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About Today's News Clips
"Today's News Clips" is published into your e-mail box on normal Citadel business days, and contains links to recent news about The Citadel, the state of South Carolina, and other topics of interest to professionals working at institutes of higher education.
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The Citadel in the News

Most Recent

PUBLISH DATE STORIES
Tuesday
January 22, 2019
1. Civil rights activist panel inspires individuals to take a stand

An MLK week documentary viewing and panel discussion, hosted by the Matthew J. Perry Chapter of the National Black Law Students Association on Jan. 17 in USC’s law school, showcased the efforts of African-American women actively engaged in the fight for equal rights. This event was inspired by Martin Luther King Jr. and other leaders' contributions to the Civil Rights movement. The purpose of this particular panel was to honor the history and lesser-known individuals of the Civil Rights movement and engage individuals to take a stand in the continued fight for civil rights. Louise Brown was one of the nurse assistants that instigated the Charleston hospital workers' strike. Although this strike was unsuccessful, Kerry Taylor, who teaches at the Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina, described the importance and impact that this strike had on South Carolina politics. “The energy coming out of the Charleston strike led directly to grassroots voter mobilizations that manifested itself in the election of the first African-American elected officials into the state legislature, eventually the state senate, since Reconstruction," Taylor said.

Published in: Daily Gamecock - Online
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Tuesday
January 22, 2019
2. Citadel, UofSC band with three other universities to tackle ocean health/climate change issues

he first multi-academic institution center in South Carolina to study the effects of ocean health-related illness and the interactions from climate change is initializing its operations. Funded by a $5.7 million grant from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), more than 20 researchers from five colleges and universities are beginning their work aimed at better protecting human health through the new Center for Oceans and Human Health and Climate Change Interactions. The University of South Carolina, College of Charleston, The Citadel, Baylor University, and the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science were awarded the NIEHS grant in the fall of 2018 for the center that is headquartered at the University of South Carolina’s (USC) Arnold School of Public Health, in Columbia. The Center will be led by Geoffrey I. Scott, clinical professor and chair in the USC Department of Environmental Health Sciences. The Center’s deputy director is Paul A. Sandifer, director of the Center for Coastal Environmental and Human Health at the College of Charleston. Scott and Sandifer will work with a team of scientists who are faculty leaders at all five institutions. Additionally, researchers and environmental public health practitioners from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the U.S. Geological Survey, the Interstate Shellfish Sanitation Conference, and the Lowcountry Alliance for Model Communities will participate.

Published in: Charleston Business - Online
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Tuesday
January 22, 2019
3. Human Health : Oceans, Human Health, Climate Change Focus of Unique New $5.7 Million Alliance

The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences has awarded a $5.75 million grant to establish a Center for Oceans and Human Health and Climate Change Interactions, a multi-academic institution to study the effects of ocean health-related illness and the interactions from climate change. The Center will be headquartered at the University of South Carolina's (USC) Arnold School of Public Health in Charleston, S.C. and involve more than 20 researchers from five colleges and universities, including the University of South Carolina, The College of Charleston, The Citadel, Baylor University, and the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES). The Center will be led by Geoffrey I. Scott, clinical professor and chair in the USC Department of Environmental Health Sciences. The Center's deputy director is Paul A. Sandifer, director of the Center for Coastal Environmental and Human Health at the College of Charleston. Scott and Sandifer will work with a team of scientists who are faculty leaders at all five institutions. Additionally, researchers and environmental public health practitioners from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the U.S. Geological Survey, the Interstate Shellfish Sanitation Conference, and the Lowcountry Alliance for Model Communities will participate.

Published in: Market Screener - Online
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Tuesday
January 22, 2019
4. SC business calendar

FEB. 16 & 23 - USING QUICKBOOKS: The Charleston Area Small Business Development Center and The Citadel Baker School of Business hold a two-session workshop on the basics of using Quickbooks accounting software. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Bond Hall, 171 Moultrie St., Charleston. $159. Advance registration required. Go to www.charlestonsbdc.com/ for details.

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Tuesday
January 22, 2019
5. Rockefeller Capital Management Continues to Expand in Atlanta

Rockefeller Capital Management (“Rockefeller” or the “Firm”) today announced that two private wealth advisory teams focused on ultra-high-net-worth clients have joined the Firm in Atlanta. The Higgins Hall Group and The Embleton Curtis Quackenbush Group both join Rockefeller Global Family Office from Merrill Lynch. The Higgins Hall Group and The Embleton Curtis Quackenbush Group are the latest additions to Rockefeller’s growing Atlanta office. The Higgins Hall Group, founded and led by David P. Higgins and Michael P. Hall, is team of seven professionals who join from Merrill Lynch’s Private Banking & Investment Group. The Embleton Curtis Quackenbush Group, a team of eight, join from Merrill Lynch Wealth Management. This group is led by John F. Embleton, William C. Curtis, P. Schuyler Quackenbush Jr. and Evan B. Georgiou. Prior to joining Rockefeller, Embleton was a Senior Vice President, Wealth Management Advisor and Senior Portfolio Manager at Merrill Lynch, where he joined in 2008. Embleton started his career in wealth management at Morgan Stanley in 1990 and is a graduate of The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina.

Examples of other media sources reporting this story include:

The Business Journals

Atlanta Business Chronicle

SC Now

Business Wire

 

 

Published in: sectorpublishingintelligence.co.uk - Online
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Tuesday
January 22, 2019
6. Today in History

In 1994, Shannon Faulkner became the first woman to attend classes at The Citadel in South Carolina. (Faulkner joined the cadet corps in Aug. 1995 under court order but soon dropped out, citing isolation and stress from the legal battle.)

Published in: The Progress - Onlline
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Tuesday
January 22, 2019
Citadel football’s Brent Thompson talks new defense, new coaches
After The Citadel won three of its final four football games — and held mighty Alabama to a 10-10 tie in the most famous halftime score of the season — the Bulldogs hit the offseason with renewed optimism for 2019. They will also go into spring practice, which starts Feb. 7, with new schemes and plans on defense, as head coach Brent Thompson gives that side of the ball a makeover coming off a second straight 5-6 season. Thompson has hired former Navy assistant Tony Grantham as the Bulldogs’ new defensive coordinator, taking over for Blake Harrell, who left after five seasons at The Citadel for the same position at Kennesaw State.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Tuesday
January 22, 2019
Rifle shoots short in winless weekend
No. 13 NC State rifle went to Lincoln, Nebraska where it went 0-2 against No. 8 Navy and No. 10 Nebraska in another unsuccessful weekend amidst a down year for the program. On Saturday, Jan. 19, the Pack (3-6, 2-6 GARC) lined up against Navy (8-4, 4-2 GARC) who topped NC State on Oct. 13, 2018, 4676-4664 in Annapolis, Maryland. Both freshman Emily Fisher and senior Claire Spina set career-high scores, but Navy outperformed the Pack in the smallbore and in the air rifle to take the match 4644-4625. The following day showed a similar result against the Nebraska Cornhuskers who also edged out NC State 4627-4606. Sunday was another strong day for Fisher who finished with a smallbore score of 579, breaking her personal-best for the second day in a row. The freshman led all competitors in the smallbore and finished 3rd in the aggregate score, with a score of 1163, after a team-high score of 584 in air rifle. Nebraska, after an 0-5 start, improved to 6-5 and 4-3 in the GARC. The Cornhuskers also narrowly topped Navy this weekend 4652-4650. The Pack has only managed wins against The Citadel, Akron and Army this season. The 3-6 season is a disappointment after an 11-7 record last year that included a sixth-place finish out of nine teams at the GARC Championships against some of the best competitors in the nation.
Published in: The Technician - Online
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Tuesday
January 22, 2019
UNCG wins at East Tennessee State, hosts The Citadel on Thursday
The UNC-Greensboro men’s basketball went into one of the most hostile environments in the Southern Conference and did what no other team has been able to do this season: knock off East Tennessee State in Freedom Hall. UNCG jumped out to a lead and didn’t surrender it once in a 75-68 victory. The victory moves the Spartans to 17-3 on the season and 6-1 in Southern Conference play. The Spartans are now also alone in second place in the SoCon standings with four straight home games ahead, beginning with The Citadel at the Greensboro Coliseum at 7 p.m. Thursday. Also, the win snapped an eight-game winning streak for ETSU and stopped a 10-game winning streak for the Buccaneers on their home court.
Published in: News and Record - Online
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Friday
January 18, 2019
1. Diseases from the sea being studied by three South Carolina colleges

Living on the coast is getting riskier to your health. Vibrio, the disease-causing germ that closes oyster beds, could soon find it way to your drinking water. It could infect you if you swim with an open wound. Algal blooms exacerbated by a heating climate could make the germ outbreaks worse and spread other toxins. hat’s why 20 scientists from three South Carolina universities — The Citadel, the College of Charleston and the University of South Carolina — and two other schools nationally are teaming up to form one of four Oceans and Human Health Centers on Climate Change Interactions. Their job is to devise a forecast system to provide early public warnings of threatening environmental conditions. “Just as we do with with weather forecast now,” said Geoff Scott, chairman of the Environmental Health Sciences department at USC, who is heading up the effort. They’re not talking about some future problem. Already incidences of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease are on the rise; vibrio, the bacteria that closes oyster beds when it is found, is a leading cause, and it will be studied. As waters warm and seas rise, saltwater vibrio is expected to be pushed closer to drinking water supplies and the hot months last longer that incubate it.

Examples of other media sources reporting this story include:

 Center for Environmental Science

The Citadel Newsroom

The College of Charleston

Lowcountry Biz SC

Charleston CEO

 

 

 

 

Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Friday
January 18, 2019
2. Governor names McCarty new South Carolina adjutant general

South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster is appointing a longtime deputy in the state's Military Department to be its new adjutant general. McMaster said Thursday he wants Maj. Gen. R. Van McCarty to oversee the state's Army National Guard, Air National Guard, volunteer State Guard and the state's Emergency Management Division. McCarty is a 1982 graduate of The Citadel and has a 36-year military career. McCarty served as deputy to the current adjutant general, Maj. Gen. Robert E. Livingston Jr. Livingston plans to retire if McCarty's appointment is approved by the state Senate. Livingston has served eight years as adjutant general. He was the final person voted into the office. Voters approved a constitutional amendment in 2014 putting the job into the governor's Cabinet.

Published in: News & Observer
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Friday
January 18, 2019
2.1 The S.C. National Guard has a new commanding general

Gov. Henry McMaster has named Maj. Gen. Van McCarty as South Carolina’s new adjutant general. McCarty, a 1982 graduate of The Citadel and a veteran of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, replaces Maj. Gen. Robert Livingston, who has served as adjutant general since 2011. McCarty is the first appointed head of the state’s Military Department. South Carolina’s adjutant general had been the only elected adjutant general in the nation prior to a constitutional amendment approved by voters in 2014. “He’s a great man and a great soldier,” McMaster said. “He is more than qualified.” The S.C. Military Department includes the S.C. Army National Guard, the S.C. Air National Guard, the S.C. State Guard and the Emergency Management Division and other elements. “We will do everything we have to to ensure our young men and women in the state of South Carolina are well represented,” McCarty said. He said his number one priority will be recruiting and retention of soldiers. McCarty, the S.C. National Guard’s deputy adjutant general, was commissioned as a U.S. Army Reserve field artillery officer into the S.C. Army National Guard. Since then he has served in numerous roles, including commander of headquarters and headquarters battery, 1st Battalion, 178th Field Artillery (Forward) in Operation Iraqi Freedom in 2005, and commander of headquarters and headquarters battery, 151st Field Artillery Brigade Forward 6, Operation Enduring Freedom, Afghanistan, in 2008.

Published in: The State - Online
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Friday
January 18, 2019
2.2 Van McCarty named new leader of South Carolina's military

South Carolina Governor Henry McMaster has named a new leader for the state's military forces, and the first ever to be appointed to the position. Thursday, McMaster introduced Maj. Gen. Van McCarty as his pick to succeed Maj. Gen. Bob Livingston as the state's Adjutant General. Livingston is retiring from duty after serving as the state's top officer since 2011. He's the last elected adjutant general, because of a law change in 2014 that made the position appointed beginning in 2018. McCarty is a 1982 graduate of The Citadel. He's been serving as the deputy adjutant general in recent years. Over his career, he's served in multiple commanding units, and has helped lead the response to natural disasters in the state. "Our business is important, and there's nothing I can do that's more important that I do than to make sure [the military] is trained, equipped, and ready," McCarty said. The adjutant general oversees the state's Army National Guard, Air National Guard, volunteer State Guard and the state's Emergency Management Division.

Published in: WLTX.com - Online
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Friday
January 18, 2019
3. A civilian commentator said women shouldn't serve in all combat jobs...

Veterans are pushing back against a Wall Street Journal op-ed, in which a woman with no military experience argued that women do not belong in combat units. Heather Mac Donald, of the conservative Manhattan Institute think tank, wrote that putting male and female service members together for long periods of time, "Guarantees sexual liaisons, rivalries and breakups, all of which undermine the bonding essential to a unified fighting force." She cites an unnamed Marine commander, who said that during his unit's Afghanistan deployment, things went downhill when a female team assigned with interacting with local women arrived at their forward operating base. All Marines in ground combat military occupational specialties open to women must meet physical standards specific to their jobs, regardless of gender, said retired Marine Gen. Glenn Walters, who served as assistant commandant from 2016 to 2018. The underlying issue is not whether women are in combat MOSs, but whether Marines can respect everyone on their team, said Walters, who is now president of The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina.

Published in: Business Insider - Online
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Friday
January 18, 2019
4. Robby Robbins heads SCDOT Commission

Robert D. "Robby" Robbins of Summerville was named chairman of the South Carolina Department of Transportation (SCDOT) Commission on Thursday during the commission’s monthly meeting in Columbia. Robbins, a commissioner representing the 1st Congressional District, had been serving as vice chairman of the commission. He joined the SCDOT Commission in 2016. Robbins, a Summerville attorney, is a graduate of the University of South Carolina and the USC School of Law. He was 1st Circuit deputy solicitor from 1997-2003 and 1st Circuit solicitor in 2004. Robbins was a member of the Dorchester County Sales Tax Transportation Authority from 2004 to 2015. He is married to Mary Bryce Robbins, and they have a son and a daughter.

Published in: The Times and Democrat - Online
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Friday
January 18, 2019
5. The Azalea Festival Garden Tour sites

The Cape Fear Garden Club 2019 Azalea Garden Tour opens at 10 a.m. Friday, April 5, at the home of Linda and Steve Smits, 1925 S. Live Oak Parkway with musical entertainment and a parade of Cape Fear Garden Club Azalea Belles accompanied by the Citadel Summerall guard.

Published in: StarNewsOnline.com - Online
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Friday
January 18, 2019
Matt Frierson finds his shot, but it’s not enough for Citadel at Samford
Matt Frierson located his shooting touch on Thursday night at Samford. But The Citadel basketball team that won nine of its first 11 games remains AWOL. Frierson made eight 3-point shots and scored 27 points to end his personal slump, but The Citadel’s late rally came up short in an 80-77 loss to Samford at the Hanna Center in Birmingham, Ala. The loss was The Citadel’s sixth straight, dropping coach Duggar Baucom’s team to 9-8 overall and 1-5 in the Southern Conference. A month ago, The Citadel was 9-2 overall and 1-0 in the SoCon. “We certainly played hard enough to win,” Baucom said on his post-game radio show. “But we didn’t execute well enough to win.” Frierson, a senior and one of the top 3-point shooters in college basketball, had gone two straight games without making a trey. But he ended an 0-for-19 skid in the first half and went on to make 8 of 15 from deep.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Friday
January 18, 2019
The Citadel Comes Up Short, 80-77, at Samford
Brandon Austin scored a career-high 28 points, including six 3-pointers and Samford held on to defeat The Citadel 80-77 Thursday night, breaking a three-game losing skid. osh Sharkey scored 23 points — 16 after halftime — with four 3-pointers, eight assists and three steals for Samford (12-7, 2-4 Southern Conference). Myron Gordon added 13 points. The teams launched 78 shots from beyond the arc, The Citadel making 17 of 46 and Samford 13 of 32. Not all probiotics are created equal. How do you choose the one that is right for you? The Citadel banged down three straight 3-pointers, cutting the gap to 74-71 before Austin drained a 3 from NBA distance, stretching the lead to six points with just under two minutes to go. Matt Frierson cut that in half with yet another 3-pointer for The Citadel, but the Bulldogs missed twice from distance in the next 90 seconds and Samford made three of four at the foul line. The free throws were enough to survive a Lew Stallworth 3 at the buzzer for The Citadel.
Published in: WCSC TV-5 (Charleston) - Online
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Thursday
January 17, 2019
1.1 McMaster budget proposes college tuition freeze for 2019-2020

A section of Governor Henry McMaster’s 2019-2020 proposed Executive Budget attempts to put a stop to the rising cost of tuition for higher education in South Carolina. McMaster announced his proposed budget on Monday, which includes an appropriation of $36 million in recurring funds for colleges and universities. “I think that’s great,” College of Charleston Sophomore Bailey Gibson said. “I think that’s great to freeze tuition and not have kids pay more because a lot of kids can’t even afford it now.” The proposal would increase funding for higher education institutions by six percent if the school does not increase in-state tuition and fees for the next academic year. “This executive budget takes the first step toward reining in these rising costs by proposing a freeze on tuition and fees for in-state students at our state’s technical schools, colleges and universities for the 2019-2020 academic year,” McMaster said in a cover letter included with his proposed budget. South Carolina has seen significant increases in tuition in recent years. “Rising tuition rates is a concern for students and a concern for me just because I don’t want to have to worry about how I’m going to pay for more after I’ve already struggled to pay for what I have to pay for,” College of Charleston Freshman Anaya Waugh said.

Published in: WCSC TV-5 (Charleston) - Online
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Thursday
January 17, 2019
2. Citadel ranked No. 1 online MBA in SC by US News & World Report

The Citadel Graduate College offers No. 1 Online MBA program in the state of South Carolina, ranked by U.S. News & World Report in an announcement Jan. 15. Of all of the South Carolina colleges and universities offering master’s degree programs in business administration online, The Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business, offered through The Citadel Graduate College, is ranked the highest. “The Citadel’s MBA program has educated busy professionals on campus in the evenings for decades, but has only been offered 100 percent online since 2016, making this achievement especially meaningful,” said Col. Michael R. Weeks USAF (Ret.), Ph.D., dean of The Tommy and Victoria School of Business at The Citadel. “We have military service members and MBA candidates studying around the country and the world, fulfilling our mission to educate and develop principled leaders as broadly as possible.”

Published in: The Moultrie News - Online
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Thursday
January 17, 2019
2.1 The Baker School of Business offers #1 Online MBA program in South Carolina

The Citadel Graduate College offers the #1 Online MBA program in the state of South Carolina, as ranked by U.S. News & World Report in an announcement made Jan. 15. Of all of the South Carolina colleges and universities offering master’s degree programs in business administration online, The Tommy and Victoria Baker School of Business, offered through The Citadel Graduate College, is ranked the highest. “The Citadel’s MBA program has educated busy professionals on campus in the evenings for decades, but has only been offered 100 percent online since 2016, making this achievement especially meaningful,” said Col. Michael R. Weeks USAF (Ret.), Ph.D., dean of The Tommy and Victoria School of Business at The Citadel. “We have military service members and MBA candidates studying around the country and the world, fulfilling our mission to educate and develop principled leaders as broadly as possible.” The Citadel’s online MBA has more than 70 students participating in the spring of 2019. It moved up to the #90 slot on the new, nationwide U.S. News & World Report list, from #205 the previous year.

Published in: Lowcountry Biz SC - Online
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Thursday
January 17, 2019
High school notebook: Schickel sold The Citadel on his versatility
Evan Schickel was recruited by The Citadel to play quarterback. But in case it doesn’t work out for the Massaponax senior under center, he has the ability to help out elsewhere. Panthers head coach Eric Ludden said Schickel’s ability and willingness to do whatever it takes made him attractive for The Citadel’s coaching staff. Schickel orally committed to the Bulldogs recently, coming off a senior season in which he rushed for 1,101 yards and 16 scores, while passing for 337 yards and five touchdowns. The Bulldogs and Panthers both run the option offense. “He fits into their system really well,” Ludden said. “But they also know sometimes when you recruit quarterbacks, it’s all or nothing. If a kid doesn’t pan out as a quarterback you’re kind of stuck with him. With Evan, I’m sure he’ll be a successful quarterback. But they like the fact that he’s very versatile and multiple.”
Published in: Fredericksburg.com
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Thursday
January 17, 2019
The Citadel Names Tony Grantham Defensive Coordinator
Tony Grantham has been named the new defensive coordinator and linebackers coach at The Citadel. The hire was announced by head coach Brent Thompson Tuesday morning. The Citadel head coach Brent Thompson has announced that Tony Grantham has been named the new defensive coordinator and linebackers coach for the Bulldogs. Grantham joins the Bulldogs after spending the previous season coaching the outside linebackers at the United States Naval Academy. Grantham spent the 2017 season as the defensive coordinator at Western Illinois where he guided a defense that ranked 22nd against the run, sixth in interceptions, 13th in takeaways, 23rd in sacks and 13th in tackles-for-loss. Prior to his time at WIU, Grantham spent three seasons as the linebackers coach and special teams coordinator at Louisville where he worked alongside his brother, Todd. Tony helped the Cardinals win 26 games and make a bowl game all three seasons. Louisville finished in the top 20 in total defense in two of his three seasons and the Cardinals forced 81 turnovers over those three years.
Published in: WCSC TV-5 (Charleston) - Online
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Wednesday
January 16, 2019
1. Veterans: Women Are Already In Combat, So Stop Saying They Shouldn't Be In Combat Unit

Heather Mac Donald, of the conservative Manhattan Institute think tank, wrote that putting male and female service members together for long periods of time, "Guarantees sexual liaisons, rivalries and breakups, all of which undermine the bonding essential to a unified fighting force." As of Nov. 30, a total of 120 enlisted female Marines and 36 officers were serving in MOSs that had been restricted to men only, according to Manpower and Reserve Affairs. That includes 21 female 0311 Rifleman; three Light Armored Vehicle crew members; two 0331 machine gunners; and three 0341 Mortarmen. Two other female Marines have passed the Infantry Officer Course. "I think there were some people who thought that once the MOSs were opened up we would have a groundswell of maybe thousands of women who wanted to do that for living in the Marine Corps," Walters told Task & Purpose. "That didn't happen, but that didn't surprise us either." The underlying issue is not whether women are in combat MOSs, but whether Marines can respect everyone on their team, said Walters, who is now president of The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina. "I don't care whether you're in an infantry outfit or a logistics outfit, or an aviation outfit, or an admin outfit – it doesn't matter," he said. "You can't win effectively on the battlefield unless everybody on the team knows their job as the MAGTF [Marine Air-Ground Task Force] and actually goes and executes it to perfection. You can't execute to perfection unless everybody on the team respects each other."

Published in: Task and Purpose - Online
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Wednesday
January 16, 2019
2. Citadel cadet honored to serve as escort during Governor McMaster’s inauguration ceremony

For more than a century of South Carolina governor inaugurations, Citadel cadets have been part of the ceremony. Among the cadets receiving the honor for Governor Henry McMaster’s swearing-in last week was Cadet David Days of Chester, Regimental Executive Officer for the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. “A real big part of mine is to represent my school and my fellow cadets and classmates,” he told South Carolina Radio Network. “So every opportunity to do that is welcome.” Days, Regimental Commander Cadet Col. Sara Zorn and 27 others were in Columbia for the ceremony. The regimental commander, regimental executive officer and all of the battalion commanders are automatically selected to participate. Two Citadel bagpipers played at the ceremony and the prayer service prior to the inauguration. Days said all were proud and privileged to represent the Citadel and South Carolina. “There’s a lot of great schools in South Carolina: Clemson, South Carolina, Furman, Claflin,” he said. “You could keep going on and on, but to be a part of that and do that for the governor was really cool.” Days said, while cadets are aware of the tradition, he was more focused on his role as a football player his freshman year than he was an opportunity to be an escort at the Capitol his senior year.

Published in: South Carolina Radio Network - Online
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Wednesday
January 16, 2019
3. Ludwig von Mises as the Victim of Quinn Slobodian’s Intellectual Dishonesty

We live at a time when one of the worst accusations that can be thrown at someone is the charge of “racist.” Have that word tied to your name and it not only results in moral condemnation, it potentially throws into discredit almost anything and everything that person has said or done. That makes it a serious matter when an individual never identified with such racist views or values has that accusation attached to them. Wellesley College historian, Quinn Slobodian, has recently attempted to attach such a charge to Austrian economist Ludwig von Mises. In an article on, “Perfect Capitalism, Imperfect Humans: Race, Migration, and the Limits of Ludwig von Mises’s Globalism” (Contemporary European History, Dec. 2018), Professor Slobodian says that Mises, in some of his writings, rationalized racist attitudes and policy perspectives, especially concerning race relations in the United States. The actual facts show this is a fundamentally baseless accusation that attempts to taint and tarnish the reputation of one of the leading economists of the 20th century, and one of the most consistent and outspoken defenders of the classical liberal ideal of political, social and economic liberty and the free society.

Published in: AIER American Institute for Economic Research - Online
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Wednesday
January 16, 2019
4. USM lessons helped alumni reach top of U.S. military

When Michael Dumont entered the University of Southern Maine (USM) as a criminology major, he was going to be a police officer. The second of seven kids from Brunswick, Maine, he worked a bit after high school. He spent a year in a technical school, and was filling part-time shifts as a local cop when he enrolled at USM. The university made him think bigger. “USM exposed me to what was going on locally, nationally and internationally,” Dumont said. “I think that’s what piqued my interest for what was possible for me.” Today, Dumont is one of the highest ranking officers in the U.S. Navy — a vice admiral — and he’s not alone among USM alumni. Dumont says the school is linked to “an unheard of” number of top admirals and generals who graduated in the 70s, 80s and 90s. “When I look back at my time at USM, I had really wonderful professors who were invested in their students,” he said. “There was a theme of public service or giving back.” It’s really surprising when I talk to other people who didn’t come out of the military academies or from The Citadel (The military college of South Carolina) or Norwich (University),” he said. “For all of us to come out of USM, it’s amazing.”

Published in: maine.edu - Online
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Wednesday
January 16, 2019
5. Jack Lane Ferrell, Jr

Jack Lane Ferrell, Jr., 78, passed into eternal life before dawn on Tuesday, January 8th at Vibra Hospital in Mount Pleasant, SC. Called Lane by family, he was JACK to most. Until his sudden illness, his routine at that hour had been to drive to Hardees near his home in Summerville, where he and his friends would fellowship over life and coffee as they began the day. Jack was born in Atlanta to Jack, Sr. and Jeanele ​​Moore Ferrell. ​He grew up in Savannah and enlisted in the U.S. Navy in 1957, ​beginning his 20 year Naval career as a submariner spanning years of the Cold War. He married Theus Smith in July 1962, a 54-year marriage. Jack's career moved them and their children ​​between east-to-west coast postings. The family settled in Summerville after his Navy retirement, where Jack began a second career with South Carolina Law Enforcement Division at the Citadel. He retired from SLED in 1996. Of all his years in service, his Navy years were the ones closest to his heart.

Published in: The Summerville Scene - Online
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Wednesday
January 16, 2019
Citadel hires son of ex-Clemson coach; names new defensive coordinator
The Citadel has hired former Navy assistant Tony Grantham as the Bulldogs’ new defensive coordinator, football coach Brent Thompson announced Tuesday. Thompson also has hired Turner West, son of former Clemson coach Tommy West, as the team’s new special teams and recruiting coordinator. Grantham was the outside linebackers coach at Navy last season, the third of his three stints at the U.S. Naval Academy. He was also the Midshipmen’s outside linebackers coach from 2008-13, and coached the defensive line and linebackers from 2003-06. Grantham replaces Blake Harrell, who left The Citadel after five seasons to become defensive coordinator at Kennesaw State. Turner West comes to The Citadel from Austin Peay, where he was linebackers coach for one season. He spent four years as a defensive assistant with the NFL’s Dallas Cowboys, and before that worked at Middle Tennessee, UAB and Samford. West played wide receiver at Memphis from 2006-10 for his father, Tommy West, who was Clemson’s head coach from 1993-98.
Published in: The Post and Courier - Online
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Wednesday
January 16, 2019
Jets' Andre Roberts Named to Pro Football Writers of America All-NFL Team
Jets kick returner Andre Roberts was named to the Pro Football Writers of America All-NFL Team. Roberts, who was selected to his first Pro Bowl in December, led the NFL in kickoff yards (1,174) and his 1,498 total return yards were fifth-most in franchise history. The nine-year veteran finished second in the league with a 29.4-yard kick return average and became the first Jet since Darrelle Revis in 2011 to make the Associated Press first-team All-Pro earlier this month. The Citadel product was also named to the PFWA All-AFC team, along with safety Jamal Adams, as a kick and punt returner. Roberts led the league with a 14.1-yard punt return average and finished second with 324 punt return yards.
Published in: newyorkjets.com - Online
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