Dr. Richard M. Ebeling is the BB & T Professor of Ethics and Free Enterprise Leadership at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina, He was formerly professor of Economics at Northwood University.
Published in: NassauInstitute.org
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Tuesday
June 28, 2016
5. Letter: Citadel flag
R.L. Schreadley's commentary "Honor valor of North and South" defends the displaying of the Confederate flag in The Citadel chapel. His statement that "It is certainly true that Confederate flags have been hijacked by a small rabble of evil men" confuses me. History documents the trafficking of young Africans for enslavement. The trafficking business had a booming hub in the Charleston area where Fort Sumter was fired on by an army (not a small rabble) that would fight under Confederate flags (not hijacked) to perpetuate the legal trafficking of kidnapped people. Long after the Civil War ended, and with it the slave trade, Confederate battle flags were once again being unfurled throughout the South to fly above statehouses, places where elected officials discuss law. The flags that once flew above an Army that fought in defense of legal kidnap and enslavement were then raised as proud ensigns of resistance to civil rights for Americans of African descent, the descendants of those enslaved without rights. This effrontery was, once again, not committed by a "small rabble of evil men."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Tuesday
June 28, 2016
6. Walters Nominated to Replace Paxton as Assistant Marine Corps Commandant
Defense Secretary Ash Carter has announced that Marine Lt. Gen. Glenn Walters has been nominated to serve as the next assistant commandant of the Marine Corps. If confirmed by the Senate, Walters will replace Gen. John Paxton Jr. as the Marine Corps' second-highest ranking officer and 33rd assistant commandant. A Cobra pilot by trade, Walters currently serves as the deputy commandant for Marine Corps Programs and Resources. Walters, who has been tapped to receive a fourth star, has served with a host of helicopter and test squadrons. He was the first commanding officer of Marine Operational and Evaluation Squadron 22 and has served as the assistant deputy commandant for Marine Corps Aviation. Walters led 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing (Forward) in Afghanistan. He was commissioned in the Marine Corps in 1979 after graduating from The Citadel in South Carolina. He attended flight training in Pensacola, Florida. Walters was designated a naval aviator in March 1981 and was assigned to Marine Aircraft Group 39, where he trained to fly the AH-1T Cobra helicopter. He was then transferred to Marine Attack Helicopter Squadron 169 where he served as the flight line officer.
Published in: MilitaryConnection.com
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Tuesday
June 28, 2016
7. Citadel students honored
The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, honored the following students with Gold Stars for outstanding academic achievement during the spring semester of the 2015-2016 academic year. Gold Stars are awarded to students that achieve a 3.7 grade point average or higher. Students that achieve Gold Star recognition are also placed on The Citadel's Dean's List. Local students are Ellison Smith of Conway, Augustus Smith of Conway, George Graham of Conway, William Mills of Conway, and Lloyd Powers of Loris. The following members of The Citadel South Carolina Corps of Cadets earned top honors in the spring 2016 semester. Dean's List recognition is given to cadets registered for 12 or more semester hours and whose grade point average is 3.2 or higher with no grade below a C for the previous semester’s work. Local students are Ellison Smith of Conway, Augustus Smith of Conway, George Graham of Conway, William Mills of Conway, Lloyd Powers of Loris, Caleb Stalvey of Loris, Coleman Floyd of Conway, and Kurt Harris of Conway.
Published in: MyHorryNews.com
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Tuesday
June 28, 2016
8. Student Spotlight : Rafael Gonzalez
Rafael Gonzalez graduated from Coral Gables High in the top one percent of his class. Now he is preparing for his next big thing - college. Gonzalez will attend The Citadel Military College of South Carolina. "I wanted to do something military for a while," he said. "I'm going to go in wanting the military experience, get it and see if it's for me." He is taking mechanical engineering so if he doesn't enter the military, he'll seek an engineering job. Gonzalez earned a full scholarship to The Citadel. He applied for West Point but was waitlisted because of a paperwork glitch. At The Citadel, Gonzalez can take ROTC from any of the military branches. While at Gables, Gonzalez created a community service project to tutor middle school students in computer science. "We helped them in HTML coding," he said. "To see if they have an interest in computer science. The point was more to teach them beginner ideas in computer science. It's pretty important to teach them young. Computer science is going to be fundamental to everyone."
Published in: Miami's Community Newspapers
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Tuesday
June 28, 2016
9. 2016 Spring Academic All-SoCon team announced
The Citadel's cadet-athletes earned a total of 22 placements on the Spring 2016 Academic All-Southern Conference Team it was announced Monday. To be a part of the academic all-conference team, cadet-athletes must have at least a 3.3 cumulative grade-point average at the completion of the spring semester and must have participated in a minimum of 50 percent of their team's contests. Additionally, the cadet-athletes must have successfully completed at least three semesters at their institutions, making true freshmen and first-year transfers ineligible for the team. Two-sport athlete Mady Riegel is one of three Bulldogs to have earned the honor in both the fall and spring seasons. Riegel is joined by track and field members Jessica DeWitte and Jamie Cunningham, who competed for the cross country team in the fall. Tennis senior Jackson Pride is one of 16 members on the team to finish with a 4.00 GPA. For more information on The Citadel athletics, follow @CitadelSports or visit CitadelSports.com.
Published in: CitadelSports.com
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Monday
June 27, 2016
1a. Palmetto dove image spreads around city after one year
When he heard the news of nine people killed at Emanuel AME church, Gil Shuler was shocked. He wanted, needed, to do something. As a graphic artist, there was only one thing he could do. "I can't give you a lot of money, I can't work on your car, I can't build your house," he said. "But I can do that. The art." Shuler, a graphic design artist based in Mount Pleasant, is the mind behind the image of doves flying from the Palmetto tree that is often associated with the Emanuel AME tragedy. From the day after the tragedy to one year later, the image has spread all over the city... The Citadel used the same phrase and Shuler's image to create a mural last year in College Park. "The College Park wall has been crying out for a mural for years," Tiffany Silverman, fine arts director at The Citadel, said. "Hundreds of feet of cracked cinder block were, in my eyes, the perfect canvas for something significant for our community." The Citadel had rejected two proposals for murals on the wall until the Emanuel AME tragedy. One of the victims was a Citadel Graduate College alumnus. The James Island Lowe's, Holy City Doves and the Color Chemists provided all of the art materials for free, and Silverman and her team were able to get the project underway quickly. Not only did cadets and art students help out, but so did Charleston community members, who were allowed to paint their own doves on the wall in solidarity with those affected by the tragedy. There are just over 1,700 doves on the wall today. Silverman said she hopes that every time someone passes the mural they remember the past and pledge to make Charleston a better place. "It's more than just paint on a wall - it's a visual symbol of how people from all walks of life can unite over a shared vision," she said. "It has been one of the most meaningful collaborations of my life."
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
June 27, 2016
1b. The Citadel is seeking applicants for teaching scholarship
The Citadel is seeking applicants for a prestigious, fully funded teaching scholarship open to college graduates or professionals in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics. The Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship program has 10 available slots, according to Citadel spokeswoman Kim Keelor. Funded by the National Science Foundation, the available scholarships are open to anyone with an undergraduate degree in a "STEM" major with a grade point average of 3.0 or higher. The scholarship pays for up to 36 credit hours in The Citadel's Master of Arts in Teaching program, or about two years' worth of in-state tuition. Selected recipients must commit to teaching science or math for two years in local high-need school districts, including Berkeley, Charleston, Colleton, Dorchester 4 or Hampton 1, after completing their master's degree. Applications for the coming fall are due July 25. Visit www.citadel.edu for more information on how to apply.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
June 27, 2016
1c. As the National Organization for Women turns 50, feminists reflect on progress, unfinished business
Two years after she was hired as a cub reporter for a local TV news station, Jennet Robinson Alterman asked for a raise. It was 1975. She had been hired at the same time as two men, both fresh out of college with liberal arts degrees just like her. But despite having the same job, they made twice as much she did. When she approached her boss about a pay bump, he said something Alterman would never forget... After moving to Charleston in 1985, she founded Skirt! magazine, originally as a newsletter where she tried to combine "feminism with lighter stuff," like articles about fashion and style. Skirt! covered issues like reproductive rights and abortion. The magazine backed Shannon Faulkner, the first female cadet to enter The Citadel in 1995 under the escort of U.S. marshals, a heated controversy that ended with Faulkner's departure from the military college. "It wasn't a popular stance to take at all," Hardin said. "I got a little bit of hate mail. I think someone threw an egg on my car at work." Nowadays, identifying as feminist also feels like an unpopular stance, Hardin said. In a way, she's right: According to a recent national survey by the Washington Post and Kaiser Family Foundation, six in 10 women and only one-third of men in the U.S. depict themselves as feminists, which are higher figures than in some polls a few years earlier. Four in 10 respondents in the new poll, however, viewed the feminist movement as "angry," and a similar portion said it unfairly blames men for women’s challenges.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
June 27, 2016
1d. How a college drug ring hid in plain sight
It was one of Charleston's bigger drug busts: A network of present and former College of Charleston students and other 20-somethings accused of funneling hundreds of thousands of dollars of cocaine, pills and other narcotics into downtown's white-hot party scene. But the bust only hinted at a problem that's been hiding in plain sight for years: A drug- and booze-fueled culture around the college that generates enormous profits for young drug dealers even as it increases risks of addiction and violence. A Post and Courier examination of police and court documents, along with interviews with people knowledgeable about the drug ring, reveal an eye-opening portrait of audacity and excess... Inside 47 Ashley Ave., officers discovered cocaine in a false bottom of an Arizona Tea can in a bedroom refrigerator. They retrieved $7,500 in Xanax pills and $7,000 worth of marijuana in small bags, one labeled "Jolly Rancher." They found several Citadel cadet uniforms, and through one of the apartment's windows, they could see Moultrie Playground. After the search, police arrested Samantha Hincks, 26, on marijuana, cocaine and other narcotics distribution charges. Hincks attended The Citadel but did not graduate. Also arrested was her boyfriend, Jake Poeschek, 21, who also attended but did not graduate from The Citadel, school officials said. It was an unusual launch to a narcotics investigation, Mullen said. Most begin after police arrest small-time street dealers or drug users. Detectives then use such arrests as leverage to go after higher-level distributors. But this one started with what Mullen described as mid-level dealers.
Published in: The Post and Courier
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Monday
June 27, 2016
2a. Local students receive Gold Stars at The Citadel
The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, honored the following students with Gold Stars for outstanding academic achievement during the spring semester of the 2015-2016 academic year. Gold Stars are awarded to students who achieve a 3.7 grade point average or higher. Students who achieve Gold Star recognition are also placed on The Citadel's Dean's List: Anjelika Brown of Summerville; Justin Brownlee of Saint George; Kai Clark of Summerville; Bryce Hoopes of North Charleston; Thomas Rogers of Saint George; Alex Bear of Summerville; James Blocker of Summerville; Allen Boyd of Summerville; Dallin Cook of North Charleston; John Cordes of Summerville; Tinslee Dilday of Summerville; Brian Lapchak of North Charleston; Dylan Lilly of Dorchester.
Published in: The Summerville Journal Scene
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Monday
June 27, 2016
2b. Conrad Geis of Streetsboro takes top honors at The Citadel in spring 2016: Dean's List
Members of The Citadel South Carolina Corps of Cadets earned top honors in the spring 2016 semester. Dean's List recognition is given to cadets registered for 12 or more semester hours and whose grade point average is 3.2 or higher with no grade below a C for the previous semester's work. Conrad Geis of Streetsboro has been awarded Dean's List recognition.
Published in: Record-Courier
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Monday
June 27, 2016
2c. College report graduations, honors lists
Members of The Citadel South Carolina Corps of Cadets earned top honors in the spring 2016 semester. Dominique Allen of Richmond Hill was recognized for academic achievement and earned dean's list recognition. Dean's list cadets registered for 12 or more semester hours whose GPAs are 3.2 or higher with no grade below a C for the previous semester's work.
Published in: Bryan County News
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Monday
June 27, 2016
2d. Hillsborough: College students dean's list grades
Michael Subach of Hillsborough was awarded Gold Stars by The Citadel in Charleston, S.C., for earning a grade-point ratio of 3.7 or higher during the spring semester. Students who achieve Gold Star recognition are also placed on The Citadel's dean's list. He is a May graduate of the military academy.
Published in: CentralJersey.com
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Monday
June 27, 2016
2e. Local students named to Citadel's Gold Stars and Dean's List
Two named Gold Star cadets - Two Colleton County students have received Gold Stars for outstanding academic achievement during the spring semester at The Citadel in Charleston. They are Joshua Hamilton of Cottageville and Jackson Riley of Walterboro. Four named to Citadel's dean's list - Four Colleton County students have been named to the dean's list for the spring semester at The Citadel in Charleston: Joshua Hamilton of Cottageville, Jackson Riley of Walterboro, David Mitchell of Yemassee and Steven Murdaugh of Walterboro. The list requires a 3.2 or higher grade point average for 12 or more semester hours with no grade below a C.
Published in: WlaterboroLive.com
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Monday
June 27, 2016
2f. Names in the News
Matthew Hamma of Haymarket was honored with a Gold Star by The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina for outstanding academic achievement during the spring semester. Daniel Yu of Gainesville was honored with a Gold Star by The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina for outstanding academic achievement during the spring semester. Matthew Hamma of Haymarket and a member of The Citadel South Carolina Corps of Cadets was named to The Citadel's Dean List for the 2016 spring semester. Daniel Yu of Gainesville and a member of The Citadel South Carolina Corps of Cadets was named to The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina's Dean List for the 2016 spring semester. Traceel Andrews of Montclair and a member of The Citadel South Carolina Corps of Cadets was named to The Citadel's Dean List for the spring semester. Brandon Hickey of Triangle and a member of The Citadel South Carolina Corps of Cadets was named to The Citadel's Dean List for the spring semester. Jeremy McCathern of Dumfries and a member of The Citadel South Carolina Corps of Cadets was named to The Citadel's Dean List for the spring semester.
Published in: PrinceWilliamTimes.com
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